Aftershocks (The Palladium Wars, #1)
A solar system fights to survive and reform in the wake of war, but the real battle is about to begin.Across the six-planet expanse of the Gaia System, the Earthlike Gretia struggles to stabilize in the wake of an interplanetary war. Amid an uneasy alliance to maintain economies, resources, and populations, Aden Robertson reemerges. After devoting fifteen years of his life to the reviled losing side, with the blood of half a million casualties on his hands, Aden is looking for a way to move on. He’s not the only one.A naval officer has borne witness to inconceivable attacks on a salvaged fleet. A sergeant with the occupation forces is treading increasingly hostile ground. And a young woman, thrust into the responsibility as vice president of her family’s raw materials empire, faces a threat she never anticipated.Now, on the cusp of an explosive and wide-reaching insurrection, Aden plunges once again into the brutal life he longed to forget. He’s been on the wrong side of war before. But this time, the new enemy has yet to reveal themselves…or their dangerous endgame.

Aftershocks (The Palladium Wars, #1) Details

TitleAftershocks (The Palladium Wars, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 1st, 2019
Publisher47North
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Space, Space Opera, Science Fiction Fantasy, Fantasy, War, Military Fiction, Business, Amazon, Military Science Fiction

Aftershocks (The Palladium Wars, #1) Review

  • Sherwood Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Simply inhaled this.Be warned: it's the first in a series, and ends on the sort of cliffhanger that causes readers to breathe brimstone and pitchforks. If you can't stand that sort of ending, then buy the book and stash it underneath that copy of Proust you've always meant to read, until the next comes out.It starts deceptively slowly, as Aden, who has been a prisoner of war for five years, is released and told to get out of Rhodia. Everyone hates the Gretians who lost the war, but they really, Simply inhaled this.Be warned: it's the first in a series, and ends on the sort of cliffhanger that causes readers to breathe brimstone and pitchforks. If you can't stand that sort of ending, then buy the book and stash it underneath that copy of Proust you've always meant to read, until the next comes out.It starts deceptively slowly, as Aden, who has been a prisoner of war for five years, is released and told to get out of Rhodia. Everyone hates the Gretians who lost the war, but they really, really hate the military unit he was in.We also are introduced to some other POVs. Some of these connect up toward the end, others don't, but as attacks begin to happen, without anyone knowing why or who, it's clear that all these POVs will be converging as action stars shifting into high gear.Kloos is so good at military SF and worldbuilding. Terrific characters, fascinating setup, unpredictable turns in the plot. But how long O lord, how long, until book two????I'll be buying this in print.Copy provided by NetGalley
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  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Solid opening on two counts. The beginning of the novel was pretty strong with the whole "what are we going to do after being in a PoW" vibe going on, full of space opera MilSF goodness between two human populations.The other solid opening was for the expectation of a full series.Unfortunately, the actual novel does not feel all that much like a set piece. It might be fine and rather perfect as long as you're reading it along with a full set of novels to come, but since the wait time will be som Solid opening on two counts. The beginning of the novel was pretty strong with the whole "what are we going to do after being in a PoW" vibe going on, full of space opera MilSF goodness between two human populations.The other solid opening was for the expectation of a full series.Unfortunately, the actual novel does not feel all that much like a set piece. It might be fine and rather perfect as long as you're reading it along with a full set of novels to come, but since the wait time will be somewhat long, I have the distinct feeling like I'll have to re-read this one just to pick up on the other various character's viewpoints and the details leading up to the hanging plot threads. One or two is no big deal, but this opener promises a bit more complexity.Not bad, mind you, and great for MilSF space opera fans, but it does come with that caveat. :)
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  • Christi M
    January 1, 1970
    Aftershocks is a very solid first book in a new science fiction series that revolves around six planets striving for stability after a war has ended. The story is told through multiple points of view – each showing a different area of how order is maintained within the solar system and how it affects different individuals. However, it doesn’t take too long in the story before we see that the “order” they are striving to maintain is fragile and occurrences of guerilla type warfare begin occurring Aftershocks is a very solid first book in a new science fiction series that revolves around six planets striving for stability after a war has ended. The story is told through multiple points of view – each showing a different area of how order is maintained within the solar system and how it affects different individuals. However, it doesn’t take too long in the story before we see that the “order” they are striving to maintain is fragile and occurrences of guerilla type warfare begin occurring. Throughout the entire book, you can almost feel the drumbeats of war coming – but the question is from whom and how are they doing what they are doing? In fact, this story is a very large prelude to something major – you can feel it with every page you turn.Often science fiction leaves me feeling very stupid for struggling to grasp the worlds the author has created so it is very refreshing when a book like this comes along – one where you clearly understand the world being built. With each of point of view we slowly learn what the world looks like. The main characters Aden, Idina, Dunstan, and Solvieg provide us a view into the world as they experience it: resentment toward the losing side, the technology used in the world, and how each of the planets differ from the others as well as how each planet adapted to their landscape. However, they each also have moments where they are presented with and escaping from danger that are each very exciting to read. My personal favorite is Dunstan and what he encounters.I loved this sci fi book. Loved! Good story, enjoyable to read, and it didn’t leave me feeling stupid. I even loved the cliffhanger ending that made me go “Noooo. You can’t end there!”I definitely recommend it.Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC in exchange for an honest review
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  • Adam Richard
    January 1, 1970
    Space opera! I love a solid space opera. (Not to be confused with space fantasy, where people have mystical powers and laser swords, and there are space dragons and the like) Marko Kloos writes plausible, believable space opera with a military bent.So, this was my free Kindle book this month. I agonised over the choice. Most of the other choices were crimey or weepy, by the looks of things, and this was straight-up science fiction. I vaguely recognised the name, and wondered why, so I did a quic Space opera! I love a solid space opera. (Not to be confused with space fantasy, where people have mystical powers and laser swords, and there are space dragons and the like) Marko Kloos writes plausible, believable space opera with a military bent.So, this was my free Kindle book this month. I agonised over the choice. Most of the other choices were crimey or weepy, by the looks of things, and this was straight-up science fiction. I vaguely recognised the name, and wondered why, so I did a quick Google before clicking okay. Kloos was one of the writers shortlisted for the Hugo Award in the contentious 2015 Sad/Rabid Puppies nonsense. He withdrew his book from consideration, which I thought showed he had some grit, and for such a classy move I’d happily take his book for free from Amazon (his publisher).If you want more on the 2015 Hugos, this is a fascinating article, but not the point of this review.So, how did I feel about my first Marko Kloos book? I really liked it! The characters are all fascinating, and I’m interested in all of their disparate stories. The action sequences are exciting and frequently unexpected. The worldbuilding is magnificent, especially with relation to martial details.Aftershocks is set in a system of worlds that are in their fifth year of uneasy peace after an exacting intergalactic war. We follow the stories of a POW and a young executive from the aggressor planet, a naval captain in deep space, and a colour sergeant now occupying, and trying to maintain order, on the planet that started the war.There is not as much infodumping, something space opera can sometimes be dreadfully guilty of, and most of the things you are wondering, like how the war started, and whether or not these characters' stories are going to intersect, is revealed in time, often in moments you don’t expect, while three other things are going on. Kloos' prose is efficient, and he has developed a cute device to make most of his dialogue simplistic, but effective. The various races in the story speak different languages, and rather than burden us with incomprehensible space talk, he has everything translated by AI, which strips away any nuance or subtlety. It’s a great choice, and we, as readers, get to overlay presumptive emotion on to some of the ruthlessly clinical dialogue.I only had a couple of concerns, both of which spring from the fact that this is the first part of what is evidently a much longer narrative. For one thing, the book just seems to stop, making it feel like a very long chapter, rather than a whole novel. There are several plot threads left dangling, and much of the book feels like foreshadowing of something huge happening in later volumes. My other concern was with the sometimes sympathetic portrayal of the people who started the war. Judging by descriptions and naming, the archetypes the characters are based on have certain racial characteristics. The teutonic aggressors of the war only really have one parallel in our recent Earth history. I am happy to reserve judgement before writing this off as a Nazi apologist piece, because Kloos, being originally from Germany, has a fascinating viewpoint and I like to think this is going somewhere interesting. If you like a book with a definite ending, then stay away, but if you like space books with explosions and fights and meticulously crafted worlds and characters, then please give this a try. I really am excited to read more from this series, and may even dip into his previous work - no doubt I will come across him soon enough, as he is one of the many writers working on the current crop of Wild Cards novels.
