A Field Guide to Getting Lost
A girl with a passion for science and a boy who dreams of writing fantasy novels must figure out how to get along now that their parents are dating.Sutton is having robot problems. Her mini-bot is supposed to be able to get through a maze in under a minute, but she must have gotten something wrong in the coding. Which is frustrating for a science-minded girl like Sutton—almost as frustrating as the fact that her mother probably won’t be home in time for Sutton’s tenth birthday.Luis spends his days writing thrilling stories about brave kids, but there’s only so much inspiration you can find when you’re stuck inside all day. He’s allergic to bees, afraid of dogs, and has an overprotective mom to boot. So Luis can only dream of daring adventures in the wild.Sutton and Luis couldn’t be more different from each other. Except now that their parents are dating, these two have to find some common ground. Will they be able to navigate their way down a path they never planned on exploring?

A Field Guide to Getting Lost Details

TitleA Field Guide to Getting Lost
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 14th, 2020
PublisherAtheneum Books for Young Readers
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Contemporary

A Field Guide to Getting Lost Review

  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Sutton and Luis meet when their parents start dating. They have nothing in common at all. Finding a way to get along or even maybe becoming friends (or step-siblings!) is a challenge. Sutton's mom is in Antarctica and is going to miss her 10th birthday and the robot she's working on. Luis is entirely different. Not sciencey at all. He writes stories about things he is afraid of (including dogs). They do begin to work together when they find themselves in a sticky situation. Funny, suspenseful, Sutton and Luis meet when their parents start dating. They have nothing in common at all. Finding a way to get along or even maybe becoming friends (or step-siblings!) is a challenge. Sutton's mom is in Antarctica and is going to miss her 10th birthday and the robot she's working on. Luis is entirely different. Not sciencey at all. He writes stories about things he is afraid of (including dogs). They do begin to work together when they find themselves in a sticky situation. Funny, suspenseful, so sad at times, along with being filled with science and art and nature, Field Guide to Getting Lost is one of my favorite middle-grade books so far this year.
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  • Jessica Lawson
    January 1, 1970
    Holy smokes, my full review is coming, but for now, just know that I LOVE this book for so many reasons. The VOICE, the HUMOR, the everyday DETAILS (the kind that make you feel like you're walking around a scene), THE CHARACTERS, and especially the HONESTY about some hard, hard topics that I know (from personal experience) are very hard to endure. Sutton and Luis are two very different kids whose parents have started dating. That's not just awkward--it's ...well, it's really hard--because both Holy smokes, my full review is coming, but for now, just know that I LOVE this book for so many reasons. The VOICE, the HUMOR, the everyday DETAILS (the kind that make you feel like you're walking around a scene), THE CHARACTERS, and especially the HONESTY about some hard, hard topics that I know (from personal experience) are very hard to endure. Sutton and Luis are two very different kids whose parents have started dating. That's not just awkward--it's ...well, it's really hard--because both of them have other things that make life challenging. But children are some of the most emotionally resilient people I've encountered in life--Sutton and Luis are no exceptions. They're an inspiration. This was a fun read that made me want to buy a compass necklace for everyone I know. More plot-based gushing to come...
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  • Sharon Roat
    January 1, 1970
    Kids are gonna love Luis and Sutton! (Adults will also love these kids... I did!) This book just feels good. I read an advance copy and can't wait for this story to be out in the world making the world a better place.
  • Kristin Crouch
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and publisher for sharing an ARC with Collabookation. Sutton loves robotics, lives with her dad while her mom is far away collecting data on penguins, and is homeschooled. Luis lives with his mom, loves writing adventure stories, and is allergic to everything. Both protagonists are working through some things: Sutton's mom being away is getting to be a challenge. Sutton's dad is a wonderful caretaker, but having her mom away for her birthday is hard for her to digest. Thank you to the author and publisher for sharing an ARC with Collabookation. Sutton loves robotics, lives with her dad while her mom is far away collecting data on penguins, and is homeschooled. Luis lives with his mom, loves writing adventure stories, and is allergic to everything. Both protagonists are working through some things: Sutton's mom being away is getting to be a challenge. Sutton's dad is a wonderful caretaker, but having her mom away for her birthday is hard for her to digest. Luis' allergies mean his mom hovers and his freedom is limited. All of these characters are charismatic and compelling. Enter a new relationships between Sutton's dad and Luis' mom, and readers get some wonderful perspective on just how hard it can be to be yourself in stressful situations!If you loved Two Naomis, this book is a must. Chapters alternate between Sutton and Luis, creating that perfect combination of perspective to help the reader understand motive and general awkwardness. What I loved the most was Sutton's lack of social grace. She's an awkward kid, who has a scientific mindset - always thinking logically: if, then. But a potential merge in her family structure throws her whole world off-kilter. At every strange and fairly painful interaction, I could see how her behavior was interpreted, and I wanted to help her out. However, she figures it out for herself, and everyone wins!I highly recommend A Field Guide to Getting Lost to fifth graders and up.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Update April 9th 2020: my ARC arrived today! I hope to read it soon but I haven't been reading due to coronavirus fear and Animal Crossing New Horizons. Feb 17th 2020: I just won an ARC of this book in a giveaway posted by SimonTEEN. I can't wait for it to arrive and start reading this! Thank you so much for this book!
