Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors
Award-winning author Sonali Dev launches a new series about the Rajes, an immigrant Indian family descended from royalty, who have built their lives in San Francisco...It is a truth universally acknowledged that only in an overachieving Indian American family can a genius daughter be considered a black sheep.Dr. Trisha Raje is San Francisco’s most acclaimed neurosurgeon. But that’s not enough for the Rajes, her influential immigrant family who’s achieved power by making its own non-negotiable rules:·       Never trust an outsider·       Never do anything to jeopardize your brother’s political aspirations·       And never, ever, defy your familyTrisha is guilty of breaking all three rules. But now she has a chance to redeem herself. So long as she doesn’t repeat old mistakes.Up-and-coming chef DJ Caine has known people like Trisha before, people who judge him by his rough beginnings and place pedigree above character. He needs the lucrative job the Rajes offer, but he values his pride too much to indulge Trisha’s arrogance. And then he discovers that she’s the only surgeon who can save his sister’s life.As the two clash, their assumptions crumble like the spun sugar on one of DJ’s stunning desserts. But before a future can be savored there’s a past to be reckoned with...A family trying to build home in a new land.A man who has never felt at home anywhere.And a choice to be made between the two. 

Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors Details

TitlePride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 7th, 2019
PublisherWilliam Morrow Paperbacks
ISBN-139780062839053
Rating
GenreRomance, Contemporary, Adult, Retellings

Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors Review

  • Sahitya
    January 1, 1970
    Mostly a 3.5.I had read books by this author before, but long ago that I don’t remember much about them. However, when I read the synopsis for this one and realized it’s a desi retelling of P&P, I was just so happy. I also loved that this was set in US, because I can relate more to diaspora stories these days than those set completely in India. And this one both impressed and frustrated the hell out of me. Trisha is an accomplished neurosurgeon who takes immense pride in her job but is quite Mostly a 3.5.I had read books by this author before, but long ago that I don’t remember much about them. However, when I read the synopsis for this one and realized it’s a desi retelling of P&P, I was just so happy. I also loved that this was set in US, because I can relate more to diaspora stories these days than those set completely in India. And this one both impressed and frustrated the hell out of me. Trisha is an accomplished neurosurgeon who takes immense pride in her job but is quite socially inept. She also immensely loves her family, but has a lot of guilt for something that she did fifteen years ago which affected her brother Yash and soured her relationship with her father. She is compassionate and a problem solver and I loved her relationship with her sister and cousins and her grandmother. However, despite working hard to achieve her goals, she has been born to extreme privilege and it shows. She also frequently puts her foot in her mouth because she isn’t good at talking or expressing her feelings. DJ is a chef who has left everything he worked for and is almost bankrupt trying to save his sister suffering from a tumor in her brain. He feels almost spiritual about his cooking and takes immense pleasure in seeing people enjoy and appreciate his food. He has also suffered a lot in his life, bullied and tormented and left homeless by his own father’s family, so he feels very hurt when Trisha makes insensitive comments about him and doesn’t see his concerns in tricky situations because of her own privilege. That makes him retaliate with his own harsh words. Both these characters hurt each other a lot, both knowingly and unknowingly, argue all the time and even though I saw that they were attracted to each other, I didn’t completely feel invested in their relationship. I just wanted them to stop hating each other. Even though they both are good people, I think I wanted to be convinced that they could be great together too, which I didn’t get in the book. Their getting together felt too much like the end of P&P and I don’t think that translates well to a contemporary setting. The author does a good job bringing the Raje family to life. We get to know their history, how the kids have been brought up, their beliefs and values and I think it was all well done. The family is very close to each other and I think that reflected on the page. The author also shows that despite being good people and working towards the betterment of society, both personally and politically, they all are still creatures of privilege and can be tone deaf and insensitive to other’s issues. For all their talk about family loyalty, they are all very quick to judge Trisha for her choices and make her feel more guilty all the time and I didn’t like it. Trisha is such an accomplished woman in her thirties but cowers in front of her father, and even though we are taught in our Indian culture to be very respectful of parents, I particularly hate when parents take advantage of this and emotionally manipulate their children which is what happens here. Even though everything works out towards the end, I think Trisha should have grown a bit of a backbone and stood up for herself instead of everyone just behaving as if it was all ok now. This book is only a loose gender bent retelling of Pride and Prejudice which focuses mostly on the character’s pride and prejudices. It is a mostly realistic portrayal of different kinds of families and how class privilege can affect the perceptions of people towards others. Just don’t go into this expecting a lot of romance. It is an interesting read and I didn’t wanna put it down at all, but I also wanted something more from the characters.
