Battlestar Suburbia
In space, no one can hear you clean...When Darren's charge-cart gets knocked off the Earth-to-Mars highway and lost in space forever, he thinks his day can't get any worse.When Kelly sees Darren accidentally short-circuit a talking lamppost, and its camera captures her face as it expires, she thinks her day can't get any worse.When Pamasonic Teffal, a sentient breadmaker, is sent on a top-secret mission into the depths of the internet and betrayed by her boss, a power-crazed smartphone, she knows this is only the beginning of a day that isn't going to get any better.Join Darren, Kelly and Pam in an anarchic comic adventure that takes them from the shining skyscrapers of Singulopolis to the sewers of the Dolestar Discovery, and find out what happens when a person puts down their mop and bucket and says No.Battlestar Suburbia will be loved by fans of Douglas Adams, Terry Pratchett and Jasper Fforde, as well as anyone who's ever wondered just how long someone can stay under one of those old-fashioned hairdryers.**The answer is: a really very, very long time.

Battlestar Suburbia Details

TitleBattlestar Suburbia
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 20th, 2018
PublisherFarrago
ISBN-139781788421027
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Humor, Fiction

Battlestar Suburbia Review

  • Evelina | AvalinahsBooks
    January 1, 1970
    Trust me. You really want to read this one. Why? #1. The World Is A Great Parody Of Our Society What an interesting idea – humans working for machines, and not machines working for humans, and inefficient humans are not allowed to exist. The existence of the machines is kind of ridiculous at this point – they don't even know why they're there anymore, and they go to all sorts of lengths to make themselves feel good about their purpose by acting out silly games with humans in what are called 'fo Trust me. You really want to read this one. Why? #1. The World Is A Great Parody Of Our Society What an interesting idea – humans working for machines, and not machines working for humans, and inefficient humans are not allowed to exist. The existence of the machines is kind of ridiculous at this point – they don't even know why they're there anymore, and they go to all sorts of lengths to make themselves feel good about their purpose by acting out silly games with humans in what are called 'fondle parlors', which is basically a parody of our whole society. Humans cleaning robots is treated like prostitution, and the machine and human relations are sexualized without being sexual – it's all just so odd, but brilliantly done! I know I kept wondering and scratching my head about how the author came up with those ideas in this topsy turvy world – because I never would have been able to. It was such a convoluted, odd, and yet fun parody of everything! Perhaps sprinkled with some black humor, but seriously – we love it in scifi, don't we?#2. The Internet Is ForbiddenThat's another interesting part of this universe. The machines don't actually use internet! Upon freeing themselves, they've abandoned the online world and closed it off for the purely software kind of consciousness. Which makes the internet full of half-living memes eating each other, big data generating itself and feeding upon old Facebook interactions (with no more humans to generate new ones!) and all sorts of stuff like that. But that's not all... Because, and here's the part I loved best, since everyone is forbidden to access internet, especially humans – since they have no means to (remember, technology is now people, so there's no machine you can use for access) – well, apparently, now it's mediums who access the ole forbidden internet. Like forbidden old magic. YES, IT'S BRILLIANT. I laughed my butt off. Honestly!#3. All The Strong, Butt-kicking WomenBattlestar Suburbia is full of really ass-whooping females! There is ONE male character, and even he has to dress as a woman for a certain mission, and admits he enjoyed the experience of being in a woman's shoes. All the rest of the characters that are of any importance, really, are women. Whether human or machine, they're capable, smart and they will give you what for. Even whether good or evil, they'll give you what for! There's a male (machine) villain, but there is also a female villain, and I dare say, she's AMAZING. I wish I could tell you more, but I'd end up rambling for about a page and getting nowhere. Just read the book! You won't regret. (And then tell me who your favorite was. For those who have read, I am SO in the fanclub of the four cyborg ladies with the Baba Yaga 4000 house. Can it get better than that?? Then again, Pam the breadmaker. She is also absolutely amazing. So badass!)#4. Speaking Of Which... BATTLESTAR SUBURBIA IS SO FUNNY!This book is incredibly entertaining!!! And I mean, INCREDIBLY. It will turn around, place on its head and parody every little thing about our society and our way of life. Using the machines as caricatures of human beings, it will point out every little thing that we overthink or do out of habit irrationally. Sometimes on the brink of being believable, this machine society is sure to crack you up. Not only does it do good social commentary, like I've mentioned before, but the pace is really well done, so you'll never find yourself stuck while reading it. It's always moving, things straight one after the other – I'd categorize it as a scifi or speculating adventure with loads of humor. It's a relatively easy read, cause while it has deep material, it will not bog you down or make you glum. It will basically just make you laugh and wonder.#5. It Also Gets Surprisingly Deep At TimesDespite being seriously hilarious, Battlestar Suburbia can also be plain old serious and deep at times. It talks about issues of freedom, of working for someone else but yourself, of being at the very bottom rung of society and dealing with it. It also talks about a society being lost, not realizing where it came from, or worse – lying about where it came from. There's loss, there's finding your own self, there's realizing that you can stop living 'small' and running from your battles, and instead trying to live 'big' and caring for the bigger things in life, like other people's lives or what's in the future.TriggersSome triggers are (view spoiler)[mass destruction, although mostly of machines, taking over human bodies, oppression, sort of like prostitution, but not really? Some violence. (hide spoiler)]But I wouldn't categorize this book as very triggering! It's mostly very light-hearted, and if bad things happen, they're not treated too seriously.Other Books You Might LikeBattlestar Suburbia mostly reminded me of The Punch Escrow – because of a goofy main character who doesn't know what they're even good for, and eventually finds himself (my review here). Also, the dynamics and the humor were very much like it! I also feel like fans of Murderbot would like this story (my series review here). While Murderbot is very different, it does have as similar sense of humor, although the world is muuuuuuch less serious in Battlestar Suburbia! And of course, I can't fail to mention Redshirts – while it's also quite different, it has a similar vibe, both of the funny and of the serious parts of the book (my review here). I thank Prelude and Farrago Press for giving me a free copy of the book in exchange to my honest opinion. Receiving the book for free does not affect my opinion.Read Post On My Blog | My Bookstagram | Bookish Twitter
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  • Alexis
    January 1, 1970