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I have been looking for more titles with blended families for the Library and this book fits the bill perfectly. A Field Guide to Getting Lost is a gently told story about two children who become friends after learning their parents are dating and ready to make their relationship more official. A Field Guide to Getting Lost is one of those wonderful stories full of diverse and relatable characters that will appeal to a wide range of audiences. Not only do we have families who have dealt with the I have been looking for more titles with blended families for the Library and this book fits the bill perfectly. A Field Guide to Getting Lost is a gently told story about two children who become friends after learning their parents are dating and ready to make their relationship more official. A Field Guide to Getting Lost is one of those wonderful stories full of diverse and relatable characters that will appeal to a wide range of audiences. Not only do we have families who have dealt with the death of a parent and divorce, immigration and separation, Sutton is a neurodiverse robotics prodigy and Luis, a fantasy writer who lives with severe food allergies. Each child has amazing gifts and strengths but also struggles with fitting in and overcoming their fears. Due to the many sensitive topics within this story, you may want to give it a read first before giving it to a younger reader who has dealt with divorce or parental death. In A Field Guide to Getting Lost, Sutton and her father live in a tight-knit community in Seattle. After learning her mother won't be home from Antarctica in time for Sutton's tenth birthday, Sutton's anger and disappointment is overshadowed by her uncertain feelings about her father's new romantic relationship with a woman named Elizabeth. Her parents have been divorced for many years and while she always knew it was a possibility, the reality of a new relationship leaves Sutton feeling replaceable. When her father invites her along on a family date with Elizabeth and her son Luis, Sutton tries her best to be friendly but is uncertain how to answer all of Luis' questions. Luis, the only child of Elizabeth, has few memories of his father who died when he was very young. His severe allergies have made he and his mother incredibly close and he wants to be supportive of his mother's new relationship but is unsure how to act around Sutton. Her short answers and lack of pop culture knowledge leave Luis feeling uncertain about the future.When the two families attempt another day trip to learn more about each other, a mysterious tunnel in the woods leave Luis and Sutton separated from their parents and forced to work together to find their way back to civilization. This is a wonderful story of friendship, overcoming fears, and understanding that families come in all shapes and sizes. As I am in a very rural area, the descriptions of Seattle, with it's farmer's markets and community gardens will be knew for my children. Large apartment buildings aren't as common here so it will be interesting to see the kid's reactions to reading about walking down the hall to a favorite neighbor or upstairs to a friend's apartment. There's a very cute scene where 10 year-old Luis gets to walk down the block to a store to buy markers by himself and this mark of independence will be a great discussion starter with younger readers about their first independent adventure. Thank you to Netgalley and the Publisher for the opportunity to read and review this title, all opinions and mistakes are my own.
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  • Kate Waggoner
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to #NetGalley and Simon and Schuster Children's Publishing for allowing me the opportunity to read a digital ARC of A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Joy McCullough. This middle grades contemporary novel will be released on April 14, 2020. All opinions are my own. Sutton is almost 10 years old and lives with her father in an apartment in Seattle. Her mother is a scientist researching penguin migration in Antarctica, and Sutton has just learned that her mom won't be home for her 10th Thank you to #NetGalley and Simon and Schuster Children's Publishing for allowing me the opportunity to read a digital ARC of A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Joy McCullough. This middle grades contemporary novel will be released on April 14, 2020. All opinions are my own. Sutton is almost 10 years old and lives with her father in an apartment in Seattle. Her mother is a scientist researching penguin migration in Antarctica, and Sutton has just learned that her mom won't be home for her 10th birthday. Sutton, who loves science, attempts to focus on fixing the issues with her robot, but her life becomes even more complicated when her father wants her to meet the woman he has been dating and her son. Luis loves telling stories and is working on writing a book. He's also allergic to almost everything which leads his mom to be overly protective. He's excited, but still apprehensive, to meet his mom's boyfriend and his daughter, Sutton. On a family hike, the Luis and Sutton get separated from their parents and lost in Discovery Park. Maybe getting lost is exactly what they needed. I found this to be a super cute middle grades book. Sutton and Luis are both kind of outsiders, in their own unique ways, who happen to be experiencing similar struggles. I think many kids will be able to relate to Sutton's anxiety of her dad dating and their family situation changing as well as Luis's desire for freedom and adventure. I enjoyed all of the facts and science that I learned from Sutton and all of the pop culture and literary references that Luis and Sutton's father make. The book alternates between Sutton and Luis's perspectives. This story has science, fantasy, adventure, and drama. It's fun and moves at an upbeat pace. I think it's a book that many middle grade readers will enjoy.