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  • Jacqie
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley for providing a copy of this book for review.I was interested to read this book- all I knew about Marko Kloos was that he got caught up in the Sad Puppies Hugo kerfuffle against his will a few years ago and acquitted himself honorably. This was th start of a new series so it seemed like a good place to jump in.There is a LOT of setup in this book. There are four points of view. One is Aden- he's a prisoner of war from an interplanetary war who has just been freed and wants to Thanks to Netgalley for providing a copy of this book for review.I was interested to read this book- all I knew about Marko Kloos was that he got caught up in the Sad Puppies Hugo kerfuffle against his will a few years ago and acquitted himself honorably. This was th start of a new series so it seemed like a good place to jump in.There is a LOT of setup in this book. There are four points of view. One is Aden- he's a prisoner of war from an interplanetary war who has just been freed and wants to return to his home planet. His journey of return is his plotline in the book. Next, there's an infantry commander and veteran who ends up stumbling into far more than she bargained for in a routine patrol on a conquered planet. She then has to learn to work with the police force on the world of her former enemies in order to figure out how to quell a very professional insurgency. She is Sikh, an interesting perspective for me. There's also a young corporate executive who's trying to prove that she's more than her family name.Finally, there's a commander in a space navy who ends up with more than he bargained for while finishing out his assignment guarding the confiscated vessels of a defeated navy. So, it's pretty clear that this series is going to be about the aftershocks of war and the defeat of a highly militaristic and aggressive planet. The setting is a rich one- the author has clearly done a lot of thinking to get six very unique planets,from a gas giant planet with floating cities to a planet of jagged mountain ranges where cities must be built vertically. Weirdly, while I'm interested in the setting and at least three of the four main characters, the book itself didn't grab me. Maybe because it felt like the whole book was a set-up for the actual story. There were action scenes which were competently done- space battles, infantry skirmishes, even space pirates- but I was never really worried about anybody. While I got a lot of information and like the world, the whole thing felt like a very long prologue because I never felt that the stakes were high enough to put a main character in danger. I'm not sure if I will read further. I might because I hope that things really get rolling in the next book, and I do like the setting. I'm curious what the author wants to say, but he hasn't given many hints as to what his message is yet.
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  • Ernest
    January 1, 1970
    Marko Kloos starts a new series with Aftershock, set 5 years after a war in a six-planet solar system where all the planet have been colonized, but only one is really Earthlike, Gretia, were Earth seed crops will grow and colonists don't have to live in floating arcologies on a sea, or in the sky, or in tunnels carved out of cliff faces. Gretia was the planet that had it all, and yet they started a war they couldn't win against the combined forces of the other worlds. Now, the aggressor is under Marko Kloos starts a new series with Aftershock, set 5 years after a war in a six-planet solar system where all the planet have been colonized, but only one is really Earthlike, Gretia, were Earth seed crops will grow and colonists don't have to live in floating arcologies on a sea, or in the sky, or in tunnels carved out of cliff faces. Gretia was the planet that had it all, and yet they started a war they couldn't win against the combined forces of the other worlds. Now, the aggressor is under occupation and civil unrest is starting to ramp back up. According to the terms of the peace, Gretia's troops were taken as POWs for five years, so the story opens as the first is being released. Aden was a member of the feard Blackguard, though his specialization was linguistics and intel, and suddenly free to leave the admittedly humane Alliance POW camp, he can go home again. Except that he'd joined up in order to escape from home and family, and no one back there even knows he's alive.Back on Gretia, civil unrest is growing and suddenly something more is raising its head, both on the ground and in space. Stealthy insurgents with highly advanced technology are starting to stage attacks on the occupation forces and protesters alike, stirring the pot, but to what end? In space, pirates that aren't pirates at all are starting to show up, and in fact, the cargo vessel that Aden takes to get off the planet he'd been imprisoned on comes under attack. The good news is that Marko Kloos has created a really terrific setup for a new space opera, and just in time. As the Expanse nears the conclusion of its nine book arc fans are going to need something to look forward to, and this more than fills the bill. The bad news is that it's short, and a fast read that you'll blow through all too quickly. Unlike books in the Expanse, Aftershock doesn't neatly tie up a sub arc but only introduces the players and sets the stage for what's to come.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    As a long-time fan of Marko Kloos' Frontlines series, I was excited to get ahold of his new series. There are some marked differences from Frontlines with this book, chiefly that this book is in 3rd person and told from the points of view of several different characters. Overall, this book definitely felt like a "book 1" in a series. It is building towards something and does a good job world building (or solar system building, as it is), but by the end I was still kind of waiting for something t As a long-time fan of Marko Kloos' Frontlines series, I was excited to get ahold of his new series. There are some marked differences from Frontlines with this book, chiefly that this book is in 3rd person and told from the points of view of several different characters. Overall, this book definitely felt like a "book 1" in a series. It is building towards something and does a good job world building (or solar system building, as it is), but by the end I was still kind of waiting for something to happen or some big reveal to be made. I'm sure it will all start to pay off in the next book. There are a couple of land and space battles included, but again it seems like it is mostly just whetting our appetite for things to really kick off in later books.
