Tears of the Silenced
Surviving child abuse, parental betrayal and sexual assault. Misty Griffin's courageous life story sheds light on the hidden, untold, stories of the MeToo movement. A true crime memoir: When Misty was six years old her family started to live and dress like the Amish. Misty and her sister were kept as slaves on a mountain ranch where they were subjected to almost complete isolation, sexual abuse, and extreme physical violence. The two young girls were too terrified to escape, they also knew that no rescue would ever come because only a few people even knew they existed and they did not know them well enough to care. The strict religious clothing the family wore acted as a barrier no one was willing to breach in order to check on the girl's welfare.Amish Sexual abuse: When Misty reached her late teens, her parents feared she and her sister would escape and took them to an Amish community where they were adopted and became baptized members. Misty was devastated to once again find herself in a world of fear, animal cruelty and sexual abuse. Going to the police was severely frowned upon. A few years later, Misty was sexually assaulted by the bishop. As Misty recalls, "Amish sexual abusers are only shunned by the church for six weeks, a punishment that never seems to work. After I was assaulted by the bishop I knew I had to get help and one freezing morning in early March I made a dash for a tiny police station in rural Minnesota. After reporting the bishop I left the Amish and found myself plummeted into the strange modern world with only a second or third-grade education and no ID or social security card. To all abuse survivors out there, please be encouraged, the cycle of abuse can be broken. Today, I am a nursing student and a child abuse and sexual assault awareness activist. If you have read Educated, A Child Called It, The Sound of Gravel, or Etched In Sand, then Tears of the Silenced is a must read.

Tears of the Silenced Details

TitleTears of the Silenced
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 15th, 2018
PublisherMango
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Crime, True Crime, Amish, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography

Tears of the Silenced Review

  • John
    January 1, 1970
    I am not sure whether to consider this a novel based on several actual abuse cases, or if its an autobiographical account with lavishly embellished events created in the authors mind to demonize and project her past abuse onto the Amish with impunity because the Amish are not very likely to dispute her story. The public is not very likely to actually demand facts but far too many will read it and take it at face value with out questionI tend to lean towards the latter. I was born and raised Swar I am not sure whether to consider this a novel based on several actual abuse cases, or if its an autobiographical account with lavishly embellished events created in the authors mind to demonize and project her past abuse onto the Amish with impunity because the Amish are not very likely to dispute her story. The public is not very likely to actually demand facts but far too many will read it and take it at face value with out questionI tend to lean towards the latter. I was born and raised Swartzentruber Amish and one thing is for certain. This is NOT a true story as the author implies. There are far too many discrepancies for it to be even remotely legit in that aspect and for me to take many of her accusations serious. She has definitely suffered abuse and I am sorry she had to endure that but it doesn’t give her the right to fabricate an account and claim it to be true. I have since left the Amish but will always acknowledge the good of the community.The Swartzentrubers do not accept and raise any children from an outside family for one. They do not ‘elect’ Bishops, they are chosen by ‘lot’. There is no ‘engagement’ period in the Swartzentrubers as she suggests, and the list goes on. Hexing buggy wheels so they cant move and have to walk to church, using dark magic to open cupboards are claims so far fetched, its simply not believable to a person with any degree of logic, especially for someone that has any real knowledge of the Amish. In her narrative she was told to choose an ‘Amish’ name and then uses names like ‘Phyllis’ for her Amish characters. I never heard of an Amish person with that name, even in the more progressive groups. I mean I get it that she is trying to paint a picture to put the Amish in a bad light but she is so over the top and embellishes so badly it gets almost laughable at times. One thing I can agree with her on is the romance novels written about the Amish by non Amish authors who project their own idealistic Puritanical ideas into them try and pass them off as fact, are giving the general public a false sense of reality about Amish life.There are social and sexual deviants within the Amish as in any group. There is a need for awareness within the Amish but writing blatant sensationalism will not help that at all. As a matter of fact, I am not sure which disadvantages the abused within the Amish more, the Amish fiction that paints it as a perfect Puritanical life or this one that sensationalizes it into the fiction category and makes it totally unbelievable.The book is rather drawn out and repetitive and somewhat poorly edited. Although I am sure if she reduced it to mere fact and used a credible, mainstream publisher and left the fiction out, it would not have made enough of a story to sell. Adding the Amish element to it definitely made it more sellable and shocking. Its somewhat choppy and almost seems like it was written in parts by different personas. I found it interesting that while she was in the first section of the book where she describes ‘mama’ and Brian and all the Sadistic abuse they subjected her to, she then quoted Octave Mirbeau. I would think someone writing a book under the pretense of being an advocate for abused children would want to refrain from even mentioning MirbeauIt is difficult to believe every adult in her life was such a monster. Her plotline and events are so sketchy and vague and With the blatant discrepancies in the way she describes some things that I know because of the way I was raised, to be untrue, I really don’t know what, if anything she says, to believe. There are only several Swartzentruber settlements in Minnesota and I have uncles and cousins in each one. No one there has ever heard of her claims and with good reason. It never happened