    more
  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    Pride and Prejudice and Other Flavors is a modern retelling of the timeless classic. This version has a unique element. The woman, Trisha, is proud, and the man, DJ, is prejudice. I liked Trisha. She is proud because she's a surgeon, and that's a justifiable reason. She is an intelligent, strong and likeable character. DJ, on the other hand, I despised. At some point, I should have come to like him, like in the original, but that didn't happen. He's just unlikable and garners no sympathy. I unde Pride and Prejudice and Other Flavors is a modern retelling of the timeless classic. This version has a unique element. The woman, Trisha, is proud, and the man, DJ, is prejudice. I liked Trisha. She is proud because she's a surgeon, and that's a justifiable reason. She is an intelligent, strong and likeable character. DJ, on the other hand, I despised. At some point, I should have come to like him, like in the original, but that didn't happen. He's just unlikable and garners no sympathy. I understand that the differences between social classes is supposed to be sharply rendered, but prejudice is present in every class and every race. Much of it is due to extreme ignorance, lack of education and an unwillingness to admit or acknowledge that these attributes are present. I see all of this in DJ. His character soured what was otherwise an engaging story. Everything else is quirky and charming and it flows well. The culture is beautiful described, well written and immersive. The place and time have a true feeling of life about them. Overall, I'm just ignoring DJ because he's a drag who brings the review down to a two star,and I think it's better than that. Instead, I'm focusing on the merits of the story. It's a delightful and culturally rich retelling. For the positive attributes, the story is more of a four star. Thanks to NetGalley for an arc in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Seema Rao
    January 1, 1970
    Enchanting ~ Enjoyable ~ Adorable tl;dr: Masala Pride and PrejudicI LOVED THIS BOOK. I have read so, so many Pride remixes. There are bad, worse, good, and great. This book falls in the great section. Dev's Trisha is a gal you would want to know in real life. She is awesome, but in a believeable way. Fairly confident many Indian-Americans have a smarty relative like her in their family tree. DJ, the darcy, is prejudiced, in sadly similar ways. So, why was this one a great remake? First, it wasn' Enchanting ~ Enjoyable ~ Adorable tl;dr: Masala Pride and PrejudicI LOVED THIS BOOK. I have read so, so many Pride remixes. There are bad, worse, good, and great. This book falls in the great section. Dev's Trisha is a gal you would want to know in real life. She is awesome, but in a believeable way. Fairly confident many Indian-Americans have a smarty relative like her in their family tree. DJ, the darcy, is prejudiced, in sadly similar ways. So, why was this one a great remake? First, it wasn't bound by the original. Liberties were taken, and well-taken at that to keep the integrity of this story. Second, the storytelling and descriptions are wonderful. Overall, Dev did an exceptional job creating a readable, enjoyable book that any reader would love, particularly ones looking for multicultural characters, strong women, or new takes on the classics. Short of finding you and handing the book to you, I can only say find this book. You will really enjoy it. Thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.Seema Rao Write : Instagram| Blog| Twitter |
    more
  • Obsidian
    January 1, 1970
    Please note that I received this book via NetGalley. This did not affect my rating or review.Wow. What a wonderful retelling of Pride and Prejudice. Only the Mr. Darcy character is gender swapped and instead of being an upperclass nobleman, we have a young surgeon whose family is descended from Indian royalty (Trisha Raje) I initially didn't like that Dev had focused on the Mark Darcy character first, but I get why she did it. Eventually we get our Elizabeth Bennett (DJ Caine) and he was fantast Please note that I received this book via NetGalley. This did not affect my rating or review.Wow. What a wonderful retelling of Pride and Prejudice. Only the Mr. Darcy character is gender swapped and instead of being an upperclass nobleman, we have a young surgeon whose family is descended from Indian royalty (Trisha Raje) I initially didn't like that Dev had focused on the Mark Darcy character first, but I get why she did it. Eventually we get our Elizabeth Bennett (DJ Caine) and he was fantastic. Dev follows the same plot though modernizes it for readers. And she even takes a look at black live matters, feminism and rape culture that I was not expecting in this one. I maybe choked up a bit a few times. No spoilers, but I can say that I am excited to see if Dev follows Trisha's brother (Yash) in the next one. I really really want it. Cause, I am all about revenge, I wanted to knock the block off the Wickman character we get in this one. I was pretty much dream casting this book from beginning to end. "Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors" follows 30 something year old neurosurgeon, Trisha Raje. Though Trisha's family is pretty freaking spectacular, her mother is an ex-Bollywood performer, her father is descended from Indian royalty and is a doctor. Her older brother was Attorney General in California and is now running for governor. However, Trisha feels pushed out of her family. An incident occurred when she was 17 that affected her brother and caused a scandal that was hushed up. Trisha though finally decides she's tired of being on the outside of her family and wants to help her brother get elected. However, an old enemy rears her head again and Trisha deals with that, a secret her sister wants her to keep from everyone, and her growing feelings for chef DJ Caine. Trisha is a snob. Sorry, she is. I actually didn't like her at first. But heck, I wasn't a huge fan of Mark Darcy either until later in Pride and Prejudice. Trisha without realizing it talks down to people and has a way of being rude to DJ and acting as if cooking isn't a real job and that it makes him lower class. These two end up having a terrible foot in the mouth meet cute, and then again when DJ has a special reason to keep interacting with Trisha. Trisha though has a lot of heart. She's just