How to Be Luminous
When seventeen-year-old Minnie Sloe's mother disappears, so does her ability to see color. How can young artist Minnie create when all she sees is black-and-white? Middle child Minnie and her two sisters have always been able to get through anything together: growing up without fathers, living the eccentric artist lifestyle, and riding out their mother's mental highs and lows. But when they lose their mother, Minnie wonders if she could lose everything: her family, her future, her first love . . . and maybe even her mind.

How to Be Luminous Details

TitleHow to Be Luminous
Author
ReleaseApr 30th, 2019
PublisherRoaring Brook Press
ISBN-139781626723757
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult

How to Be Luminous Review

  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    Still mulling over my full thoughts on this story. In some respects, it really was quite interesting — especially as a story about grief and anger over the loss of someone beloved.
  • Jay G
    January 1, 1970
    Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer...*I was sent a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for my honest review* Minnie and her two sisters have always been eccentric, taking after their artistic mother. When their mother goes missing, each sister copes in their own way. Minnie finds herself struggling with the loss of her colours, seeing the world in monochrome. She doesn't know how she will be able to be an artist Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer...*I was sent a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for my honest review* Minnie and her two sisters have always been eccentric, taking after their artistic mother. When their mother goes missing, each sister copes in their own way. Minnie finds herself struggling with the loss of her colours, seeing the world in monochrome. She doesn't know how she will be able to be an artist if she sees the world in black and white. She is also worried that she may be taking after her mothers wild mood swings she sometimes experienced. This is Minnie's story. I think this book did an excellent job dealing with some very difficult topics in a sensitive manner. It covers grief, loss, suicide, mental illness and much more. The book is heavily focused on loss and grief and how it can be different for different people. I liked seeing how each sister handled the loss of their mother but all came together to support one another in the end. I also really enjoyed how this book handled mental illness and medication as well. It showed that it can be scary and hard to handle, but with a good support system it will be okay, although it may still be difficult at times. I also really liked that the author included a list of phone numbers to call in case the reader was struggling with their own mental illness. I liked Minnie for the most part, but at times she frustrated me with the decisions she made. Some of them were extremely selfish, which is understandable in her situation and the mental state she was in. I found her to be very impulsive and I wish she had stopped and thought about her actions a bit more. I liked that the author included a deaf character and how the sisters and those around her were constantly communicating in BSL. I thought it was a nice addition to the story. Overall, I did really enjoy the story and I thought it was a great portrayal of the different stages of grief.
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    All the color disappeared from her world along with her mother. While trying to remedy the situation, Minnie worries that she might have inherited more than her mother's artistic ability.My love for grief and loss books was really satisfied by How to Be Luminous. This book was beautiful, heartbreaking, and poignant. Hapgood's exploration of grief was well executed, and she did a beautiful job capturing the different ways people deal with great losses.The story was told from the point of view of All the color disappeared from her world along with her mother. While trying to remedy the situation, Minnie worries that she might have inherited more than her mother's artistic ability.My love for grief and loss books was really satisfied by How to Be Luminous. This book was beautiful, heartbreaking, and poignant. Hapgood's exploration of grief was well executed, and she did a beautiful job capturing the different ways people deal with great losses.The story was told from the point of view of Minnie, the middle Sloe daughter, but her sisters also played a big role in the story. The three young women were dealing with their mother's disappearance in vastly different ways, and I always appreciate, when the complexities of people's sorrow is shown from different perspectives, because grief is not a one-size-fits-all thing. Hapgood show the good, the bad, and the ugly sides of mourning, and was really able to convey the emotions attached with this process.The Sloe sisters had put their mother on a pedestal, and would explain away her moods as "starlight and sinkholes". After much soul-searching, and the discovery of a box of prescription drugs, they realized that there was an explanation for their mother's behavior. It was sad to see the girls finally accept that their mother's highs and lows were symptoms of her mental illness, and I felt their pain and anguish with having to admit it to themselves. This conflicted with their vision of who their mother was, and it was obvious how difficult it was for the teens to comes to terms with it.Throughout the story, Minnie was trying to deal with her emotions, her monochromatism, and the ghost of her mother. By examining the past and making some poor decisions, Minnie was able to process her grief as she discovered new things about herself.In addition to grief and loss, I love stories with siblings, and this was one interesting trio. Each sister was dealing with the loss of their mother, but there were also some old wounds to contend with. Things were touch and go with the sisters for a while, but in the end, they were there for each other, and I was really pleased with the way Hapgood handled their situation.Overall: This was a beautifully written book about how people grieve and struggle to come to terms with their loss.