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  • Misty Griffin
    January 1, 1970
    Breaking the silence on Amish sexual abuse. My memoir about leaving the Amish
  • Kymberli Ward
    January 1, 1970
    I give up. If this author had an horrific childhood, she has my deepest sympathies. However, this book is not only dreadful, but completely unbelievable. "Let me count the ways ..."1. Her "family" was not Amish. That she would blame that community for her trauma(s) is ridiculous and unsupported by any kind of fact. I'm sure there are cases of child abuse in Amish communities; just as there are vile cases in every strata of society. How did she end up in an Amish community anyway? To my knowledge I give up. If this author had an horrific childhood, she has my deepest sympathies. However, this book is not only dreadful, but completely unbelievable. "Let me count the ways ..."1. Her "family" was not Amish. That she would blame that community for her trauma(s) is ridiculous and unsupported by any kind of fact. I'm sure there are cases of child abuse in Amish communities; just as there are vile cases in every strata of society. How did she end up in an Amish community anyway? To my knowledge, taking in outside young people is something that is not part of that culture. I could certainly be wrong, but I don't think so. 2. Did ANYONE edit this book? The spelling, grammar, word usage, and punctuation were so bad, I had to stop mentally correcting every sentence. That was hard, as I teach remedial English and EFL.3. As another stated, I get it. The author is "tiny." How many times does the reader need to hear that? She's also perfect ... and beautiful ("pretty," in her words). I was almost nauseated by her "sweetness," not to mention her frequently commented on "kind eyes," etc. What is this? The canonization of Misty (or Emma)?4. With the lack of education the author refers to, how is it she was asked to write a column for a community newsletter? Her "wisdom" is at best, difficult to swallow. At the least, it reads as completely bogus.5. Baptism? For an outsider, and a teenager, after a short span of time? Really?And seriously? Every adult in her life is an abuser (or a "boy" who is after her)? The women are verbally and emotionally vicious (but for mommy-dearest, who, if a real person, is indeed monstrous), but every man is portrayed as an abusive monster. Yet we are to believe our hero is a magnet for babies, animals, children, ad nauseam, and escapes all of this (virtually) unscathed.I simply do not believe this book is nonfiction. At page 300+, I finally deleted it. The author needs help, no doubt, and I hope she gets it. But to pass this tripe off as a "true" book is appalling. Sorry.
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  • Spider the Doof Warrior
    January 1, 1970
    Dammit. It did not save my review! That's so annoying. I'll have to write it all over again. I swear if I have to write one more thing over again I will turn into something.Anyway, this book is painful to read. It's like trying to watch Slumdog Millionaire which I could not even handle because the child abuse would not end. I was like if one more child gets beaten and molested in this book... It made me want to jump into the book and just shoot her so-called parents who beat her endless and her Dammit. It did not save my review! That's so annoying. I'll have to write it all over again. I swear if I have to write one more thing over again I will turn into something.Anyway, this book is painful to read. It's like trying to watch Slumdog Millionaire which I could not even handle because the child abuse would not end. I was like if one more child gets beaten and molested in this book... It made me want to jump into the book and just shoot her so-called parents who beat her endless and her mother let her step father molest and beat both sisters and force them into a pseudoAmish cult.Then when they join a real group of Amish you think, oh, things will get better! Amish people are so pure and innocent right? So virtuous.But then you would be WRONG! Because there is molestation and all kinds of problems in the Amish community. But if a person molests a child they get put in the Bann for six weeks. Then the victim is forced to forgive them. Never mind THAT IT HAPPENS OVER AND OVER AGAIN!But if you're gay you'd be kicked out. But get molested and don't forgive and YOU'RE TREATED LIKE YOU COMMITTED A CRIME! They won't even get the cops involved. It's horrible.So, Misty stood up and called the cops on a man who was raping his kids, tried to rape her and then was also poisoning his wife. But she was treated like the bad guy for involving outsiders.I really hope that her so-called parents were punished somehow because they were not only abusing these kids but an elderly woman and a mentally ill woman!
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  • Jes Caruss
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I could give ZERO stars!What a crock of shite! For someone who "doesn't remember things well" because they fell head first into the mouth of a Dane at 4 and had suffered severe head injuries (don't even get me started on that flat out lie!) she sure remembers a lot, and in minute and graphic detail! And the claims of the FBI coming in and taking her from her mom and dad because they had a warrant for kidnapping, yet the parents weren't arrested? Lady, I want what ever it is that you've be I wish I could give ZERO stars!What a crock of shite! For someone who "doesn't remember things well" because they fell head first into the mouth of a Dane at 4 and had suffered severe head injuries (don't even get me started on that flat out lie!) she sure remembers a lot, and in minute and graphic detail! And the claims of the FBI coming in and taking her from her mom and dad because they had a warrant for kidnapping, yet the parents weren't arrested? Lady, I want what ever it is that you've been smoking!As someone who is a survivor of childhood abuse/sexual abuse, domestic violence who also suffers a TBI from being hit head on by a drunk driver, I have PTSD, I have borderline personality disorder stemming from the abuse, I am appalled at this clear attempt to exploit what true victims live through!She may have suffered some type of abuse, but this "true story" is a huge pile of bullshit! This is the only time I've ever said this, but SHAME ON YOU! I hope you rot in hell!
