Healthy Habits Suck
Salad instead of steak? Working out? Skipping that second beer or glass of wine? Healthy habits are THE WORST. If you’re someone who gets up every morning and can’t wait for your run, considers eating sweet potatoes a splurge, and sets aside thirty minutes before work to meditate—this book isn’t for you. If you’re someone who thinks about getting up to go for a run but goes back to sleep, regrets last night’s dinner of fast food, and can barely get to work on time—let alone meditate—then this book will help you find the motivation you’ve been looking for to live your healthiest life, even when you don’t want to.With this funny, in-your-face guide, you won’t find advice on how to “enjoy” exercise, or tips for making broccoli and kale taste as good as donuts and ice cream. What you will find are solid skills to help you actually do the healthy things you know you should be doing. Using these skills—based in acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and neuroscience—you’ll learn to find the motivation you’re really craving to adopt healthy habits, even if they do suck. You’ll also discover how to accept self-criticism, develop self-compassion, and live a more meaningful life.This book not only acknowledges that many healthy habits suck, it uses science to explain why we want the things we want (junk food), crave the things we crave (sugar), and dislike the things we dislike (exercise). At the end, you’ll feel validated in feeling like these things are the absolute worst. But you’ll also find the motivation to do them anyway.

Healthy Habits Suck Details

TitleHealthy Habits Suck
Author
ReleaseJul 1st, 2019
PublisherNew Harbinger Publications
ISBN-139781684033317
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Health

Healthy Habits Suck Review

  • MissBecka
    January 1, 1970
    There is some decent information in here on how to change your lifestyle slowly and permanently.How she broke down changes into "values" and forced you to dig deeper into the reasons behind these "values" before making a change could be a great way to decide if they are even needed.I especially liked the 90% idea (make sure you can commit to the new thing 90% of the time before integrating it). The problem I had with the book is that the writing makes it seem like they are trying to explain adul There is some decent information in here on how to change your lifestyle slowly and permanently.How she broke down changes into "values" and forced you to dig deeper into the reasons behind these "values" before making a change could be a great way to decide if they are even needed.I especially liked the 90% idea (make sure you can commit to the new thing 90% of the time before integrating it). The problem I had with the book is that the writing makes it seem like they are trying to explain adult issues to a small child.As a result this comes off highly condescending. Thank you NetGalley and New Harbinger Publications, Inc. for my ARC.
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  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    When non-fiction authors hit the trifecta of being educational, entertaining and engaging I am a very happy reader. Dana Lee-Baggley accomplishes exactly that in this book. Healthy Habits Suck is written with equal parts humor and expertise. She veers away from preachy, dogmatic and the overenthusiastic overpromising adapted by so many authors in the genre. It’s solid advice based on the Adaption of Choice Model to help you adopt healthier habits.
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    “The majority of North Americans eat too much processed food, don’t sleep enough, drink too much, and are overweight.” Why? Because Healthy Habits Suck!Healthy behavior goes against our caveman instincts to rest, avoid pain, seek pleasure, and live in the now. To override those instincts, you must find more pros or reduce the cons of a healthy behavior like exercising. You may never experience a runner’s high but the bragging rights of running a marathon may be enough of a pro in your eyes to en “The majority of North Americans eat too much processed food, don’t sleep enough, drink too much, and are overweight.” Why? Because Healthy Habits Suck!Healthy behavior goes against our caveman instincts to rest, avoid pain, seek pleasure, and live in the now. To override those instincts, you must find more pros or reduce the cons of a healthy behavior like exercising. You may never experience a runner’s high but the bragging rights of running a marathon may be enough of a pro in your eyes to encourage running 10 miles before work each morning.The goal you set has to be within your control. Sometimes, despite eating low calorie food, you just can’t lose weight. You’ve reached a plateau. So you give up and indulge in a chocolate sundae. This happens because your goal shouldn’t be “losing weight” because your body controls that. Instead, you should make “eating more fruit and vegetables” or “eating fast food only once per week” your goal because that is totally within your control.Healthy Habits Suck uses well-researched psychological methods to allow you to motivate yourself to reach your goals. The author suggests working on only one goal at a time and reading just one chapter per week. The ideas in each of the nine chapters require some introspection so that timeframe seems reasonable. The book also has a website with a 22-page workbook used within the chapters plus three short audio files.There is a lot to like about this book. It approaches healthy goals in new ways. This is not just another book with a diet and recipes. It digs into the underlying motivation or stagnation of our actions. It might be the way to achieve truly long-term healthier living. 4 stars!Thanks to New Harbinger and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Jeeves
