The Miraculous
Eleven-year-old Wunder Ellis is a miracologist. In a journal he calls The Miraculous, he records stories of the inexplicable and the extraordinary. These miracles fill Wunder with the feeling that he is not alone, that the world is magical, that he is part of something brighter than he can imagine.But then his newborn sister dies, at only eight days old. If that can happen, then miracles don’t exist. So Wunder gets rid of The Miraculous. And he stops believing.Then Wunder meets Faye—a cape-wearing, outspoken girl with losses of her own. Together, they find an abandoned house by the cemetery and the old woman who lives there—and who might be a witch. The old woman asks for Wunder and Faye’s help. She asks them to go through graveyards and forests, to townhalls and police stations, by bike and by train. She asks them to believe. And together, they go on a journey that leads them to friendship, to healing—and to miracles.THE MIRACULOUS is Jess Redman’s stunning debut about facing grief, trusting the unknown, and finding the brightness in the darkest moments.

The Miraculous Details

TitleThe Miraculous
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 30th, 2019
PublisherFarrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN-139780374309749
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy

The Miraculous Review

  • Gail Shepherd
    January 1, 1970
    I can't think of another middle grade novel that deals with the loss of an infant sibling, and Jess Redman's THE MIRACULOUS does so with such grace and feeling it left me breathless. Having lost a sibling myself, I know just how quickly and painfully even a close family can unravel around the death of a child. Redman gets all that heartbreak on the page as she describes Wunder Ellis's confusion and loneliness, even as she balances it beautifully with a story about how faith in connection and com I can't think of another middle grade novel that deals with the loss of an infant sibling, and Jess Redman's THE MIRACULOUS does so with such grace and feeling it left me breathless. Having lost a sibling myself, I know just how quickly and painfully even a close family can unravel around the death of a child. Redman gets all that heartbreak on the page as she describes Wunder Ellis's confusion and loneliness, even as she balances it beautifully with a story about how faith in connection and community can help us heal, and restore our belief in everyday magic. In spite of its painful subject, this is a warm and often funny book about friendship--Wunder's relationship with Faye, an eccentric Korean-American fan of the paranormal who has also lost her grandfather, helps him recover his passion for collecting miracles. Wunder rebuilds a broken friendship with his oldest friend Davy; he begins to understand that while he is grieving, even his best friends aren't always sure what to do or say to help him. What I loved most about this book was the way it mirrored the rhythms of healing from grief: the ebbs and flows, the passage of time. THE MIRACULOUS movingly captures the way some things have to be dismantled--like the empty baby crib that stands for too long in a corner of Wunder's bedroom--before life can be rebuilt. As with the magical flowering tree Wunder and his friends set out to find, there is a DoorWay to healing and connection with the departed. We just have to be willing to look for it. Note: I read an Advance Readers Copy provided by the publisher.
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  • Divine Anas
    January 1, 1970
    Awwww look at that heartwarming cover and that blurb!!! Another MG book added to my 2019 tbr!
  • Gillian
    January 1, 1970
    Some books come straight from the heart, and this is one of them. We meet Wunder Ellis shortly after the death of his baby sister, when his family is still spinning with grief. What follows is an exploration of family, friendship, love—and the miracles that surround us. If you like heartfelt books with lyrical language, characters that will make you laugh and cry, and a beautifully detailed setting, then you will love THE MIRACULOUS.
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  • seyma
    January 1, 1970
    I am fed up with the moms-in-depression. But I love the main character and his crazy friend anyway.
  • M.L. Little
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partner: The Miraculous by Jess Redman. Releases July 30th, 2019. The Miraculous, set in an America that feels nothing like our America, and completely like a place new and mysterious, brings us a boy named Wunder, his friend Faye, a witch in the woods, and a baby sister who only lived for eight days. The imagery is rich, the dialogue thought-provoking. The characters burst off the page, not because they are so loud or eccentric (with the exception of Faye), but because they are @kidlitexchange #partner: The Miraculous by Jess Redman. Releases July 30th, 2019. The Miraculous, set in an America that feels nothing like our America, and completely like a place new and mysterious, brings us a boy named Wunder, his friend Faye, a witch in the woods, and a baby sister who only lived for eight days. The imagery is rich, the dialogue thought-provoking. The characters burst off the page, not because they are so loud or eccentric (with the exception of Faye), but because they are so deeply real, with every quiet word and thought and emotion. Many middle-grade books cover loss, but this is the first piece of fiction I’ve ever read that depicts infant loss. Losing an infant sibling is so different from losing an older one. You may not be losing a friend, but you’re losing your hope of this child. The idea of who this little person would have grown up to be. It can be deeply devastating. And this book handles it so, so well. Jess Redman is a psychologist by day, but The Miraculous, her first book, reads like she’s been doing this all her life. It is masterfully handled and the story is woven with grief and mystery and so much love. I read this book in one day. You can too on July 30th! Thank you @kidlitexchange for providing me with a review copy—all opinions are my own.