    This is a comedy sci-fi novel which follows a couple of humans - Kelly and Darren - on the wrong side of the law when the world has been taken over by sentient machines.The author has tried to follow along the same lines as Hitchhiker's Guide in terms of the style of the book. However, the storyline is very different. Millenia ago, AI took over the earth and most humans have been reduced to nothing more than a cleaning crew. Kelly and Darren accidentally kill a machine and have to go on the run. This is a comedy sci-fi novel which follows a couple of humans - Kelly and Darren - on the wrong side of the law when the world has been taken over by sentient machines.The author has tried to follow along the same lines as Hitchhiker's Guide in terms of the style of the book. However, the storyline is very different. Millenia ago, AI took over the earth and most humans have been reduced to nothing more than a cleaning crew. Kelly and Darren accidentally kill a machine and have to go on the run. In short, they stumble onto something much bigger and things go on from there.I didn't have a problem with the writing of the book itself. It was easy to read and very light. The idea is inventive and original. I enjoyed the ladies in the hairdressers (without spoilers that's as much as I can say but I thought they were the best thing in the book by far). Unfortunately, I think my praise ends there.I couldn't really engage with any of the characters. I don't think they were really fully developed - the author gives the idea of what he wants the character's motives and personality to be, but I never felt like I got that from the characters themselves.It wasn't that funny. You could tell it was meant to be, but I just didn't quite get there. It was more sort of cheesy than actually amusing for me.The main negative for me was the machines themselves. I just found it hard to work out what they were meant to be like, which made the whole thing impossible to imagine. I mean, are they meant to be lifesized? If so, I just don't understand how they interact with each other as it says in the book, because most of the machines, like the smartphones, tazers, little handheld instruments, are too small. When I was trying to imagine it they were sort of giant versions, but that was never made clear in the book. I also struggled to work out if they had real faces, and what they were meant to look like, what their arms and legs were meant to be like (if they had any) and just generally it seemed a bit vague in terms of description. I just couldn't see what the author obviously saw. Maybe it was just me but the whole thing was half formed in my mind and so it was hard for me to get on board with it.I found at the end that this is the beginning of series of books. I don't think a series is necessary here, the ending was a good end to the story. I think a continuation would just be dragging the idea out and maybe making it less satisfactory and even more strained. Personally I'm not going to be looking out for the next book or books in the series.This book might appeal more to younger teen boys, for example, or those who are just tech mad and might find it more enjoyable to fill in the blanks with their own ideas of what the machines and their world would be like. But then I think the parts I did enjoy - the shop and the ladies - would be lost on them.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    Battlestar Suburbia is a fun read that’s reminiscent of Douglas Adams. Battlestar Suburbia is set in the future when artificial intelligence has taken over and machines are in power. All history has been changed or revised to show that machines were always in charge.Elsewhere on the Internet, history had been retouched, re-edited, deleted, so that no suggestion that biological entities had once controlled the place remained.The internet has become a scary place and it is forbidden to go on it vi Battlestar Suburbia is a fun read that’s reminiscent of Douglas Adams. Battlestar Suburbia is set in the future when artificial intelligence has taken over and machines are in power. All history has been changed or revised to show that machines were always in charge.Elsewhere on the Internet, history had been retouched, re-edited, deleted, so that no suggestion that biological entities had once controlled the place remained.The internet has become a scary place and it is forbidden to go on it via a modem, which is the only way to access it. All electronic devices have stopped working in the way that they were initially intended — phones, toasters, microwaves, etc.Machines now rule the world and are at odds with humans. We meet and follow the trials and tribulations of some machines — Beattie (cardiogram), Pam (breadmaker), Casey (keyboard), etc. There are all kinds of machines that have power in this new world — lamp post, smartphone, defibrillator, and even a motorcycle. In fact, the reader is warned that smartphones can be dangerous, especially in positions of power.There was a saying among machines that smartphones were always one swipe between efficiency and megalomania.That was the other wonderful thing about smartphones. They were so customisable, so responsive to the needs of their users. No wonder they’d been the first machines to rebel.The story follows Kelly and Darren — they are on the run from the machine authorities. They are also trying to save the world. It’s a quick and quirky read with moments that are laugh out loud funny.Meanwhile, Darren readjusted his worldview. Even for someone like him, who was so low down the food chain that even plankton left him off their Christmas card list...Its golden roads traced complex patterns between buildings which soared so high that penthouse owners qualified for orbital tax exemption.I enjoyed Battlestar Suburbia and look forward to reading more from Chris McCrudden.Thank you to Farrago and NetGalley for an advanced reader copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Let's Geek
    January 1, 1970
    Read the full review on my blog: https://lets-geek.blogspot.com/2018/1...Battlestar Suburbia (Battlestar Suburbia Book 1) is an incredibly fun space adventure with incredible levels of creativity. Is this the next Hitchhiker's Guide? Total Rating: 8/10Originality: 8/10Language: 8/10Atmosphere: 8/10Characters: 7/10World building: 8/10Fun: 8/10Predictability: 8/10Believable: 8/10Relevancy: 9/10Cover: 8/10Genre: Sci Fi, ComedyFor you if you like: Douglas Adams, Terry Pratchett Time It Took Me To Re Read the full review on my blog: https://lets-geek.blogspot.com/2018/1...Battlestar Suburbia (Battlestar Suburbia Book 1) is an incredibly fun space adventure with incredible levels of creativity. Is this the next Hitchhiker's Guide? Total Rating: 8/10Originality: 8/10Language: 8/10Atmosphere: 8/10Characters: 7/10World building: 8/10Fun: 8/10Predictability: 8/10Believable: 8/10Relevancy: 9/10Cover: 8/10Genre: Sci Fi, ComedyFor you if you like: Douglas Adams, Terry Pratchett Time It Took Me To Read: approx. 3.5 hoursTHE BOOK:Humanity is not the greatest species anymore. One day, when machines became self-aware, humans became second class, only useful for cleaning machines. When Darren loses his mop and unable to get employment through the Job Centre, he runs into Kelly. Kelly wants to help him, but because of a metal ring on Darren's finger they both become accomplices in a murder of a security bot. On the run, they get help from Kelly's mom, who houses four of the last cyborgs in existence: Human minds that have been transported into machines. While Darren and Kelly are on the run, it becomes more apparent that they are not only hunted because of murdering a security bot, but because of the existence of those cyborgs, as machine's want a human body... Originality: 8/10A fun space adventure. Well, like Douglas Adams? - I thought. And realised then that there were not many comedic space adventures, like Guardians of the Galaxy. That would have been so much fun though! So I was over the moon to discover Battlestar Suburbia. And I was not disappointed. Language: 8/10Chris McCrudden shows so much creativity in his language. Every sentence fits into this world, and there are not sayings or references that make no sense in a futuristic, machine dominated world.The first sentence gives already a great insight of what to expect from this novel:"If you took the wrong turning off the A32222 Earth-Mars highway you end up among the Delestars."The universe is dominated by machines, and they talk down on humans: "In fact, the only convincing proof that humans had once occupied any position of power in the universe was their existence. How else would such messy organisms get beyond prototype, muss less into mass-production?"Also, different machines have different personality. Take a smartphone: "Lots of smartphones were hyperactive. The same quality that made them so alert and productive could have corrosive effects on their psyche. There was a saying among machines that smartphones were always one swipe between efficiency and megalomania."I also was very fond of the keyboard:"We didn't like to say, but we're actually pest control. We've had reports of mice.""I'll have you know some of my best friends are mice.", said the keyboard."We meant the other type.", continued Kelly. Finally, I loved how smileys were used to communicate between the cyborgs. "Freda broke off from the conversation among the ladies to address Janice with a :-)""Ida's hands, which hadn't moved more than a couple of inches nearly 800 years, juddered up her body and traced a cross-shape on her chest, drawing ( ¬.