Invisible Women
Imagine a world where your phone is too big for your hand, where your doctor prescribes a drug that is wrong for your body, where in a car accident you are 47% more likely to be seriously injured, where every week the countless hours of work you do are not recognised or valued. If any of this sounds familiar, chances are that you're a woman.Invisible Women shows us how, in a world largely built for and by men, we are systematically ignoring half the population. It exposes the gender data gap – a gap in our knowledge that is at the root of perpetual, systemic discrimination against women, and that has created a pervasive but invisible bias with a profound effect on women’s lives.Award-winning campaigner and writer Caroline Criado Perez brings together for the first time an impressive range of case studies, stories and new research from across the world that illustrate the hidden ways in which women are forgotten, and the impact this has on their health and well-being. From government policy and medical research, to technology, workplaces, urban planning and the media, Invisible Women reveals the biased data that excludes women. In making the case for change, this powerful and provocative book will make you see the world anew.

Invisible Women Details

TitleInvisible Women
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 12th, 2019
PublisherHarry N. Abrams
ISBN-139781419729072
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Science, Technology

Invisible Women Review

  • Gwen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book about unconscious bias. It's not about men deliberately excluding women when considering things like uniforms, city travel, or treatments for medical conditions ... although it's true that once the bias is pointed out, it's not always top of the list to make safety adjustments. And that's really one of the most important points of the book: it endangers women if you design and build the world without considering women's needs and habits. Women are built in a particular way, and th This is a book about unconscious bias. It's not about men deliberately excluding women when considering things like uniforms, city travel, or treatments for medical conditions ... although it's true that once the bias is pointed out, it's not always top of the list to make safety adjustments. And that's really one of the most important points of the book: it endangers women if you design and build the world without considering women's needs and habits. Women are built in a particular way, and they are socially conditioned in a particular way, and they're treated in a particular way - comparing all this to men's situation is useful only to a certain extent because it is so easy for everyone to slip into the mindset that men are the default human, and women are, as the author notes, "niche". We design things for people, but really only think of men and their needs because - and companies and designers are open about this - women are harder, with our non-linear bodies and hormones meaning that more sophisticated (and more expensive) research needs to be done.We also design things for men because men are the designers for the most part. They have no experience being women of course, and don't really look into it because, for the most part, it doesn't occur to them. If you're a woman, just think about all the books you've read through the years about male experience, with a male protagonist, and presented - or even taught - to you as "human experience". We do it all the time, and I read books regularly with male protagonists sorting out their stuff (if you follow me here, you'll see plenty of ex-Navy-SEALS running around). But women's experience in novels and poems? That's women's experience only. My point here is that while women are trained to identify with both men and women, and indeed possibly favor the male experience, men aren't trained to look at - or think about - about women's experience. Criado Perez has really done her research, but what could have been a very statistic-heavy book is in fact very readable, engaging, and so enlightening. The Introduction should really be published on its own - it's magnificent. This is a book to buy and keep, and get some of those sticky notes because you'll want to mark pages for future reference!
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Do not read this if you are suffering from high blood pressure, because it is absolutely rage inducing. However EVERYONE should read this at some point, it looks at things that I had never even considered, genuinely brilliant.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Read this if you're ready to get mad about how basically every research study done and used to create solutions to problems for "all people" are based on the average white male. Not surprising, but infuriating to see it laid out so plainly. I've always been so angered about technology being not useful for my tiny hands, and it's relieving -- and again, angering and frustrating -- this is just a norm of being female when research completely excludes the fact your body isn't the average white dude Read this if you're ready to get mad about how basically every research study done and used to create solutions to problems for "all people" are based on the average white male. Not surprising, but infuriating to see it laid out so plainly. I've always been so angered about technology being not useful for my tiny hands, and it's relieving -- and again, angering and frustrating -- this is just a norm of being female when research completely excludes the fact your body isn't the average white dude. And don't get me started on the viagra research. Crucial reading for feminists and for anyone who does product research. There is so much work to be done.
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  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    Audiobook fundamental para se ter uma visão abrangente e fiel das desigualdades de género a que as mulheres continuam sujeitas num mundo moldado à imagem dos homens.