*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Ryley (Ryley Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    After Hapgood's previous novel, The Square Root of Summer, I was really excited to pick up her latest book. While it was well-written, I couldn't help but feel like I've read similar stories and that there wasn't maybe as much originality as I wanted there to be.This book follows seventeen-year-old Minnie. After the disappearance and presumed death of her famous artist mother four months ago, Minnie has lost all the colour in her life. Instead of vibrant colours, her entire world has turned gray After Hapgood's previous novel, The Square Root of Summer, I was really excited to pick up her latest book. While it was well-written, I couldn't help but feel like I've read similar stories and that there wasn't maybe as much originality as I wanted there to be.This book follows seventeen-year-old Minnie. After the disappearance and presumed death of her famous artist mother four months ago, Minnie has lost all the colour in her life. Instead of vibrant colours, her entire world has turned grayscale, and she has no idea why. While she tries to navigate her new family life with her two sisters, Min also has to deal with Ash, her sweet, non-artist boyfriend. She has trouble letting him into the world of her mind and to her art. When she meets Felix, the similarly grieving new kid, she finds a kindred spirit. But how can she decide who to be with when her own world is crumbling around her?Just to get this out of the way, this book does have a love triangle. I have to say, it's been quite a while since I've read a book with a love triangle, I'm not sure they're as common these days as they once were and it took me a minute to figure out what was happening, I couldn't quite believe it at first. Subsequently, there is a bit of cheating/overlap that happens in the book, and while Min's internal commentary addresses that she knows what she is doing isn't right, she makes no real move to discuss it out loud.Despite the issues within the family, I did really enjoy the family aspect of the story. Each of Min's sisters has been affected by their mother's disappearance in different, but also similar ways. Min's youngest sister, Emmy-Kate, doesn't know that their mother is likely dead, and not just missing and is dealing with that by acting out and immersing herself in her mother's things. Min's older sister, Niko, is now their guardian and has to juggle that with going to school. Niko, Min's older sister is also Deaf, and the characters use both BSL (the book is set in England), as well as "home-signing." I have only read a couple of books with Deaf characters and I was happy to see how well Hapgood was able to seamlessly include signing in the book. It wasn't just thrown in as a plot point, and it wasn't forgotten along the way - even when the characters were talking fast or having an argument, Hapgood made sure that someone was communicating to Niko as well.My main issue with this book, however, was that it wasn't really anything new. It felt fairly similar to This Adventure Ends by Emma Mills with the slightly pretentious art lingo and deeper subject matter. I also felt like the characters themselves weren't super unique from one another - they each seemed to have their 'thing,' but beyond that, I don't know if I could really tell you who they were.Overall, I think it was a good book, but I'm not sure it is one that I needed to read.
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  • Chelsea Girard
    January 1, 1970
    When seventeen-year-old Minnie Sloe's mother disappears, so does her ability to see color. How can young artist Minnie create when all she sees is black-and-white? Middle child Minnie and her two sisters have always been able to get through anything together: growing up without fathers, living the eccentric artist lifestyle, and riding out their mother's mental highs and lows. But when they lose their mother, Minnie wonders if she could lose everything: her family, her future, her first love . . When seventeen-year-old Minnie Sloe's mother disappears, so does her ability to see color. How can young artist Minnie create when all she sees is black-and-white? Middle child Minnie and her two sisters have always been able to get through anything together: growing up without fathers, living the eccentric artist lifestyle, and riding out their mother's mental highs and lows. But when they lose their mother, Minnie wonders if she could lose everything: her family, her future, her first love . . . and maybe even her mind.----What can I say? I have a soft spot for book that deal with mental health so sue me! I fell in love with Minnie and her two sisters as they took on the words through grief, loss and mental health. This book was deep, extreme tear-jerker right here so make sure to grab some tissues while reading this baby!I loved how Hapgood put so much love and emotion into this story. The characters were heart-wrenchingly real as if I could feel their pain through the words on the pages in front of me.From start to finish, I loved every page that I devoured as my mind was in awe of how beautiful this book was. Even though it was extremely sat mind you, I loved how the details were as though they were seated in front of me on a silver platter.There is definitely a trigger warning for suicide so please be mindful while reading.