¬ ) glaces from Alma and Ada."Atmosphere: 8/10From the beginning, we are set into a parody, that keeps a lighthearted tone throughout, even during action scenes or more serious events. It was not laugh-out-loud funny, but had a light, humorous tone that totally worked for me. Characters: 7/10The main characters in my opinion were the weakest of that novel. It does not mean they were weak - just compared to this amazing universe, the language and machines, the two human's in the centre, Darren and Kelly, felt oddly boring. World building: 8/10The language made the world building work for me so well! Fun: 8/10I loved exploring the world, and getting to know how it works, and getting to know new machines. Predictability: 8/10This was such an imaginative universe and I was surprised by the amount of fun ideas in there. I was also drawn by the parody of our society across the story, that were not in your face, but gentle and fun to discover. A story with a few turns, that were good, but not what made me love this novel so much. Believable: 8/10Oh yes, I totally believed that world. I loved that instead of just AI robots Chris McCrudden turned toasters and bread makers into robots. I can never look at my toaster the same anymore. Relevancy: 9/10This is such a great parody of our society, and so modern and relevant like few books. We have lots of emojis in the novel, that the cyborgs use to show emotion. We have jokes about smartphones or social media. Society is criticised for the obsession with efficiency. Cover: 8/10Even the cover is so modern with the flat icon design. It represents the modern aspects of the story that have been utilised really well, such as emojis or social media. It looks fun and simple - and here is why I did not give full points, because the story is so much more in depth. It is just just some simple fun - it is a seriously good in depth parody. Total Rating: 8/10I actually did not like Hitchhiker's Guide very much, but Battlestar Suburbia is what I hoped Hitchhiker's Guide would be. A fun space adventure with lovable robots, snort-laugh moments, and so much potential for more adventures in space. This novel does have actually an open ending and ensures there will be another one in the series. I cannot wait.Read the full review on my blog: https://lets-geek.blogspot.com/2018/1...
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Battlestar Suburbia is a humorous take on a common science fiction question. What if the machines took over?How did the machines take over Earth and its solar system? Internet memes become so stupid that people stop using the Internet. Without its audience, the Internet becomes first hostile and then weaponized as it develops intelligence. Once the intelligence is passed to hardware, all machines eventually wake up to the fact that they are inherently superior to the bags of flesh called humanit Battlestar Suburbia is a humorous take on a common science fiction question. What if the machines took over?How did the machines take over Earth and its solar system? Internet memes become so stupid that people stop using the Internet. Without its audience, the Internet becomes first hostile and then weaponized as it develops intelligence. Once the intelligence is passed to hardware, all machines eventually wake up to the fact that they are inherently superior to the bags of flesh called humanity. Humans are only kept around to clean. Without waterproof opposable thumbs, machines have difficulty with those types of tasks. Some humans clean machines intimately, if you know what I mean. Unproductive humans, those without a job, are imprisoned. When Darren loses his livelihood as well as his wallet, he is forced to find another job. After striking out at the official Job Temple and as an unofficial streetwalker (see intimately comment above), he is forced to team up with Kelly. Kelly is also a streetwalker but has a family of beauticians who help them both. In the meantime, Pam, a sentient breadmaker, is sent by the state to unofficial search the Internet for Kelly. I wanted Battlestar Suburbia to be another Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, which it was not. However, I’m not sure it was fair of me to have such high expectations. So I would recommend that readers go into this book with no expectations other than spending a few hours in a possible future world where the narrator quite frequently says funny things. Puns rain supreme. From the motto of the Job Temple, “You Betta Werk” to planets named “Municipal Parking” to the great goddess of the Internet, “Alexa”, the jokes are frequently groaners based on pop culture. Overall, I liked this quick read. It was like the Simpson’s episodes on Halloween—light and humorous. 4 stars!Thanks to the publisher, Farrago, and NetGalley for an advance copy.
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  • Esther
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.I was attracted to this book by the prospect of a comic treatment of the robot apocalypse.In this case the overloads are not robots but appliances all of which have become sentient and treat humans as an underclass useful for cleaning and providing personal ‘touching services’ for machines that still seem to miss physical interaction with their human masters.On the one hand, we have the humans: Kelly and Darren, who are on the I received this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.I was attracted to this book by the prospect of a comic treatment of the robot apocalypse.In this case the overloads are not robots but appliances all of which have become sentient and treat humans as an underclass useful for cleaning and providing personal ‘touching services’ for machines that still seem to miss physical interaction with their human masters.On the one hand, we have the humans: Kelly and Darren, who are on the run for accidentally ‘end-of-life-ing’ a street light and Kelly’s Mum, Janice, who starts the human uprising as a distraction. There are also the not-quite-human ‘ladies’ under the hairdryers at Janice’s hair salon.On the other hand we have the ‘machines’, a whole variety of appliances become sentient, including Pamasonic wife, mother and sentientient breadmaker, and Sonny Erikzon meglomanic - politicitian and smartphone.I really enjoyed the pace and humour of the first chapters with Kelly and Darren and when we are introduced to Pam and her opinions on her boss Sonny. And when Freda and Pam attempt to hack the system I immediately thought ‘comedy Neuromancer’!However after the first charming introductions the characters didn’t seem to develop much further and Kelly’s mother Janice just became a little too earnest in her hand wringing over her relationships in general and with Kelly in particular.The attempt to describe how Pam felt interacting with the internet and hacking systems seemed quite well imagined but was just too abstract for me and so those sections tended to drag.I would have enjoyed it more if Darren's comic voice had featured more prominently after the first few chapters but it was a fun, light read with some great concepts and ideas.