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  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    The overall message of this book is contradictory. On the one hand the topic of death, especially that of a younger sibling, is addressed in an accessible way. There is also much hope as the town is brought together by the deliveries of Wunder and Faye. I also loved the way Faye's character was so comfortable in her own skin and steadfast in supporting Wunder (Wundie) in the midst of his family crisis. We are indeed all witnesses of miracles (as defined by Wunder) and slowing down enough to see The overall message of this book is contradictory. On the one hand the topic of death, especially that of a younger sibling, is addressed in an accessible way. There is also much hope as the town is brought together by the deliveries of Wunder and Faye. I also loved the way Faye's character was so comfortable in her own skin and steadfast in supporting Wunder (Wundie) in the midst of his family crisis. We are indeed all witnesses of miracles (as defined by Wunder) and slowing down enough to see them and connect with each other is indeed a blessing. My biggest objection to this novel is the fact that a witch is given the credit for drawing the town together when it should be given to God.Thank you to Macmillan and NetGalley for providing a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    I wondered if I could take another book with grieving being an important part of it, but actually this is the book to read if you think you can't read another book on this topic for MG readers. The people of the small town at the center of this book learn to believe in what they cannot see and find light in the darkest of places. This is no small challenge for an author to pull off, but I think Jess Redman has done it.
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  • Jeanne Ferruolo
    January 1, 1970
    “But sometimes the brightest miracles are hidden in the darkest moments.”This is what Faye tells Wunder in Jess Redman’s beautiful debut about loss. I loved this story for so many reasons. First, the prose is gorgeous. I found myself lost in the beauty of the scenes and the words. The imagery throughout the story is magical– the DoorWay Tree, the cemetery, the forest, the Witch and her house.Second, I fell in love with Wunder and Faye (et cetera, et cetera). Wunder is sincere and real. I was mor “But sometimes the brightest miracles are hidden in the darkest moments.”This is what Faye tells Wunder in Jess Redman’s beautiful debut about loss. I loved this story for so many reasons. First, the prose is gorgeous. I found myself lost in the beauty of the scenes and the words. The imagery throughout the story is magical– the DoorWay Tree, the cemetery, the forest, the Witch and her house.Second, I fell in love with Wunder and Faye (et cetera, et cetera). Wunder is sincere and real. I was more than happy to take this journey through grief with him because I knew he would guide us both back to the light.Finally, and maybe especially, I loved this story because it tackles a subject that few middle grade authors are brave enough to take on full force as Redman does. All children have dealt with loss in some capacity. This story shows the resilience and beauty hidden deep inside the grief – the kind of beauty it takes a child to see.It is so easy to become cynical and see only the bad. But just as Wunder reminds everyone in Branch Hill that miracles exist everywhere if you’re willing to look for them – he helped me remember that, too. I needed Wunder right now. I needed THE MIRACULOUS. Thank you Jess Redman for sharing this exquisite story. I know that it will be adored by kids and adults alike.
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  • Naomi Milliner
    January 1, 1970
    This is a stunning book - and, indeed, miraculous to think it is a debut. This story of love and loss and hope is one everyone can identify with. There is so much heart and wisdom in it. I already want to read it again but, even more than that, I want to share it with others. This book will stay with me for a very long time. "No one was ever alone. And no one was ever truly gone... Because love never ended." I hope you read this powerful book, and love it as much as I do.
