Back Stabbers (The Country Club Murders, #8)
All Ellison Russell wanted was an update on her stock portfolio. Instead, she found her broker dead.With an unexpected out-of-town guest at her house, Ellison is too busy for a murder investigation. Only this time, Detective Anarchy Jones wants her help, and she can’t deny the handsome detective. Can Mr. Coffee supply her with enough caffeine to keep her brain sharp and everyone else happy?Juggling bodies (one, two, three, four), two-faced friends, her social calendar, and a cat (yes, a cat) is taxing but Mother might be the biggest challenge of all.With a killer drawing closer, can Ellison put together the pieces or will she be the one getting stabbed in the back?

Back Stabbers (The Country Club Murders, #8) Details

TitleBack Stabbers (The Country Club Murders, #8)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 23rd, 2018
PublisherHenery Press
Rating
GenreMystery, Cozy Mystery

Back Stabbers (The Country Club Murders, #8) Review

  • LORI CASWELL
    January 1, 1970
    Dollycas’s ThoughtsFirst, another great title/music tie-in, from the O’Jays. Really gets you into that 70’s feeling. No cell phones, no internet, no cable tv, but some really fine music!One of my favorite amateur sleuths is back with her knack of finding dead bodies and her love affair with Mr. Coffee. This time she finds her stockbroker dead and in a way, she will never be able to wipe from her memory. After that bodies quickly start to pile up and Detective Anarchy Jones actually wants her hel Dollycas’s ThoughtsFirst, another great title/music tie-in, from the O’Jays. Really gets you into that 70’s feeling. No cell phones, no internet, no cable tv, but some really fine music!One of my favorite amateur sleuths is back with her knack of finding dead bodies and her love affair with Mr. Coffee. This time she finds her stockbroker dead and in a way, she will never be able to wipe from her memory. After that bodies quickly start to pile up and Detective Anarchy Jones actually wants her help with the case. This does not make her mother happy at all. Can Ellison catch a killer or will she be the next victim of the backstabber?Ellison may be part of the country club set but she never comes off the way. It is her mother that cares about all the social standing. But her parents have been keeping a huge secret. Ellison’s father was in a relationship before marrying her mother. This union produced a child. Karma runs a brokerage firm in San Francisco and has never met the rest of her family. After almost 40 years she makes a trip to Kansas City and stays with Ellison as a favor to her dad. Also, Ellison and Anarchy are moving forward with their relationship to everyone’s delight except her mother. Dead bodies, secrets exposed and Ellison’s dating a detective has sent mom Francis into quite a tizzy.These characters are so genuine and believable. The dialogues are cleverly written and will have you laughing out loud. Interactions between the characters but especially between Ellison and her mother are pure gems. This author has a unique style and she knows how to pepper the story with humor in all the right places even when taking on serious issues.This story takes place way before the #metoo movement and clearly shines a light on sexual harassment that was commonplace back then and widespread until recently. Ms. Mulhern fictional take on the subject and involving the murders was very well done. Ellison’s quest to narrow the suspect pool was very intriguing. Who had the most credible motive? Finding out was not an easy task. I loved following along for each and every step.I have learned that when I start reading anything by this author not to have anything else planned for the rest of the day because I know when I start reading I will not be able to stop. My family has also learned to expect giggles and full out laughter from me during that reading.This is an excellent addition to this fantastic series. All the characters have evolved so much since the series began, even Francis has grown a little. I do recommend new readers start at the beginning of this series but you can really start anywhere in this series for classic cozy entertainment.
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  • November Is Nyarlathotep
    January 1, 1970
    Review: BACK STABBERS by Julie Mulhern(COUNTRY CLUB MURDERS #8)When I first started reading this series a while back, I expected I would be disinterested with a class structure beyond my means and past my imagination. So wrong! (I'm so glad!) I love the series. Ellison is a precious personality; although born into wealth and married into wealth and raised by a very “upper-class disdainful” mother, she is very much an “at-home,” loving, compassionate and generous individual, an artist, and a devo Review: BACK STABBERS by Julie Mulhern(COUNTRY CLUB MURDERS #8)When I first started reading this series a while back, I expected I would be disinterested with a class structure beyond my means and past my imagination. So wrong! (I'm so glad!) I love the series. Ellison is a precious personality; although born into wealth and married into wealth and raised by a very “upper-class disdainful” mother, she is very much an “at-home,” loving, compassionate and generous individual, an artist, and a devoted mother and dog lover.In fact, Ellison strongly reminds me of Lois Winston's crafting sleuth Anastasia Pollack. Both are women with (or previously with) some wealth, who could be snooty and inclusive. But both are generous, kind-hearted souls, and make their series all the more appealing because of their natures.Also, both can't seem to stop stumbling over corpses (usually NOT the “natural death” moments), and so just have to investigate for themselves—sometimes or else!This time Ellison unfortunately stumbles on her dead broker. That was more than she needed to see and that death only uncovers an iceberg of intrigue and danger.