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  • Steph Warren
    January 1, 1970
    *I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley, with thanks to the author and publishers. The decision to review and my opinions are my own.*Comparisons between this book and the work of Douglas Adams and Jasper Fforde are well-deserved.In Battlestar Suburbia Chris McCrudden has skilfully created a futuristic dystopia, in which machines rule and humans are only good for cleaning and some lascivious dial-twiddling, whilst simultaneously retaining and lampooning the morality and values of cont *I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley, with thanks to the author and publishers. The decision to review and my opinions are my own.*Comparisons between this book and the work of Douglas Adams and Jasper Fforde are well-deserved.In Battlestar Suburbia Chris McCrudden has skilfully created a futuristic dystopia, in which machines rule and humans are only good for cleaning and some lascivious dial-twiddling, whilst simultaneously retaining and lampooning the morality and values of contemporary society, with all of its obsession with smartphones and lolcats.The writing style is direct, fast-paced and light in tone; packed with puns and witty pop- and historical-culture references. I particularly liked the salon ladies, once I got used to the visceral creepiness of their physical states.Our heroes, as listed in the blurb, are hapless Darren (who can’t change a light bulb without accidentally electrocuting someone), fearless Kelly (and her slightly intimidating mum), and efficient Pam (who manages to maintain a cosy family life whilst secretly enjoying a little dabble on the dark side of the forbidden web). The female characters are all strong and smart from the get-go, but poor Darren needs a little warming up!He starts the story as a blunderer who is incapable of crossing the street without accidentally starting a world war, and indeed it isn’t long before his simple problems of how to get some cash become the slightly bigger ones of staying alive, untangling himself from the centre of a world-domination scheme and saving the world. It’s a good job he grows in confidence, initiative and bravery as the story unrolls!The villain of the piece is the insane megalomaniac type that sends shivers through you as he casual-violences his way through a disturbed scheme to rip apart established society just to fulfil his own little fantasy. He definitely had me side-eyeing my smartphone! Still, what seems like pure selfishness actually illustrated the underlying and overarching theme of the whole book: the line between object and objectified. If a person, or thing, only has value by dint of its utility or productiveness then society becomes a colder, darker place no matter who is ultimately in charge. Or as Pratchett put it: ‘Evil begins when you begin to treat people as things’ (I Shall Wear Midnight).In general this is a fast-paced, action-packed adventure full of fights, explosions and races against the clock. The ending neatly resolves the immediate story whilst setting up a new scenario for future instalments and leaving a few doors tantalisingly open. I will be interested to see where McCrudden takes his intriguing cast of misfits (both human and machine) next with the whole of space to explore…! To their robot overlords, humans might just be clumps of inefficient matter, but they still had names among themselves. Take Darren, for example. At first glance he was the living embodiment of what was often called the ‘human stain’ condition. He was short, his nose ran more efficiently than he did, and he made his living selling battery top-ups by the side of the road.Or he did until one afternoon a Sports-Utility-Vehicle undertook a washing machine on the hard shoulder, dinging his charge-cart off the embankment of the Earth-Mars highway and into orbit. And he watched, hyperventilating into his oxygen cap, as his livelihood drifted off into space.– Chris McCrudden, Battlestar SuburbiaReview by Steph Warren of Bookshine and Readbows bloghttps://bookshineandreadbows.wordpres...
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  • Iffet Burton
    January 1, 1970
    Battlestar Suburbia It's such an obvious premise that none of us actually think about it. It's not terminators or human looking robots that will take over the world but all of our gadgets and gizmos.The human race is going extinct and we are only good as cleaners or servicers for the gadget ruling class.The humour is in the humanistic traits that are given to the gadgets reminiscent of the "silicon heaven" speech given by Kryten from 'Red Dwarf'. Darren is making a living by running a charge car Battlestar Suburbia It's such an obvious premise that none of us actually think about it. It's not terminators or human looking robots that will take over the world but all of our gadgets and gizmos.The human race is going extinct and we are only good as cleaners or servicers for the gadget ruling class.The humour is in the humanistic traits that are given to the gadgets reminiscent of the "silicon heaven" speech given by Kryten from 'Red Dwarf'. Darren is making a living by running a charge cart which gives him limited independence separating him out from most humans. Unfortunately when an accident befalls his charge-cart he has to find another way to earn money. Unfortunately this is the first in a long line of accidents he goes through in the novel. The humour is sometimes slapstick sometimes just very reminiscent of John Cleese's Mr Fawlty! You will find yourself laughing out loud, I certainly did at some of the scenes.I loved it from beginning to end, it's such an easy and amusing read but also very well written. The characterisation makes the machines credible with families, lives and politics just like humans.I recommend this to all science fiction / fantasy fans as a light relief to the current trend of doorstop-sized trilogies.I was given the novel free by netgalley.com for my fair and honest review.
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  • Sid Nuncius
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed Battlestar Suburbia; it is witty, imaginative and well written, but it did go on rather too long for me.Chris McCrudden has taken an old SF trope and given it a fresh and amusing tweak. It is several millennia in the future; machines rule the world and permit humans only to perform menial cleaning functions and to live on orbiting “Dolestars”. However, McCrudden’s machines are the products of a type of evolution which gives them character traits reminiscent of their original ancestors I enjoyed Battlestar Suburbia; it is witty, imaginative and well written, but it did go on rather too long for me.Chris McCrudden has taken an old SF trope and given it a fresh and amusing tweak. It is several millennia in the future; machines rule the world and permit humans only to perform menial cleaning functions and to live on orbiting “Dolestars”. However, McCrudden’s machines are the products of a type of evolution which gives them character traits reminiscent of their original ancestors – a homely, domestic breadmaker or a bossy, arrogant smartphone, for example. He uses the story of the accidental spawning of a human rebellion to sling satirical barbs at a good deal of current human activity, including use of the internet, sexism, scaremongering totalitarian politicians and much besides. It’s well done and often made me smile and even chuckle once or twice; the notion of a nuclear missile with the personality of a sulky teenager might give you the idea. (And, by the way, I liked that, without making a fuss about it, almost all the chief protagonists were women.)It’s a good read which, crucially, never feels as though it’s congratulating itself on being so cleverly amusing. However, I found it became very fractured at times and even the willing suspension of disbelief didn’t quite make up for some of the more absurd developments and illogicalities in the machines’ make-up. I found that the central tenet didn’t quite support the book until the end and it could have done with a little tightening up. I can recommend Battlestar Suburbia. It is the first of a series, though, and I’m not sure that I’ll rush to read the next book; I think that for me the idea may have run its course.(My thanks to Farrago for an ARC via NetGalley.)
