Let’s Call It a Doomsday
There are so many ways the world could end. There could be a fire. A catastrophic flood. A super eruption that spews lakes of lava. Ellis Kimball has made note of all possible scenarios, and she is prepared for each one. What she doesn’t expect is meeting Hannah Marks in her therapist’s waiting room. Hannah calls their meeting fate. After all, Ellis is scared about the end of the world; Hannah knows when it’s going to happen.Despite Ellis’s anxiety — about what others think of her, about what she’s doing wrong, about the safety of her loved ones — the two girls become fast friends. As Ellis tries to help Hannah decipher the details of her doomsday premonition, she learns there are secrets Hannah isn’t telling her. But with time ticking down, the search for answers only raises more questions. When does it happen? Who will believe them? How do you prepare for the end of the world when it feels like your life is just getting started?Katie Henry, the author of Heretics Anonymous, delivers an engrossing and thoughtful tale about how people survive — with some faith in family, friends, and maybe a few prepper forums.

Let’s Call It a Doomsday Details

TitleLet’s Call It a Doomsday
Author
ReleaseAug 6th, 2019
PublisherKatherine Tegen Books
ISBN-139780062698926
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Health, Mental Health, Young Adult Contemporary

Let’s Call It a Doomsday Review

  • Kales
    January 1, 1970
    Let me start off this review by saying this is a great depiction of GAD. As someone with GAD, I thought Henry's portrayal of it with Ellis's inner voice and her journey through therapy were good. I read it and related strongly with the vast majority of Ellis's struggles. I was impressed.Henry also had a great insight into the Mormon religion. Unfortunately, as a religion, Mormonism gets a bad rap. Admittedly, I am limited in my knowledge of this particular religion (it is limited to THE BOOK OF Let me start off this review by saying this is a great depiction of GAD. As someone with GAD, I thought Henry's portrayal of it with Ellis's inner voice and her journey through therapy were good. I read it and related strongly with the vast majority of Ellis's struggles. I was impressed.Henry also had a great insight into the Mormon religion. Unfortunately, as a religion, Mormonism gets a bad rap. Admittedly, I am limited in my knowledge of this particular religion (it is limited to THE BOOK OF MORMON, I am sorry to say). However this family and Ellis herself were great, unparodied insight into Mormonism. I definitely learned a lot.I also liked the said characters of Sam and Theo. I wish we got more of them. I also am going to steal that Five-Word Books game! I totally would have been that kid in high school who played that.Once again, Henry put a focus on family relations and the complicated notions of them. I am grateful for that portrayal in YA because I think it is wholly underrated. It was relatable and unique and something, I think, needs to be addressed. Critiques and approval from parents is huge for children, especially teenagers! And Henry does a good job of add that level to the story.My biggest issue with this book was Hannah. Ironically, I lost faith in that storyline but Henry turned it around in the end and made it worthwhile. I ended up liking it but I couldn't stand the manipulative nature of Hannah. Honestly, that has to do with my history in toxic relationships and being manipulated in similar ways. I saw that signs and it made me uncomfortable reading about Hannah and Ellis's relationship. It was torturous to get through those spots -- not gonna lie. This is proof that Henry is a YA author to watch out for, writing unique stories with entertainment and faith and family and friendship and self-discovery at the center. She's becoming an insta-buy author for me.Conclusion: Buy in Hardcover
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  • Lacey D-Bell
    January 1, 1970
    RTC.
  • Cassandra {semi-hiatus}
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this! Exactly what I was hoping for from the brains that brought me one of my truest loves, Heretics Anonymous.
  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Ellis suffers from Generalized Anxiety Disorder. One day, when leaving her therapist's office, she meets Hannah who tells her that the end of the world is coming and that she's seen that they'll be together on that day. Ellis believes her, but will anyone else?Without having direct personal experience with either of these, this seems like a thoughtful and well-executed depiction of both clinical anxiety and Mormonism. With a quirky cast of characters (a la John Green) and a well-paced plot, this Ellis suffers from Generalized Anxiety Disorder. One day, when leaving her therapist's office, she meets Hannah who tells her that the end of the world is coming and that she's seen that they'll be together on that day. Ellis believes her, but will anyone else?Without having direct personal experience with either of these, this seems like a thoughtful and well-executed depiction of both clinical anxiety and Mormonism. With a quirky cast of characters (a la John Green) and a well-paced plot, this was hard to put down. My one possible issue is that it seems to tie up a little too neatly? But I really loved this. After two great books, Katie Henry is definitely now on my list.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I adore this book. Perfectly drawn characters facing real life battles of faith, family, mental health, and sexuality with both humor and gravitas. I have more passages highlighted in this book than any other book I've ever read. Both youth and adults will be completely immersed on this path to discovering identity."I’ve only been given one body. I’ve only been given one brain, miswired and odd and mine. But my voice—not just what spills over my vocal cords and into the world, but the things I s I adore this book. Perfectly drawn characters facing real life battles of faith, family, mental health, and sexuality with both humor and gravitas. I have more passages highlighted in this book than any other book I've ever read. Both youth and adults will be completely immersed on this path to discovering identity."I’ve only been given one body. I’ve only been given one brain, miswired and odd and mine. But my voice—not just what spills over my vocal cords and into the world, but the things I say to myself—that’s something I get to claim for myself. I’ll always hear it, but that doesn’t mean I’m doomed to hear what I’ve heard before. There are so many words in this world. I can learn new ones."Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the Advanced Reader copy.