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    I tried not to do this as each new ARC'S/DRC'S I received is one I want to read or I would not have requested it. Before long I would have a mess to untangle without knowing which books, I needed to read. I have been searching for a DRC for this book sometime. I was between books when it arrived so I read it and the 8th installment did not disappoint. The humor was there especially the scene between Max, a dog, and McCallester, a cat was hilarious. It is well-written. I had just graduated high d I tried not to do this as each new ARC'S/DRC'S I received is one I want to read or I would not have requested it. Before long I would have a mess to untangle without knowing which books, I needed to read. I have been searching for a DRC for this book sometime. I was between books when it arrived so I read it and the 8th installment did not disappoint. The humor was there especially the scene between Max, a dog, and McCallester, a cat was hilarious. It is well-written. I had just graduated high during the 1950's and remember many of the situations that are covered. I like the new rings tones cover in the tale.Ellison Russell wanted to check on her Portfolio Stocks. Instead, she finds a dead broker and she called Anarchy for help. While waiting for Anarchy Ellison received a message to call her Father who wants Ellison to host her unknown half-sister. Her father has not informed her Mother that he invited Karma to visit him. There are a number of funny things happening. Ellison romance with Anarchy is in an open view and she has introduced him to her friends. Ellison will encounter abuse, betrayal, fraud, social realm and FAMILY TIES before she finds answers. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK AND SERIES. I will find hard to wait a year to find out Ellison next adventureDisclosure: Many thanks to Edelweiss and Henery Press for a review copy. The opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Shalini
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun book to read. Though it was labeled under a cozy genre, I found the story to be solid without it being too cutesy. My first book by author Julie Mulhern, though 8th in the series, had me wanting to get to the bottom of the mystery ASAP. Ellison, the main character, with a tendency to find dead bodies, drops into her stockbroker's office only to discover him dead hours ago with his pants down. Her cop boyfriend Anarchy, is then called and the investigation proceeds, with Ellison's This was a fun book to read. Though it was labeled under a cozy genre, I found the story to be solid without it being too cutesy. My first book by author Julie Mulhern, though 8th in the series, had me wanting to get to the bottom of the mystery ASAP. Ellison, the main character, with a tendency to find dead bodies, drops into her stockbroker's office only to discover him dead hours ago with his pants down. Her cop boyfriend Anarchy, is then called and the investigation proceeds, with Ellison's help in providing inside information about the other characters. I loved the way the main character was depicted, strong, intelligent, addicted to coffee, with a daughter and a dead philandering husband. Ellison felt real to me, a complete character with many loving relationships with friends and family, always ready to help with a keen eye for observation, and somehow the right information does reach her. Anarchy made a compatible duo with her. The other characters mom, dad, sudden entry of step sister Karma, friends and associates, book group, nasty ex lover of her dead husband all added to the flavor of the mystery. The story progressed with a good pace with the right amount of emotions. The plot lines seemed to be well weaved by the end of the book. The only niggle I had was there were too many characters and paramours. I got confused by the end and I felt the story was a wee bit long. A book set in the mid 1970s had me enjoying it far more than I expected. The author's writing was clean, clear creating an atmosphere that was needed for this book. I loved the landlines going brng brng I received a DRC from Edelweiss and publisher Henery Press, and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Rosemary Standeven
    January 1, 1970
    Yet another fabulously enjoyable Country Club Murder book. All the beloved old (and some not quite so welcome) characters are included. Aggie is still looking after Ellison, Grace and Max, trying to keep them out of trouble while producing appropriate, tasty and welcome sustenance for them (and bereaved neighbours). Grace has decided that Max needs a friend. And Max creates more chaos than you could imagine, ‘welcoming’ his new ‘friend’. Ellison’s father has the brilliant idea of asking her to h Yet another fabulously enjoyable Country Club Murder book. All the beloved old (and some not quite so welcome) characters are included. Aggie is still looking after Ellison, Grace and Max, trying to keep them out of trouble while producing appropriate, tasty and welcome sustenance for them (and bereaved neighbours). Grace has decided that Max needs a friend. And Max creates more chaos than you could imagine, ‘welcoming’ his new ‘friend’. Ellison’s father has the brilliant idea of asking her to have her half-sister, Karma, to stay: “It was an epically terrible, bring-about-the-apocalypse bad idea. Rivers would run backward. The locusts would descend. Mother’s face would melt.” Frances Walford’s public