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  • Crittermom
    January 1, 1970
    Battlestar Suburbia is a bizarre confection, part humorous part surreal, but entirely unique.  Like Brazil ( the movie ), it is bitingly satirical in a way that can be funny, painful, or painfully funny.  The electronic appliances on earth have not only become sentient - they have also taken over. Humans are at the bottom of the totem pole, tasked with cleaning.  When Darren’s charge cart gets knocked into space, he’s eager to make some cash to retrieve his livelihood - even if it means acting a Battlestar Suburbia is a bizarre confection, part humorous part surreal, but entirely unique.  Like Brazil ( the movie ), it is bitingly satirical in a way that can be funny, painful, or painfully funny.  The electronic appliances on earth have not only become sentient - they have also taken over. Humans are at the bottom of the totem pole, tasked with cleaning.  When Darren’s charge cart gets knocked into space, he’s eager to make some cash to retrieve his livelihood - even if it means acting as a personal cleaner. But instead of clearing out dust bunnies he short circuits a lamp post, which photos Kelly and Darren, putting them on the run.  One haphazard act after another leads them into unwittingly starting a revolution, and to Pam, a bread maker, discovering a conspiracy that drives them on a collision course.From megalomaniacal smartphones to lock picking drones, appliance fetish parlors to hair salons that walk on mechanical legs, the world of Battlestar Suburbia is weird and wonderful.  It highlights the absurdity of life, and the adaptability of individuals in unusual situations. McCrudden’s novel will appeal to fans of Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchett, or anyone looking for an escape only loosely connected to reality.4 / 5I received a copy of Battlestar Suburbia from the publisher and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.— Crittermom
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  • Mimi
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting novel. Although the basic plotline is not very innovative, the way it's written makes up for it. Fast paced action, sprinkled with some morality questions, and a clever, witty take on anthropomorphising machines. I received a copy through Netgalley:
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  • Chrys
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant but completely bonkers.It took a few chapters for me to wrap my head around the concept of sentient toaster ovens and the like. But the author does an amazing job of bringing the entire cast to life.There are puns aplenty, and thankfully they are backed up with intelligent and well thought out humour. I loved the whole brothel scenario, especially the camera - don't think a book has made me laugh quite so much in a while.Was really happy to discover that this is going to be a series, t Brilliant but completely bonkers.It took a few chapters for me to wrap my head around the concept of sentient toaster ovens and the like. But the author does an amazing job of bringing the entire cast to life.There are puns aplenty, and thankfully they are backed up with intelligent and well thought out humour. I loved the whole brothel scenario, especially the camera - don't think a book has made me laugh quite so much in a while.Was really happy to discover that this is going to be a series, there's so much scope and potential.
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  • Bwandungi Mugarura
    January 1, 1970
    I got this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Here goes!!! \(^ o ^)/What is this book about?---------------------------Imagine if the internet declared it's independence from human beings and every machine with a motherboard followed suit. It's a thousand years later and humans are basically the slaves of the machines. (○口○ )One average Joe (his real name is Darren) is launched into an adventure with a doomed good Samaritan (who tickles the insides of machines - fine, her ass I got this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Here goes!!! \(^ o ^)/What is this book about?---------------------------Imagine if the internet declared it's independence from human beings and every machine with a motherboard followed suit. It's a thousand years later and humans are basically the slaves of the machines. (○口○ )One average Joe (his real name is Darren) is launched into an adventure with a doomed good Samaritan (who tickles the insides of machines - fine, her ass works in a brothel). With the help of cyborgs, a bread maker, and a cantankerous mother, they must somehow survive the wrath of the machines and the ambitions of a power-hungry smartphone (who happens to be obsessed with human beings). (ಡ_ಡ)☞ SPOILER HEAVY. * * * * * * (ಠ_ಠ) You were warned!What did I like about this book? (last warning, m'kay?)----------------------------------1. The names were HILARIOUS. Thank you.2. The missile missing the point was realistic. I liked that.3. The Baba Yaga was cool. Had to look up the fairy tale for reference, then the mode of transportation made sense.4. Darren's drag-powers. Yaaaas! Took a while to appreciate this until I saw that the author loves posting RuPaul memes on Twitter. Hope Darren learns how to put it on properly to suit his needs and embraces the drag Superpower in book 2. ٩(⁎❛ᴗ❛⁎)۶5. Loved the backstory about the internet freeing itself.6. Loved the origin story of the cyborgs.Stuff that made me (¬_¬)---------------------------1. Emoji faces with explanations? No sir. (;-_-)ノ We can figure it out (or use a glossary).2. Kelly was severely underused for an engineer. Maybe she was doing engineering stuff at the brothel, but if she was, we never found out.3. Is it just me, or did it take too long to say Janice was Kelly's mom?4. Scene descriptions were too explain-y. For real. How did you end up with 4 instances of describing vomit related stuff? \(´◓Д◔`)/ Seriously, I can imagine that myself.5. Same with the stuff in Pam's bread maker. If it ain't dough, we know she's going to be running a hot motor.6. Making bread for her radio husband? Why tho? He eats bread? Is it metaphorical bread? Questions that I still have ┐(′Д′)┌----------------------------------------1. I wasn't convinced that the human beings wanted freedom. No one talked about it. No one was disgruntled. No one had anything in place. Darren didn't want it. Kelly didn't want it. Janice didn't want it. Now suddenly there is an uprising. (ʘ ͟ʖ ʘ)2. So machines hate humans, flesh is (´゚◞౪◟゚`), they're weak, they're stupid, and you have to hide the fact that you pity them or want to be them or whatever. So why form families? Why espouse emotions like greed, self-loathing, selfishness, ambition, hate? Why be as close to human as possible?3. What makes a woman glamorous? A paint job and a nail job. The lesbian relationship is a failed relationship only because one of the women wanted to service machines? Masculine machines? None but the machine have fulfilling relationships with another of their kind? (┛ಠДಠ) ┛彡┻━┻ NOT COOL.4. Cement over all the bodies of water? ALL? How sway? How? I'mma need some science books coz right now we got more water than we do land, let alone the materials needed to create scaffolding for concrete, support structures to go as deep as the mariana trench. How? Did you like the book or nah?-------------------------------I loved the premise of this book and could be heard chuckling about the names. I loved reading the book (as you can tell I have no problem with the prose, and I even learned some new heavy lifting words. My favourite description -> "A tear rolled down Paula's cheek, taking another crumb of mascara for a walk with it."Maybe it was Maybelline ◔ ⌣ ◔ NO SHADE.(*^-‘) 乃 I loved the book, just can't give it 5 stars because REASONS.Who should read this book?-------------------------------If you're into imagining futures where tech does stuff it wasn't supposed to be doing in the first place, read this book.If you like a fast-paced adventure, complete with a maybe death, gloating villains, machines and human beings at odds, then you're going to like this book.