afraid to show it. When we hear about the incident that occurred that caused Trisha to be labeled the "black sheep" I felt sorry for everyone involved. And when she has a heart to heart with her mother, I maybe teared up a bit. This was a strong story-line I wasn't expecting and Dev did an excellent job with it. We also of course get the Mark Darcy I am attracted to you scene in this one and it goes just as poorly in this book as it did in P&P. It doesn't help that this is after Trisha almost gets DJ shot by a cop (it's a long story) and I loved that DJ had to slap her down about her privilege of being a rich woman whose family is known and he is seen as nothing but a black man when law enforcement is around. DJ Caine is an up and coming chef. He left England after he realized that his younger sister needed his help. Now he's catering and hoping for a big break. His sister is all he has and DJ is worried that he won't be able to do what is needed for her. We do get a Wickman in this one, but won't get into that too much. It was a surprise and I liked how DJ interacted with Wickman and Trisha. Dev did a good job with DJ's backstory (actually English, though his father side is descended from Indian's too and his mother was a Rwandan refugee). I loved how DJ learned how to cook Indian food and how he modernized it up a bit too. The other characters are very developed in this one too. Loved Trisha's sister Nisha and her brother Yash. And wow, Yash's story-line. Once again, I hope the next book in this series follows him. I have some questions. Dev takes a very good look at the Desi culture in the United States and how Trisha's family remade itself. And I think it was great that she included in DJ's background and what he went through becoming a chef and how he still has to carry himself a certain way due to the fact that yes, she's seen as a black man who can be killed if he breathes hard a certain way. I do wish that Dev had included the recipes of the food that DJ was cooking though. Seriously everything sounded delicious and I love Indian food. Don't read this book while hungry. Have a snack nearby. The flow was a bit uneven at first, but stick with it. I promise it gets better.The ending was a delight. I just wanted more.
    more
  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come
  • Mila
    January 1, 1970
    The digital arc of this book was kindly provided by the publisher via Edelweiss+ website in exchange for an honest review.I found the initial ideas behind this book interesting but the end product was weird. The writing was too descriptive at times; the plot seemed to go back and forth between very detailed flashbacks and the present-day action and I got tired of it rather quickly. I also could not stand DJ, he was so mean all the time and I couldn't make myself like him even at the end of the s The digital arc of this book was kindly provided by the publisher via Edelweiss+ website in exchange for an honest review.I found the initial ideas behind this book interesting but the end product was weird. The writing was too descriptive at times; the plot seemed to go back and forth between very detailed flashbacks and the present-day action and I got tired of it rather quickly. I also could not stand DJ, he was so mean all the time and I couldn't make myself like him even at the end of the story. I still liked the rich cultural background of the novel and Trisha was a very compelling character. But, overall, not for me.
    more
  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    This book. It made me feel so much. It kept me up at night. Being a P&P retelling, I wasn't sure what to expect. But Sonali did a really good job exploring the book's themes and characters while telling a completely original story. She made it her own. The book draws you in. It was so thought-provoking. The story was stressful at times, but as always with Sonali's books, man does the ending deliver. I look forward to seeing what she has in store for us next.Thanks to Edelweiss for an advance This book. It made me feel so much. It kept me up at night. Being a P&P retelling, I wasn't sure what to expect. But Sonali did a really good job exploring the book's themes and characters while telling a completely original story. She made it her own. The book draws you in. It was so thought-provoking. The story was stressful at times, but as always with Sonali's books, man does the ending deliver. I look forward to seeing what she has in store for us next.Thanks to Edelweiss for an advance copy of this book.
    more
  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Truly, one of the best Austen adaptations I've encountered and would highly recommend picking this one up.
  • Tiff at Mostly YA Lit
    January 1, 1970
    Review tk.
  • Arlene
    January 1, 1970
    Just okay. Took me over a week to finish this one because I was never really excited to pick it back up.
  • Joanna Shupe
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate to read an advanced copy of this book and I **loved** it. Sonali's writing is, as ever, utterly gorgeous and I could not put this story down. There were several moments where I teared up and one part that made my heart squeeze so hard in my chest. PPAOF is a dramatic family saga that has so many layers and fascinating characters, all deftly drawn with Sonali's eye for exploring class and culture differences. The heroine was strong and fierce in some ways and the exact opposite in I was fortunate to read an advanced copy of this book and I **loved** it. Sonali's writing is, as ever, utterly gorgeous and I could not put this story down. There were several moments where I teared up and one part that made my heart squeeze so hard in my chest. PPAOF is a dramatic family saga that has so many layers and fascinating characters, all deftly drawn with Sonali's eye for exploring class and culture differences. The heroine was strong and fierce in some ways and the exact opposite in others, just like many of us. The hero is a chef, which means that food plays an important part in the journey as well.This book has heat, heart, and laughter. I think it's Dev's best yet.
    more
  • Christina (A Reader of Fictions)
    January 1, 1970
    Heads up: This is a very loose Pride & Prejudice retelling with a gender flip. If it hadn't been for the introduction of a "Wickham" character, I wouldn't have been able to tell, title aside.