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  • Kathie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and Farrar Straus Giroux for an ARC of this book (release date is July 30th)This is such a beautiful story about loss, love, hope, faith, and miracles. Wunder Ellis is a miracologist, but when his baby sister dies, he stops believing in miracles. He inadventently befriends a girl named Faye, and together they meet an old woman (who may or may not be a witch) who lives at the place in the woods called The DoorWay House. The woman asks them to deliver several letters for he Thank you to the author and Farrar Straus Giroux for an ARC of this book (release date is July 30th)This is such a beautiful story about loss, love, hope, faith, and miracles. Wunder Ellis is a miracologist, but when his baby sister dies, he stops believing in miracles. He inadventently befriends a girl named Faye, and together they meet an old woman (who may or may not be a witch) who lives at the place in the woods called The DoorWay House. The woman asks them to deliver several letters for her to people who live in their community, and as they undertake this task, both friends start to rethink their beliefs about miracles. I truly loved the focus on losing a younger sibling, and how it can tear a family apart, but the power of healing to put it back together again. The hope in this book makes the heavier subject matter easier to handle, and a touch of the miraculous keeps the reader wondering where the story is going to go. I love the friendship between Wunder and Faye, and also the way Wunder and Davy are able to find their way back to each other. This book will take you on a bit of an emotional roller coaster, but will always set you back gently on the ground.This is a must-read middle grade book of 2019 for me.
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  • Clare O'Connor
    January 1, 1970
    Jess Redman has delivered a heart-warming and emotionally powerful debut novel in THE MIRACULOUS. The story will capture your heart from the beginning and have you thinking about it long after the last page has been devoured. Beautifully written, the book features a main character with an important message: Miracles exist. Eleven-year-old Wunder Ellis considers himself a miracologist. A keen observer of the world around him, he researches life-changing stories and events and records them in a bo Jess Redman has delivered a heart-warming and emotionally powerful debut novel in THE MIRACULOUS. The story will capture your heart from the beginning and have you thinking about it long after the last page has been devoured. Beautifully written, the book features a main character with an important message: Miracles exist. Eleven-year-old Wunder Ellis considers himself a miracologist. A keen observer of the world around him, he researches life-changing stories and events and records them in a book called The Miraculous. These stories are evidence that the world is filled with miracles. Wunder is full of optimism and hope until the death of his baby sister changes everything. His parents have been rocked to their core with grief. His friends, Davey and Tomas, don’t know what to say and can’t relate. Navigating his loss alone, Wunder decides he was wrong to believe in miracles. Fortunately, his decision to stop believing is challenged by Faye, a new friend who is grieving her own loss. Together, they take readers of THE MIRACULOUS on an adventure with lots of twists and turns that, in the end, leave us no other choice but to believe. This is a story the world needs, now more than ever!My thanks to the author for an advanced reading copy of this incredible book.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Interest Level: 3-6Do you believe in miracles? Do you believe in witches? Do you believe in reincarnation? These are all questions that 11-year-old Wunder Ellis struggles with. When he was 5-years-old he became a miracologist - someone who believes in and records the miracles of others. He and his parents were walking in the woods and he ran ahead of them. He ended up in front of an old, run-down house that was made of a very odd wood. As a crow cawed above him the spirals in the wood started sp Interest Level: 3-6Do you believe in miracles? Do you believe in witches? Do you believe in reincarnation? These are all questions that 11-year-old Wunder Ellis struggles with. When he was 5-years-old he became a miracologist - someone who believes in and records the miracles of others. He and his parents were walking in the woods and he ran ahead of them. He ended up in front of an old, run-down house that was made of a very odd wood. As a crow cawed above him the spirals in the wood started spinning, he felt dizzy, and was all of the sudden filled with a miracle feeling. He saw a shadow in an upper window but his parents told him that no one lived in The Doorway House. From that day forward, and with the help of his parents, Wunder wrote down miracles of others. He even clipped out newspaper articles which recorded miracles. He even named his book The Miraculous. Now Wunder is eleven and he doesn't believe in miracles anymore, not since his baby sister died. She was 8-days-old when she passed away and Wunder expected a miracle. Now he has lost faith as he watches his family crumble apart. Then Wunder meets Faye, an outspoken girl who goes around all day wearing a cape. Faye has experienced death in her family also and she believes in the paranormal. Wunder and Faye realize that the day after his sister passed away that an old woman, who Faye insists is a witch, shows up on the porch of the abandoned Doorway House. The witch sends Wunder and Faye on a series of errands that will make Wunder rethink his opinions of miracles. Is this witch his sister reincarnated like Faye believes? Can this witch find a way to mend Wunder's broken family? Or will her errands land them in jail? Will Wunder ever believe in miracles ever again? Read this touching tale of grief, mourning, friendship, love and above all having faith when all seems lost.The Miraculous is Jess Redman's debut middle-grade novel and I believe she hit it out of the park with this one. This book will take your heart and break it then find a way to mend it back stronger than ever. You might need a box of Kleenex near you for those sad and happy tears. Don't miss this debut 2019 book!!Follow me:Blog - Blazer Tales - https://blazertales.com/Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https://www.facebook.com/LauriesLibra...Instagram - laurieslibrary - https://www.instagram.com/laurieslibr...Twitter - @laurieevans27 https://twitter.com/laurieevans27?lan...Goodreads - Laurie Purser - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1...Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/auburngirl2...YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCulD...Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurie-ev...