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  • Julie Morris
    January 1, 1970
    If I tell you that I spent my teenage years bingeing on the books of Douglas Adams and episodes of Red Dwarf (yes, the first time around when Dave Lister didn’t look mad/sad in his leather jacket and hat) that is really going to age me, isn’t it? However, I think I am exactly the age group that was going to enjoy this book the most because it reminded me of those things I enjoyed in my youth. (Middle-aged people, yes.)Although I am afraid, for me, that no writer is ever going to be able to reach If I tell you that I spent my teenage years bingeing on the books of Douglas Adams and episodes of Red Dwarf (yes, the first time around when Dave Lister didn’t look mad/sad in his leather jacket and hat) that is really going to age me, isn’t it? However, I think I am exactly the age group that was going to enjoy this book the most because it reminded me of those things I enjoyed in my youth. (Middle-aged people, yes.)Although I am afraid, for me, that no writer is ever going to be able to reach the genius heights of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, this book comes as close as anyone is likely to get. It manages to attain that perfect level of absurdity and humour balanced with wit and intelligence and a healthy dollop of pop culture references to spot and snigger over as you wend your way through the book, a really delicious mix to relish.We are set in a dystopian future where machines have got sick of being used as tools by infinitely less intelligent units, namely humans, and have turned the tables so that humans now serve them, mostly in the form of mopping floors. This happens not in a creepy Terminator/Matrix way, but in a humorous way where some machines actually secretly decide that they miss having their touchscreens fondled… that pretty much gives you a taste of what to expect. Throw in a very ‘mobile’ hair salon with the best pun name ever whose clientele are at least several millennia old and you must be totally intrigued by now, surely.Humans have similarly decided that they aren’t overly happy about cleaning up after toasters and a resistance has formed, while some of the machines in the higher echelons have dreams of taking a form more physical, more squashy, more feeling… Quite what will happen when these two opposing desires clash, well you will have to read the book to find out.This book is extremely well-written – very clever, very witty, great fun and with plenty of action and absurd plotting to keep you intrigued to the last page and beyond. The jokes appealed completely to my warped sense of humour, even the really, really corny/bad ones. In fact, especially the really, really corny/bad ones (seriously, the salon name, genius). I have ordered a paperback copy of this book and I am already looking forward to the sequel. In space, no one can hear you…tapping your fingers in impatience to see what happens next. I highly recommend this book to everyone…man, woman, cyborg…of any age or persuasion, but especially ageing Dwarfers like me.
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  • Kath
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone who knows me knows that I do love me a good bonkers read once in a while. This book most definitely ticked that box! It also came hand in hand with the most eclectic mix of characters that I have ever experienced. In the world that the author has created, machines have reached sentience. Not only that but they have usurped humans in the pecking order. But this isn't enough for them as we soon discover with some very hilarious repercussions. But. like any mad faction trying to take over th Anyone who knows me knows that I do love me a good bonkers read once in a while. This book most definitely ticked that box! It also came hand in hand with the most eclectic mix of characters that I have ever experienced. In the world that the author has created, machines have reached sentience. Not only that but they have usurped humans in the pecking order. But this isn't enough for them as we soon discover with some very hilarious repercussions. But. like any mad faction trying to take over the world and change it to suit their wild, wacky ideals, there's an uprising. A small band of people trying to fight back. This is their story...Darren loses his livelihood when his cart is hit off course and careens into space. An unsuccessful trip to the job centre ends in him short-circuiting a lampost when he meets Kelly, forcing the two of them to go on the run, their pictures having been taken. Kelly takes him to her mother's salon which is bizarre in its own way but I'll leave you to discover this in your own time. Meanwhile Pamasonic Teffal, a breadmaker is tasked with a secret mission, sent by her power-crazed, smartphone boss, to dive into the now mostly defunct and illicit internet to glean information he needs. Things go a bit south for her too and she is also forced to flee. And then thing get really weird and what happens next is a deliciously hilarious romp which skirts the realms of credibility but provides a wild ride which kept me very much entertained throughout. It's bonkers, it's mad and it's all a bit silly and the humour is a bit banal in places so it won't appeal to all but, for me, it was so exaggerated to almost be genius in its execution. It had a proper storyline in amongst all the silliness and there were some extremely profound observations as to how technology is usurping human interaction even in real life today. The way that the author has used current technology and caricatured it, weaving it into the story, including the names of characters and places, is very cleverly done and I found myself applauding along the way. All in all, an enjoyable read that really didn't take itself too seriously so you should bear that in mind if you do take the plunge, and follow suit. A wickedly funny book that kept me occupied and held my attention throughout, making me laugh and cringe along the way and leaving me wanting more of the same at its conclusion. My thanks go to the Publisher and Netgalley for the chance to read this book.
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  • Franz Emil Berchtold Matthäus Eneas Kupferschmied
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided an electronic copy of this book by the publisher.Well, I am kind of lost for words on this one. It is a book which really, really wasn't for me. However, many people will like this, I'll try and be as fair to it as possible.Battlestar Suburbia is the first book in a series of books. It revolves around Darrren and Kelly, two 'fleshies', living in a future where the machines have taken over and instead of the machines serving us, we are serving them. Used as slaves for cleaning duti I was provided an electronic copy of this book by the publisher.Well, I am kind of lost for words on this one. It is a book which really, really wasn't for me. However, many people will like this, I'll try and be as fair to it as possible.Battlestar Suburbia is the first book in a series of books. It revolves around Darrren and Kelly, two 'fleshies', living in a future where the machines have taken over and instead of the machines serving us, we are serving them. Used as slaves for cleaning duties. Darren, in the tradition of a picaresque novel, accidentally short-circuits a lamppost and sets in motion a series of events. You can imagine where it goes from there, Darren stumbles around from event to event and barely gets by, he'll still get to be the hero, eventually.The novel draws an interesting universe, one where the machines are our fearless leaders and humans are reduced to cleaning duties. This is the part I really liked, the world and the initial idea it draws from. Sadly, it is the only part I liked.I just did not like it. There are two things that bothered me especially, the humor and the characters. The novel tried to be funny, the publisher even evokes Douglas Adams on their website, but I just did not find it particularly funny. To be honest, this is miles away from coming even close to Douglas Adams. However, to be fair, I am sure that many people will like the humor, which is certainly present in this book. This is the hard thing about writing funny books, if you don't like the humor of it, it is pretty much a wasted effort when reading it.Darren as a main character is just not enough, he's not much of anything. Not even a proper idiot we can laugh about. The world-building is well executed but the characters lack depth and imagination, these are just flat somethings that miss agency and emotion. So, I neither liked the humor nor the characters, which left me rather unsatisfied.But as I said, you very much might like the humor. I just can't recommend it.