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  • Lukyan's Library
    January 1, 1970
    This book was sent to me as a physical ARC from HarperCollins Publishers in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own and were not influenced by me being sent this novel. It comes out on August 9, 2019.A really enjoyable contemporary bookCW: Mentions and goes into great detail of possible apocalypse scenarios.One of the things I really enjoyed about this story is the involvement of the family in this book. Often in YA books, I feel that parents and other family members This book was sent to me as a physical ARC from HarperCollins Publishers in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own and were not influenced by me being sent this novel. It comes out on August 9, 2019.A really enjoyable contemporary bookCW: Mentions and goes into great detail of possible apocalypse scenarios.One of the things I really enjoyed about this story is the involvement of the family in this book. Often in YA books, I feel that parents and other family members are not included, sometimes for the sake of the story, but most of the times not. I really loved seeing the dynamic between the main character Ellis and her mother, and I thought some parts were very relatable. I think the development of their relationship was also very interesting and the progression of it was something I continued to look forward to throughout the novel.I also really enjoyed the positivity of therapists. Once again, often times in YA stories, therapists are seen as bad people who complicate issues, and they tend to get a very bad rep in young adult stories whether it is in a contemporary setting or not. I think that Ellis had a good relationship with her therapist, and didn't dislike her in the narrative. The writing was great as I expected after reading Heretics Anonymous over the summer. I did think that this book was a little less funny than Heretics Anonymous and more serious.As a person who is also worried about the world spontaneously ending, I related a lot to the main character, Ellis. She had a lot of paragraphs in the book that really resonated with me that I tabbed in the book. I have many tabs in the book that I will go over in my spoiler-filled review that will be posted at the time of the book's release. The anxiety representation in this book was really well done. I think Katie Henry REALLY did her research on mental illness and wanted to depict an accurate presentation of anxiety. I think something that was really great is that Ellis wasn't upset about her mental illness. Every time her mother or the rest of her family told to her to stop being anxious or worried about doomsday, she didn't back down and never felt as if she was ashamed about her anxiety, which I thought was great, and an amazing portrayal of mental illness.A critic that I had was with Hannah. I thought she was very manipulative to Ellis who is vulnerable and impressionable. I also thought that Hannah wanted to seem nice with the "good deeds" she did. But, I felt as if she was only performing "good deeds" to make herself seem like a good person. To me, Hannah felt as if she was a liar, and didn't have good intentions with Ellis. I think she wanted to use her just to get her way, and the development of her character continued to make me dislike her. Another critic was the ending. Specifically, the ending for Hannah, which I feel could be a product of me not taking a liking to her character. I think her story was wrapped up too nicely in a neat ribbon, despite the bad things she did throughout the novel, specifically to Ellis. I also thought that Ellis kept going back to Hannah, and trying to be there for her, even though Hannah was NEVER there for her.Overall, LET'S CALL IT A DOOMSDAY was a fantastic novel, and my only problem was the ending and the character of Hannah. Would really recommend.