  • Zoe Obstkuchen
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I could make everyone read this book in the hope that every man could actually see how insignificant women are in a male-oriented world. Quite simply, we do not exist.When I was 13 I adored reading Sherlock Holmes stories but I soon worked out that when a man refers to ‘people’ what he actually means is ‘other men’. Every single thing that impacts on the lives of women has actually been designed by men for the benefit of men. From cars to taxes, from medication to disaster relief time and I wish I could make everyone read this book in the hope that every man could actually see how insignificant women are in a male-oriented world. Quite simply, we do not exist.When I was 13 I adored reading Sherlock Holmes stories but I soon worked out that when a man refers to ‘people’ what he actually means is ‘other men’. Every single thing that impacts on the lives of women has actually been designed by men for the benefit of men. From cars to taxes, from medication to disaster relief time and time again women suffer, die and are sidelined because instead of being seen at 50% of the population we are simply seen as non-standard men.
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  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    Since I've picked up this book, I've recommended it to everyone I've talked to, and now I'm recommending it to you. This is an extremely well-researched and comprehensive look at the gender data gap in all aspects of life, ranging from the utterly absurd to the life-threatening. The sub-subtitle of this book could be "but wait, there's more" as Criado Perez delves deep into the social construction of the gender data gap with both conscious humour and appropriate outrage. I cannot recommend this Since I've picked up this book, I've recommended it to everyone I've talked to, and now I'm recommending it to you. This is an extremely well-researched and comprehensive look at the gender data gap in all aspects of life, ranging from the utterly absurd to the life-threatening. The sub-subtitle of this book could be "but wait, there's more" as Criado Perez delves deep into the social construction of the gender data gap with both conscious humour and appropriate outrage. I cannot recommend this enough.
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  • Zoë
    January 1, 1970
    "Like so many of the decisions to exclude women in the interests of 'simplicity', from architecture to medical research, this conclusion could only be reached in a culture that conceives of men as the default human, and women as a niche aberration. To distort a reality you are supposedly trying to measure makes sense only if you don't see women as essential. It doesn't make sense if you're talking about half the human race. And it doesn't make sense if you care about accurate data."And there you "Like so many of the decisions to exclude women in the interests of 'simplicity', from architecture to medical research, this conclusion could only be reached in a culture that conceives of men as the default human, and women as a niche aberration. To distort a reality you are supposedly trying to measure makes sense only if you don't see women as essential. It doesn't make sense if you're talking about half the human race. And it doesn't make sense if you care about accurate data."And there you have it. For years and years and years, society has ignored the fact that women are physiologically different to men and as a result have completely different needs. And as a result of this women are being put in danger and mistreated because society treats them as an aberration from the "norm". In this, the 21st century when women's capabilities, endurance and perspective is adding more value than ever, the facts that the design of things all around us is holding us back is ever more stark. I am absolutely furious. Everybody needs to read this book. We are so far from an equal society, and we have no idea just how deep set that divide is.
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  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    This book is infuriating as it is fascinating.
  • K.H. Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    Everybody needs to read this book. Everybody. Female, male, nonbinary, everybody.The introduction perfectly articulated and validated many of my own anecdotal observations - the pervasive idea that female is somehow a deviation of human, rather than the base model. The first few chapters, which deal largely with social impacts - community planning, workplace dynamics, etc. - were fascinating, insightful, and compelling.But then as the book progresses, Criado-Perez slowly ups the ante. By the tim Everybody needs to read this book. Everybody. Female, male, nonbinary, everybody.The introduction perfectly articulated and validated many of my own anecdotal observations - the pervasive idea that female is somehow a deviation of human, rather than the base model. The first few chapters, which deal largely with social impacts - community planning, workplace dynamics, etc. - were fascinating, insightful, and compelling.But then as the book progresses, Criado-Perez slowly ups the ante. By the time she begins to dissect the utter disregard for women in medical studies and pharmaceutical trials, I was a white hot ball of righteous fury. And it only gets worse from there.And yet, despite how FUCKING LITERALLY INCREDIBLE it is that women remain unseen, despite comprising half of the population, Criado-Perez's impeccable research and dry wit give the reader something to feel optimistic about. No, it isn't hope. Hope is passive. What Criado-Perez provides is motivation. She cites numerous examples of individuals and organizations who are actively changing things for the better. Simply by writing the book, she joins their ranks. Simply by reading the book, I do, too. By passing it along, recommending it to every damn person on my friend list, I am helping make women visible.We are not niche. We are not aberrations. We are not a specialized subset of the human race. We are not to be ignored.