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  • James Wilkinson
    January 1, 1970
    After 5 years as a POW, Aden tries to come to terms with reality and forge a life for himself in a system that disdains his people as warmongers. But when a Palladian security force is wiped out and an advanced warship stolen, it's clear that a time of dearly bought peace is about to end.I really enjoyed Aftershocks by Marko Kloos. Correction. I WAS really enjoying it. And then it stopped. Rather abruptly. Like when you’re watching a really great show and then suddenly the power goes out. That’s After 5 years as a POW, Aden tries to come to terms with reality and forge a life for himself in a system that disdains his people as warmongers. But when a Palladian security force is wiped out and an advanced warship stolen, it's clear that a time of dearly bought peace is about to end.I really enjoyed Aftershocks by Marko Kloos. Correction. I WAS really enjoying it. And then it stopped. Rather abruptly. Like when you’re watching a really great show and then suddenly the power goes out. That’s what it felt like at the end of Aftershocks.But let’s not start on a downer …Aftershocks is still a great read. I’ve sorta cherry-picked the afore-mentioned Aden as the principle character but I confess I’m not entirely convinced. There are a few other characters, for a start. And the format of the book basically revolves around a different character spearheading a particular chapter. So we start off with Aden, but we also have Idina – a Palladian warrior (more on that later), Solveig – the heir apparent to a manufacturing empire and Dustan – a starship commander.And for all intents and purposes, Aden doesn’t really do all that much during the book. Initially, he’s released from a Rhodian prison centre –Okay, time out -Rhodia is a planet and there are other planets – namely Acheron, Palladia, Oceania and Gretia. Gretia basically tried to be king of the planets but the other planets didn’t like it, fought back and won. So now we have an Alliance of sorts between everyone other than Gretia and they really don’t like Gretia. As you might expect. Okay ...Resume... and basically Aden spends the majority of the book trying to get back home, ending up in a few scrapes along the way. A lot of the juicier action happens with the other characters, but I just have this feeling that Aden’s going to be the driving force in this series. I’d put money on it. It just doesn’t really happen here.All the main characters are solid nonetheless. Aden is very much the fish out of water, let loose in a world (or system) that has hurried on without him. Idina is the badass warrior, Dustan the redoubtable commander and Solveig the newly crowned vice-president of Ragnar industries and who already is feeling the weight of expectation. They wear their roles well but I wouldn’t say any of them were dynamic though. They function within their niches and they do it well.The real winner here for Aftershocks is the plotLeast I think it is. It was exciting, it was dramatic, it was suspenseful … If there’s one thing that Kloos excels at, it’s how to build a sense of anticipation. His action scenes are stupendous and there’s a real sense of indrawn breath before everything hits the fan. But then the whole thing ended and I felt cheated to some extent. Don’t get me wrong. I know a series (and this is definitely a series) is going to have developments that will be relayed in other books, but I still think any book needs a sense of completeness. This book doesn’t have it. It felt like a long load of the gun and then the gun eventually jammed. Very frustrating. And that’s the main reason why it dropped from a four star to a three. But it was gripping – can’t deny it. While it was moving, it was MOVING, with shocks, rope-a-dopes and some serious reader questions along the lines of ‘Who is doing this? I need to KNOW’.It’s also a well realised worldThere’s detail in the environments, from the flower-shaped city capital of Oceania to the glistening glass arcologies of Rhodia. And even the technology of this space-faring fable has a sense of legitimacy. But it’s also not so outlandish as to be incomprehensible. They still work on ‘comtabs’ (basically fancy iPads) and these function as both tools and entertainment devices. It’s a sort of strange this world / future world hybrid.Aftershocks is still a solid sci-fi space adventureKloos’ characters and interplanetary setting are tangible creations and the plot itself is exciting, suspenseful and provides tantalising hints of forces hitherto unknown. It promises exciting stories ahead as well. But this story has a tame ending, if you could even call it an ending. I expected some measure of explanation regarding unfolding events, some iteration of ‘Dun dun dun – SCENE’, but it just … stopped. I’d still recommend it to readers looking for a good space opera or military science fiction, but maybe make sure you have Book 2 as well to be on the safe side.
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    This is the start of a new series by Kloos, set in the aftermath of an interplanetary war. There are several major points of view - that sometimes bothers me, but in this book it was quite well done - I was interested in each of them, and they enhanced each other nicely.Our main character (we see him slightly more than the others) is Aden Robertson, who has been a military prisoner since his planet lost the war five years ago. A scaled release is planned and he is in the first batch. On the whol This is the start of a new series by Kloos, set in the aftermath of an interplanetary war. There are several major points of view - that sometimes bothers me, but in this book it was quite well done - I was interested in each of them, and they enhanced each other nicely.Our main character (we see him slightly more than the others) is Aden Robertson, who has been a military prisoner since his planet lost the war five years ago. A scaled release is planned and he is in the first batch. On the whole, the other governments are quite merciful, although of course there is lingering resentment.We also see a (formerly military) industrialist on the losing side, a soldier in the police force who is monitoring the conquered planet, and a captain of a starship who was guarding the fleet of ships from the losing planet. This book has a lot of setup for future installments. Something is definitely happening, and while things are starting to be investigated, there is no resolution. But I didn't mind too much - that actually felt pretty realistic, and everything was very well done. I'll be watching for the next one - and thanks netgalley for the opportunity to read this one.
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  • Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate to receive an ARC of this via NetGalley, and was excited to dig in. The premise appealed to me- it has been years since the aftermath of a war that spanned solar systems, in which an alliance of planets finally succeeded in overtaking the miltaristic society of Gretia. Now, after a period of peace as society struggles to right itself and the Gretian way of life is all but dismantled, unrest is stirring once more. A mysterious group is appearing with technology far beyond anything I was fortunate to receive an ARC of this via NetGalley, and was excited to dig in. The premise appealed to me- it has been years since the aftermath of a war that spanned solar systems, in which an alliance of planets finally succeeded in overtaking the miltaristic society of Gretia. Now, after a period of peace as society struggles to right itself and the Gretian way of life is all but dismantled, unrest is stirring once more. A mysterious group is appearing with technology far beyond anything seen during the War, and they bring destruction with no discernible agenda beyond fostering fear and discord.There are a handful of point of view characters, and each are unique and well written, with their own voices to distinguish themselves. A space naval commander, a young woman who is heir to the wealthiest family on Gretia and their company’s last hope at survival, a former Gretian “Blackguard” intelligence officer, and a Palladian war veteran who loses her entire unit in a surprise guerilla attack. Marko Kloos handles them all with a deft touch; his prose is easy to ingest and fulfilling, making this story reminiscent of some of the best television science fiction.So why the three star review?Well...it’s funny. When you’re writing a series, you can’t lose focus of the individual story for the sake of the larger tale. This is book one of The Palladium Wars, and it FELT like it far more than it felt like Aftershocks. There really was very little discernible story here. No classic structure. Nothing. All building taking place was in service of later books, which I want to read, but make this something of a barrier to entry instead of a story which can also stand on its own two feet. I was left with a profound sense of, “That’s it?” when I turned the final page.For all its successes in getting me to identify with and even care about most of these POV characters, it just fell flat. There needed to be more. It’s a big issue for me, writing for a sequel instead of focusing on the present. Here’s hoping the payoff in Book Two of the Palladium Wars at least makes this entire book of introduction and filler worth it.