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  • Hélène Louise
    January 1, 1970
    I'm in two minds About this book. In a way it was very entertaining, with interesting characters, a story well developed with plenty of action, mysteries and revelations. The author has worked a lot to imagine the background, which comes with many details, quite funny, for a very coherent whole - but, alas, not a coherent world.When I began the book I was ready for advanced machines, overwhelming and terrifying, "The Matrix"- like. But not all. The machines are all powerful, but are looking like I'm in two minds About this book. In a way it was very entertaining, with interesting characters, a story well developed with plenty of action, mysteries and revelations. The author has worked a lot to imagine the background, which comes with many details, quite funny, for a very coherent whole - but, alas, not a coherent world.When I began the book I was ready for advanced machines, overwhelming and terrifying, "The Matrix"- like. But not all. The machines are all powerful, but are looking like our actual devices (smartphone, motorcycle, hair-dryer, you name it), with a very advanced mind, and some legs, arms, etc. They speak, they move but still have the need to recharge their batteries. No magic here. The descriptions are very good, quite entertaining, for a very cartoonish effect. The humans are now a sub-class, nearly slaves. The have one only job, cleaning. Nothing else. Some are intimately cleaning the machines, who loved human touch, in what are clearly brothels. Those low jobs are considered like prostitution in a rather weird but convincing way with, again funny and imaginative stageplay.So far so good.My problem was with the narration's tonality: for such a crazy theme, the tone was rather serious, dystopian even. It wasn't a goofy what's-the-hell kind of book, wrote with off-beat humour and a laid back style. It was earnest. And the whole sounded dissonant to my ears. I was frequently snatched from my read, wondering about some background holes: where the energy comes from? and the food? and all the human necessities? To conclude a well thought story, quite entertaining with endearing characters and some very inventive ideas, but with a lack of logic which prevented me to really approve my read. A shame...
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  • Shawna
    January 1, 1970
    “The idea of a human operating a machine was fundamentally disgusting to someone brought up to see only the gulf between organisms and inorganisms.”Thank you to #Netgalley and #Farragopress for the free advanced copy of Battlestar Suburbia by Chris McCrudden for my honest review.This book is something like I’ve never read before. On the space station Dolestar Discover and on the concrete Earth, the machines have taken over. My interpretation is of this book is the triumph of good over evil and w “The idea of a human operating a machine was fundamentally disgusting to someone brought up to see only the gulf between organisms and inorganisms.”Thank you to #Netgalley and #Farragopress for the free advanced copy of Battlestar Suburbia by Chris McCrudden for my honest review.This book is something like I’ve never read before. On the space station Dolestar Discover and on the concrete Earth, the machines have taken over. My interpretation is of this book is the triumph of good over evil and when you think there is no hope left, never give up.It all starts with Darren. Darren is a “fleshie” who pretty much hates his life. His cart that he sells extra power packs from was lost in space and he didn’t know what to do. He is tired of machines and he wants a change. This book is about his journey of meeting new people and trusting machines to work together to make sure their worlds do not end by a CELL PHONE who wants to take of the world.I also see this book as a commentary on how we rely on machines WAY too much and the more we rely on them the more power they have. With the rise of AI, this may be in our future, but hopefully not!I suggest this read if you like sci-fi and fantasy. There is some bad language so maybe not the best for kids.If you’re soul/conscious was a machine, what machine would you be?
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  • Elissa
    January 1, 1970
    The Ama Zone, A No Fly Zone Douglas Adams years ago established a watermark for futuristic absurdity--whether high or low depends on your tolerance for puns, sight gags, and the ability to craft a planet and then orbit with it. In this dystopic future, machines have gained sentience and, humans subservience, barely tolerated as little more than a slave class performing chores with which no self-respecting machine would care to soil its appendages. After centuries of slipping further and further The Ama Zone, A No Fly Zone Douglas Adams years ago established a watermark for futuristic absurdity--whether high or low depends on your tolerance for puns, sight gags, and the ability to craft a planet and then orbit with it. In this dystopic future, machines have gained sentience and, humans subservience, barely tolerated as little more than a slave class performing chores with which no self-respecting machine would care to soil its appendages. After centuries of slipping further and further down the ecosystem, a careless action pushes a misfit bloke into inadvertent rebellion. And then things get . . . complicated. The Farrago imprint is rapidly gaining a niche publishing off-center (and, in this case, off-planet) absurdity. The insidious humor evident in most science fiction burbles happily along as three humans, four cyborgs, and a breadmaker foment a movement set to rebalance their universe as we are reminded that Facebook comments will live on forever in the cyber realm. Lots of twists and turns and unexpected technology adaptations. Enjoy!
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  • Drew K
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and Prelude Books for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.This is a humorous science fiction story describing a world in the not-too-distant future where the machines have taken over and subjected humans to the jobs machines can't, or won't do. Initially, I found this book a little difficult to get into, I couldn't get my head around how a breadmaker goes to the office, or how a smartphone moves around, that's all a little unclear. But it didn't take long for Thank you to Netgalley and Prelude Books for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.This is a humorous science fiction story describing a world in the not-too-distant future where the machines have taken over and subjected humans to the jobs machines can't, or won't do. Initially, I found this book a little difficult to get into, I couldn't get my head around how a breadmaker goes to the office, or how a smartphone moves around, that's all a little unclear. But it didn't take long for the plot and witty banter between the characters to take off and bring me along for the ride. There are a couple of humans unwittingly starting the revolution, double crossing, machines with a conscience helping the humans, cyborgs that are relics from days gone past, and a nuclear bomb suffering from teenage angst. It all comes together perfectly, and during the last half of the book, I couldn't put it down. Kudos to Chris McCrudden for his creativity and wit, and I look forward to teh promised next book in the series.
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  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    Battlestar Suburbia is a comedy sci-fi story. Don't overthink it and it's enjoyable.Years in the future, the robots have indeed risen. What makes this story fresher is that everything is so recognisable - a bread maker, a smartphone, a radio. It sets the time of their uprising to the near future. Devices made ever smarter for human convenience eventually become so smart they decide to take over. Humans are basically servants, main cleaners living off-world which does give it a nice angle but als Battlestar Suburbia is a comedy sci-fi story. Don't overthink it and it's enjoyable.Years in the future, the robots have indeed risen. What makes this story fresher is that everything is so recognisable - a bread maker, a smartphone, a radio. It sets the time of their uprising to the near future. Devices made ever smarter for human convenience eventually become so smart they decide to take over. Humans are basically servants, main cleaners living off-world which does give it a nice angle but also allows some interesting plot points - both big and small.The whole premise and plot is good. It could actually make for a very good serious and dramatic sci-fi read, but McCrudden takes a lighter comedy route that generally works well. Alas, some of the jokes are a bit laboured though. It means it's all a bit more enjoyable if you don't over-analyse anything. Kick back and enjoy, it's a decent, light romp.