reaction to the news is unexpected – but goes to show what a formidable – and indeed admirable – woman she is. She makes the point remarkably clear, that no-one may try to trash Frances Walford’s reputation, nor that of her family.Libba is always a welcome addition to Ellisons world (““You do realize liquor isn’t the answer to every question?” “This isn’t every question. This is a man question. Trust me, liquor is the answer.” Who was I to argue with Libba’s vast experience?”), Detective Peters, not so much. And then there is … “Some demon (a demon bunny?) had forgotten to guard the gates of hell and Prudence had escaped. There could be no other explanation for her presence”.Ellison and Anarchy Jones are now finally an item, and are being seen in public together. Anarchy has realised that if he wants Ellison, he has to accept that if she stumbles across a crime scene or mystery, that she will feel duty bound to investigate. He can try to keep her safe, but cannot demand that she stays out of trouble: “Anarchy’s silence was long. And fraught. Why-can’t-I-find-a-girlfriend-who-finds-deals-on-dress-shirts-instead-of-bodies fraught”. And Ellison is, of course, finding dead bodies again: “As if I’d ever cry wolf about a body. I didn’t kid about corpses”, and throwing herself into the investigation despite the incredible shock on finding the first (in this book) corpse: “There are things once seen that cannot be unseen. My hands flew to my eyes, covering them. My hands were too late”.The first dead body belongs to Ellison’s broker – an odious man of the Harvey Weinstein type, who will not be missed by many of his female office workers (or their husbands/boyfriends): “I strongly suspected Winthrop had very broad tastes. He didn’t hunt with a rifle but with a shotgun. If the pellet spray was wide enough, he was bound to hit something” – but who will be missed by the many members of the Country Club for whom he has made a lot of money. The Country Club Murder books never stop at one death (fact – not a spoiler), and Ellison is on the alert for more corpses: ““Vicky, have you seen Frank Wallace?” I hated to disturb my hostess but, given my track record, the likelihood Frank was dead and stuffed behind the boxwood hedges was high”.As always, the writing is excellent and very witty, the story lines engaging, and the characterisation superb – both for the human and animal characters. I have loved all the Country Club Murder books – and this was no exception. Please bring on the next instalment!I received this copy from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review
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  • RO G'ma
    January 1, 1970
    Back Stabbers is the eighth book in Julie Mulhern’s awesome Country Club Murders series. Ms. Mulhern’s writing style is crisp and clear, the storyline is well developed, and the characters are entertaining, fun, and a little quirky. The setting for this series is the country club society in Kansas City, Missouri, in the 1970s, and all the details are right on target for that era. The sensitive subject of sexual harassment is addressed in this book. The mystery is interesting, and there are witty Back Stabbers is the eighth book in Julie Mulhern’s awesome Country Club Murders series. Ms. Mulhern’s writing style is crisp and clear, the storyline is well developed, and the characters are entertaining, fun, and a little quirky. The setting for this series is the country club society in Kansas City, Missouri, in the 1970s, and all the details are right on target for that era. The sensitive subject of sexual harassment is addressed in this book. The mystery is interesting, and there are witty statements and humor dispersed throughout the book. This book is fast paced, with lots of twists and turns to keep the reader engaged. I highly recommend this series to readers who enjoy well-crafted clean mysteries.Ellison Russell, who lives in Kansas City, Missouri, is a widow, an artist, the mother of a teenager daughter, loves Mr. Coffee, and much to the dismay of her mother, Francis, has the unwanted talent of finding murder victims. Ellison and Detective Anarchy Jones are pursuing their relationship; Grace, her daughter, is pleased, but Francis and Ellison’s housekeeper, Aggie DeLucci, aren’t. Before marrying Ellison’s mother, Harrington, her daddy, fathered a child, Karma, and Ellison’s socially prominent parents had kept her a secret from everyone for forty years. Karma, who runs a successful brokerage firm in San Francisco, wants to meet Ellison, and, not wanting to cause friction in his own home, Harrington asks Ellison to allow Karma to stay with her.Ellison arrives for a meeting with her broker, Winthrop Marshall, to review her portfolio and is upset when she’s kept waiting in the reception room with a woman who’s ill and spreading germs. After requesting to wait in Winthrop’s office, his assistant, Debbie, takes Ellison to his office and leaves to get coffee for her; and that’s when she finds Winthrop’s body in a compromising position. Ellison calls Anarchy, but his partner, Detective Peters, who isn’t her biggest fan, arrives first. Ellison takes Karma to the see the Chinese exhibit at The Nelson-Atkins Museum, and, as luck would have it, they discover Debbie’s body; Karma faints and hits her head, which requires a stay at the hospital.I received an Advance Reader Copy of this book from Edelweiss/Above the Treeline and voluntarily reviewed it.