  • Mwinchester97
    January 1, 1970
    I received an arc copy of Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors from the publisher William Morrow, and the author Sonali Dev. A huge thank you to them!Can these two put aside their differences to save the ones they love?Neurosurgeon Trisha Raje comes from a family of overachievers. The Rajes became one of the most powerful families by making and following unbreakable rules : Never trust outsiders, never do anything to jeopardize your brother's political aspirations, and never ever, defy your famil I received an arc copy of Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors from the publisher William Morrow, and the author Sonali Dev. A huge thank you to them!Can these two put aside their differences to save the ones they love?Neurosurgeon Trisha Raje comes from a family of overachievers. The Rajes became one of the most powerful families by making and following unbreakable rules : Never trust outsiders, never do anything to jeopardize your brother's political aspirations, and never ever, defy your family. Even before breaking these rules, Trisha was the black sheep in her family. Now she's got the chance to redeem herself.Up-and-coming chef DJ Caine is hesitant and leary of people like Trisha. He knows what it's like to be looked down upon by them. Not wanting to, but desperately needing to, DJ accept the Rajes job offer. Then he discovers that he will have to put all of his reservations aside, not only because he needs the job but because Trisha is the only one who can save his sister Emma's life.Trisha and DJ must sort out their differences, or they will both suffer the consequences.Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors is completely engrossing. Sonali Dev immediately made me fall in love with the lives of our protagonists. This novel is a perfect Pride and Prejudice retelling with a Desi culture twist. Trisha and DJ are such well-built characters. They have such unique and endearing backstories that motivate them to do what they love. The motivations of loving not only what they do, but extreme love for their family's is heartwarming. Barbs, banter, and heartfelt statements between Trisha and her family and DJ and Emma really bring these two to life. I refuse to believe that the Rajes' and the Caines' aren't real. The Rajes are snobbish, loving, and clearly willing to do anything to keep their family name out of scandals. Even if for some of them that means turning on one of their own.The Caines are snarky, smart, and they would definitely go to the ends of the Earth for each other.I liked Trisha more than I liked DJ. she was a little high-and-mighty, but her intentions were pure at heart. Plus she went through some really tough things with her family. They certainly didn't treat her the best. DJ definitely had reasons to be grieving and angry, but he was so petty. At least I found the things he chose to be especially angered about petty. I thought that there were other things that Trisha did that he could have been more angry about then the ones he chose.However something I struggled to see was the romance between Trisha and DJ. They just didn't seem to truly connect. I know it was the point, but they just snipped at each other one moment then suddenly had a heart-to-heart conversations and went back to sniping at each other the next. The romance felt forced and manufactured.Julia is a character that I hope gets dealt the worst hand in life ever. The whole mystery are around exactly what she did was enticing to figure out and once I did I absolutely despised her.Culture is clearly a part of this book but it was so vastly different for DJ and Trisha. It brought them together but they experienced it on a different levels. Sonali Dev is a master of writing a engrossing plot line with two Indian families that simultaneously embrace their culture and yet try to fit in in America. She truly brought Desi culture to life in her novel. It is beautiful and elegant and full of yummy sounding food.The ending wasn't my favorite. A choice Trisha made left me thinking but why? It just didn't seem to fit in with the story. The romance factor obviously came in at the very end to and it seemed to go from a slow burn ( in my opinion no burn ) to scorching, raging fire in about 30 seconds. The very, very, ending was absolutely adorable though.I'm absolutely going to need more of the world of the Rajes and the Caines because their stories clearly aren't over.Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors is not a book to miss.
    more
  • Barbara O'Neal
    January 1, 1970
    A juicy start to unique family series. I had the vast good fortune to read this book early, and loved every word. Dev has a deft touch with class and culture, and explores them with both humor and depth. When Indian-American surgeon Dr. Trisha Raje meets DJ Caine, an aloof Indian/African cook raised in Southall, sparks fly. The glimpses into both the histories of both families and how their paths led them all to California are multi-layered and never pat--and these two have to work hard to find A juicy start to unique family series. I had the vast good fortune to read this book early, and loved every word. Dev has a deft touch with class and culture, and explores them with both humor and depth. When Indian-American surgeon Dr. Trisha Raje meets DJ Caine, an aloof Indian/African cook raised in Southall, sparks fly. The glimpses into both the histories of both families and how their paths led them all to California are multi-layered and never pat--and these two have to work hard to find a way to navigate their differences. The families play as much a part as the romance, but my favorite part was the FOOD. Dev layers the narrative with scents and ingredients, giving us a rich taste of DJ's world--and the entire novel is worth reading for Trisha's reaction to his food. And then some
    more
  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    I have enjoyed all of Dev’s books, but this story had all the right ingredients; family, food, conflict, and romance. Trisha Raje is a talented neurosurgeon, one of a family of privileged overachievers. Facing a challenging case as Emma makes a difficult decision regarding her health, Trisha meets Emma’s brother, DJ, and the class differences between them become an issue for him. With likable characters, and an appealing story line, I highly recommend this book. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC.