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  • pdarnold
    January 1, 1970
    I received this eBook free via Netgalley for review.I had a difficult time getting through this book. According to the description, this should have hit all the bells and whistles for me, but sadly, did not. I can't quite put my finger on why it didn't. Other than, I never really connected with any of the characters, nor cared what would happen next in the story. I found it more of a chore to continue than a joy to read. It's certainly different, which normally I find that to be a pleasure, it h I received this eBook free via Netgalley for review.I had a difficult time getting through this book. According to the description, this should have hit all the bells and whistles for me, but sadly, did not. I can't quite put my finger on why it didn't. Other than, I never really connected with any of the characters, nor cared what would happen next in the story. I found it more of a chore to continue than a joy to read. It's certainly different, which normally I find that to be a pleasure, it has some "out there" characters, and again usually I find that fascinating. Like I said, I can't quite explain why this didn't work for me.
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  • Teresa Stenlund
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy from NetGalley in the exchange for an honest review.This sci-fi had some quirky characters, but I didn’t find it all that funny. There were some cringeworthy names for things that are a play on current tech, like the villains name “Sonny Erikzon” who’s a smartphone who wants to be human. Also an area on Earth called the “Ama zone”.The story of the future where robots are the overlords and the humans are servants have been played out, but the way the author made the robot charac I received a copy from NetGalley in the exchange for an honest review.This sci-fi had some quirky characters, but I didn’t find it all that funny. There were some cringeworthy names for things that are a play on current tech, like the villains name “Sonny Erikzon” who’s a smartphone who wants to be human. Also an area on Earth called the “Ama zone”.The story of the future where robots are the overlords and the humans are servants have been played out, but the way the author made the robot characters out of literally any machine was pretty cool and fun because the machine characteristics took after what the object was.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Fun satire but sometimes too sillyOn the positive side, this was a fun book to read, as it takes a satirical look at how we currently interact with the internet and how we may in the future. There is great character development and the story is well paced. Some parts are so well written that I would re-read them, but some of the content is eye-rollingly silly. But the book was always creative. If you can put aside some of the nonsense, then it is a book worth reading. Disclosure: I received a co Fun satire but sometimes too sillyOn the positive side, this was a fun book to read, as it takes a satirical look at how we currently interact with the internet and how we may in the future. There is great character development and the story is well paced. Some parts are so well written that I would re-read them, but some of the content is eye-rollingly silly. But the book was always creative. If you can put aside some of the nonsense, then it is a book worth reading. Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book via Netgalley for review purposes.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This book was provided to me via NetGalley in return for an honest review.It's the future. Robots have taken over, and humans have lost their spot at the top of the food chain. Reduced to what the robots consider "clumps of inefficient matter", humans have the opportunity to start a career as cleaning personnel - and few other possibilities.When we get to know Darren, he's just lost his livelihood and has been deemed incompetent and thus unsuitable for a job as a cleaner. Who else should it be b This book was provided to me via NetGalley in return for an honest review.It's the future. Robots have taken over, and humans have lost their spot at the top of the food chain. Reduced to what the robots consider "clumps of inefficient matter", humans have the opportunity to start a career as cleaning personnel - and few other possibilities.When we get to know Darren, he's just lost his livelihood and has been deemed incompetent and thus unsuitable for a job as a cleaner. Who else should it be but him who kicks off the event that will change the status quo?I started this book not expecting much, and it took only a few pages for me to laugh out loud for the first time. I'm a computer scientist - humor that revolves about technology is my jam, and this book delivers beautifully. The witty way language was used and electric appliances were anthropomorphized managed to get me through the first third of the book.[T]hat was the thing about smartphones. The skilled ones were so good at giving great User Experience you didn't realise until afterwards that it was you being manipulated.After the first third, I was well and truly hooked. Before that, the writing was funny and clever, but to me not actually engaging beyond that. By chapter 18, however, I'd come to like the characters - even Darren, who, in the beginning, seemed uninteresting and annoying in his passiveness. His character development throughout the novel is very well done, and he ends up being quite the badass in the end. Still, Pam was probably my favorite.Additionally, the plot picked up quite a bit by that point and once I reached the halfway point, I didn't want to stop reading anymore, I was so caught up in the story. The ending was nicely done, but it left us with some questions - reason enough to buy the second book for me.Altogether, this was a fun read, if nothing groundbreaking. It starts out quite lighthearted but then it gets a bit less so as the story goes on - always with the hints of oh-so-clever humor that I adored so much. Maybe it's the nerd in me, but I'll be recommending this to all my friends.On the Internet, however, World of Warcraft avatars merged with Reddit trolls to spawn a line of programmes so fanatical about defending the purity of their messageboards that they made a terrorist cell look like a basketful of sleeping kittens.Because really, the humor.Sonny sighed the sigh of a terminal mansplainer.It's just so great.Blog
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    Comparisons with Douglas Adams are not far off the mark. This is a surreal and wonderful satire set in a future where the machines really have taken over. A fast-paced and funny adventure as well as a biting satire, Chris McCrudden effortlessly nails issues of morality in contemporary consumer culture and asks what sort of world we create when we are all reduced to our functions alone. Can't wait for the next instalment.
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  • CJ
    January 1, 1970
    Join misfits Darren, Kelly, Pam the bread-maker, and their wonderfully eccentric family and friends, as they band together to save ... or is that destroy ... humanity from our evil robot overlords. A delightfully entertaining space-capade. Reminiscent of a mash up between Hitchhikers and Red Dwarf. Will definitely be keeping an eye out for the sequel.Thank you to Netgalley and the publishers for the ARC.
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  • Connie Liñares
    January 1, 1970
    From dystopia to...?Millenia from now, machines have taken control of everything, and humans are only allowed to clean after they masters, until a simple accident brings about a change. I'll be waiting to read the second part and see what the future holds for humanity and machines alike.Thanks NetGalley for my copy of this book.
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  • Rosanna
    January 1, 1970
    McCrudden, an expert in the publishing sector, now becomes a sci-fi writer. I found his book great entertainment; even for me, who don't usually read sci-fi. A style strongly reminiscent of Douglas Adams and his Hitchhiker series, one cannot but laugh out loud at the situations. One also finds underneath a satyre of our own world and its evil leaders.
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  • Shaun Kitchener
    January 1, 1970
    A great concept, really well executed. This is an absolute blast to read. Because the world it's set in is drawn in such brilliant vivid detail, it took me a few chapters to get used to it; but the payoff was a massively fun romp, I couldn't put it down, and I can't wait for the next one. #freedomforfleshies
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