    January 1, 1970
    I’m not normally one to read self-help books, but when I saw the cover of Healthy Habits Suck, I couldn’t resist checking it out. The cover showed me that the book would be filled with humor, and wouldn’t be the typical self-help book, and thankfully the cover did not lie! The author infuses humor and real world examples to teach the reader that, yes, healthy habits DO suck, but there’s a reason we follow through with them anyways. Apple pie will always taste better than apples, our instinct mig I’m not normally one to read self-help books, but when I saw the cover of Healthy Habits Suck, I couldn’t resist checking it out. The cover showed me that the book would be filled with humor, and wouldn’t be the typical self-help book, and thankfully the cover did not lie! The author infuses humor and real world examples to teach the reader that, yes, healthy habits DO suck, but there’s a reason we follow through with them anyways. Apple pie will always taste better than apples, our instinct might always be to choose the couch over the gym in the evening, but that doesn’t mean we should allow our instincts to rule our actions. The author gives specific examples and then clear advice about how to follow through with changes for the better in your life.It’s a quick and easy read, not at all dry. Though the author cites research to back up her findings, it doesn’t overwhelm the book and her voice rings through every page. I enjoyed reading the book and hope to put some of the advice into action. Thank you, NetGalley, for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Hopefully I will develop some more healthy habits because I read this book!
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  • Girl
    January 1, 1970
    I received an e-copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!The premise of the book is shown in the title: healthy habits (such as running, eating greens, avoiding fast food) can be difficult to implement, because they are difficult or even counterintuitive. We’d rather stay in and eat a donut / a hamburger with fries, right? And this approach kind of makes sense and makes one’s failure’s at staying healthy easier to stomach. However: then Lee-B I received an e-copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!The premise of the book is shown in the title: healthy habits (such as running, eating greens, avoiding fast food) can be difficult to implement, because they are difficult or even counterintuitive. We’d rather stay in and eat a donut / a hamburger with fries, right? And this approach kind of makes sense and makes one’s failure’s at staying healthy easier to stomach. However: then Lee-Baggley goes on to ground these hang-ups of ours in our cave people past (”it was easier to survive back then if you had your belly full!”) , and this evolutionary psychology does not work for me. Oddly, then there comes another metaphor: that each of us is a “bus driver”, and our “passengers” are various emotions and needs we experience. So, for example, as the bus driver, we think “it’s time to exercise!”, but one of the passengers shouts that “exercise is boring!” and another tells us “eat a donut instead!”. And we should try to work with these passengers to be able to take them into account or dismiss as needed. Again, not a bad metaphor, although not a 100% congruent with the first one.Overall, I think the book contains some good ideas, but it is unfortunately too chaotic. It switches gears / metaphors too easily, and loses sight of its bigger picture to the point where the reader is not sure what the bigger picture is.
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  • Michelle Noble
    January 1, 1970
    I volunteered to give my honest review in exchange for a free copy of the book pre-publication. This book is refreshing in that it isn't goal oriented. It's value oriented, because values are always there, and goals are forgotten once achieved. It discusses all of the contributing factors that influence your weight, and how much you can actually control. I found it to be very helpful. I have been on weight loss programs of some sort off and on for over 30 years! It was nice to read the author's I volunteered to give my honest review in exchange for a free copy of the book pre-publication. This book is refreshing in that it isn't goal oriented. It's value oriented, because values are always there, and goals are forgotten once achieved. It discusses all of the contributing factors that influence your weight, and how much you can actually control. I found it to be very helpful. I have been on weight loss programs of some sort off and on for over 30 years! It was nice to read the author's ideas that aren't the mainstream. However, it's common sense.
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  • Kayo
    January 1, 1970
    I'm sorry but this book was just a blah blah blah blah...with nothing to say. Wouldn't recommend .Thanks to author, publisher and Netgalley for the chance to read. While I got the book for free, it had no bearing on the rating I gave it.