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  • Ben Babcock
    January 1, 1970
    As much as I think the finale of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine might be one of the best TV finales ever, I do wish we had seen (canonically, on screen) what the aftermath of the Dominion War brought. It’s one thing to tell a war story—and DS9 told it well—and another to talk about after the war. About picking up the pieces, rebuilding, and healing wounds of all varieties. Aftershocks is exactly that kind of book. Marko Kloos drops us into a solar system five years after the last official shot was f As much as I think the finale of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine might be one of the best TV finales ever, I do wish we had seen (canonically, on screen) what the aftermath of the Dominion War brought. It’s one thing to tell a war story—and DS9 told it well—and another to talk about after the war. About picking up the pieces, rebuilding, and healing wounds of all varieties. Aftershocks is exactly that kind of book. Marko Kloos drops us into a solar system five years after the last official shot was fired and, through a select cast of characters, asks us to consider how we would rebuild trust, empathy, and our own personal lives. Thanks to 47North and NetGalley for the eARC!Perhaps the main character, because we meet him first and get the most pagetime with him, is Aden. At the beginning of the book he is a prisoner of war, because he was on the losing side. He is soon released, time served, and finds himself adrift in that way released prisoners often are. Aden is in no rush to return to his home planet of Gretia, to be found by his estranged father of means, yet he doesn’t know where else he might belong. Kloos introduces other perspectives: Dunstan is the commander of a Rhodian battleship that witnesses some very unusual activity; Idina is a Palladian infantry sergeant who loses her entire squadron in a devastating ambush and then gets put on peace patrol duty; Solveig is the heiress to a Gretian family business suffering under sanctions and war reparations.Each of these characters is trying to move on in some way, to some degree, although you will grow attached to them by varying amounts. For example, as much as I liked Dunstan, we don’t learn as much about his backstory as we do some of the others, so I’m not entirely sure what his deal is. Idina might be my favourite. She goes through a lot in a short amount of time in this book, yet she remains true to herself and still develops as far as her character goes.Kloos makes it clear that there is something untoward happening in this system, hints at a conspiracy or Xanatos gambit behind the scenes. From strange piracy behaviour to mystery attacks and the destruction of mothballed fleets, it’s as if someone is trying to stir up trouble—but to what end? If you’re looking for answers, without spoilers I’m going to tell you that you won’t really find them. Aftershocks doesn’t exactly end on a cliffhanger, but it’s definitely not a standalone book. Indeed, my major grip with this novel is just how little Kloos ties together the characters’ stories. There is definitely some overlap; don’t get me wrong. Clearly the connections are there. I just was expecting the storylines to converge towards the end, and when that didn’t really happen, it left me disappointed.I’m willing to cut Kloos a lot of slack, however, simply because I enjoyed the sandbox we got to play in. Lots of tantalizing hints about the origins of this system without anything along the lines of a huge infodump. The technology is handwavey at times, yet also fairly familiar—commtabs and artificial gravity, etc. Oh, and do you like naval-inspired space battles? Because have some good naval-inspired space battles happening here, particularly in Dunstan's chapters. Great combination of AI and human responsibilities, really intense and suspenseful scenes of stalking a target, deciding when to go hot, etc. This isn’t the main focus of the book by any means; I wouldn’t call Aftershocks military SF per se—but it’s just enough to satisfy me without being more than I really want in a book.So on balance, I liked Aftershocks. It’s good without being particularly great, and you know, that’s really all I want in the end. I’ll take great when I can get it, and I’ll wax poetic and reread it and talk about how it changed my life. But this is a nice science fiction adventure full of intrigue and both interpersonal and intrapersonal drama, and I am totally here for it. Give me more!
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  • Liviu
    January 1, 1970
    Quite an unexpected hit for me as I started but never progressed in the author's debut six-volume+ series Frontlines; an Amazon prime book of the month in July 2019, I got a sample in my email and the first page intrigued me, so I started reading and couldn't put the book down until the end, while volume 2 became a clear asap; Closer to space opera than pure military sf (though on a multiplanet solar system scale), the novel starts some 5 years after the end of a brutal 4+ year interplanetary wa Quite an unexpected hit for me as I started but never progressed in the author's debut six-volume+ series Frontlines; an Amazon prime book of the month in July 2019, I got a sample in my email and the first page intrigued me, so I started reading and couldn't put the book down until the end, while volume 2 became a clear asap; Closer to space opera than pure military sf (though on a multiplanet solar system scale), the novel starts some 5 years after the end of a brutal 4+ year interplanetary war in which Gretia, the main Earthlike but militaristic society (and with Nordic/German like names and racial description of the population to boot) of a 6 planet system (the others being much less hospitable to humanity but compensating in their own ways) tried to subjugate the other 5 and eventually lost to the alliance led by their main opponents Rhodia (having the main alliance fleet and Anglo-like names and ranks) and Pallas (with their shock ground troops and Southeast Asian names and racial description), though it surrendered while still occupying enemy territory and without being invaded; under the surrender terms, Gretia is under alliance rule, has to pay huge reparations, its fleet was confiscated, its military disbanded and its main elite forces - the Blackguards - condemned as war criminals so subject to a 5 year pow imprisonment rather than the usual 2 for the regular soldiersThe main characters are Aden Robertson, a Gretian Blackguard intelligence major (with an Oceanian mother and a very good linguist) who is now just being set free from the Rhodian pow camps and has to decide what to do with the rest of his life after 17 years in the Gretian military, experienced Palladian sergeant Idina Chaudary of the allied occupation forces whose standard reconnaissance mission in the Gretian countryside goes bad in the first major incident since the peace, lt commander Dunstan Park, captain of Rhodian frigate Minotaur in charge of guarding the remains of the Gretian fleet (still under dispute between the alliance members 5 years on, as to whom gets what), a routine mission that turns out to be far from such, and finally but not least, Solveig Ragnar, 23, sole remaining child of major industrialist and former leading Gretian politician, Falk Ragnar - one of the 100+ council members who voted to start the fateful war and who is now banished from any interaction with his company or any political role in the "new" Gretia (as Solveig's much older brother Aden vanished 17 years ago after a brutal confrontation with their father and is presumed dead, while her Oceanian mother left her a year later and is now living a gambling socialite life in the casinos of Hades); Solveig by dint of being just under 18 when the peace treaty was signed is allowed to take the