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author for sharing an ARC with our #bookexpedition group! Beautiful MG novel about the heartbreak and loneliness that accompanies death. Wunder is a miracologist; he studies the miracles that happen in our everyday world. Until one day, tragedy strikes his own family and his belief system is shattered. Enter Faye, who’s struggling with a loss of her own, a mysterious forest, an abandoned house, and a mysterious old woman (witch?) who lives there. This novel brings them together Thank you to the author for sharing an ARC with our #bookexpedition group! Beautiful MG novel about the heartbreak and loneliness that accompanies death. Wunder is a miracologist; he studies the miracles that happen in our everyday world. Until one day, tragedy strikes his own family and his belief system is shattered. Enter Faye, who’s struggling with a loss of her own, a mysterious forest, an abandoned house, and a mysterious old woman (witch?) who lives there. This novel brings them together on a journey full of friendship, belief, hope, and miracles. With themes of trusting the unknown and dealing with grief, this novel that publishes in July 2019 will be a hit with MG readers.
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  • Clare Lund
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from the author, but am not being compensated for my review. A bittersweet story about giving up on a belief in miracles after a tragedy. The setting descriptions were stunning, and the message was beautiful, but I personally had a harder time connecting to the characters. I’d recommend this one for ages 10 and up.
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  • Amy Robertson
    January 1, 1970
    Wunder Ellis is a collector of miracles. That is, until he loses his baby sister upon birth. The Ellis family mournes, each in their own way. It is Wunder, and his belief in miracles, that is able to heal himself, and those around him.This heartfelt story is beautifully written and a perfect story for youngsters dealing with death. It has hope, grief, family, friendship, magic, healing, faith, and miracles. The Miraculous is the perfect read for middle graders and their first experiences dealing Wunder Ellis is a collector of miracles. That is, until he loses his baby sister upon birth. The Ellis family mournes, each in their own way. It is Wunder, and his belief in miracles, that is able to heal himself, and those around him.This heartfelt story is beautifully written and a perfect story for youngsters dealing with death. It has hope, grief, family, friendship, magic, healing, faith, and miracles. The Miraculous is the perfect read for middle graders and their first experiences dealing with death. It is kind and soothing, with the right touch of adventure. My 4th grade readers will love it.Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read/review this ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Celia Henry
    January 1, 1970
    THE MIRACULOUS is deeply touching but also funny and exciting. Redman masterfully weaves together grief, hope, friendship and adventure in this amazing debut novel that you just can't put down. Reading this book was pure joy and the final chapters, full of magic, love and mystery, are breathtaking.