  • Priya
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. What a phenomenal book.I picked up this book solely because of the cover. Based on the cover and the title, I was expecting a book which will use strong language and rant with me about how difficult it is to live healthy.Instead I got a well researched book on why maintaining healthy behaviours is so difficult and what I can do to make behaviours stick. The author used principles of ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) to suggest ways to live healthier. I have been restless the past few Wow. What a phenomenal book.I picked up this book solely because of the cover. Based on the cover and the title, I was expecting a book which will use strong language and rant with me about how difficult it is to live healthy.Instead I got a well researched book on why maintaining healthy behaviours is so difficult and what I can do to make behaviours stick. The author used principles of ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) to suggest ways to live healthier. I have been restless the past few days because of a difficult situation at work. This book was right up my alley. Although it was a book on healthy behaviours, it helped me so much with my anxiety too. It reminded me to go back to the book by Hariss as well.Please don't consider this a weight loss book, it is not. It is strictly about being in the right mental frame to make health behaviours stick. The author assumes that you already know what to do to lose weight (eat whole foods and more veggies, less sugar and processed food, exercise etc.), the problem is that you don't stick with those behaviours. That's what this book targets.I will definitely revisit in future once I apply some techniques. A companion book to this can be Better than Before by Gretchen Rubin where she talks about the loopholes. Combo of these two would be deadly for your extra weight.I received a free copy from Netgalley. Thanks to the publisher, author and Netgalley.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I actually do enjoy having a healthy lifestyle but also love to read about various topics and people from a psychological and biological standpoint. I liked how this book did relate our tendency to not typically gravitate towards those healthy standpoints back to a evolutionary basis. The book didn't really hold new information for me but I thought it was very informative and interesting.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    Strong Start, Falters About Halfway In, Never Really Recovers. This book had an intriguing premise - it was going to explain the scientific reasons for why you don't want to be healthy and help you overcome them. And it had some excellent points in the beginning regarding human evolution, even as it glossed over any actual science or citations. But around halfway in it begins using a particular metaphor that effectively says "you're not to blame" and rather than continuing with the quasi-scienti Strong Start, Falters About Halfway In, Never Really Recovers. This book had an intriguing premise - it was going to explain the scientific reasons for why you don't want to be healthy and help you overcome them. And it had some excellent points in the beginning regarding human evolution, even as it glossed over any actual science or citations. But around halfway in it begins using a particular metaphor that effectively says "you're not to blame" and rather than continuing with the quasi-scientific explanations it goes full bore with this metaphor through the end of the book. Intriguing in the first half, and genuinely well written throughout. May be exactly what people who generally read self help books are looking for. Recommended.
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  • Heather Bennett
    January 1, 1970
    Healthy Habits Suck offers humor, real advice, and tells you that the change is up to you. Good writing and no earth shattering new things.
  • Diah R
    January 1, 1970
    (I received a digital ARC via NetGalley. All thoughts and opinions are my own.)Healthy Habits Suck didn't offer, as the writer stated, a magical exercise or meal plan to lose weight (because let's face it, most would take up the book to lose some weight). It dwelled much on what value do you want. Why did you want to do xyz instead of abc? By digging deeper, she believed that we would obtain a push power that keeps us going.This book didn't sugar-coated. Eating more veggies won't make you automa (I received a digital ARC via NetGalley. All thoughts and opinions are my own.)Healthy Habits Suck didn't offer, as the writer stated, a magical exercise or meal plan to lose weight (because let's face it, most would take up the book to lose some weight). It dwelled much on what value do you want. Why did you want to do xyz instead of abc? By digging deeper, she believed that we would obtain a push power that keeps us going.This book didn't sugar-coated. Eating more veggies won't make you automatically like it, etc., but it excelled in doing and keep doing. Even if you fall off the wagon, which is human, she advised us to be back on track by reducing the 'goal'.Overall, this book was more of a psychological lifestyle, but everyone might benefit from it.
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  • Cristie Underwood
    January 1, 1970
    This book is exactly what it says it is, a guide for being healthy when you aren't motivated to work out or eat healthy. The author explains why we crave certain foods and gave some tips that did work for me.
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