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    Another 1975 adventure with the Country Club crowd in Kansas City, Missouri as Ellison Russell discovers an older half sister and three more dead bodies. What will Mother say!Ellison & Anarchy Jones are a hot item and people are beginning to get used to the idea. When Ellison finds her stockbroker murdered in his office she becomes aware of the plight of the young women who work there. As Ellison faces the wrath of Mother over Karma, she also discovers how fiercely Mother defends Ellison fro Another 1975 adventure with the Country Club crowd in Kansas City, Missouri as Ellison Russell discovers an older half sister and three more dead bodies. What will Mother say!Ellison & Anarchy Jones are a hot item and people are beginning to get used to the idea. When Ellison finds her stockbroker murdered in his office she becomes aware of the plight of the young women who work there. As Ellison faces the wrath of Mother over Karma, she also discovers how fiercely Mother defends Ellison from her back stabbing peers.Mr. Coffee, Ellison's most steadfast man, provides the backbone needed to get her through every twist & turn.Fast paced action and true to period descriptions put a smile on my face the entire read. With only pagers and landline phones, shag carpets, lavender and green bathrooms, the nostalgia was spot on.Sadly to say the attitude towards young female brokerage staff continued into the '90s when I worked at one.I volunteered to read an ARC from Henery Press through Edelweiss. Release date is Oct 23 2018
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  • Sheryl
    January 1, 1970
    Ellison Russell has been waiting somewhat impatiently for her meeting with her stockbroker. She's getting distraught because the other woman, remaining in this close waiting room is what Ellison describes as a "Germ, masquerading as a woman" she demands to wait in her broker's office. Big mistake for Ellison, as soon as his secretary leads her back to Winthrop Marshall's office and opens the door, Ellison finds out why Mr. Marshall has been keeping her waiting, let's say he's not late getting in Ellison Russell has been waiting somewhat impatiently for her meeting with her stockbroker. She's getting distraught because the other woman, remaining in this close waiting room is what Ellison describes as a "Germ, masquerading as a woman" she demands to wait in her broker's office. Big mistake for Ellison, as soon as his secretary leads her back to Winthrop Marshall's office and opens the door, Ellison finds out why Mr. Marshall has been keeping her waiting, let's say he's not late getting into the office as previously told, he never left from the night before. To add insult to injury that she's found another dead body, she's never going to think of Winthrop Marshall in the same way. He was not an attractive man fully clothed but partially clothed the image is just too much for her to compute. As she recovers from her shock, she calls her favorite coffee eyed, Detective Anarchy Jones to inform him of her latest find. Ellison is pretty old hat regarding dead bodies much to her society mother's chagrin. It seems like if there is a dead body to stumble over it, Ellison is quite adept of righting herself on her Gucci's when finds one.This series set is in mid 70's and, whether you were born in that era, or not a few things may go over your head, but it's written so well that you will that you'll not get lost. I love how Ms. Mullhern weaves her mysteries around that era, including but not limited to her love affair with her Mr. Coffee, and the references to Harvest Gold and Avocado Green kitchen appliances. Some things that were left in that era were for the best believe me. The one that got me laughing and still does is when Anarchy is trying to reel Ellison in by letting her know that she isn't Pepper Martin. That was a top-rated television series starring Angie Dickenson. It's was called "Police Woman," and it was instrumental in my career choice. That was when I was bitten by the police bug; I thought I would be able to dress to the nines and solve crimes without breaking a sweat. This series has so much more to love than the '70's era. It's plain fun; this book had several different sub-plots going so you after you finish this book you find your find yourself wondering how long was I sitting here? The settings, witty dialog and characters make this a must-read for any cozy mystery fan. When you pick this book up, be prepared not to get anything done for the rest of the day. You'll find yourself teleported back with Ellison Russell and her quirky family.I want to thank The Henery Press and Edelweiss for providing me with a copy of this e-galley in exchange for my honest review. The opinions I expressed above are my own.
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  • Mary Songer
    January 1, 1970
    I just love this series!!! Ellison is a strong, relatable character and the rest of the characters are equally good. The series is set in the 70's and since I grew up in that time I love the references. I want to live in these books! Start from the first one and work your way through. Completely fun. Julie Mulhern has been added to my list of authors whose books I prebuy so I'll have the books the second they're released. I just hope she keeps writing. One caveat, you'll want to make sure you ha I just love this series!!! Ellison is a strong, relatable character and the rest of the characters are equally good. The series is set in the 70's and since I grew up in that time I love the references. I want to live in these books! Start from the first one and work your way through. Completely fun. Julie Mulhern has been added to my list of authors whose books I prebuy so I'll have the books the second they're released. I just hope she keeps writing. One caveat, you'll want to make sure you have coffee available before you start reading. Read and you'll understand.