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  • Mandy Stallard
    January 1, 1970
    When we meet Wunder, we learn that he no longer believes in miracles, even though he has been a "miracologist" most of his life. He collected miracles and documented them in a notebook, but something heartbreaking has happened to his family, and they are all in a place dark enough to make him think that miracles no longer exist. In the midst of his grief, he befriends a unique girl named Faye. Faye believes that all things are possible because she knows enough to know that she doesn't know every When we meet Wunder, we learn that he no longer believes in miracles, even though he has been a "miracologist" most of his life. He collected miracles and documented them in a notebook, but something heartbreaking has happened to his family, and they are all in a place dark enough to make him think that miracles no longer exist. In the midst of his grief, he befriends a unique girl named Faye. Faye believes that all things are possible because she knows enough to know that she doesn't know everything. She and Wunder encounter an old woman who might be a witch and begin delivering letters for her. They aren't really sure what this strange lady has planned, but they know she wants to make a miracle happen for their town. Faye and "the witch" are the only things tethering Wunder to the world around him, and if they have anything to say about it, they are going to prove that miracles do exist.I don't have the words to do this book justice, so I will simply say it is one of the best novels I've ever read, and I've read a lot! Jess Redman's debut is a beautiful reminder that we are all connected by grief and miracles. Every single person has experienced some type of personal tragedy, whether that be the physical death of a loved one or the death of a life imagined. At the very same time, all humans have experienced some type of miracle, be they big or small. While it is easy for people to connect with each other over miraculous events, we often suffer alone in grief. We don't know how to reach out to someone who is in the deepest dark; why bother saying anything when you know your words cannot bring back their loved one? Even if it is uncomfortable, we need to reach out to those around us who are grieving to remind them they are not alone and that their love will never end. No matter how long you have loved someone, your grief over their loss is valid. As Faye tells Wunder, "what does time have to do with love?" This book is a must-read for children and adults alike. I cannot wait to share this novel with teachers and students at my new school. I will sing its praises near and far. It publishes July 30th, so go ahead and pre-order it now. It will be the best the book you read this summer.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Wunder Ellis is a miracologist, dutifully cataloging stories of the miraculous in a journal. However, after his newborn sister dies, Wunder stops the stories— miracles don’t exist. But then he meets Faye and, in turn, the woman who lives in the crumbling house near the cemetery. Though Wunder can’t say for sure if she’s a witch, he follows her instructions for a journey that makes him reconsider friendship, grief, and even miracles.There are few books that, within the first sentences, feel speci Wunder Ellis is a miracologist, dutifully cataloging stories of the miraculous in a journal. However, after his newborn sister dies, Wunder stops the stories— miracles don’t exist. But then he meets Faye and, in turn, the woman who lives in the crumbling house near the cemetery. Though Wunder can’t say for sure if she’s a witch, he follows her instructions for a journey that makes him reconsider friendship, grief, and even miracles.There are few books that, within the first sentences, feel special. They’re different in an almost intangible way. And yet, there’s an energy that radiates through their prose — effortless and compelling — that suggests something wondrous is to come.That’s what author Jess Redman has managed to accomplish in her debut novel. To be fair, with a main character named Wunder, that’s sort of implied. Yet, this complicated and driven kid just trying to find his way after the death of his infant sister is the glue that binds this work together. Disconnected from his friends and navigating a home life with parents who are also struggling, he pushes aside the miracles that have defined the first part of his life. Yet underneath is his optimistic, curious side that drives him into an adventure full of potential magic.Perhaps that’s what Redman has done best of all: she’s crafted an expression of the healing process as it relates to grief. Wunder’s moods buck and weave, grappling to find peaceful equilibrium in his sorrow. And through it all he seeks answers, about miracles and about himself. It’s all part of the healing process.While this might sound heavy — and it certainly is — that’s not to suggest there’s no fun. Faye is the perfect partner, unapologetically boisterous and ready to tackle the world. She sneaks into Wunder’s protective shell and propels him into taking risks. After all, there’s a potentially witch out there who has a quest, and that needs investigating. Just like in life, there’s plenty of joy in sorrow.Redman has written a story that thrusts the darkness of death into the light while punctuating with a hug. As a result, The Miraculous is a breathtaking debut.Note: I received a free ARC of this book through NetGalley.Review also posted at https://pluckedfromthestacks.wordpres...