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  • andrew y
    January 1, 1970
    andrew's adventure in kindle unlimited-eligible titles, part 5:well, here it is. the top choice eligible for kindle unlimited, the obvious pinnacle of quality in the field.Trigger Warning: Expand the following field for my usual flippant tone.(view spoiler)[this might be the single worst book I have ever read. remember dave pelzer? remember saying "okay this is a little overwrought but he is helping people probably"? imagine that but now imagine the book was written with inelegant word choice at andrew's adventure in kindle unlimited-eligible titles, part 5:well, here it is. the top choice eligible for kindle unlimited, the obvious pinnacle of quality in the field.Trigger Warning: Expand the following field for my usual flippant tone.(view spoiler)[this might be the single worst book I have ever read. remember dave pelzer? remember saying "okay this is a little overwrought but he is helping people probably"? imagine that but now imagine the book was written with inelegant word choice at every turn, timelines that do not match, stupifyingly obvious falsified details hiding behind the "we are protecting the innocent!" defense while in reality plain lying, and a narrator whose imperiousness made her impossible to root for. since I am also incredibly anal about this sort of thing, a couple hours of researching caused key moments of the story to totally fall apart. yes, pelzer also stretched the truth, but not over and over with absolutely no redeeming purpose driving it. (hide spoiler)]I am sensitive to the clearly traumatic childhood Ms. Griffin underwent. But this book is not, not, not what she should be doing with her time, and any editor who cared about her would not have let it be released to the public in this form.Overall I would not recommend the kindle unlimited service.
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  • BAC
    January 1, 1970
    A fabricated tabloid like story passing as a biography. Yes, child abuse does happen in Amish communities like it does in the world at large, trust me. HOWEVER using a sad aspect of humanity to sell books for your own gain not only takes away the attention and support for those who are abused but only make people less likely to believe those in Amish communities who come forward looking for help.From her claims to have a GED but yet failed the math section (Trust me, GED testing doesn't allow fo A fabricated tabloid like story passing as a biography. Yes, child abuse does happen in Amish communities like it does in the world at large, trust me. HOWEVER using a sad aspect of humanity to sell books for your own gain not only takes away the attention and support for those who are abused but only make people less likely to believe those in Amish communities who come forward looking for help.From her claims to have a GED but yet failed the math section (Trust me, GED testing doesn't allow for failure in ANY aspect and yet still give GED certifications) to claims of black magic to curse people's buggies, everything is suspect. Even the inner workings of everyday Amish life are wrong in the details. Bishops are chosen by blind lot, not chosen or elected to a position, for example. SHe claims to have been adopted in to her community but adoption from the outside isn't something that Swartzentruber Amish do, ever. The beatings she claims to have endured, including heavy whippings from a thick strap belt multiple times a day for days on end, would have easily killed an adult let alone a small child.I don't doubt that the author might have been abused in some way, at some point, in her Amish community (assuming she even WAS part of a community). But if that's the case then it's been spun in to a ridiculously farcical sensationalist tale for her own gain and all that does is make it MUCH harder for those going through abuse to get the credibility they need in order to find a way out.
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  • Barbikat60
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to cry but I couldn't. This is a powerful book about child abuse and how abusers get away with their crimes. I'm glad the author escaped her misery but my heart aches for all of those who cannot escape their tormentors. A few Summers back, I attended a demonstration against a Satmar male therapist who molested a young girl under his professional care. Amish and Hasidic communities are insular and nobody talks about abuse. The government can't interfere allegedly but all these fundamenta I wanted to cry but I couldn't. This is a powerful book about child abuse and how abusers get away with their crimes. I'm glad the author escaped her misery but my heart aches for all of those who cannot escape their tormentors. A few Summers back, I attended a demonstration against a Satmar male therapist who molested a young girl under his professional care. Amish and Hasidic communities are insular and nobody talks about abuse. The government can't interfere allegedly but all these fundamentalist groups can get money from the government. That is unacceptable and they have to be held accountable for the damage they have inflicted on so many children and adults. I hope more books like this are published so that that the truth can set the victims free.