    more
  • Kimberly Kowalski
    January 1, 1970
    I was very generously provided a free copy of this book by Edelweiss for review.This book was phenomenal. I have read many retellings of Pride and Prejudice and this may be my new favorite. Sonali Dev put a fabulous twist on a classic tale. Her characters are brought to life with depth and substance, she conquers real life modern issues, tells a classic love story, and most importantly maintains the importance of loyalty and family. I absolutely loved this book, I look forward to rereading it ma I was very generously provided a free copy of this book by Edelweiss for review.This book was phenomenal. I have read many retellings of Pride and Prejudice and this may be my new favorite. Sonali Dev put a fabulous twist on a classic tale. Her characters are brought to life with depth and substance, she conquers real life modern issues, tells a classic love story, and most importantly maintains the importance of loyalty and family. I absolutely loved this book, I look forward to rereading it many times in the future.
    more
  • Christi
    January 1, 1970
    YES. PLEASE. I completely gobbled up this Pride and Prejudice reworking. It absolutely worked for me on every level. It felt so completely authentic to my favorite Austen novel while also being incredibly fresh and new. Also I couldn’t get enough of the food descriptions. Yummmm. I can’t wait to read more books about the Rajes. Amazing.I received this as an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for a fair review.
    more
  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. It made me laugh and it made me tear up. I also couldn't put it down so I read it in two days.
  • Chermaine
    January 1, 1970
    I love this author! It was so good I didn't want it to end.I want a sequel, I want to know more about the family.Sonali Dev is one of the great American writers, and every page draws you in.She writes about women that are strong, and brave and fierce, but also flawed, and scared and full of life and love. I always look forward to her books when they are published.
    more
  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    There’s a lot to really like about Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors, there’s Trisha Raje and her delightful, beautiful family and the wonderful aroma of the foods featured on the pages, but, sadly, for me, so much of the story got bogged down by an exceptionally angry hero. Having never read a book from Sonali Dev before-but knowing her Indian background-I picked up Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors, looking forward to a culturally-rich story that played off one of my favorite novels of all There’s a lot to really like about Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors, there’s Trisha Raje and her delightful, beautiful family and the wonderful aroma of the foods featured on the pages, but, sadly, for me, so much of the story got bogged down by an exceptionally angry hero. Having never read a book from Sonali Dev before-but knowing her Indian background-I picked up Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors, looking forward to a culturally-rich story that played off one of my favorite novels of all time. Meeting the Raje family was a delight and they met every expectation I had, from the stoic and proper father to the loving grandmother who counted the days between visits from her grandchildren. Dev brought these people to life and I missed them as soon as I closed the book, especially Trisha.Trisha Raje is one of my favorite characters that I’ve read in the last few months. A brilliant surgeon who may or may not be on the spectrum, she’s justifiably arrogant about her abilities and completely insecure in her interactions with anyone who isn’t related to her by blood. Despite a self-imposed isolation from many family activities after a bad choice on her part years ago that almost destroyed her brother’s political career, she’s dedicated to her family, loves them unconditionally, appreciates good food, and is loyal to a fault. Her passion for medicine and healing pulsates off the page, but it’s her vulnerability outside of the operating room that really resonated with me. Dev wrote her perfectly.While Trisha wears the role of Darcy in this retelling of Pride and Prejudice (and does so brilliantly), it’s Chef Darcy “DJ” Caine that takes on the poorer, looked down upon persona of Elizabeth Bennett. It’s in DJ that the book loses its ability to entertain and instead becomes a harsh lesson on what it means to be brown or black in today’s America and a severe scolding of the western world in general. While I expected this to a degree, after all it is a retelling of Pride and Prejudice, DJ’s anger and resentment hovers on every page like a dark cloud, making it almost impossible for me, as a reader, to empathize with him. Instead I found myself wanting to skip the pages that he narrated. And, while I own that my response to DJ may reflect my own life experiences, I was more bothered that his anger and resentment stalled out the overall story, both his own journey and his relationship with Trisha. It’s not until the 65% mark that DJ starts to look internally at his own prejudices and, had I not been reviewing, I would have put down the book long before this. Which would have been a shame because once he recognized how he’d misjudged Trisha and started to see his life through different lenses, he became very likable and the book took off.Overall, I enjoyed Sonali Dev's writing and her depiction of Indian-American culture. As the daughter of an immigrant, this is something that I can relate to so easily and I look forward to reading more of her work.