reigns of the failing family company from its interim managemnent now that she just graduated from college (any Gretian financial dynasty member whose company was involved with the war effort and was over 18 at the time of signing the peace treaty is not allowed to take any part in the company business or the political life of Gretia under said treaty, while Solveig was just 3 days under 18 then, so she and the Ragnar dynasty got lucky - or did they?) .The universe (politics, society, technology) is extremely intriguing and the characters quite appealing, while the book has action, intrigue and of course promises a lot more to come, parallels to WW1 and all (there is a passage towards the end where confronted by Solveig as to why he voted for war, Falk expounds for the first time the seemingly reasonable Gretian point of view of why Gretia chose war and specifically the way they started and prosecuted it by invading helpless Oceania rather than taking on their main rivals, Rhodia and Pallas, as opposed to the Gretians were the aggressive, militaristic, often monsters point of view that we get from everyone else until then - Idina, Dunstan, various people whom Aden meets etc)Highly, highly recommended and the unexpected sff hit of the year so far
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  • Scott Whitmore
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve heard so many good things about the work of author Marko Kloos but haven’t yet had the chance to dive into his popular and critically-praised Frontlines series. So when given the opportunity to read the opener to his new military/sci-fi series, I jumped without hesitation. And now, having finished Aftershocks (The Palladium Wars #1) in just two days — firing up my Kindle over breakfast, between innings of softball games, in lines at stores and late into the night — I understand what all the I’ve heard so many good things about the work of author Marko Kloos but haven’t yet had the chance to dive into his popular and critically-praised Frontlines series. So when given the opportunity to read the opener to his new military/sci-fi series, I jumped without hesitation. And now, having finished Aftershocks (The Palladium Wars #1) in just two days — firing up my Kindle over breakfast, between innings of softball games, in lines at stores and late into the night — I understand what all the fuss was about. He’s good, real good.This review is based on an advance copy provided by the publisher through NetGalley for that purpose. The book will be available on July 1, 2019.Five years after losing a devastating system-wide war that it started, the planet of Gretia is under occupation, stripped of it’s vaunted military and paying heavy reparations to the winning Alliance comprised of the system’s other five planets. The peoples of the Alliance planets carry a lot of anger, fear and resentment against the Gretians, but for the most part their lives have returned to normalcy; the constant reminders that they were the losers, however, has begun to eat at some on Gretia. Protest demonstrations on the planet have grown in frequency, size and intensity.Throughout the system ominous events happen. Are they connected, and if so, how, why and to what end? To those with some knowledge of history, this premise bears remarkably similarities to post-WWI Europe — something I found very interesting and instantly engaging. History as we understand it changes with time: the impact of some events and people only become clear in hindsight; for those swept up in the moment such potentialities and connections are near-impossible to discern. The story advances across several locations in the system through the actions of four protagonists: a recently released POW military intelligence officer, a senior non-commissioned officer in the Alliance occupation forces, a captain of a warship patrolling Alliance space, and a young Gretian woman taking the reins of her family’s corporate empire after her tycoon father loses his position as part of the armistice. The characters are well-developed and relatable, but I have no doubts we haven’t yet learned all there is to know about them. Because this is, after all, very much the first book of a series. No knowledgeable reader should have any doubts about this. Before the open-ended conclusion — which will doubtless annoy more than a few shortsighted readers — there are some exceptionally well-described action set pieces, but overall the pace is measured. The author is setting the stage, describing the characters and locations, and providing the necessary initial information to understand, and enjoy, the entire production. The prose is smooth and natural, the premise engaging, and the characters interesting; I absolutely want to know what happens next, and if the following entries are as good as Aftershocks I’m sure to enjoy the series.
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    Good start to a new series”Aftershocks” marks the beginning to a new series by the author , Marco Kloos. It is the work of this novel to set up the characters and the world, or worlds, they inhabit, and it is done very well. We learn about the four primary characters as they are introduced to the reader. There is Aden, who at the beginning of the novel, is a POW of the Alliance which defeated the forces of the aggressor planet, Gentia ( spelling?) Aden was an intelligence officer of the Blackgu Good start to a new series”Aftershocks” marks the beginning to a new series by the author , Marco Kloos. It is the work of this novel to set up the characters and the world, or worlds, they inhabit, and it is done very well. We learn about the four primary characters as they are introduced to the reader. There is Aden, who at the beginning of the novel, is a POW of the Alliance which defeated the forces of the aggressor planet, Gentia ( spelling?) Aden was an intelligence officer of the Blackguards, apparently the hated shock troops of the aggressor forces. After five years in detention, these POWs are about to be released. He wants to go home in peace, but instead finds himself on a ill-fated tramp steamer carrying a valuable cargo. Next: Idina, who is a non-combatant of the Alliance forces which are currently acting as the occupying police forces on Gentia. After five years of strict control, the populace is becoming restless. Still, things are quiet, until Idina finds her self in an ambush with a surprisingly well armed unknown revanchist enemy. Dunstan is a commander of a ship in the Alliance space fleet, whose current duty is to patrol against pirates who prey on merchant cargo ships and also,to watch over the ghost fleet of the defeated Gentian navy, which is corralled in space, awaiting scrapping. Dull patrol work is the norm- until a suspiciously well- armed pirate ship is caught in the act by Dunstan’s ship. Finally, Solvieg, the daughter of an industrialist whose company manufactured war material used against the Alliance was taken under Alliance control as reparations. She is now helping manage the company with the aim of bringing it back to it’s former eminence. If this sounds rather dry or dull, it is definitely not. By the end of this introductory book, it is possible to see how their lives begin to cross and interact, because it seems that the war is about to restart. The idea of this book is to set the story in motion. By the book’s end, I decided that it would definitely be worth following on to sequels to see how it all works out. There is plenty of what I guess is termed “space marine” type action, with enough science to make space travel and alternate planetary living feasible without over-technicalizing ( I think I just coined a new word there) the flow of the plot. Recommended to all who are looking for a new series. Mr. Kloos has done well with his previous series in upholding plot and characters over a number of books, and is sure to do the same again.