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  • Cathi Deal
    January 1, 1970
    Horrifying!For years now we have romanticized the Amish as a group of people who have gone back to the basics in the most complete sense. That view almost precludes us from taking an in-depth look at what they are truly like, and some of the novels about Amish life hints at the dark side but fail to reveal what may be the actual truth. Over the last few years, differing views have been shown on television, and they caused me to choose Misty's book.It is almost implausible that not one of the gov Horrifying!For years now we have romanticized the Amish as a group of people who have gone back to the basics in the most complete sense. That view almost precludes us from taking an in-depth look at what they are truly like, and some of the novels about Amish life hints at the dark side but fail to reveal what may be the actual truth. Over the last few years, differing views have been shown on television, and they caused me to choose Misty's book.It is almost implausible that not one of the government entities that were sending her mother checks over the years ever picked up on what these young children were going through, and criminal that Brian's mother and Misty's aunt had to live in that situation. That over twenty years should go by is just unthinkable! That it took a wolf to warn her and a parolee to save her is an interesting counter and yet a shame. Misty's story is a tribute to the human spirit, but that the family that brought this to a culmination was able to flee to Canada is disgusting. Corporal punishment that is hidden by long skirts, attempted murder, rape and molestation should not be subject to the borders of another country. Thank God for the family that took her in and helped her escape that life! I hope Misty continues wIth her plans for a foundation to help others in this situation, because it appears that the government and law enforcement doesn't do what they should. This should be required reading for youth and social workers living near communities such as this. Welfare organizations should. Have to see and to interact with children ho are in Misty's situation. That she could have fallen through as many cracks as she did is criminal. That she was unable to help her aunt is worse. Had even one person done their job, this wouldn't have happened. Sad!
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Probably not fair to rate this book, but I stopped after reading only the very beginning. Something does not feel right in the telling. I am not at all discounting the author's experience - it is her own. That said, I acknowledge my own discomfort while reading it, and that, along with the unrelenting narrative of abuse has made me decide to put it down. I have read other books of survivors (I.e Glass Castle) that were much more readable, better edited, and rang truer to the writer's experience Probably not fair to rate this book, but I stopped after reading only the very beginning. Something does not feel right in the telling. I am not at all discounting the author's experience - it is her own. That said, I acknowledge my own discomfort while reading it, and that, along with the unrelenting narrative of abuse has made me decide to put it down. I have read other books of survivors (I.e Glass Castle) that were much more readable, better edited, and rang truer to the writer's experience - or so it seemed. I do not recommend this book.
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  • Liz Kauffman
    January 1, 1970
    Tears of the SilencedI read your book, my heart goes out to you and your Sister.You are a true example of taking your tragedies and making them into stepping stones!I am so glad you wrote your book, the outsiders need to know being Amish is not all a bed of roses.I am so proud of you for taking a stand against the Bishop and the other Ministers, that Bishop and some of the others need to be thrown in jail and throw away the key!Have you heard from your Sister?<3 God Bless You <3
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  • Andrea Ginn Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Tragic, sure. Well written, nope. Plenty of odd phrasing and moments to indicate perhaps less than authentic. I finished it because I finish things.
  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    1, Not believable. Not worth wasting my time to review. Other negative reviews pretty much sum things up.2.Poorly edited -- typos all over the place
  • J.P. Willson
    January 1, 1970
    This was an extremely difficult book to read. Not simply because of the content which in places was brutal but also because of the repetitiveness of the abuse. I do understand that this kind of abuse should not be tolerated under any circumstances but once having established the brutality of such there was no need to repeat the same thing over and over just because it happened over the course of many years. The first 150 or so pages were the same thing as the girls grew older the abuse continued This was an extremely difficult book to read. Not simply because of the content which in places was brutal but also because of the repetitiveness of the abuse. I do understand that this kind of abuse should not be tolerated under any circumstances but once having established the brutality of such there was no need to repeat the same thing over and over just because it happened over the course of many years. The first 150 or so pages were the same thing as the girls grew older the abuse continued, I get that, the title tells that quite well.Yes I did put the book down many times. I am aware abuse happens in every kind of community on the face of the planet- it's just the way it is. I do have a bit of a hard time believing though, the extent of the sexual abuse the author describes within the Amish community and nothing is done about it.Quite apparently the author has suffered for many years and for that I feel for her and her sister, this should not happen to anyone, anywhere, ever. Truthfully I think this book was much too long, too repetitive and at times, I believe, somewhat colourfully enhanced as to the life of the Amish. Of this I can never be certain as I am not Amish, yet I am also a "creative non-fiction" writer.