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!Jess Redman's debut The Miraculous starts with a hard punch to the gut. It's seldom that middle grade novels look at the death of a sibling, and even worse an infant. Our main character, Wunder, has stopped believing in miracles, and is convinced that miracles are not real. That snippet of information should immediately tell you what a rough ride The Miraculous is going to be. Wunder meets Faye, a girl who has also suffered extreme loss, and the two becom Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!Jess Redman's debut The Miraculous starts with a hard punch to the gut. It's seldom that middle grade novels look at the death of a sibling, and even worse an infant. Our main character, Wunder, has stopped believing in miracles, and is convinced that miracles are not real. That snippet of information should immediately tell you what a rough ride The Miraculous is going to be. Wunder meets Faye, a girl who has also suffered extreme loss, and the two become friends, creating an understanding that grief strikes when it wants to. I could easily connect with this story, especially as someone who has lost people who are valuable to me. Faye's responses to her trauma are much more aggressive and even vocal, which admittedly, was also something I connected with. Despite its over arching theme of grief and loss, I want to stress that The Miraculous is a hopeful read, and one filled with a lot of magical realism. There's so many fantastical elements in the story that create such a rich reading experiences, and the larger themes (both positive and negative) are highlighted in interesting or magical ways. What I equally love about this book is that its such a fast-paced read, so much so that I read it in two one hour lunch breaks because I needed to know what was happening to Wunder and Faye throughout the story.I do think those who love story-driven magical realism will definitely love this book. I won't lie though, as I do think the harshness of Wunder's trauma may be difficult for some younger readers to understand or even bear. Even with that in mind, The Miraculous is a beautiful story that will fill readers with both hope and "wunder"!
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  • Kristin Crouch
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Macmillan Kids for sharing an ARC with Collabookation.For the past several years, Wunder has been researching miracles. He scours the newspaper for stories about miracles, interviews people, and records all of the events in a book he calls The Miraculous. He believes that miracles are all around us, if only we look. He believes and lives this.Until he doesn't. When his infant sister dies, after holding on for eight days, Wunder loses this belief in miracles. If miracles were real, s Thank you to Macmillan Kids for sharing an ARC with Collabookation.For the past several years, Wunder has been researching miracles. He scours the newspaper for stories about miracles, interviews people, and records all of the events in a book he calls The Miraculous. He believes that miracles are all around us, if only we look. He believes and lives this.Until he doesn't. When his infant sister dies, after holding on for eight days, Wunder loses this belief in miracles. If miracles were real, surely one would have come along to save his sister. And so, as surely as he collected miracles, Wunder begins to rally against them. What occurs after Wunder stops believing in miracles is even more stunning than what happened before. The Miraculous is a tale of grief, and of trying to figure out where that grief fits in. With his mother grieving alone in her room, and his father working through his grief at the office, Wunder is left to his own devices. While his old friends act like nothing ever happened, Wunder forms a friendship with Faye. Faye is holding on to her own grief, and together the two find an adventure that just may restore some of their faith in miracles.The Miraculous is a wonderful examination of the different ways that people grieve. As we know, there is no right way, and Redman honors that through story. It also highlights what different friendships can bring out of people, and how we can be the best people we can be with people who believe in us. The Miraculous is an adventure ~ a little creepy, a little intriguing and mysterious. But at it's core it's a testament to faith and love. Highly recommend for readers in grade 5 and up.
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  • Alin
    January 1, 1970
    When it comes to difficult topics, some adults believe that children should be shielded and not exposed to them. However, I am a firm believer that the realities of life can be shared in careful ways. Over the past few years, I have found several children's books that do a great job with difficult issues. The Miraculous is one of these books. The main character is dealing with the death of his baby sister. The way it affects his family and his own life is a true-to-life experience of grief and l When it comes to difficult topics, some adults believe that children should be shielded and not exposed to them. However, I am a firm believer that the realities of life can be shared in careful ways. Over the past few years, I have found several children's books that do a great job with difficult issues. The Miraculous is one of these books. The main character is dealing with the death of his baby sister. The way it affects his family and his own life is a true-to-life experience of grief and loss. I don't know of many other middle grade books that deal with the death of an infant sibling, so just for that alone, I'd recommend it as a resource for understanding and empathy. Jess Redman has crafted this story in a way that brings the feelings straight to you. To have depression and grief explained in ways a child can understand is a real gift. I cried many tears because the characters' pain was so realistic. It is surely a talent to write in such a way--not only through the grief but to resolution, to understanding, to a point of healing. This is a rare and beautiful book. And as with most middle grade books, it can be read by any adult as well. Fascinating characters, interesting plot, mystery, humor, relationships. I cannot recommend it enough.