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  • Maxine Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    It's a 3.5, rounded up.Finally a Sci-fi that didn't leave me feeling stupid.A war criminal, Aden, has spent the last 5 years imprisoned on Rhodia. One year longer than the war went for. The time has finally come, he is out, it's time to head home, to his planet Gretia. Deciding to take the long route, he buys passage on a cargo ship. All goes well until they are hit by pirates and left drifting in an escape pod.Indina is on her second tour of Gretia. Keeping the peace and enforcing the treaty, s It's a 3.5, rounded up.Finally a Sci-fi that didn't leave me feeling stupid.A war criminal, Aden, has spent the last 5 years imprisoned on Rhodia. One year longer than the war went for. The time has finally come, he is out, it's time to head home, to his planet Gretia. Deciding to take the long route, he buys passage on a cargo ship. All goes well until they are hit by pirates and left drifting in an escape pod.Indina is on her second tour of Gretia. Keeping the peace and enforcing the treaty, she and her team are out on a regular patrol when after years with no hostile activity, they are hit by weapons unlike any they have seen before. The loss of her team hits her hard and she is recalled to the city to work with the local police.Dunstan and his crew are almost ready to head back home for leave, when something comes up on their radar. Unsure of what it is, they assume the worst. But even following the rule book doesn't prepare them for what comes next.Finally we have Solveig. Daughter of the man whose company built and supplied weapons for the war effort. He is no longer allowed to run the company, so it's fallen to her to meet her fathers high expectations and keep the company afloat.Who are the terrorists blowing up protestors, police and medical personal? Who are stealing the ships? And why when the peace has lasted so long is everything looking like it might fall apart.While there is plenty of action in Aftershocks, it's a character driven story. We delve straight into Aden's experiences, he gives us a sense of the universe. The planets, the technology, the way the war has affected the people. Through him we get a real sense of before and after. This is all done so naturally, that a large portion of the world building is completed before you are fifty pages in. I never once felt bogged down with information, it flowed. Every word that we got was required with no filler in between. As the rest of the characters are introduced the worlds are fully fleshed out. The temperament of the people on the street, the peacekeepers in the air and on the ground. The tension starts to build and it continues slowly for the rest of the book.I said it at the start, the technology and the way it was discussed didn't leave me feeling stupid. The technological aspects weren't overly in-depth, which works for me as a lot of the time it goes over my head. I loved the different planets. They were all harsh and the people all had to adapt, meaning on one planet there is only one small continent split down the middle by a mountain range, another is so unbearable that the people have to live underground and then you have the planet that has perfect living conditions. And yes, it was the Government of one of those planets that started the war. It's easy enough to guess which one I'm sure.The characters were all well written, distinctive in their voice and natures. While I appreciated all of them and their role in the way the story winds together, I enjoyed reading Aden the most. Not all characters got the same amount of page time which worked well. Using the characters, Kloos was able to bring the planets and the story together in a cohesive way. As the book progressed, I did find that certain terms were repeated, which I didn't like but that was only in the last half. I found his style of writing easy to read, and while the story did feel slow, I liked it.POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD... YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.My issue was the ending. Um... What The Fuck was that?I still don't know how I feel about it, and while I enjoyed this book, I'm concerned about what book two will be like. Will the pacing pick up? Will there be more consistent action? Will there be answers? The book didn't feel complete.I'm conflicted.I received an arc from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Callum
    January 1, 1970
    Aftershocks is at times a very fun read. A lot of the time, though, it just feels like a prologue. Right as things started to get going with the plot and I had the ‘here we go!’ feeling starting to happen, the book ended. I get things needing to be a series more and more these days, but it would have been nice to have any kind of conclusion to anything in this book. Instead, it left me feeling like I read half a book, let alone the first book in the series. Set 5 years after a big war, Aftershoc Aftershocks is at times a very fun read. A lot of the time, though, it just feels like a prologue. Right as things started to get going with the plot and I had the ‘here we go!’ feeling starting to happen, the book ended. I get things needing to be a series more and more these days, but it would have been nice to have any kind of conclusion to anything in this book. Instead, it left me feeling like I read half a book, let alone the first book in the series. Set 5 years after a big war, Aftershocks deals with what it means to have been fighting on the wrong side, what it was like losing people to an unnecessary war and how much punishment a country deserves after committing itself to such an asinine conflict. We follow Aden, a former member of the losing side of the war, Idina, a former solider of one of the planets that won the war, yet another former soldier, and a young CEO. Some of these POVs tie together and overlap, while others stay completely independent. Kloos does a good job with characters. None of them are earth shattering or particularly deep, but they all have an individual voice and different feelings on the war that ended 5 years ago. It was fun when POV characters overlapped, witnessing the same events from different perspectives etc., and I will be interested to see how those kinds of things happen more as the series goes on. I did enjoy this book, it was an easy read and a quick one, I just dearly wish there had been an extra couple hundred pages to really get in to things. Or just any kind of ending at all so it wasn’t all so damn unsatisfying. Having said that, I will be picking up the rest of this series as it’s published - I need to know where things are going! So the plot is definitely what this book is worth reading for, and assuming the rest of this series keeps up to the standard of Aftershocks then it’ll definitely be worth a read. But as it stands, as a singular first book in a series, it’s a hard one to recommend. A story is supposed to have a beginning, middle and end. Aftershocks stops after the beginning.2.5 rounded to 3 stars. A review copy was provided by the publisher and NetGalley I’m exchange for an honest review.
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  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . .Okay mateys, I know I haven't even finished Marko Kloos' Frontlines series and yet here I be starting another series by him.  I have no regrets.  I picked this up and devoured it in one sitting.  It also helps that it be under 300 pages.In this book a nasty war has ended and it has been five years since the peace treaty.  But peace seems to be faltering.  This se Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . .Okay mateys, I know I haven't even finished Marko Kloos' Frontlines series and yet here I be starting another series by him.  I have no regrets.  I picked this up and devoured it in one sitting.  It also helps that it be under 300 pages.In this book a nasty war has ended and it has been five years since the peace treaty.  But peace seems to be faltering.  This series has multiple points of view.  Ye follow four perspectives:Aden - a POW from the losing side of the battle who is released five years after defeat to start anew;Idina - a soldier from the winning side who holds a grudge, she is part of the occupying military force on the defeated planet;Dunstan - a member of the winning naval space fleet whose simple guard duty turns into a mess with epic ramifications; andSolvieg - a civilian who was a minor during the war now has to deal with the consequences of her planet's loss and what it means for the family business.Like the first book in the Frontline series, this one was enjoyable entertainment of the popcorn fluff type.  Nothing wrong with that.  These characters are all likeable in their own ways and I was rooting for them all even when they were at cross-purposes.  Aden was me favourite.  The world-building was sufficient and the plot was fun but the characters were the driving force for me.  The peace is about to destruct and I want to know what happens next!Be advised that this has a major cliffhanger ending that had me surprised at the abruptness and wanting more.  For those crew members who dislike these, mehaps wait until more books are released.  I will be reading them as they come.  Arrr!So lastly . . .Thank you 47 North!Check out me other reviews at https://thecaptainsquartersblog.wordp...
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  • Traci
    January 1, 1970
    Find this and other reviews at The Reader In IndigoHuge thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me an ARC in exchange for an honest review!Five years after the end of a system-wide intergalactic war, civilians and former combatants are desperately trying to pick up the pieces of their lives, just as a new threat emerges from the shadows. (Well, it doesn’t really emerge. By the end of the book, the threat remains firmly ensconced in the shadows, which as a reader, I found somewhat pro Find this and other reviews at The Reader In IndigoHuge thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me an ARC in exchange for an honest review!Five years after the end of a system-wide intergalactic war, civilians and former combatants are desperately trying to pick up the pieces of their lives, just as a new threat emerges from the shadows. (Well, it doesn’t really emerge. By the end of the book, the threat remains firmly ensconced in the shadows, which as a reader, I found somewhat problematic.)This is a difficult book to rate properly, because it didn’t really feel like Book 1 in a series. It read more like a prologue to Book 1: it introduced the characters, fleshed out the worldbuilding, introduced some hints toward the overarching plotline, then . . . ta-da, The End.Which is not to say it was bad. Far from it! This was my first Marko Kloos book, and it won’t be the last. (Which, as a reader, is probably the highest praise I can give.) The prose is clean, fresh, and perfectly styled; the work flowed effortlessly, in that particular manner that only truly talented authors can manage. The story has enough potential that I very much want to read the rest of the series.Had I been able to go straight from this to Book 2/3/whatever, I might not necessarily have found the lack of plot resolution so jarring. (Also, two of the POVs wouldn’t have felt quite so , , , bare bones.) As it was, I read to the end, then I wanted to double-check to see if my e-ARC file was corrupted. The book does not end on what feels like a full-book storyline. It’s the sort of ending that has you expecting to turn the page and see “Chapter 1”.Recommended, but be aware: very much the first part of a series, even more so than readers accustomed to reading series might expect.