    more
  • Jordanne
    January 1, 1970
    The Gender-Swapped, Multi-Cultural, Soap-Opera-esque Pride and Prejudice Retelling You Never Knew You Needed🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟I loved this book. I adore Pride and Prejudice and, as a result, am very particular about what a ‘retelling’ needs to include to qualify as one. This book includes the key themes & scenes I personally look for in a P&P retelling but it transcends all that to become its own novel entirely too. I love the rich backgrounds – both characteristically and culturally – of all the The Gender-Swapped, Multi-Cultural, Soap-Opera-esque Pride and Prejudice Retelling You Never Knew You Needed🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟I loved this book. I adore Pride and Prejudice and, as a result, am very particular about what a ‘retelling’ needs to include to qualify as one. This book includes the key themes & scenes I personally look for in a P&P retelling but it transcends all that to become its own novel entirely too. I love the rich backgrounds – both characteristically and culturally – of all the characters.I love the way Dev flipped the roles of our Elizabeth & Darcy archetypes in character whilst also maintaining the family dynamics tied to the originals – Trisha keeping her tight-knit, sprawling, acentric and sometimes overly involved family and DJ holding onto the solidarity and closeness of two orphan siblings (Fitzwilliam & Georgianna) left to fend for themselves and each other against the rest of the world.Also, Julia Wickham’s whole character transition - genius! (And super evil, way more evil than George Wickham – I love it!)This book does allude to sexual assault, (view spoiler)[as there are a few characters who are victims of rape in their pre-book past (hide spoiler)], though it’s never explicitly described or shown, it’s just worth knowing for those particularly sensitive to this. I will say it’s handled quite well, (view spoiler)[purely for the fact that the assaults occur 15 years + before the events of the novel (hide spoiler)] and whilst it still impacts the characters in some ways, they present great, well-adjusted survivor stories.This book really hit me in the feels in all the right moments and I was really invested the whole way through and can’t wait to read any sequels(!) that I just found out might(?) exist. (That in itself is impressive too since I’m historically against P&P sequels)I received a copy of this book from William Morrow Paperbacks via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.To read more of my reviews, visit my blog, Bloodthirsty Little Beasts.
    more
  • Sonja
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. I'm a sucker for Pride and Prejudice retellings but, alas, this time I liked the idea of this book more than the author's execution of it. Mainly, I found the book too long, bloated with overly descriptive language, as well as flashback info dumps that were meant to give depth to the characters, but just made the book clunky. It took me six days to read, when I could have otherwise breezed through it in two. The chemistry between Trisha and DJ also just didn't work for me. I love a go 2.5 stars. I'm a sucker for Pride and Prejudice retellings but, alas, this time I liked the idea of this book more than the author's execution of it. Mainly, I found the book too long, bloated with overly descriptive language, as well as flashback info dumps that were meant to give depth to the characters, but just made the book clunky. It took me six days to read, when I could have otherwise breezed through it in two. The chemistry between Trisha and DJ also just didn't work for me. I love a good enemies to lovers story but, while I liked them as individual characters, I just didn't find their journey together believable.And while I loved the contemporary setting and diverse cast, there were some truly cringe-worthy scenes dealing with race that really do nothing to advance the plot. For one, there is an incident involving a police officer that calls to mind the Black Likes Matter movement, but is used only to illustrate Trisha's naïveté and isn't explored beyond that, and which is apparently resolved with a beer summit (yes seriously — recall the 2009 beer summit between Barack Obama and Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr, and the police officer who tried to arrest him as he was entering his own house). Yikes. Then there is the treatment of Africa/ns, including DJ, who is described as having "Rwandan-Tutsi skin like [his] mother, dark and luminous." As a Rwandan-American, kudos to Dev for introducing a Rwandan character as a normal everyday person, but WTF is "Rwandan-Tutsi skin"? There is no such thing. Just no. And then there's Trisha going off to Africa because "There's no place like Africa to set your head straight." It's 2019 and we're really still using "Africa" to redeem characters? Just... sigh.Despite all this, I did like the Raje family, and siblings in particular, so I'm curious to see whose story is next in this series. Whether I will read it though remains to be seen.***I requested and received an ARC from HarperCollins Publishers through NetGalley in exchange for my review.***
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I received this title as an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Take a stressed-out neurosurgeon who has trouble with emotions. Add a super hot chef who has never felt like anywhere is home. Now stir in a dash of Jane Austen. And let it simmer, simmer, simmer...Trisha Raje is one of Stanford's top neurosurgeons, and is highly dedicated to her patients. However, her outside of work life is a wreck. She's excluded from family events because of a mistake she made as a teenager, she I received this title as an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Take a stressed-out neurosurgeon who has trouble with emotions. Add a super hot chef who has never felt like anywhere is home. Now stir in a dash of Jane Austen. And let it simmer, simmer, simmer...Trisha Raje is one of Stanford's top neurosurgeons, and is highly dedicated to her patients. However, her outside of work life is a wreck. She's excluded from family events because of a mistake she made as a teenager, she doesn't have time to date, and her brother is just about to launch the biggest campaign of his political career. You know, the one she nearly destroyed with that one teenage mistake. Now her work life has become complicated, too. She has just figured out how to remove a tumor and save her patient's life. Unfortunately, her patient is refusing the surgery.DJ Caine dropped his entire life in Paris to come to the side of his baby sister, Emma, when she tells him that she has a brain tumor. Now he's once again restarting his life and his career as a chef, slowly being crushed under the weight of Emma's medical bills and his sister's stubborn refusal to have surgery. He thinks he's found his lucky break when he's asked to cater dinner parties for the campaign of Yash Raje. However, this means he crosses paths with Yash's spoiled, uptight, and proud younger sister, Trisha... who happens to be the only one who can save his sister's life.A wonderful "Pride and Prejudice" inspired tale, "Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors" is a beautiful tale of family love, overcoming obstacles, overcoming your own failings, and finding a brighter future. Add in family drama, old wounds, and past actions that come back to haunt you, and you've got a fascinating, funny, unforgettable, heartbreaking and heartwarming book. And as Goodreads implies that this is only the beginning, I look forward to returning to see what will happen next with the Raje family.