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  • Glen
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book, mainly because I went through an abusive childhood and I was intrigued by the Amish angle. I wanted to know about the abuse she endured as well as how she got to a place where she could write about her experience.I am not Amish, nor do I know about the Amish in any great detail. I do have Mennonite co-workers and friends. My wife and I, with her brother and wife visited 'Amish' country in Ohio and in the hustle and bustle of my normal life, I will say that I liked what I saw an I read this book, mainly because I went through an abusive childhood and I was intrigued by the Amish angle. I wanted to know about the abuse she endured as well as how she got to a place where she could write about her experience.I am not Amish, nor do I know about the Amish in any great detail. I do have Mennonite co-workers and friends. My wife and I, with her brother and wife visited 'Amish' country in Ohio and in the hustle and bustle of my normal life, I will say that I liked what I saw and wanted to jump out of the car and join them. Before I gather thoughts on writing a review I looked at other reviews on goodreads, some of which I could both agree with and some disagree with. One person brought up the 'fact' that the Amish don't take in anyone outside their culture, but I have read an article (National Geographic?), where people were able to become members of the community. According to the article it is very rare but possible. Another person, indicated that in his (Amish) community, Bishops were not elected but were chosen by lot. I believe Misty indicated that the Bishops were chosen by lot, in that several men were recommended (elected?) and given bibles where one bible had a slip of paper indicate the bearer was to become a Bishop. The reviewer also condemned the superstition/witchcraft angle of her Amish district. I know nothing about that but must make observation that there is a history of hex symbols painted on barns and many are reproduced and are for sale to the 'English'. What is the origins of the need for hex symbols? Maybe they are not any superstitions as a part of life now, but there was a time that they were. The hex signs did not come out of a vacuum, even if they are now considered endearing folk art, which is part of the Amish charm. I am sure googling the subject will bring about a lot of information, but I have said enough, I just wanted to make a couple of observations. Already, I put more work in this review then I intended.The book did capture my imagination and I read through it in a very short time. Like others have observed, editing seem non-existent. I kept asking myself what was the point on repeating this or that aspect of her life. When she announced at the beginning of a chapter how her life was about to change for the worst (again), I didn't feel that it did. Significant was when Brian tried to kill her, and later when the Bishop assaulted her under the barn. The beatings when she and her sister were young were brutal to say the least, but she did not indicate that there was any in the Amish community, and her negative experiences seemed more like 'the growing pains' of becoming Amish. Except that she was very leery of what intentions her Amish father may have on her, she didn't report anything more than his desire to be alone with her and her Amish mother's jealousy. What is factual and what may be an exaggeration? I don't know. Why even bring up the subject of the Bishop and bestiality? She made no direct observations of the Bishop pursuing this. The author claims to be on the short end of the education spectrum, but I feel that she may have been emphasizing the wrong things in the structure of her writing. Is she going to hell if she rejects the Amish way? She said she knew more about the Bible than the Bishop did, the biblical answer was there for her to grasp and process. She regretted her need to leave the Amish community, but as she revealed what she went through before she was accepted by the Amish, there had to be a overwhelming need for family. She expressed multiple times how she and her sister did not know what normalcy was outside her mother and step-father's control.As already indicated, there was a lot about this story that did not make sense. It is suspicious that Misty has a very balance and perfect view of herself and what is required to be a halfway decent person, but she writes about her many pleas to God and these attributes may have been passed on as part of her faith. There are things that need to be elaborated on. Cases of abuse often takes on forms that never makes sense. As an abuse survivor, I will say I am hyperaware of the possibility of abuse in everything I observe. Misty indicated her suspicions in the things she observed. I am unhappy that she reports no consequences or actions against her mother and stepdad by herself or the authorities. In my own case of abuse, even with clear proof and other victims coming forward, not much was done to my abuser. I blame that on the attitudes at that time and the lack of clear-cut actions that needed to be implemented by law enforcement and state agencys.I liked the book. I would not recommend that you don't read the book, but it could have been written more concisely and with more thought towards the many questions her account of her abuse would generate from reading it.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    While I don't doubt what is written in this book is true, I also don't consider it typical of most of the Amish. Also, what happened with Brian and Misty's mother is most definitively not typical of the Amish as I would not consider them Amish, more like people pretending to be Amish and adopting some of their customs. Brian and his wife seem more like lazy, system beaters with sadistic personalities. I did find the book interesting and sad, but it was the most poorly edited e-book I have ever r While I don't doubt what is written in this book is true, I also don't consider it typical of most of the Amish. Also, what happened with Brian and Misty's mother is most definitively not typical of the Amish as I would not consider them Amish, more like people pretending to be Amish and adopting some of their customs. Brian and his wife seem more like lazy, system beaters with sadistic personalities. I did find the book interesting and sad, but it was the most poorly edited e-book I have ever read.
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  • Phyllis Stinson
    January 1, 1970
    HumWhether this is true or not, I personally have never read any such thing. I imagine rape happens every where but to believe the Amish would be that cruel to the victim and easy on the rapist is really over the top. I couldn't read it all. Just because they say it is true, doesn't make it so.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    Oh it was awful, awful, awful what Misty had to endure as a child and words cannot describe how it sickened and angered it made me. I could hardly put the book down as I waited impatiently to find how she ever got out of he ordeal. Instead it seemed to go from bad to worse. First she and her sister, along with a mentally handicapped aunt and a grandmother with dementia, were horribly abused by her mother and step-father. Then has teenagers the girls were sent to live in an Amish community. Their Oh it was awful, awful, awful what Misty had to endure as a child and words cannot describe how it sickened and angered it made me. I could hardly put the book down as I waited impatiently to find how she ever got out of he ordeal. Instead it seemed to go from bad to worse. First she and her sister, along with a mentally handicapped aunt and a grandmother with dementia, were horribly abused by her mother and step-father. Then has teenagers the girls were sent to live in an Amish community. Their parents had made them dress and act like Amish most of their lives. Things were just as evil over there as the harsh religion covered up all the atrocities the people were capable of doing. They made it look so peaceful on the outside that when Misty finally went to the police they had a hard time believing her. It made me so angry that the Amish were more concerned about their stupid rules then about protecting the victims of horrible crimes. I was so proud that Misty stood up for what she believed and refused to back down even if got her in serious trouble. I am so pleased that she was able to expose the truth and is now pursuing her dreams. I was very impressed with her faith in God and marveled that she could live her convictions despite so much opposition. She is an inspiration and I pray that she will continue to allow God to use her to be a blessing to others.