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  • Tiffany Neal
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, NetGalley for the gigital ARC aid this middle grade.Wow. What a beautiful book. The writing g was gorgeous. The characters were so real. The story line was intriguing and full of emotion. This middle grade book will be well known. Loss is never an easy subject to tackle, especially in middle grade books, but this story manages to weave hope, love, friendship, and miracles into the experiences of grief in a way that brings light to the loss. The characters, Wunder & Faye, in partic Thank you, NetGalley for the gigital ARC aid this middle grade.Wow. What a beautiful book. The writing g was gorgeous. The characters were so real. The story line was intriguing and full of emotion. This middle grade book will be well known. Loss is never an easy subject to tackle, especially in middle grade books, but this story manages to weave hope, love, friendship, and miracles into the experiences of grief in a way that brings light to the loss. The characters, Wunder & Faye, in particular were such a pleasure to follow. Wunder is such a real and true portrayal of a child trying to sift through his emotions and family after losing his eight day old baby sister. Faye is an unforgettable character, so honest and with a voice that only belongs to her. She’s so vivid, you can hear her voice and see exactly who she is as you read. Third through sixth grade teachers: add this one to your list to buy. I think it’d make an excellent read aloud as well. You do not want to miss this one. This is hands-down my favorite middle grade read of 2019 so far.
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  • Sarah R. Baughman
    January 1, 1970
    This beautiful book handles grief and faith with exceptional sensitivity. In the wake of his baby sister's death, Wunder Ellis decides he no longer believes in miracles. But with the help of Faye (fierce, funny, et cetera; my absolute favorite secondary character ever!) and an old woman in a mysterious house, he begins to wonder if "sometimes the brightest miracles are hidden in the darkest moments." Jess Redman has crafted a story rich with lyrical language and relatable characters, and she doe This beautiful book handles grief and faith with exceptional sensitivity. In the wake of his baby sister's death, Wunder Ellis decides he no longer believes in miracles. But with the help of Faye (fierce, funny, et cetera; my absolute favorite secondary character ever!) and an old woman in a mysterious house, he begins to wonder if "sometimes the brightest miracles are hidden in the darkest moments." Jess Redman has crafted a story rich with lyrical language and relatable characters, and she doesn't shy away from the kinds of tough questions about death, love, and family that all middle grade readers ponder. This book was just what I needed, giving words for the complex feelings surrounding loss; and it's just as important a read for friends of kids struggling with a loved one's death as it is for the ones grieving. Fans of hopeful, poignant reads with a touch of magic will find exactly what they're looking for in THE MIRACULOUS.
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  • Meag McKeron
    January 1, 1970
    The Miraculous explores a very heavy topic (death of a sibling, in this case a sister who was only eight days old) in a way that is accessible to young readers - it's deeply sad, but it is also full of hope. The main character, Wunder, is easy to love. The author does a great job of showing the toll his sister's death has taken on him and how complicated processing grief as a child can be, especially when you add in the fact that the parents are also dealing with their own sadness. I had a tough The Miraculous explores a very heavy topic (death of a sibling, in this case a sister who was only eight days old) in a way that is accessible to young readers - it's deeply sad, but it is also full of hope. The main character, Wunder, is easy to love. The author does a great job of showing the toll his sister's death has taken on him and how complicated processing grief as a child can be, especially when you add in the fact that the parents are also dealing with their own sadness. I had a tough time with Wunder's parents at points (leaving his sister's crib in his bedroom for weeks after her death is just one example) but I understood the importance of showing that adults aren't always able to put on a brave face for their children. The miraculous events toward the end of the story were a bit much for me, as well as the whole Doorway House witch, but overall I thought this was a well-done middle grade book on grief.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    THE MIRACULOUS perfectly balanced loss and hope, grief and humor through the eyes of eleven-year-old Wunder Ellis. I loved this character so much. He was someone so hopeful, so observant of the world around him and the people in it, but when his newborn sister died he closed himself off from those he loved and the miraculous events he believed in. Journeying with him as he connected with his friends (new and old) and as he worked to believe in the miraculous again, warmed my heart. Faye was anot THE MIRACULOUS perfectly balanced loss and hope, grief and humor through the eyes of eleven-year-old Wunder Ellis. I loved this character so much. He was someone so hopeful, so observant of the world around him and the people in it, but when his newborn sister died he closed himself off from those he loved and the miraculous events he believed in. Journeying with him as he connected with his friends (new and old) and as he worked to believe in the miraculous again, warmed my heart. Faye was another one of my favorite characters, with her cloak and her confidence and her ability to get close to Wunder when no one else could. She blew into the story, and while she was so much fun, she ran so much deeper than that as well.Such a beautiful and thoughtful story!Thanks to NetGalley for the e-arc!