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  • F.
    January 1, 1970
    In a world largely built for and by men, we are systematically ignoring half the population. And it’s killing women. From all male crash test dummies to viagra that works brilliantly for period pains if only someone tested it and so much more. It took me ages to read this because I had to keep taking breaks to calm down. Read it. And try and change things.
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  • Savannah
    January 1, 1970
    This book is fabulous! I will be looking at the world in a much different manner after reading this. I am not kidding when I say this changed my life. I was already aware of some of the issues Caroline mentions, specifically gender data gaps when it comes to medicine, but others blew my mind. Super interesting. And maddening.
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  • Melania 🍒
    January 1, 1970
    4,25/5
  • Urban
    January 1, 1970
    This is an excellent book, well researched and supported by lots of facts and statistics. I’m very sad to see that so few men have read it, at least judging by reviews here. I had to scroll down 40 reviews to find a single male reviewer.
  • Jessica Scott
    January 1, 1970
    It’s rare that a book so completely challenges your underlying assumptions about the way the world works but this book accomplishes that and more. Absolutely enthralling read that shows the impact of assuming male as universal and female as niche.
  • Rachel Matthews
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this is like driving past the scene of a car crash. You know it's bad but you can't look away. Talking of car crashes, as a woman this book revealed that I am 17% more likely to die in a crash than a man and that wasn't even the worst of it. Women are under represented in almost every sphere of influence. We are underpaid, under appreciated, overworked, overlooked. We are often not listened to by medical professionals and this can result in death. God help you if you're a black, pregnant Reading this is like driving past the scene of a car crash. You know it's bad but you can't look away. Talking of car crashes, as a woman this book revealed that I am 17% more likely to die in a crash than a man and that wasn't even the worst of it. Women are under represented in almost every sphere of influence. We are underpaid, under appreciated, overworked, overlooked. We are often not listened to by medical professionals and this can result in death. God help you if you're a black, pregnant woman; you are more likely to be given an emergency caesarian and more likely to die in childbirth. It's infuriating but it's an important book because only with this information being out there can change happen.I just hope this book makes a difference.
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  • Saara
    January 1, 1970
    Järkyttävän hyvä kirja. Huolellisesti taustoitettu, hyvin argumentoitu, todella hyvin kirjoitettu kirja.
  • Katheryn Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    I have a feeling that this one will end up being my book of the year. I often read reviews where people say "everyone needs to read this book", but I have never felt the need to say that about any book I have read...Until this one. Criado Perez covers a wide range of situations, and the depth of her research is evident. I was impressed with the organisation of the book, despite the breadth of material covered, which is something often lacking in books as ambitious as this one. Criado Perez is cl I have a feeling that this one will end up being my book of the year. I often read reviews where people say "everyone needs to read this book", but I have never felt the need to say that about any book I have read...Until this one. Criado Perez covers a wide range of situations, and the depth of her research is evident. I was impressed with the organisation of the book, despite the breadth of material covered, which is something often lacking in books as ambitious as this one. Criado Perez is clear and engaging. She strikes the right balance in her use of statistics, and she asks the right questions. I especially loved that she was able to convey her passion for her subject matter without compromising her objectivity. Invisible Women is a fascinating and important book, and everyone needs to read it.
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  • Gemma Hartley
    January 1, 1970
    An infuriating and eye-opening read that exposes how women fall through the cracks of society and infrastructure at every level. Caroline Criado Perez makes a compelling case for rethinking the "default male" as the representative for all humans, and instead taking the "radical" approach of listening to women. Required reading.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    This book was really eye-opening for me to see how so many things in our world are unconsciously skewed towards males. It did not demonize men, or belittle them, which I was wary of, but instead shed some light on data biases that most men and women do not even realize is there. It was extremely fact-heavy and a bit hard to read in narrative form sometimes, which is why I give it 4/5 stars. Extremely interesting information; now, what will we do with it?