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  • Nathaniel
    January 1, 1970
    I have really enjoyed Marko Kloos's Terms of Enlistment series. This one? Not so much, so far. It feels technically more accomplished (more on that later) but the biggest problem is that at the end of the first book I still have no idea what the point is. There are four viewpoint protagonists. Two of them--the most important two, as far as I can tell--have no discernible objective whatsoever. Well, unless you count "Don't let my dad catch me." There are two more minor characters. They have more I have really enjoyed Marko Kloos's Terms of Enlistment series. This one? Not so much, so far. It feels technically more accomplished (more on that later) but the biggest problem is that at the end of the first book I still have no idea what the point is. There are four viewpoint protagonists. Two of them--the most important two, as far as I can tell--have no discernible objective whatsoever. Well, unless you count "Don't let my dad catch me." There are two more minor characters. They have more interesting objectives, and one even has a satisfying plot arc. But nobody has an objective that has anything to do with the main plot. There clearly is a Big Plot going on. There are all kinds of interesting tidbits. Lots of loose ends that could come together in really cool ways. But they haven't yet. This felt like just backstory before the actual story begins. I'm still waiting for something to care about.And is it really going to be just fighting over palladium? I mean... that's so corny. You can have like, a super-rare doohicky to fight over, but make it cool. You know, "the spice must flow!" I'm going to read the next one because Kloos has built up a lot of cred with me and because he's a good writer. But so far the transition from pure mil sf to The Expanse 2.0 is off to a rocky start.
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  • John Schmidt
    January 1, 1970
    Full Disclosure: I received an ARC copy of the book from Netgalley.I am a relative newcomer to Marko Kloos's writing as I only started his Frontlines series after Point's of Impact had came out. What I had found was a series that was well written with compelling characters and a realistic science fiction universe that is a world that 'could have been'. I devoured the whole series in just over a week and added another favorite author of the military science fiction genre along side David Weber, J Full Disclosure: I received an ARC copy of the book from Netgalley.I am a relative newcomer to Marko Kloos's writing as I only started his Frontlines series after Point's of Impact had came out. What I had found was a series that was well written with compelling characters and a realistic science fiction universe that is a world that 'could have been'. I devoured the whole series in just over a week and added another favorite author of the military science fiction genre along side David Weber, Jack Campbell, David Drake, and John Ringo. Aftershocks, the start of a new series, 'The Palladium Wars', was just as well written and with the same level of character development as his previous novels. The story is about a system still recovering from a vicious war 5 years in the past. But unlike a lot of the genre, this was not a war with aliens or on an interstellar stage, but something far more intimate. The universe (so far) takes place in a single system and like all the wars in the real world, it was fought by a single species amongst itself divided mainly by planetary cultures. Kloos also has written the book from 3 main points of view allowing the reader to get more than one side of the story and the underlying issues in the system. Overall, I found it a great read and was sorry that I have to wait until next summer until the next book.#Aftershocks #NetGalley
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  • Rusty
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free eARC of this in exchange for an unbiased review.I enjoyed Kloos's other series so thought I would give this a shot. Aden was on the losing side of an interplanetary war and has been a POW for five years. He finds out that he is getting set free the next day and is going to have to figure out his place in this galaxy now that his homeworld Gretia has been under control of interplanetary forces. His homeworld started the conflict and his brigade specifically committed incredibly I received a free eARC of this in exchange for an unbiased review.I enjoyed Kloos's other series so thought I would give this a shot. Aden was on the losing side of an interplanetary war and has been a POW for five years. He finds out that he is getting set free the next day and is going to have to figure out his place in this galaxy now that his homeworld Gretia has been under control of interplanetary forces. His homeworld started the conflict and his brigade specifically committed incredibly violent acts, drawing the hatred of most people he meets who find out his true origin. So Aden makes his way across the galaxy back towards home with some interesting adventures along the way. As a counterpoint to Aden's side we have a few other people back on Gretia telling their tales letting us know about the discontent running through that world due to the peacekeeping forces still there after the war.I liked this book, the writing was good and fast paced. It was an interesting take on what happens after a war. The characters could use a bit more development. My biggest complaint was that it seemed that we got a lot of build-up but never really got anywhere. Don't get me wrong, the plot definitely moved forward, but it was all set up for what must be coming down the road. Which will keep me reading once the second book comes out, so there's that, I guess.
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  • Tyler
    January 1, 1970
    Aftershocks is the first novel in The Palladium Wars series released by Marko Kloos. It's a future military SF set after a major war, and follows four separate character story lines that eventually start linking together. Aden is an ex-military officer and linguistics specialist with the Grecians (who lost their expansion effort in the war), and is the main character who is now looking for a way to move on.This was a good read – an interesting plot that links together well, natural characters th Aftershocks is the first novel in The Palladium Wars series released by Marko Kloos. It's a future military SF set after a major war, and follows four separate character story lines that eventually start linking together. Aden is an ex-military officer and linguistics specialist with the Grecians (who lost their expansion effort in the war), and is the main character who is now looking for a way to move on.This was a good read – an interesting plot that links together well, natural characters that one can empathise with, and it delves into some of the moral issues associated with the aftermath of war. It also provides some contrast between the plot-lines that makes things interesting; the four characters all have different backstories and agendas.That said, as often when reading a book with a few different POV's, I found myself drawn to one or two at the expense of others – and that was the case here; I wasn't as invested in the storyline and character of Dunstan the naval officer especially (almost to the degree that I think some of it could have been left out). But apart from that it was a better than average read for me, and ends fairly suddenly to lead into book 2, which I look forward to!
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley for a fair and honest reviewI should preface this by saying that I liked the authors previous books, so he's built up a fair amount of credit Why is this relevant, does it make me give a nicer review? No, but it buys trust that the payoff is worth the investment. This book, for me, is a scene setter for a broader story. The book seems a little flighty at first, with multiple perspectives and different, seemingly unconnected stories and threads. I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley for a fair and honest reviewI should preface this by saying that I liked the authors previous books, so he's built up a fair amount of credit Why is this relevant, does it make me give a nicer review? No, but it buys trust that the payoff is worth the investment. This book, for me, is a scene setter for a broader story. The book seems a little flighty at first, with multiple perspectives and different, seemingly unconnected stories and threads. Towards the end of the book, things started to knit together a bit more solidly, but I was left with the impression that the payoff is coming in the next few books. There was a fair amount of background and character backstory setting, which took quite a while to get going. That's not to say it was dull, the story was interesting and the world rich, but it took some time to understand why it was relevant.Back to my original point, for a newcomer to the author, it may seem like you don't get anywhere, but with some trust, I'm sure that the series will be a good one. I enjoyed the book, but looking forward to the next one more.