    more
  • Delaney Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    3.5Note: I read an ARC of this book.I'm a big fan of pride and prejudice, and other such hate to love stories, so I was really looking forward to this book. And while I definitely enjoyed it, I can't say that I just *loved* it by any means. It was good, it was well written, but it didn't really wow me. I really loved Trisha's story, and her relationship with her family. She was an excellent flawed protagonist. I also really loved DJ. I absolutely adored Emma. The characters were all spot on, com 3.5Note: I read an ARC of this book.I'm a big fan of pride and prejudice, and other such hate to love stories, so I was really looking forward to this book. And while I definitely enjoyed it, I can't say that I just *loved* it by any means. It was good, it was well written, but it didn't really wow me. I really loved Trisha's story, and her relationship with her family. She was an excellent flawed protagonist. I also really loved DJ. I absolutely adored Emma. The characters were all spot on, completely enjoyable.It is true that this is a loose retelling of P&P, but I think that is totally okay. The themes are still there. Prejudices, social classes, etc.I do have a few actual quibbles. The first being there is a part at the very beginning of the book where DJ overhears Trisha calling him "the hired help." He holds this against her for most of the book (rightfully so). But I wish we could have gotten to see her side of that moment. Knowing her character, I'm sure she was saying that to Nisha because she didn't exactly feel like revealing she had just argued with the chef and the guy Nisha was trying to set her up with (kinda). But we didn't get to see that. And I really don't believe that she is that shallow by any means, but never getting to see her side of that just bugged me.Also, it seemed that what really made Trisha begin liking DJ was his food. There was the part where it helped her see him with more humanity rather than arguing with him, but there were also points where I was questioning whether she really liked him that much, or just his food. I wanted to see a little bit more of that lead up of Trisha and DJs interactions where we could see the moments that made Trisha like DJ--besides the fact that his food was good.Despite these negatives, I don't want to prevent anyone from reading the book; it was honestly a very enjoyable, fun read.
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book SO much! However, just as in the story, it wasn't love at first sight. I was offered an advance reader copy and it took me a few days to decide if I wanted to read it. Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" has long been my favorite book of all time. How could a re-telling possibly live up to my expectations? I figured I would be constantly comparing it to the original and how could it come close? It sounded so different though that I was intrigued. Set in the modern day, an India I loved this book SO much! However, just as in the story, it wasn't love at first sight. I was offered an advance reader copy and it took me a few days to decide if I wanted to read it. Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" has long been my favorite book of all time. How could a re-telling possibly live up to my expectations? I figured I would be constantly comparing it to the original and how could it come close? It sounded so different though that I was intrigued. Set in the modern day, an Indian Immigrant family and a gender flip for the Darcy/Elizabeth Bennet characters? My curiosity got the best of me and I jumped in. I immediately got sucked into the multi-layered story. The character development was fantastic. Trisha Raje has a huge family but each of them are richly developed to be uniquely different. I found myself sitting in traffic and wondering what they were doing - always the sign of a good book! It was different enough from the original that I wasn't comparing the two and I loved the nods to the original including a few cleverly placed quotes and the characters' names. Add to that the mouth watering food descriptions and you've got a big winner. ALL of the stars!!Ugly Cry Potential: LowCharacter Development: Fantastic! Learned about other cultures: Yes!Food Descriptions: Mouth-wateringUnputdownable-ness: HighThank you so much to Sonali Dev and the #tallpoppywriters for allowing me to read an advance copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Sheryle
    January 1, 1970
    What an absolutely delicious morsel of a book! There were enough similarities to Pride and Prejudice for any Austen fan, but this was most definitely its own book. As the author says in the afterword, there were no daughters to be married off, but the underlying themes of family, love and misunderstandings were all there. There was much to enjoy about this book. First, there was a role reversal. While the main male character was still named Darcy (DJ), he was the prejudice of the story while our What an absolutely delicious morsel of a book! There were enough similarities to Pride and Prejudice for any Austen fan, but this was most definitely its own book. As the author says in the afterword, there were no daughters to be married off, but the underlying themes of family, love and misunderstandings were all there. There was much to enjoy about this book. First, there was a role reversal. While the main male character was still named Darcy (DJ), he was the prejudice of the story while our heroine, Trisha, was the pride. And, they were wonderful in their roles. Another enjoyable facet to the story was that DJ was a chef and the reader was treated to the most mouth watering descriptions of a variety of food. Then there were the families. The main characters came from extremely different backgrounds, but both were utterly devoted to their families. It was so wonderful to read about both and how these families formed their lives. This author did an outstanding job with characters, pacing and dialogue. My only tiny complaint was occasionally when the characters said something, it turned out they only thought it. That happened a bit too often for my taste. But, that is a very minor flaw. It seems like this book would appeal to a wide range of readers and to book clubs. I certainly hope we see more of this delightful family. My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.