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  • wanderonwards
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Atheneum Books for Young Readers for sending me a free ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.A Field Guide To Getting Lost is a charming and humorous middle grade story about unlikely friends and navigating your way through lifes difficulties. McCullough does a wonderful job of creating likable, realistic characters while tackling an ambitious range of subjects. I particularly enjoyed the little bits of humor throughout the story and how honestly McCullough Thank you to NetGalley and Atheneum Books for Young Readers for sending me a free ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.A Field Guide To Getting Lost is a charming and humorous middle grade story about unlikely friends and navigating your way through life’s difficulties. McCullough does a wonderful job of creating likable, realistic characters while tackling an ambitious range of subjects. I particularly enjoyed the little bits of humor throughout the story and how honestly McCullough portrayed some difficult topics without overwhelming the reader. Some of the many subjects and topics covered in A Field Guide To Getting Lost are: science (coding, robots, the scientific method, and scientific theory), environmentalism and climate change (and penguins!), writing and the creative process, extreme food allergies, divorced parents, coparenting, dealing with change, dealing with frustration (concerning projects and things out of your control, like single parents dating other people), and difficulties with social interactions and making friends.Thank you again to NetGalley and Atheneum Books for Young Readers for the privilege of reviewing an ARC.
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  • Kathie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for an eARC of this book.This is the author's debut middle grade book, but many will be familiar with her YA historical fiction novel in verse BLOOD WATER PAINT. In A FIELD GUIDE TO GETTING LOST, two kids (Sutton and Luis) are brought together because their parents are dating. Sutton loves science and robotics, and is struggling with the absence of her mom who is working in Antarctica. Luis is a writer who loves fantasies since his numerous allergies keep Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for an eARC of this book.This is the author's debut middle grade book, but many will be familiar with her YA historical fiction novel in verse BLOOD WATER PAINT. In A FIELD GUIDE TO GETTING LOST, two kids (Sutton and Luis) are brought together because their parents are dating. Sutton loves science and robotics, and is struggling with the absence of her mom who is working in Antarctica. Luis is a writer who loves fantasies since his numerous allergies keep him from real life adventures. Though very different, Sutton and Luis need to try and find some common ground for their sake of their parents, until an unexpected outing leads them right to it.I loved that this story is told from both Sutton and Luis' perspectives; not only are the chapters short, but the book itself is only 225 pages and will appeal to a wide range of readers. As a mom of a child with a food allergy, I really appreciated that severe allergies were addressed in a realistic fiction story, and would desperately like to see more stories that address this issue. I would love to see a sequel to this book, as I can't help but wonder what happens next in their lives. I look forward to reading more middle grade fiction from this author in the future.
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and publisher for sharing an early copy with our #bookexpedition group. Suttons parents are divorced. She lives with her dad while her mom is in Antarctica, researching penguin migration. Shes a science-minded kid whos dealing with programming issues, both with her mini-bot and in her own life. Luis lives with his mom, having lost his dad to cancer years ago. While his creative writing is fantasy driven (Star Wars and Harry Potter are favorites), hes usually stuck in Thank you to the author and publisher for sharing an early copy with our #bookexpedition group. Sutton’s parents are divorced. She lives with her dad while her mom is in Antarctica, researching penguin migration. She’s a science-minded kid who’s dealing with programming issues, both with her mini-bot and in her own life. Luis lives with his mom, having lost his dad to cancer years ago. While his creative writing is fantasy driven (Star Wars and Harry Potter are favorites), he’s usually stuck in reality (indoors) due to his many allergies and an over-protective mom. They couldn’t be more different from each other, but their parents start dating and they have to navigate this new path neither expected to explore. With themes of adaptation, possibilities, community, and finding home, my heart loves Sutton and Luis, and yours will too! My students will love that it’s told in dual perspectives with short (10 pages or less) chapters. It’s a must buy for your middle grade library. Publishes 4/14/20.