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  • Toni Marie
    January 1, 1970
    Truly amazing story! Everyone should read this story and learn from the author, Misty Griffin.This book is educational, moving, and mostly inspirational. This is a novel every person should be required to read before being a teacher, a police office, a government employee that works with people. This books will open your eyes to the cults of the world and make people realize that an individual's image is not what a person really is, but what the want you to see. The live that Misty and her siste Truly amazing story! Everyone should read this story and learn from the author, Misty Griffin.This book is educational, moving, and mostly inspirational. This is a novel every person should be required to read before being a teacher, a police office, a government employee that works with people. This books will open your eyes to the cults of the world and make people realize that an individual's image is not what a person really is, but what the want you to see. The live that Misty and her sister had to endure is heartbreaking to say the least! And the fact that no one would help or believe her after the fact is a travesty. Shame on those people. Upon learning that the training and lifestyles of the Amish are based on a man's needs and wants, will not only open your eyes to see that they are cults. They don't even follow the words of the bible, but authoritatively "Hush" those that question anything. The sadness, pain, and abusive doings of people in our world will be the end of man and women kind, our innocent suffer, and many go without punishment or justice. Not everyone can be a good person, but those people that are good, can try and help. And I believe this is what Misty Griffin was trying to convey to her readers! I pray that there was justice in this case.
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  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a self-published book, which became apparent after only a few chapters. I verified that and then read with great skepticism because with self-publication there is no fact checker. I don't totally disbelieve the verbal and physical abuse, but I don't fully believe it either. Memory is too fluid and easily changed by things which occurred before or after the event, but suddenly seem in one's memory of have happened on the same day. I'm not Amish nor ever lived near an Amish group, but I ha This is a self-published book, which became apparent after only a few chapters. I verified that and then read with great skepticism because with self-publication there is no fact checker. I don't totally disbelieve the verbal and physical abuse, but I don't fully believe it either. Memory is too fluid and easily changed by things which occurred before or after the event, but suddenly seem in one's memory of have happened on the same day. I'm not Amish nor ever lived near an Amish group, but I have read several things about the Amish and many of her memories of Amish life don't seem correct to what I have read. I would not recommend that anyone read this book without a healthy dose of skepticism.
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  • julie
    January 1, 1970
    This was unbelievable story. Made me sad,angry for any abuse especially to children. This is an old an always a prayer to God This is always a prayer to God to stop any harm to children. It is unbelievable a parent can be so bad an let another hurt your child like this. I have come to realise humans are evil. I am thankful that she was so brave and finally got a break. She is certainly an inspiration an I hope more come to realise this is so wrong to hurt an abuse anyone. Thank you and may you o This was unbelievable story. Made me sad,angry for any abuse especially to children. This is an old an always a prayer to God This is always a prayer to God to stop any harm to children. It is unbelievable a parent can be so bad an let another hurt your child like this. I have come to realise humans are evil. I am thankful that she was so brave and finally got a break. She is certainly an inspiration an I hope more come to realise this is so wrong to hurt an abuse anyone. Thank you and may you only know happiness.
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  • cimona
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing and heartbreakingI started reading the free few chapters. Usually when I do I don't buy the book. This one I did. I shed tears in shock about what the author and her sister went through with her mom and step dad. It's just evil. But how she never lost hope or faith is inspiring. Then when she thought they were free by joining Amish community and turns out that she traded one horror for a different one. Misty is a fighter for what's right. And she never gave that up.
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  • Kanika Gupta
    January 1, 1970
    My first insight into the Amish culture but not the very first in sexual abuse.Misty- people like you are an inspiration to everyone and not just the ones who are abused. Experiences like yours help us appreciate the most common things in our life.Thank you for turning the lifetime of horrible abuse into something that can inspire the readers.