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  • Razvan Rogoz
    January 1, 1970
    Uhm, is that all?I swear it feels like a prologue. A very long prologue but where is act 2? Act 3? I don’t know if I feel frustrated but I am certainly a bit disappointed. This is not a TV show. It is a book. Something should happen to seriously push the plot forward and nothing did so far. I mean, there was one thing and I won’t spoil it but compared to Terms of Enlistment this is extremely slow paced. Or maybe this is the problem? I’m comparing it to a traditional sci-fi military novel when it Uhm, is that all?I swear it feels like a prologue. A very long prologue but where is act 2? Act 3? I don’t know if I feel frustrated but I am certainly a bit disappointed. This is not a TV show. It is a book. Something should happen to seriously push the plot forward and nothing did so far. I mean, there was one thing and I won’t spoil it but compared to Terms of Enlistment this is extremely slow paced. Or maybe this is the problem? I’m comparing it to a traditional sci-fi military novel when it’s more of a space opera? Should I focus on the character and not the action? Was all of this book just character development for the next ones in the series? I don’t know... i would have rather had a new book in the terms if Enlistment series, one in which they invade the lankies homeworld or something. This felt like good fun but it’s like a date that keeps getting interesting but never actually ends up in a kiss or more. I will read the next book because Kloos certainly knows how to write a military sci fi book but I’m so damn underwhelmed so far. :(. Oh well. Let’s see next year.
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    Aftershocks (The Palladium Wars #1) by Marko KloosI am amazed by the depth of this book, It took me to places i did not expect. Reading about prisoners of war after a battle, when they have lost I did not know how empathetic it would be to look at those war criminals. This book looks into how the solar system (or any country) returns to normal after an all encompassing war. The losses on both sides were as steep as those in World War II. With the main characters on the front line. From the paper Aftershocks (The Palladium Wars #1) by Marko KloosI am amazed by the depth of this book, It took me to places i did not expect. Reading about prisoners of war after a battle, when they have lost I did not know how empathetic it would be to look at those war criminals. This book looks into how the solar system (or any country) returns to normal after an all encompassing war. The losses on both sides were as steep as those in World War II. With the main characters on the front line. From the paper pushers to the military police, this book looks at the cost of war, and the desire to find retribution on both sides of the conflict. It is an enduring story that may change your mind about war, combatants and all the politics of war. Marko has brought to the forefront the idea that not every story is understood. Thank you for teaching me to see more then the headlines of a story. I hope to read the next book soon.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I usually enjoy this author's work, and this would be no exception but for the unsatisfying conclusion, which emphatically establishes AFTERSHOCKS as a decent half-book. This first book of the series concludes with less punch than the average chapter. Understanding the current practice of authors writing chapters and selling them as "books" doesn't mean I don't find it insulting to readers. Readers are invited to pre-order the second book in the series...with a delivery date of July, 2020. Uh, n I usually enjoy this author's work, and this would be no exception but for the unsatisfying conclusion, which emphatically establishes AFTERSHOCKS as a decent half-book. This first book of the series concludes with less punch than the average chapter. Understanding the current practice of authors writing chapters and selling them as "books" doesn't mean I don't find it insulting to readers. Readers are invited to pre-order the second book in the series...with a delivery date of July, 2020. Uh, no thanks. I doubt that the characters and story line of the first book will remain vivid in my mind for a full year. I have previously resolved never to buy a book from an unfinished series. I made an exception in this case because my Prime program offered it to me free. I wish I had waited the year for the series to be concluded; together, the two "books" will probably constitute one decent novel.All that said, this author writes very well and authentically in the military vein.
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  • D. Jensen
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, so I'm a fanMarko Kloos takes us back to that era of science fiction when character development, plot, and storyline were the key elements of good science fiction. He doesn't spend pages upon pages describing calibers and armor. Yes, he does make the requisite references; he's just not obsessed.Aftershocks is a good opening gambit to what I hope will be a long series. The title is one of my favorites because it is symbolic of Aden (Ragnar) Robertson Jansen's reentry into a post war society Okay, so I'm a fanMarko Kloos takes us back to that era of science fiction when character development, plot, and storyline were the key elements of good science fiction. He doesn't spend pages upon pages describing calibers and armor. Yes, he does make the requisite references; he's just not obsessed.Aftershocks is a good opening gambit to what I hope will be a long series. The title is one of my favorites because it is symbolic of Aden (Ragnar) Robertson Jansen's reentry into a post war society. It is also a symbol for all the other major characters and how they are changing and adapting to the new galaxy (for lack of a better word). Aftershocks is also a sociological exploration of how foes find common ground, sometimes despite themselves.Take a read. You won't be disappointed.
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  • Matthew Stienberg
    January 1, 1970
    In this rating, I would say 2.5 stars is accurate. This is not because this book is bad, it very much is not as it shows excellent promise and premise, but that is to say it does not feel complete. In this book, things happen, but there is very little in the way of cohesive beginning, middle and end like in Mr. Kloos's other works. He has some very solid characters he lays the foundations for, but, being frank, they don't accomplish much. The book feels like it is ending at the half way mark rat In this rating, I would say 2.5 stars is accurate. This is not because this book is bad, it very much is not as it shows excellent promise and premise, but that is to say it does not feel complete. In this book, things happen, but there is very little in the way of cohesive beginning, middle and end like in Mr. Kloos's other works. He has some very solid characters he lays the foundations for, but, being frank, they don't accomplish much. The book feels like it is ending at the half way mark rather than a full on ending in and of itself. It teases just enough for me to want to keep going, but completely ends before I feel like I have found anything out.I will be reading the next book, that is for certain, but I would really have appreciated some further conclusion in this one.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    Aftershocks follows four characters from different parts of a solar system that is still in the aftermath of a long and bitter war. It starts off slowly and as fairly generic sci-fi, with impressive locations and slick technology. The pace and the tension start to pick up a bit as the plot develops. Unfortunately any good done up to that point is thrown away by the ending. It just stops.I know this is supposed to be the first book in a series, so by all means leave some hanging threads, but endi Aftershocks follows four characters from different parts of a solar system that is still in the aftermath of a long and bitter war. It starts off slowly and as fairly generic sci-fi, with impressive locations and slick technology. The pace and the tension start to pick up a bit as the plot develops. Unfortunately any good done up to that point is thrown away by the ending. It just stops.I know this is supposed to be the first book in a series, so by all means leave some hanging threads, but ending a novel with no kind of resolution at all is unforgivable. I feel like I’ve been sold half a book.
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  • Sontaranpr
    January 1, 1970
    Six inhabited planets are located within the same system. One is Earth like, the others not so much hence life is harder. They all have resources the others want and so can price themselves as they so wish. Which of course leads to war. The Earth like planet went to war against its neighbours and lost. Five years after losing the war a POW is released just as the peace begins to unravel. Someone very well equipped and very well planned is moving and the body count is increasing.This is very clea Six inhabited planets are located within the same system. One is Earth like, the others not so much hence life is harder. They all have resources the others want and so can price themselves as they so wish. Which of course leads to war. The Earth like planet went to war against its neighbours and lost. Five years after losing the war a POW is released just as the peace begins to unravel. Someone very well equipped and very well planned is moving and the body count is increasing.This is very clearly book one. Everything gets slipped into place and the plot kicks in but nothing really gets accomplished. No give me ramming speed moments but there were railguns so I'm satisfied.
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