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  • Katra
    January 1, 1970
    Possible future siblings with absolutely nothing in common other than a love for their parents. Joy McCullough painted two in-depth characters in Sutton and Louis that will resonate with children and adults. Their compulsive interests, relationships with friends and neighbors, physical and emotional challenges give resonating depth that will appeal to children and adults. Life isn't easy, even when you're doing your best and a bit more, but once these two learn to accept each others weakness and Possible future siblings with absolutely nothing in common other than a love for their parents. Joy McCullough painted two in-depth characters in Sutton and Louis that will resonate with children and adults. Their compulsive interests, relationships with friends and neighbors, physical and emotional challenges give resonating depth that will appeal to children and adults. Life isn't easy, even when you're doing your best and a bit more, but once these two learn to accept each others weakness and play off each other's strengths, doors open. This is an engaging story that could also be used for in depth discussions.
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  • Jenny Claiborne
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from School Library Journal and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Sutton loves science, robots, and logic. Luis loves writing stories and is allergic to just about everything. Their parents are dating and things are getting serious, but how do Sutton and Luis learn to work together when they have nothing in common?A Field Guide to Getting Lost is such a sweet story. McCullough does a great job of giving Sutton and Luis unique voices. These are characters you truly I received an ARC from School Library Journal and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Sutton loves science, robots, and logic. Luis loves writing stories and is allergic to just about everything. Their parents are dating and things are getting serious, but how do Sutton and Luis learn to work together when they have nothing in common?A Field Guide to Getting Lost is such a sweet story. McCullough does a great job of giving Sutton and Luis unique voices. These are characters you truly root for and their growth is believable and appropriate. I can't wait to introduce my young readers to this duo!
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  • Jennifer Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Sutton is a girl who codes and likes building robots. Luis has severe peanut and bee allergies and is a writer. Both of them tell their side of the story in their own voices. Sutton's dad is dating Luis's mom and they start getting the kids together as well. Sutton is a little socially awkward and seems to not like Luis, but we see through her thoughts she is dealing with her mom being gone for work and her parents divorce really take a toil on her. As the book progresses the characters develop Sutton is a girl who codes and likes building robots. Luis has severe peanut and bee allergies and is a writer. Both of them tell their side of the story in their own voices. Sutton's dad is dating Luis's mom and they start getting the kids together as well. Sutton is a little socially awkward and seems to not like Luis, but we see through her thoughts she is dealing with her mom being gone for work and her parents divorce really take a toil on her. As the book progresses the characters develop and change and learn from each other.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to School Library Journal for the ARC!Lackluster story about two social misfits who come together because of their dating parents. Cover art is charming but I found that the only good part about the book. Social commentary about girls in STEM fields wears thin when the female protagonist spends most of her time thinking about programming her robot. Contains divorced parents and homosexual relationship which is troubling, especially when the child of divorce is clearly affected by her Thanks to School Library Journal for the ARC!Lackluster story about two social misfits who come together because of their dating parents. Cover art is charming but I found that the only good part about the book. Social commentary about girls in STEM fields wears thin when the female protagonist spends most of her time thinking about programming her robot. Contains divorced parents and homosexual relationship which is troubling, especially when the child of divorce is clearly affected by her parents' relationship. Story needed to be thought out more before being published.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this lower middle-grade novel. I enjoyed the dual points of view, Sutton and Luis. The characters were realistic for the most part (Sutton seemed older than nine going on ten). The dynamics between the children and their respective parents was realistic. The book is well-written with both funny and heartfelt moments. This is a good choice for children just getting into middle-grade fiction who want a bit of drama but not too much. #Netgalley
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  • Cassie Reynolds
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you author and publisher for sharing a copy with #Collabookation.Sutton and Luis couldnt be more different from each other navigating under single parent life. So different, yet both so lovable. I love how the chapters alternate between Sutton and Luis' perspectives to add an additional dimension to their back story. I love the voice, the humor, and just overall honesty and realism of this story. This was such a fun and easy read. These two kids are totally an inspiration, and I cannot Thank you author and publisher for sharing a copy with #Collabookation.Sutton and Luis couldn’t be more different from each other navigating under single parent life. So different, yet both so lovable. I love how the chapters alternate between Sutton and Luis' perspectives to add an additional dimension to their back story. I love the voice, the humor, and just overall honesty and realism of this story. This was such a fun and easy read. These two kids are totally an inspiration, and I cannot wait to add this to my classroom library in the spring!
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  • Joanna Szabo
    January 1, 1970
    A hilarious, sweet, fun, and emotionally complex journey from beginning to end. Sutton and Luis are absolute gems, and the supporting cast is full of love and humor as well. I hope Joy McCullough continues to write middle grade for a long time.