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  • Nada Sobhi
    January 1, 1970
    "Of the three partners at Bisby, Marshall, & Wallace, one was hospitalised, one was murdered, and one was a murder suspect." Ellison Russell has a knack for finding dead bodies and by that I mean if there was ever a Guinness World Record for the number of dead bodies found, Ellison Russell would break the record several times over.Back Stabbers by Julie K. Mulhern is the eighth book in The Country Club Murders. And even though it is my first – full – read for Mulhern, it feels as if I had "Of the three partners at Bisby, Marshall, & Wallace, one was hospitalised, one was murdered, and one was a murder suspect." Ellison Russell has a knack for finding dead bodies and by that I mean if there was ever a Guinness World Record for the number of dead bodies found, Ellison Russell would break the record several times over.Back Stabbers by Julie K. Mulhern is the eighth book in The Country Club Murders. And even though it is my first – full – read for Mulhern, it feels as if I had known the characters a long time. Ellison is relatable, funny, down-to-earth, and tough coffee addict.Narrated from Ellison's first-person perspective, the novel is quick-paced and enjoyable, with lots of sleuthing and jumping around. The reader is introduced the murder from the first few pages. "You have that sound in your voice.""What sound?""The I've-found-another-body sound." I loved Ellison, though I think she drinks way too much coffee and that her coffee cups are too small. I connected with her on various levels. As the novel progresses, the reader is introduced to previous books and previous murders such as Ellison's husband.There are too many cheaters in this book, hence the title Back Stabbers. I was beginning to think there weren't any decent people in Kansas City where the book is set.Not only does Ellison keep stumbling on dead bodies, her father surprises her with news that her never-before-seen half-sister is not only coming to town but also would be staying with her. Add to that, there is trouble in paradise, or particularly with the oddly-named Detective Anarchy Jones, whom we are led to believe it Ellison's boyfriend.One of the things I absolutely loved about Back Stabbers is the constant humour. Not only is Ellison sarcastic, but her imagery plays into the humour as well. "Why didn't someone else find him? Why you?[...]Why do these things [dead bodies] happen to you?""I wish I knew.""Perhaps you should figure it out, then you could avoid making the mistake in the future."My disappointing propensity for finding bodies was an evergreen topic. There were a lot of angles to the mystery, allowing Mulhern to keep the reader off-track most of the time. There's also a lot of "show-don't-tell". Used expertly throughout the book. "My stomach took the elevator to my ankles and all the strength left my fingers (not just left but packed its bags and took off for Palm Springs)." Ellison also has tough parents to deal with. Her mother is a dragon of a woman and her father is eccentric in a way. In Back Stabbers, Ellison's father appears to be distant from his daughter but lavishing his half-daughter with long over-due affection. I sympathised with Ellison but personally disliked her father, whom I thought had emotional issues. "With his rumpled overcoat, permanently disagreeable expression, and tendency to blame for the world's ills, Detective Peters was not my favourite person to look at – especially when he was smirking at my discomfort. Overall, I truly enjoyed this read for Julie K. Mulhern. Definitely won't be my last. I loved jumping around with Ellison, who is a strong character. Anyone who could put with a mother like that deserved a medal.I finished this book in less than 8 hours!
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  • Georgie
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsA slightly disappointing entry in an otherwise consistently superb series. There's still lots of the qualities that made me gobble up the first seven books: the 1970s clothes (described in mouth-watering detail), social one-up-manship (taking a ham to the afflicted trumps any number of Bundt cakes), and Ellison's gloriously bitchy mother. Here she is delivering the perfect put-down to one of Ellison's detractors:"Ellison Russell is—well ..she’s not our kind.”...“Our kind? What kind is t 3.5 starsA slightly disappointing entry in an otherwise consistently superb series. There's still lots of the qualities that made me gobble up the first seven books: the 1970s clothes (described in mouth-watering detail), social one-up-manship (taking a ham to the afflicted trumps any number of Bundt cakes), and Ellison's gloriously bitchy mother. Here she is delivering the perfect put-down to one of Ellison's detractors:"Ellison Russell is—well ..she’s not our kind.”...“Our kind? What kind is that, dear?” Mother’s voice was chilly. “The jealous kind? The petty kind? The little-people-have-little-minds kind?..."Mother’s tone could freeze a lake. A large one. Michigan and Superior combined."You know, dear. On reflection, I think you’re right. Ellison isn’t your kind....” There was a moment of silence and I could picture Mother patting a hair into place before she wielded the killing blow. “I’m rather pleased about that."However, the plot is singularly incoherent, and I found myself spluttering, "But, the museum, how did...? And why say that...?" Which is not how you want to end a clever book. I'm also concerned about police procedure: was it usual (even in the 1970s) to let witnesses leave a crime scene before a statement was taken? And why do experienced detectives simply follow Ellison's (unevidenced) declaration that someone is a murderer without checking? Illogical (and irritating).One of the enjoyable stylistic devices Mulhern has used to great effect in earlier books is a brittle narrative delivery - "I stood. We hugged. I sat." - which works well when it's suddenly contrasted with something like, "And then I saw the corpse." But there's a lot of these short rather banal sentences here; I think the trick's become over-used a bit.I'd say that the sub-plot with Ellison's half-sister was unnecessary, except that it did force the pace on Anarchy Jones' glacial courtship. As in, Ellison & Anarchy now hold hands, and occasionally kiss. I like a good romance as much as the next woman, but at the rate they're (not) going, I'm beginning to doubt that theirs is one.Don't be put off the series by this slightly sub-standard entry, though: even sub-standard Mulhern is still very enjoyable. Just crossing my fingers for the next one: more "Mother", one or two fewer murders, and a little zing to the romance, please.