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  • Kathy Koehn
    January 1, 1970
    My reviewVery Good book. Sad and riveting. I was also once a member of a group who covers up abuse. :(
  • Catherine Watson
    January 1, 1970
    I found this book absolutely fantastic, I couldn't put it down until I was finished! The events that unfolded were tragic, but unfortunately not surprising. It's always so horrible to hear good people suffering at the hands of evil, Amish community aside. No matter the religion, there will always be people there to try and abuse it for their own gain and to manipulate. I was elated when Misty left the church, and felt so proud of her for going to the police. I've read some review complaining abo I found this book absolutely fantastic, I couldn't put it down until I was finished! The events that unfolded were tragic, but unfortunately not surprising. It's always so horrible to hear good people suffering at the hands of evil, Amish community aside. No matter the religion, there will always be people there to try and abuse it for their own gain and to manipulate. I was elated when Misty left the church, and felt so proud of her for going to the police. I've read some review complaining about the demensions of the characters, but I don't think they're truly taking into consideration the difficulty one encounters when writing about the horrors of their own lives. To do so at all is commendable, but to make it successful, with a strong narrative in which results in a popular book? Downright extraordinary. To the Amish that are complaining about the book, it's clearly stated that Misty isn't condemning the Amish, but rather those who try to take advantage of the system. Fantastic read by a fantastic author. Whilst everyone is more than entitled to their own opinion, if anyone is in strict denial about the events of this book, please proceed to fight me.
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    I won't be reading any more of those sweet little fiction "Inspirational Amish" paperbacks I was so fond of. My blinders are off! I no longer idealize the Amish as BIBLE QUOTING, Bible following people. NO! EVERYONE SHOULD READ THIS BOOK! From 0-22% of the story Misty is raised by psychopaths/criminals who are running from the law and still obtaining benefits. They pose as Amish, dress it, but aren't part of the Amish community at all and live isolated up in the mountains. The girls are horrific I won't be reading any more of those sweet little fiction "Inspirational Amish" paperbacks I was so fond of. My blinders are off! I no longer idealize the Amish as BIBLE QUOTING, Bible following people. NO! EVERYONE SHOULD READ THIS BOOK! From 0-22% of the story Misty is raised by psychopaths/criminals who are running from the law and still obtaining benefits. They pose as Amish, dress it, but aren't part of the Amish community at all and live isolated up in the mountains. The girls are horrifically abused. They look Amish so no one gets involved to help the girls. Extremely sad and disturbing. Looking Amish makes the parents golden-they can do no wrong.At 22% Misty is given over to a real Amish family and community where she also encounters unbelievable ABUSE! I learned the Amish don't care about quoting the Bible-don't even read it! (in those sweet little inspiration Amish books they are always quoting the book and talking about love and kindness) The Amish are only concerned about THEIR OWN CREATED "bible" and FOLLOWING THEIR OWN CREATED RULES! It's all about their rules and you better not think for yourself. Sex crimes such as fathers raping daughters, brothers raping sisters, and even grandfathers raping grandchildren and guess what! NOBODY cares! if a victim speaks up or shows emotional distress they are PUNISHED! They punish the victim. the perpetrator is allowed to continue the behavior forever basically. Husbands have tried killing wives, animals are tortured for the fun of it-I learned the Amish do not believe in pets (in the Inspirational Amish books they are always so sweet to animals). They see animals are objects only. Really horrible.I also learned that the Amish practice black magic and witchcraft and believe in curses and chants. This shocked me the most since they are portrayed as the most conservative Christians. Unbelievable. Misty was not allowed to read Bible. They really don't care about what Jesus preached. This girl was challenged AGAINST the Bible every time she tried to speak up they would shoot down the Bible for their own "bible" wow. I am still really shocked. I no longer want to visit some sweet little Amish community and buy their baked goods. No thanks. Child abusers belong in prison and these Amish people should not be allowed to be set apart and outside the law! I admire Misty Griffin and wish her all the best with the rest of her life.
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  • Jeannie
    January 1, 1970
    This book I would title "The Other Side of Forgiveness" , as it tells the story of a strict Amish sect in Wisconsin who insists that men (even deacons or bishops) who sexually abuse children and adolescents, or unmarried girls, must confess their sin. This is usually iin general terms, such as "I committed a sin of the flesh"--then, because of their confession, the church, victim and all, are bound to forgive them. The victim gets no relief, as the abuser is put under the Bann (shunned for a per This book I would title "The Other Side of Forgiveness" , as it tells the story of a strict Amish sect in Wisconsin who insists that men (even deacons or bishops) who sexually abuse children and adolescents, or unmarried girls, must confess their sin. This is usually iin general terms, such as "I committed a sin of the flesh"--then, because of their confession, the church, victim and all, are bound to forgive them. The victim gets no relief, as the abuser is put under the Bann (shunned for a period of time) but stays in his own home, meaning his wife and kids still have to be accessible to him, if they are the ones he is abusing. Also, they do not allow church members to go to outside authorities, such as the local police because "it's not our way". If the police are called in, it is difficult for them to obtain evidence. They are reluctant, in the name of "religious liberty" to lift dresses to look at other parts of the body than those that are showing. The person who goes to the police takes a heavy toll themselves in terms of disapproval, maybe shunning themselves, for going against what is considered to be a matter of "discipline" for the church. All in all, a very educational book, about strict conservative views, told in a well-written manner. One grows to admire the author tremendously, for her strength and ability to stand up for herself and take what the church dishes out. The early part of the story is of she and her sister's (Samantha) growing up years on a mountain-top, isolated, with cruel, even sadistic parents. Her sister was so broken by this experience of growing up that she saw the Amish church as a wonderful place, simply because she was safe, fed well, and appreciated for her work ethic. Even then, however, the two girls were suspect by the community, because they had not grown up in it, and Samantha was forced to marry someone who was seen by the community as poor marriage material because he was only five feet tall, and could not work as hard as the other men. The exposures go on and on, and for a while I thought I could not continue reading, but in the end, one is inspired by the resilience of Misty, the older sister, almost, but never, did give up. A remarkable story of bravery. I only have a beef with the proof editing, as there are many places where small words are left out or misplaced. It is never hard to tell the meaning, but disconcerting, nevertheless.