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  • Kelli Cross
    January 1, 1970
    Ellis has General Anxiety Disorder and her life revolves around what if's. What if an earthquake strikes, what if there's a tsunami, what if a volcano erupts and covers the world in ash? Ellis is very concerned about the end of the world. So when she meets a girl who tells her she knows when it's going to happen, Ellis decides to go all in.Katie Henry's depiction of GAD was spot-on (to me, personally). Anxiety Disorder is a spiteful voice telling you all of the things you're doing wrong. And it' Ellis has General Anxiety Disorder and her life revolves around what if's. What if an earthquake strikes, what if there's a tsunami, what if a volcano erupts and covers the world in ash? Ellis is very concerned about the end of the world. So when she meets a girl who tells her she knows when it's going to happen, Ellis decides to go all in.Katie Henry's depiction of GAD was spot-on (to me, personally). Anxiety Disorder is a spiteful voice telling you all of the things you're doing wrong. And it's a constant state of worrying, even over seemingly intangible things like the end of the world.This is the second book I've read from her where religion plays a major part. Ellis is a Mormon, and while her family is fairly liberal for the church, the rules of the church are also the family's foundation. Sometimes religion can be a little tricky to write about, but just like with Heretic's Anonymous, I felt like Henry handled it respectfully.There were some small problems I had with the character development, but it was mostly fine-tuning stuff that I think we'll see in the final product. Hannah was hard to like - I tried to be sympathetic, because she did have a rough time of it. But mostly I was just frustrated with the character. I also loved Sam and Theo, but they felt very much like secondary characters. Overall, I think a little fleshing out would benefit some of the background characters.Thanks to Edelweiss and Katherine Tegen Books for providing me with an Advanced Reader Copy.
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  • Crossroads Library
    January 1, 1970
    Actual Rating: 4.75Ellis has General Anxiety Disorder and her life revolves around what if's. What if an earthquake strikes, what if there's a tsunami, what if a volcano erupts and covers the world in ash? Ellis is very concerned about the end of the world. So when she meets a girl who tells her she knows when it's going to happen, Ellis decides to go all in.Katie Henry's depiction of GAD was spot-on (to me, personally). Anxiety Disorder is a spiteful voice telling you all of the things you're d Actual Rating: 4.75Ellis has General Anxiety Disorder and her life revolves around what if's. What if an earthquake strikes, what if there's a tsunami, what if a volcano erupts and covers the world in ash? Ellis is very concerned about the end of the world. So when she meets a girl who tells her she knows when it's going to happen, Ellis decides to go all in.Katie Henry's depiction of GAD was spot-on (to me, personally). Anxiety Disorder is a spiteful voice telling you all of the things you're doing wrong. And it's a constant state of worrying, even over seemingly intangible things like the end of the world.This is the second book I've read from her where religion plays a major part. Ellis is a Mormon, and while her family is fairly liberal for the church, the rules of the church are also the family's foundation. Sometimes religion can be a little tricky to write about, but just like with Heretic's Anonymous, I felt like Henry handled it respectfully.There were some small problems I had with the character development, but it was mostly fine-tuning stuff that I think we'll see in the final product. Hannah was hard to like - I tried to be sympathetic, because she did have a rough time of it. But mostly I was just frustrated with the character. I also loved Sam and Theo, but they felt very much like secondary characters. Overall, I think a little fleshing out would benefit some of the background characters.Thanks to Edelweiss and Katherine Tegen Books for providing me with an Advanced Reader Copy.-Kelli
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  • Jill booksandescape
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for review.Let's Call It a Doomsday by Katie Henry is about Ellis, a girl who fears the end of the world. When she meets Hannah in her therapist's waiting room, her entire life changes: Hannah says she knows when the world is going to end. As Ellis and Hannah search for the answers to Hannah's doomsday premonition, Ellis quickly becomes friends with Hannah and her friends. Ellis is even more fearful of doomsday now that she h I received an advance copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for review.Let's Call It a Doomsday by Katie Henry is about Ellis, a girl who fears the end of the world. When she meets Hannah in her therapist's waiting room, her entire life changes: Hannah says she knows when the world is going to end. As Ellis and Hannah search for the answers to Hannah's doomsday premonition, Ellis quickly becomes friends with Hannah and her friends. Ellis is even more fearful of doomsday now that she has so much to lose.This novel is brilliantly written. The representation of mental illness is spot-on, and the story compelling. I look forward to reading more from Katie Henry, and will definitely be getting to her first book, Heretics Anonymous, soon.
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  • caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Review copy courtesy of Edelweiss.This book just wasn’t as compelling as Heretics Anonymous, and I just didn’t really sympathize with the characters. After her last book was strong satire about Catholic education, her attempt at doing the same to Doomsday prepping fell flat. I will definitely be reading the next Katie Henry release.
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  • j.chestnut
    January 1, 1970
    i think ??? i am going to go with 3.5 ✨i got an arc and i am supposed to review it but i'm not sure what to say.
  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Two girls find themselves becoming best friends all while anticipating the end of the world. It is funny, sweet, and a excellent look at society with drama.
  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    Whoever designed this cover probably ate Andy Warhol's soul and then ate a lot of tomatoes.
  • Elena
    January 1, 1970
    pleASE KATIE HENRY GIVE ME THIS NOW :(((
  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    There are some wonderful messages in this book that warmed my heart. RTC closer to the publication date.
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