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  • JoAnne McMaster (Any Good Book)
    January 1, 1970
    Ellison Russell has a problem: she's gone to see her broker regarding her stock portfolio, and when she enters the office, she finds him dead. Another body. Her mother will be horrified, her homicide detective boyfriend Anarchy will be resigned. And her father...her father has a surprise for her as well: her older half-sister Karma has decided to visit, and he wants her to stay at Ellison's, since he hasn't even told her mother yet.Of course, she knows her mother will be furious, but she doesn't Ellison Russell has a problem: she's gone to see her broker regarding her stock portfolio, and when she enters the office, she finds him dead. Another body. Her mother will be horrified, her homicide detective boyfriend Anarchy will be resigned. And her father...her father has a surprise for her as well: her older half-sister Karma has decided to visit, and he wants her to stay at Ellison's, since he hasn't even told her mother yet.Of course, she knows her mother will be furious, but she doesn't have a choice if their marriage has any chance of survival after this comes to light; and it doesn't help when she discovers that Anarchy already knows Karma, and has for a long time. Only the dead stockbroker keeps getting in the way, especially since Anarchy asks for her help on the case. With an office full of attractive women to sift through, did one of them kill the man? Or are more sinister forces at work trying to keep anyone from finding out the truth? But what will she do about Karma? And how do she and Anarchy know each other? How is her mother going to deal with it all? And what's a girl to do when she's stuck smack dab in the middle of murder?...Ellison Russell is a widow with a teenage daughter in Kansas City, Missouri. She's a well-respected artist born of money who has a full life, loving parents, a faithful housekeeper and a devotion to Mr. Coffee. It is the world of the 1970's before technology became king and people had to either visit or use a telephone to communicate with each other; a simpler life - or so you would think. But not in the case of Ellison, who has a knack of finding dead bodies on a regular basis, and this day is no different. Unfortunately, the bodies don't stop with just one, and Ellison's going to need a lot of coffee to keep up.This is the eighth book in the series, and a wonderful addition as such. Ms. Mulhern writes characters that are lively and believable; with plenty of sarcasm, wit, intelligence and even, at times, venom. Ellison has grown from an insecure young widow into an independent woman who's not about to allow anyone to steamroll over her, friend and foe alike.The tale is often funny listening to Ellison's thoughts in her head while she's dealing with the unwanted drama around her. Even while she manages to maintain a semblance of her life - still going to play bridge and chair various committees along with attending parties, she also has the addition of a new half-sister to deal with, learning to find her way in navigating a relationship with a sister she doesn't know anything about.While she's delving into the murders of three people (don't worry; she didn't find all of the bodies); she's dealing with the fallout of such and juggling not only assorted mourners but the fact that there were many more who didn't mourn at all. Watching her figure out who had the greatest motive - and just exactly if and/or how they were connected is quite an absorbing tale. There is plenty of intrigue, secrets and lies, and watching Ellison put it all together is quite a delightful journey to take. While I wouldn't want to find myself in the nest of vipers that Ellison calls her friends, this is one woman who is well able to deal with it and come out on top.When everything comes together and the murder is finally discovered, we realize that the clues were there all along yet we were looking down other paths - exactly as both the murderer and Ms. Mulhern expected us to do until the end. Another admirable entry in the series and I look forward to the next, which can't be soon enough for me. Highly recommended.
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  • Ivonne Rovira
    January 1, 1970
    Ellison Russell knows her formidable mother is going to kill her. After all, Russell, a widowed artist and a member of Kansas City’s WASP elite, will be hosting her illegitimate half-sister, a secret for decades. How can she keep her mother from finding out?Well, it isn’t Ellison, who gets killed; it’s her philandering stockbroker. And then there are more deaths. And that’s when the novel gets a bit silly. Everyone — from Ellison’s mother to her friends to her detective boyfriend, Anarchy Jones Ellison Russell knows her formidable mother is going to kill her. After all, Russell, a widowed artist and a member of Kansas City’s WASP elite, will be hosting her illegitimate half-sister, a secret for decades. How can she keep her mother from finding out?Well, it isn’t Ellison, who gets killed; it’s her philandering stockbroker. And then there are more deaths. And that’s when the novel gets a bit silly. Everyone — from Ellison’s mother to her friends to her detective boyfriend, Anarchy Jones — makes Ellison’s bad luck in finding corpses seem a personal failing. It’s used as a punchline, but it got old quick, and no reasonable person would pretend to believe that Ellison was finding bodies on purpose. It really annoyed me.But a sub-par novel by Julie Mulhern is much, much better than other authors’ best works. In addition, Mulhern’s novel, obviously written before the Brett Kavanaugh hearings, has a nice does of #MeToo in the days before women were heard or believed. Still recommended.
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  • Lisa Hudson
    January 1, 1970
    SPECTACULAR!Back Stabbers (The Country Club Murders #8) is truly spectacular! This book does not need to be read as a stand alone but needs to be read in order in the series. If not, the reader will miss out on so many details of the relationships between these complex characters Mulhern’s readers have grown to love. Mulhern takes us back into the 1975 in Kansas City., MO. We join Ellison Russell, her daughter Grace, her parents, her boyfriend Detective Anarchy Jones, her housekeeper and friend SPECTACULAR!Back Stabbers (The Country Club Murders #8) is truly spectacular! This book does not need to be read as a stand alone but needs to be read in order in the series. If not, the reader will miss out on so many details of the relationships between these complex characters Mulhern’s readers have grown to love. Mulhern takes us back into the 1975 in Kansas City., MO. We join Ellison Russell, her daughter Grace, her parents, her boyfriend Detective Anarchy Jones, her housekeeper and friend Aggie and her friends in the Country Club set. What an eclectic group of friends! Ellison’s life is always a daring adventure and this novel is filled with epic adventures! Starting with finding her broker dead, unexpected company arriving that may cause her Mother to have a heart attack and then the body count starts adding up. Gossip is rampant among the Country Club set. Do you know what it’s like to be stabbed in the back? Who is cheating on who? What is the real motivation? An excellent novel from start to finish!I was provided an ARC of this book by Henery Press and Edelweiss. The opinions expressed here are completely my own and without influence. I have preordered a copy of this book for my own library.