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  • Yzabel Ginsberg
    January 1, 1970
    [I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.]Wow, did this book hurt. And made me angry. In a good way, that is—not feeling angry at some, at least, of what it deals with, would have probably been abnormal. For two main reasons: 1) it points at things one doesn’t necessarily thinks about when reflecting at first upon all the ways women still get the short straw, and 2) once you consider these things, you realise you’re not even surprised, and -that- is pro [I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.]Wow, did this book hurt. And made me angry. In a good way, that is—not feeling angry at some, at least, of what it deals with, would have probably been abnormal. For two main reasons: 1) it points at things one doesn’t necessarily thinks about when reflecting at first upon all the ways women still get the short straw, and 2) once you consider these things, you realise you’re not even surprised, and -that- is proof that all of this stuff is… just sad. It’s the 21st century, and half of humanity is still forced to deal with rubbish.Here’s a very simple illustration of one of the problems the author points. It’s very simple, and minor, and I bet a lot of people (possibly mostly men, but surely also some women) would tell me to ignore it and “suck it up” and “it’s not important, so stop dwelling on it.’ But it is a good example. I work in a fairly good company when it comes to treating people equally. It’s not perfect, of course, but let’s just say that for a Silicon Valley company, they actually openly try to recruit more diverse people than just 25-ish white male nerds, which in itself deserves to be pointed. And it gives its new hires little welcome gifts. So when I joined, among the gifts, was a pair of socks. They’re pretty, I like their colour, and I’d love to wear them. There’s just a problem that no one obviously though about: they’re not “one size fits all”, they’re “one size fits all MEN”. Which means they’ve been gathering dust at the bottom of my wardrobe, since wearing socks whose heels ride above your ankles is really incomfortable. And there you have it: the way the default “human being” is actually “male”, with female bodies being sort of a side show that those poor men have to accommodate (/le sigh).(In defence of my employer, they do give us female version of T-shirts, too, so it’s not completely hopeless either. And no, my point is not to rant about socks. If someone hasn’t gotten my point by now, they should probably read this book because they’d make a good target for it.)It is both enlightening and infuriating to read about this for 300+ pages, about all the circumstances in which women are still, more or less unconsciously, treated as the less important part of humanity, the part that can “suck it up” and “deal with it: look, we men deal with it”, except that it’s much easier for men to deal with it since the “it” was made for them at first. An example from the book: tsunami shelters in countries where there’s a solid separation between the female sphere and the male sphere, where women can’t go out unless they’re with men from their family, because if they do, they’re pretty much free buffet for all. So, when a tsunami hits, and the shelters are designed as huge places where hundreds of people have to cram, without any separation between the sexes, guess what happens? Well, women die, because they don’t dare to go in there (if they do, they almost surely end up shamed and beaten and raped); and that’s IF they get to the shelters in the first place, since a man from their family needs to warn them and take them there first. (It is also telling that in such dire circumstances, like these ones, or refugeed camps, the worst for women is often not even the wars or natural catastrophes that led them there, but male violence.)And the worst of it, the saddest part, is that most of the time, it’s not even done on purpose: it happens because most people who plan these places, most people who decide about infrastructures, are still men, and the mere idea that not all people (read: 50% of the people) don’t have exactly the same needs as theirs doesn’t even cross their minds. How pathetic is that?Conclusion: Read this book. Read about all these pathetic things, that you can’t dismiss as “oh well it’s not true, surely this (female, of course) author is exaggerating”, except that she’s not, nope, you can indeed see all this around you, every day, if you pay attention. I don’t even need to check sources to realise this. If it’s around me in 2019 Britain, I can’t dismiss it as “but it only happens in ‘certain countries’, luv”.