  • Shanna Rogers
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this story! Sutton and Luis are unforgettable characters, so different from each other, but each so lovable in their own ways. Joy is a master heartstring-tugger. I want more adventures of Luis and Sutton!
  • Alexandra Alessandri
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my goodnesswhat a sweet and heartwarming read!! I read an ARC with my twelve-year-old son and we were both hooked from the start, laughing and awwing along the way. Sutton and Luis are characters that kids will connect with and parents will want to reach in and hug. Oh my goodness—what a sweet and heartwarming read!! I read an ARC with my twelve-year-old son and we were both hooked from the start, laughing and awwing along the way. Sutton and Luis are characters that kids will connect with and parents will want to reach in and hug.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    My kids are going to love this book when it comes out.
  • Jenny Chou
    January 1, 1970
    A truly delightful book!
  • Mrs.
    January 1, 1970
    I received a complimentary copy of A Field Guide to Getting Lost from NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.TOO CUTE! This was a very short but also very heartwarming novel. Two very different children learn to get along for the sake of others. These characters were very believable and their interactions extremely realistic. My only wish is that the book had been longer!Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC.
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  • Kriss
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed A Field Guide to Getting Lost. Thanks to Netgally and the publisher for letting me read an advance copy! I will definitely recommend, and purchase a copy of this book for my elementary students. Sutton and Luis are great characters who really come live in this story. It is a wonderful book about unlikely friends and finding your way.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusSutton lives with her father in an apartment in Seattle. She is homeschooled, loves robotics, and is happy with her neighbors and her life. She's not happy that her mother is living at the South Pole, and decides not to come to celebrate Sutton's tenth birthday because the emperor penguins she is studying have changed their habits. Luis lives with his mother, his Guatemalan father having died of cancer when he was two. He loves to write stories about brave E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusSutton lives with her father in an apartment in Seattle. She is homeschooled, loves robotics, and is happy with her neighbors and her life. She's not happy that her mother is living at the South Pole, and decides not to come to celebrate Sutton's tenth birthday because the emperor penguins she is studying have changed their habits. Luis lives with his mother, his Guatemalan father having died of cancer when he was two. He loves to write stories about brave children, since his mother is overly protective because he has life threatening allergies to lots of things, including bees and peanuts. Sutton's father and Luis' mother are dating, and have reached the point where they want to have a "family date" to introduce the children. They go to an art museum that Luis likes, but is outside Sutton's comfort zone. (Sutton isn't labeled but seems to be on the autism spectrum.) Her father is not happy that she couldn't make an effort, but Sutton is obsessed with getting the coding on her robot finished for a science fair, and she's not wild about her father dating. Also, she feels like she DID make an effort to the best of her ability. When another family date is attempted, this time to a park, Sutton and Luis get separated from the parents, have an adventure, and bond a bit more. Strengths: I loved the depiction of characters who love coding and who have life threatening allergies. There are very few books about kids who need EpiPens, which is a real lack. The fear about parents dating, and missing the absent parents, is done well. The real triumph of this book is the use of the city as almost another character. This was a fun book to read, and the faux-canvas texture on the cover made me ridiculously happy. Weaknesses: Sutton is nine and about to turn ten, and the adventure in the park was fairly tame. The cover makes it look like they are critically lost.What I really think: I would definitely buy this for an elementary school, and enjoyed reading it, but think it is too young for my students. There is a lot of imaginative play that seems childish to middle school readers, although this might work for fans of Bridge to Terebithia. (But without the sadness. I am not a fan.)
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    This book is about families, possibilities, and new beginnings. Sutton and her dad are family. Mom is in Antarctica studying penguins and, much to Suttons disappointment, will miss her birthday. Sutton is also upset by a tiny robot who wont co-operate and navigate a maze. Now she is going on outings with Elizabeth and her son Luis. Suttons dad desperately wants these adventures to work but Sutton is having difficulties with fantasy loving, allergy driven Luis. When one of the outings planned by This book is about families, possibilities, and new beginnings. Sutton and her dad are family. Mom is in Antarctica studying penguins and, much to Sutton’s disappointment, will miss her birthday. Sutton is also upset by a tiny robot who won’t co-operate and navigate a maze. Now she is going on outings with Elizabeth and her son Luis. Sutton’s dad desperately wants these adventures to work but Sutton is having difficulties with fantasy loving, allergy driven Luis. When one of the outings planned by the parents goes horribly wrong, can Sutton and Luis overcome their differences and work together to get back to a parking lot? This uplifting tale will bring tears to the reader’s eyes. This book is a beautifully written, joyous read.
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