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  • Jeanie Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    Love, love, love itWhen Karma comes to town, Ellison's world is tilted on its side, but Karma isn't responsible for all the deaths.Too many series lose steam after a few book but Julie Mulhern has kept the series at the same great level that made The Deep End a winner. It was wonderful to see Ellison's relationship with Anarchy bloom and meeting Karma the development there was awesome. Yes, Karma is a person and one that you will be delighted to meet. I was as disappointed in Ellison's dad as sh Love, love, love itWhen Karma comes to town, Ellison's world is tilted on its side, but Karma isn't responsible for all the deaths.Too many series lose steam after a few book but Julie Mulhern has kept the series at the same great level that made The Deep End a winner. It was wonderful to see Ellison's relationship with Anarchy bloom and meeting Karma the development there was awesome. Yes, Karma is a person and one that you will be delighted to meet. I was as disappointed in Ellison's dad as she was and I was so impressed with the way Ellison's mother handled Gaye! The path to discovering the murderer was twisted and fun. Once again, Ms. Mulhern has highlighted a issue that has continued to this day.
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  • Kimberley Cornwell
    January 1, 1970
    Another winner in this amazing series. I continue to be in awe of Mulhern's ability to infuse humor with tough societal issues!
  • Barbara Tobey
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it! Take a small step back in time prior to cell phones and digital devices. Good generational issues among the extended family, and in this case, really extended. The romance continues and so does our protagonist's penchant for finding dead bodies. Entertaining, engaging, and clever. Thanks to the publisher for providing a copy via Edelweiss.
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  • Jannelies
    January 1, 1970
    The only thing that is wrong with Julie Mulherns’ Country Club series, is that the books are a little short. I’m enjoying them immensely and I wish they would be a longer. Not that there is anything missing, mind you. Everything is just as it should be in a cozy mystery. Which is not always really cozy, because finding a dead body almost every day you can hardly call cozy, and even for Ellison it is a bit much. In this eight book in the series Ellison has to rely on her lover Anarchy a lot, almo The only thing that is wrong with Julie Mulherns’ Country Club series, is that the books are a little short. I’m enjoying them immensely and I wish they would be a longer. Not that there is anything missing, mind you. Everything is just as it should be in a cozy mystery. Which is not always really cozy, because finding a dead body almost every day you can hardly call cozy, and even for Ellison it is a bit much. In this eight book in the series Ellison has to rely on her lover Anarchy a lot, almost as much as on her trusty Mr Coffee. It all starts when Ellison discovers the body of her stockbroker, and rapidly evolves in a fast paced mystery with bodies and suspects galore. Not to mention the fact that Ellison needs time to entertain her new found half sister and several other people who really want or need her. This ranges from playing bridge to visit to a museum. What an exhausting life this Ellison leads… although her mother would like her to be more ‘ladylike’ and not find bodies all the time.Delicious. I’ve laughed a lot over this book and was sorry it ended. I’m eagerly awaiting the next one in this series. Thank you Edelweiss+ and Henery Press for a digital copy of this book.