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  • Eitakbackwards
    January 1, 1970
    Originally saw this on @Will's 'Want to Read' list and thought it sounded v interesting so on my next book haul popped it into bag. So #discoverycreds2uThis whole book is one interesting but also frustrating statistical slap in the face. Some stuff was just like wtf, like not testing car safety on female dummies. The city planning stuff was also v interesting, don't wanna go into spoilers so won't but it is so true and as she points out, it's not necessarily that 'people' are TRYING to be sexist Originally saw this on @Will's 'Want to Read' list and thought it sounded v interesting so on my next book haul popped it into bag. So #discoverycreds2uThis whole book is one interesting but also frustrating statistical slap in the face. Some stuff was just like wtf, like not testing car safety on female dummies. The city planning stuff was also v interesting, don't wanna go into spoilers so won't but it is so true and as she points out, it's not necessarily that 'people' are TRYING to be sexist, it's just that unless women are represented in forums where they can suggest and implement policy improvements, then consideration for women's issues simply doesn't occur to men making decisions leading to women being left out because the data on them does not exist, or isn't deemed important. I liked that she talked about issues in multiple countries so it wasn't totally eurocentric (though it mainly was) but there needed to be more about the data gaps for women of ethnic minorities in my opinion. At the end I was quite glad as the continuous streams of data are quite intense and was feeling low key irked by that point. Glad to read it though, its important to expose these gaps if we are to improve things for the 50-ish% of the population who are not in fact, 'atypical' or 'other'.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone should read this book! The world mainly revolves around men, let's face it. Women are basically an afterthought in design. Look at the objects around you, how many would fit better if they were made smaller or adjustable. Sit in your car. Think about how close you sit to the steering wheel in comparison to other people you know. This isn't necessarily a feminism book, although it can be. It is more about the lack of input that women have in how our bodies get to interact with the world Everyone should read this book! The world mainly revolves around men, let's face it. Women are basically an afterthought in design. Look at the objects around you, how many would fit better if they were made smaller or adjustable. Sit in your car. Think about how close you sit to the steering wheel in comparison to other people you know. This isn't necessarily a feminism book, although it can be. It is more about the lack of input that women have in how our bodies get to interact with the world around us. How different our needs are from distances traveled in a day to, how parks and subways are designed, to how medications are researched. This is the most important book I have read in years.
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  • Coralia Varga
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing book. Everyone should read this. I read it side by side with my husband and we were both shocked to discover how discriminated women are. It's terrible. We need to redesign our system to include more than half of the population.P.S. it will make you angry and sad! Nevertheless, it's a MUST READ!
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    A must-read. This author does an incredible job exposing the gender data gaps that are so prevalent in our world. She shows how the world has truly been designed for men, and we need to start intentionally and explicitly filling these data gaps or structural sexism will continue to be perpetuated. We need to fill these data gaps so that we can have a world that is safe, functional, and just for all of humankind, not just half of it. There are so many topics covered in this book (from car safety, A must-read. This author does an incredible job exposing the gender data gaps that are so prevalent in our world. She shows how the world has truly been designed for men, and we need to start intentionally and explicitly filling these data gaps or structural sexism will continue to be perpetuated. We need to fill these data gaps so that we can have a world that is safe, functional, and just for all of humankind, not just half of it. There are so many topics covered in this book (from car safety, pharmaceuticals, bathrooms, and public transportation, to artificial intelligence, taxes, academia, and politics)... but they all reveal how the bodies, ideas, and work of females are made invisible, and why this invisibility is so dangerous.
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  • Charley James
    January 1, 1970
    I devoured this in about 24 hours. So thoroughly researched and passionately told. If this doesn't inspire anger and heartbreak at the omission of the female experience from the structure of the modern world, I don't know what will. I only hope that this book doesn't simply preach to the converted. It needs to be read by politicians, medical practitioners, clinical researchers, city/town planners, business leaders, HR directors, and more.
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  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely everyone should read this book.
  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    The gender-pay gap is something most have heard of, but, the gender data gap, is something new to me. The book is extensively researched and filled with exhaustive examples on topics spanning: everyday life (town planning,. commuting, civil infrastructure), to medicines, design, engineering , and the workplace. The basis is that men and women are different, across the board. But, often solutions are designed with only men in the room, and through unconscious bias (or worse), solutions are produc The gender-pay gap is something most have heard of, but, the gender data gap, is something new to me. The book is extensively researched and filled with exhaustive examples on topics spanning: everyday life (town planning,. commuting, civil infrastructure), to medicines, design, engineering , and the workplace. The basis is that men and women are different, across the board. But, often solutions are designed with only men in the room, and through unconscious bias (or worse), solutions are produced with either consciously or unconsciously benefit men, or just don't account for women. 2 examples:plain stupid: The EU only requires that car crash tests are performed using a male dummy. A female dummy is only sometimes asked for testing, and only then, in the passenger seat - as women are more likely to be passengers. As well, the female crash dummy, is the male crash dummy, shrunk down. Surprisingly, it does not respond like a female.Unconscious and unintended: a city prioritised clearing snow on the main roads connecting the downtown business district with residential. However, this only prevented increased commute times for men, as women had more care-based responsibilities, and were likely to be using pavements and other roads, to look after elderly relatives, drop kids off at school etc. In a pilot, the city decided to prioritise clearing the sidewalks over the main roads. Not only did female commute times improve, but hospital AE admission significantly reduced, and the city saved >$10m. Why? Because in snowy conditions, women made-up approx 70% of admissions from walking on slippery pavements, during their caring responsibilities prior to work.The book is filled with these examples, and very likely features examples relevant to your job sector. So give it a read!