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    How can you believe in anything when you have experienced a great loss and are so sad? Jess Redman takes the reader through a journey of discovery with Wunder, Faye and Davy. This beautiful story will have you rising and falling right along with these characters and this whole town. Just when you think sadness will take over, change occurs, there is time for healing, and we all learn what it is like to experience a miracle. Redman's descriptions of nature, specifically the trees and change of se How can you believe in anything when you have experienced a great loss and are so sad? Jess Redman takes the reader through a journey of discovery with Wunder, Faye and Davy. This beautiful story will have you rising and falling right along with these characters and this whole town. Just when you think sadness will take over, change occurs, there is time for healing, and we all learn what it is like to experience a miracle. Redman's descriptions of nature, specifically the trees and change of seasons, are very engaging. I loved thinking about the DoorWay Tree and how healing nature is. This book could be matched with Wishtree, The Story Web, and The Magic of Melwick Orchard if you want to tie in more stories that surround the reader in nature.
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  • Kim Long
    January 1, 1970
    I love books that take place in our world but have a twinge of magic, so I was very interested in this book. It did not disappoint! We're rooting for Wonder from the start, and I've never read a book that deals with a sibling death in such a realistic, yet not-so-depressing-I-want-to-stop-reading manner, Each way Wonder deals with his parents, freinds, and strangers, is spot-on. The magical mystery of what's with the witch in the woods is a great complementary plot that really moves the story fo I love books that take place in our world but have a twinge of magic, so I was very interested in this book. It did not disappoint! We're rooting for Wonder from the start, and I've never read a book that deals with a sibling death in such a realistic, yet not-so-depressing-I-want-to-stop-reading manner, Each way Wonder deals with his parents, freinds, and strangers, is spot-on. The magical mystery of what's with the witch in the woods is a great complementary plot that really moves the story forward and provides a fantastic outlet for Wonder to process his feelings. Highly recommend!
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  • Tina Athaide
    January 1, 1970
    Jess Redman has delivered a heart-warming and powerful debut novel in THE MIRACULOUS. A story about loss, love, hope, and miracles. When Wunder's infant sister dies, after holding on for eight days, he loses this belief in miracles. He meets a young girl, Faye, and an old women, who both help him restore his faith in miracles. This book debuts on July 30th, 201 and will make a great addition to school libraries, especially for children looking for books with characters handling grief.Thank you t Jess Redman has delivered a heart-warming and powerful debut novel in THE MIRACULOUS. A story about loss, love, hope, and miracles. When Wunder's infant sister dies, after holding on for eight days, he loses this belief in miracles. He meets a young girl, Faye, and an old women, who both help him restore his faith in miracles. This book debuts on July 30th, 201 and will make a great addition to school libraries, especially for children looking for books with characters handling grief.Thank you to Net Galley for an advanced copy.
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  • Derek Moore
    January 1, 1970
    Jess Redman takes the reader into the world of an 11 year old boy whose newborn sister dies. We go through the healing process of his mother, father and Wunder himself. Wunder is somewhat a quirky person who is fascinated by miracles. It is a well written book to be read by all, young and old. It is full of hope, belief, sadness and wonderment. Jess Redman can make this reader believe in miracles again. I really enjoyed this book and will recommend it to everyone. I have already passed it along Jess Redman takes the reader into the world of an 11 year old boy whose newborn sister dies. We go through the healing process of his mother, father and Wunder himself. Wunder is somewhat a quirky person who is fascinated by miracles. It is a well written book to be read by all, young and old. It is full of hope, belief, sadness and wonderment. Jess Redman can make this reader believe in miracles again. I really enjoyed this book and will recommend it to everyone. I have already passed it along to a friend. Thank you for the opportunity of receiving an advanced copy.
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  • Mariama Lockington
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful, beautiful, beautiful book about grief, family, friendship and the power of love. The prose soars with lyricism and sharpness, and Wunder and his band of friends will make you laugh out loud, cry, and cheer. This book will stay in my heart for a long and long time, and I can't wait to share it with people in my life, young and old. We need more stories like this—honest stories about what it means to lose someone you love and find them again in those around you.
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