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  • Lghiggins
    January 1, 1970
    If you are part of the Country Club set in Kansas City, Missouri, in the 1970’s, certain things are expected of you—the right clothes, the right committees, and the right friends. In Ellison Russell’s case, expectations are that she will find yet another dead body. Ellison really doesn’t want to be involved in murder investigations. She wants a simple life with her teenage daughter Grace, her art work, her country club friends, and her blossoming romance with Detective Anarchy Jones. Between bei If you are part of the Country Club set in Kansas City, Missouri, in the 1970’s, certain things are expected of you—the right clothes, the right committees, and the right friends. In Ellison Russell’s case, expectations are that she will find yet another dead body. Ellison really doesn’t want to be involved in murder investigations. She wants a simple life with her teenage daughter Grace, her art work, her country club friends, and her blossoming romance with Detective Anarchy Jones. Between being in the wrong place at the wrong time and having friends who expect her to help when they have a crisis (especially of the criminal type), Ellison’s life is anything but simple and uncomplicated.When she discovers her investment advisor murdered in a compromising position and in an office where secretaries are treated like sex objects, Ellison is drawn into an investigation in which this is just the first of several crimes to be discovered. As always in the Country Club Murder series, Back Stabbers is set in shades of harvest gold and avocado with shag rugs making an appearance. Mr. Coffee with his liquid ambrosia makes multiple appearances.Ellison’s half-sister Karma (from the “wrong side of the blankets”) pays a visit to meet her sister, and they have more in common than they would have thought. Lots of other interesting characters populate this book. The plot has humor, multiple threads, and a surprise ending. Fans of Julie Mulhern’s cozy mysteries will not be disappointed.I would like to extend my thanks to Edelweiss and to Henery Press for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Laura Reading
    January 1, 1970
    We head back to the 70s again as Ellison finds not only another dead person she knows, in a very uncomfortable position, but also new family members she was unaware of. As people are getting used to her relationship with Anarchy Jones, besides her usual sarcastic side, mother Francis finds herself defending Ellison from their social set.Fast paced and with wonderfully descriptive details of the era, the multiple plotlines weave together smoothly and in such an enjoyable way.Even if you have not We head back to the 70s again as Ellison finds not only another dead person she knows, in a very uncomfortable position, but also new family members she was unaware of. As people are getting used to her relationship with Anarchy Jones, besides her usual sarcastic side, mother Francis finds herself defending Ellison from their social set.Fast paced and with wonderfully descriptive details of the era, the multiple plotlines weave together smoothly and in such an enjoyable way.Even if you have not read previous books in this series, you will fall hard and fast for this protagonist and her predicaments.Thanks to Henery Press and Edelweiss for providing me with a copy
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  • Lynn W Stubenrauch
    January 1, 1970
    Love these books!This latest book is just as great as her others. Love the whole country club world of the 70s. The main character is so fun, spunky and quick witted. I really enjoy this series. I try not to read the books too fast. I have to deliberately put the book down so I don't read it all in one sitting. So much entertainment!
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  • Marian
    January 1, 1970
    Julie Mulhern has another hit on her hands. Ellison is once again finding bodies, but this time she’s also dealing with a half-sister she’s meeting for the first time, Grace’s rescue cat, a more serious relationship with Anarchy, and, as always, Mother.
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  • Mckenzie
    January 1, 1970
    Julie Mulhern has outdone herself, yet again! I love how she picks topics that were social issues and problems in the 70s and are in our headlines everyday in the present. This is a great read and, as always, I look forward to the next Book in this wonderful series!
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! I have enjoyed every book in this series and this was no exception!
  • Ruth Roberts
    January 1, 1970
    More fun!Serious murder mystery? Nope. But you can always pick up one of those. This series is great fun, a perfect combination of humor and mystery when you need a light read and a few laughs. Who doesn't, these days? Have you watched the evening news?😄
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Another 6 star work with a 5 star limit. This was great. I was prepared not to like Karma but I did. Glad to have her visit. Just wish they could be written as fast as I read them. If you aren’t reading this series you are missing a great chance of being entertained.
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  • Kristi
    January 1, 1970
    Loved every word.
  • Natalie Drake
    January 1, 1970
    Ellison does it again! Love the Kansas City setting and 1970s references intermingled with a murder mystery that has you in suspense til the bitter end! Ellison’s sense of humor about her overbearing mother and the ironies if country club life make it a story for all of us.
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  • Christie Marks
    January 1, 1970
    Who do you trustI absolutely love Ellison and all of her friends and family, and I'm rather fond of the 70s. Makes me sorry I wasn't raised as part of a he country club set; I had no idea what I was missing.
  • Jo Dervan
    January 1, 1970
    This is the 8th book in a series about a wealthy woman who helps solve murders. Ellison Russell, the wealthy widow of a philandering banker, had a knack for discovering dead bodies. In this story, she goes to talk to her stockbroker about her portfolio, only to find him dead in his office. Ellison would love to help her boyfriend, Kansas City Detective Anarchy Jones, solve the murder but has a problem of her own. Her half sister, Karma, has come from San Francisco to meet the Ellison’s family fo This is the 8th book in a series about a wealthy woman who helps solve murders. Ellison Russell, the wealthy widow of a philandering banker, had a knack for discovering dead bodies. In this story, she goes to talk to her stockbroker about her portfolio, only to find him dead in his office. Ellison would love to help her boyfriend, Kansas City Detective Anarchy Jones, solve the murder but has a problem of her own. Her half sister, Karma, has come from San Francisco to meet the Ellison’s family for the first time.Karma was born before Ellison’s parents married and her Dad had not married Karma’s mother. However Ellison’s socially prominent mother and father had kept the love child a secret from everyone for 40 years. Rather than cause friction at his own home, Ellison’s Dad asks her to allow Karma to stay at Ellison’s home. Soon another partner in the stock brokerage is killed as well as one of the secretaries. Everyone assumes that the 3 murders are connected but neither the police of Ellison can figure out how. Before the book ends, Ellison does find time to help Anarchy and his partner solve the mysteries.This is a cosy mystery that takes place in the 90s in Kansas City. It may seem dated to younger readers. Also those unfamiliar with Midwestern society may not be interested in this story. I found it a quick, light story unlike many of the longer mysteries that I usually read.
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