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  • Tinna Björk
    January 1, 1970
    Invisible Women fjallar um þá staðreynd (já, það er staðreynd) að karlmenn séu nánast án undantekninga sjálfgefna kynið þegar það kemur að öllu í okkar daglega umhverfi og hvernig það hefur gríðarleg (og stundum banvæn) áhrif á líf kvenna; lyf sérstaklega ætluð konum eru oft eingöngu rannsökuð á karlmönnum áður en þau eru fjöldaframleidd þó það sé gríðarlegur líffræðilegur munur á milli kynjanna, einkenni hjartaáfalla eru mismunandi eftir kynjum en samt eru einkenni karla alltaf talin vera týpís Invisible Women fjallar um þá staðreynd (já, það er staðreynd) að karlmenn séu nánast án undantekninga sjálfgefna kynið þegar það kemur að öllu í okkar daglega umhverfi og hvernig það hefur gríðarleg (og stundum banvæn) áhrif á líf kvenna; lyf sérstaklega ætluð konum eru oft eingöngu rannsökuð á karlmönnum áður en þau eru fjöldaframleidd þó það sé gríðarlegur líffræðilegur munur á milli kynjanna, einkenni hjartaáfalla eru mismunandi eftir kynjum en samt eru einkenni karla alltaf talin vera týpísku einkennin og vinnufatnaður er í flestum tilvikum miðaður við karlkyns fatastærðir sem þýðir að hann getur verið hættulegur konum (t.d. ef konur í verksmiðjum þurfa að vinna í of stórum vinnufötum er hætta á því að fötin festast í vélum eða ef lögreglukonur þurfa að vinna í skotheldum vestum sem eru of stór fyrir þær þá gera þau lítið gagn og geta verið fyrir þeim í starfi). Þetta eru örfá dæmi af mörgum og fjallar Criado-Perez sérstaklega um "the gender data gap" sem er sú staðreynd að meirihluti allra gagna í heiminum kemur frá rannsóknum á líkömum karla og daglegu lífsmynstri þeirra.Ég mæli með þessari bók!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this as a woman (and one would hope for a man reading as well), this is the nonfiction equivalent of a horror novel. On a separate subject, I was carrying this book with me at work and was having a conversation about it with another woman. A man butted in and "joked," "If the women are invisible, how do you know they're there?" I guess he thought it was fiction (??), but when I started explaining what the book was about, he kind of just faded out and away from the conversation the first Reading this as a woman (and one would hope for a man reading as well), this is the nonfiction equivalent of a horror novel. On a separate subject, I was carrying this book with me at work and was having a conversation about it with another woman. A man butted in and "joked," "If the women are invisible, how do you know they're there?" I guess he thought it was fiction (??), but when I started explaining what the book was about, he kind of just faded out and away from the conversation the first chance he got. To me, that's the exact attitude this book is trying to change. It's probably the word "data" in the title, but I went into this expecting this to be very tech focused, which didn't turn out to be the case. It definitely hit upon technology, but it was much further reaching and touched upon data bias when it comes to the medical field, disaster deaths and relief, violence, unpaid care work, political representation, and much more.
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  • Anetq
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone should read this, right now! And to those holding off because of the size, it's only 380 pages (the rest is notes and references). And you shouldn't read it because you're a feminist, but because understanding how thoroughly the world and everything in it, down to aid efforts are designed (by and) for men. And it is literally killing women, but if that is not motivation enough for you, it is also holding back humankind from using all resources and potentials.
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