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  • Patsy
    January 1, 1970
    Secrets in the Amish lifestyle...to be punished for trying to stop a bad person was like being punched in the stomach after saying a person from drowning"Very descriptive true story of 2 sisters life being raised Amish lifestyle by mental ill mother and step dad. The oldest (the author) begins to rebel at age 14 for the isolation, daily whipping, abuse, brainwashing, starvation and hard labor they have done since small age. She threatens to report all and the government checks they receive would Secrets in the Amish lifestyle...to be punished for trying to stop a bad person was like being punched in the stomach after saying a person from drowning"Very descriptive true story of 2 sisters life being raised Amish lifestyle by mental ill mother and step dad. The oldest (the author) begins to rebel at age 14 for the isolation, daily whipping, abuse, brainwashing, starvation and hard labor they have done since small age. She threatens to report all and the government checks they receive would stop. No education she has no way to escape. She has learned to read and has a secret friend that hides books for her. She is placed in a Amish community willing to take her in as a future wife. Believing it has to be the only way she and sister can start a new life she agrees. Again she is abused by a male member. Learning of other sex abuses she learns how many can get away with just a church confession, a shunning and no police action. She rebels again and contacts police ending her world as she knows it and separated from her sister who has also joined and is engaged. With no ID, education and only her hard working ethic she starts a new life with a English friend and step Aunts help.
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  • Maureen Shields Jacobs
    January 1, 1970
    Gripping & Absolutely Eye OpeningWhile I realize that not all Amish sects are like this, being an insular community, things are rarely brought to light. Ms. Griffin made the correlation with cults. I find that the perfect comparison. I respect the right to religious freedom and outsiders should respect the traditions and customs of the Amish and not interfere. However, when crimes occur, there needs to be accountability and many agencies fear reprisals so they do not get involved. I feel tha Gripping & Absolutely Eye OpeningWhile I realize that not all Amish sects are like this, being an insular community, things are rarely brought to light. Ms. Griffin made the correlation with cults. I find that the perfect comparison. I respect the right to religious freedom and outsiders should respect the traditions and customs of the Amish and not interfere. However, when crimes occur, there needs to be accountability and many agencies fear reprisals so they do not get involved. I feel that if more victims spoke out, less of this would happen. In certain situations, the offenders have no punishment and the victims almost always are "punished" for speaking out. The world isn't perfect. Many folks want to see the best in people. I've learned that most folks aren't within sin. Temporary faltering or inherently bad. Who knows? Ms. Griffin was truly a victim. Starting her life was no picnic, the vulnerabilities were attacked and she knew nothing else of the world. She is indeed a brave soul for breaking through the fear that many religions, cults, etc have placed upon their communities. Kudos to her for making a huge step and then using her difficult past to shape her today and her future. Read it. Have a box of tissues, it is rather eye opening.
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  • Koren
    January 1, 1970
    This book reminded me of A Child Called It. It is just page after page of intense abuse by this girl's mother and her boyfriend. They were not Amish but posed as Amish as a way to keep people from investigating them. Later her and her sister were sent to an Amish community when they became too big for the parents to beat. So there is a lot of Amish customs to learn from this book. I did not read the reviews for this book until I was done, which I was glad. When I read this book there were some t This book reminded me of A Child Called It. It is just page after page of intense abuse by this girl's mother and her boyfriend. They were not Amish but posed as Amish as a way to keep people from investigating them. Later her and her sister were sent to an Amish community when they became too big for the parents to beat. So there is a lot of Amish customs to learn from this book. I did not read the reviews for this book until I was done, which I was glad. When I read this book there were some things that just didn't seem true. For one thing, when she was little it just seemed like she was wise beyond her years, especially when it came to medical things. Also, she seems to read a lot into what other people's thoughts are. I thought the incident with the dog was a little weird. There are a lot of comments from people that know the Amish traditions and they commented that some of the things that happened did not match what they knew about the Amish. There are a lot of comments from people thinking this book is not entirely factual. I tend to agree.
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