    more
  • BrocheAroe
    January 1, 1970
    Paying cheeky homage to Jane Austen’s beloved books, the pride and prejudice in this novel come in all flavors for both main characters, as an Indian-American neurosurgeon and a Rwandan-Anglo-Indian chef meet their match together in life and love. While Dr. Trisha Raje and DJ Caine are thrown together by family responsibilities and reluctantly drawn to each other for reasons neither want to identify, the rest of the family members are just as intriguingly introduced, making the happily ever afte Paying cheeky homage to Jane Austen’s beloved books, the pride and prejudice in this novel come in all flavors for both main characters, as an Indian-American neurosurgeon and a Rwandan-Anglo-Indian chef meet their match together in life and love. While Dr. Trisha Raje and DJ Caine are thrown together by family responsibilities and reluctantly drawn to each other for reasons neither want to identify, the rest of the family members are just as intriguingly introduced, making the happily ever after ending of this book only the beginning of this wonderful new series. The seamless merging of cultures and traditions suffuse the funny dialogue, empathy of the characters, and well-built plot with an evocative richness the reflects the realities of a 21st century life. Incredibly timely and representative of women as both mothers and working at the top of their field professionally, and of physical illness and (dis)ability struggles and triumphs, this book should not be relegated to only the category of women’s fiction, but should be celebrated as an example of where all types of literature should be heading – increasing representation of the myriad ways races, cultures, ethnicities, nationalities, and abilities influence, inform, and clash with family responsibilities, individual identities, and personal choices.
    more
  • Jamie Beck
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this Austen-inspired family saga and love story, which forces strong yet flawed characters to confront timely social issues and personal crises in order to better understand themselves and each other on their way to falling in love. Ms. Dev’s skill for beautifully articulating feelings and philosophies makes you pause and reflect on the fact that, no matter our differences in race, class or other form of distinction, we are all alike in our base personal need to be understood and loved. I loved this Austen-inspired family saga and love story, which forces strong yet flawed characters to confront timely social issues and personal crises in order to better understand themselves and each other on their way to falling in love. Ms. Dev’s skill for beautifully articulating feelings and philosophies makes you pause and reflect on the fact that, no matter our differences in race, class or other form of distinction, we are all alike in our base personal need to be understood and loved. To pursue our passions without unfair impediments. And to be respected on the basis of merit. Much like Darcy and Elizabeth, Dr. Trisha Raje and master chef DJ Caine must overcome prejudices and pride in order to see the other clearly. With the Raje family, Ms. Dev sets up a complex cast and web of relationships for future books. I must say, I fell particularly hard for Yash and look forward to seeing more of him! That said, I also loved the exploration of multigenerational relationships (and the value those bring to our lives and personal development). It will be interesting to see what comes next, but I’ve no doubt it will be equally moving and gorgeous.
    more
  • stacia
    January 1, 1970
    Gosh, I love Sonali Dev so much and this might be my favorite of her novels (I’ve read them all). Her language is so lush and her storytelling is so assured. I love being able to tuck into a book with full confidence in the author. I know I won’t have to question too confusedly or rigorously what’s happening or what’s being said. This was especially true of this work; Dev knew exactly what’re she was going and I so appreciate and admire that. There’s even some racial politics here, as our male p Gosh, I love Sonali Dev so much and this might be my favorite of her novels (I’ve read them all). Her language is so lush and her storytelling is so assured. I love being able to tuck into a book with full confidence in the author. I know I won’t have to question too confusedly or rigorously what’s happening or what’s being said. This was especially true of this work; Dev knew exactly what’re she was going and I so appreciate and admire that. There’s even some racial politics here, as our male protagonist, DJ (short for Darcy James) is half-Rwandan and dark-skinned, a matter of both identity and plot, not exploited but explored in a fairly thoughtful (if predictable) way here. I loved the rendering of the Raje family. With so many members, it must’ve been difficult to give them all such distinct and alive personalities but she did it. This book has all the fun and angst and romance characteristic to Dev’s best works and everyone who already digs her should devour it. Those new to her work should give this a generous chance; you’re unlikely to be disappointed.
    more
  • Ramona Mead
    January 1, 1970
    I'm new to the romance genre and I haven't read any Austin, so I probably missed some points this book is meant to make. However I've read this author before and enjoy her stories a great deal. This one was on the slow side to start, but once all the characters' lives became intertwined, the pace picked up. I'm adjusting to the slower pace and character driven aspects of romance as opposed to a lot of other genres I read. This allows for a lot of personal development for the characters over the I'm new to the romance genre and I haven't read any Austin, so I probably missed some points this book is meant to make. However I've read this author before and enjoy her stories a great deal. This one was on the slow side to start, but once all the characters' lives became intertwined, the pace picked up. I'm adjusting to the slower pace and character driven aspects of romance as opposed to a lot of other genres I read. This allows for a lot of personal development for the characters over the course of the novel, which is definitely the case here. I like how my opinions of Trisha and DJ changed throughout the book, as theirs are changed as well, of each other and of themselves. And while this is a romance novel, this story is mostly about families, and the power of keeping secrets. There were serious parts as well as lightness. Many thanks to NetGalley for my advanced copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
    more
Write a review