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Net Galley and Roaring Brook Press for a digital copy of this ARC in return for an honest review.In How to Be Luminous by Harriet Reuter Haphood Minnie and her two sisters, Niko and Emmy-Kate, are suddenly left without their mother. Minnie, the middle sister, finds a suicide note in her mother’s art studio but no sign of her body. Niko has to take over as guardian, Minnie loses all her color, and Emmy-Kate is going out at all hours of the night. Their mother was an artist, as well a Thank you to Net Galley and Roaring Brook Press for a digital copy of this ARC in return for an honest review.In How to Be Luminous by Harriet Reuter Haphood Minnie and her two sisters, Niko and Emmy-Kate, are suddenly left without their mother. Minnie, the middle sister, finds a suicide note in her mother’s art studio but no sign of her body. Niko has to take over as guardian, Minnie loses all her color, and Emmy-Kate is going out at all hours of the night. Their mother was an artist, as well as the three girls, so losing color makes things very difficult, but Minnie doesn’t want to tell anyone, including her boyfriend.I thought this was a really good book about mental illness and suicide, and I thought all the art was really interesting. I also love whenever one of the characters is deaf.I thought there might be some sex in the beginning, and I wasn’t a fan of that in a YA novel, but it ended up not happening and being okay. It was also hard for me to get past some of the words the author used to make the story appeal to youth (“eff” and “WTFasaurus”).How to Be Luminous will be released on April 30.
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  • Amber Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. The beginning was a little slow for me but once I became invested in the sisters’ story, I couldn’t put it down. The author really portrayed the sisters’ grief well with each of them processing it differently. I felt as though there were a varied amount of characters in the story with flaws and all. I like the way the book ended.
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  • Cassie
    January 1, 1970
    Net Galley provided me an ARC of this book. The plot developed in this book nicely. The story moved along at a great pace and I was interested in finding out what happened to all of the characters throughout the story. I wasn't very impressed with the main character at times, I didn't feel like I could feel sorry for her or sympathize with her. She didn't seem to progress as a person, and I wasn't rooting for her at the end. I would maybe categorize this as older young adult--I'm not sure a midd Net Galley provided me an ARC of this book. The plot developed in this book nicely. The story moved along at a great pace and I was interested in finding out what happened to all of the characters throughout the story. I wasn't very impressed with the main character at times, I didn't feel like I could feel sorry for her or sympathize with her. She didn't seem to progress as a person, and I wasn't rooting for her at the end. I would maybe categorize this as older young adult--I'm not sure a middle school student would be interested in this or if they could understand some of the artistic descriptions/references. This would be appropriate for a 14-18 year old possibly. I would ultimately recommend this book to peers, it was a quick read and informative on a sensitive topic of depression and mental illness.
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  • Katelyn Attanasio
    January 1, 1970
    A mix of Where'd You Go Bernadette and The Bell Jar, I sometimes felt this books didn't know what it wanted to be. Also, other than the age of the main character (17), I'd have a difficult time classifying this as YA, and I don't think I'd recommend it to most teenagers. I also would have liked to have seen more growth from the main character.I received an advanced reader copy of this title from NetGalley.
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  • Lindsay Montague
    January 1, 1970
    This book was beautiful. From start to finish, I was absolutely mesmerized by the language and prose. I was immediately pulled into this whimsical south London town and into the Sloe household. Our main character, Minnie, is struggling with finding her place in her family of artists after the disappearance of their art famous mother, Rachel Sloe. She's also is hit with one of the worst things that could happen to an artist: she's lost her ability to see color.While there are a few other characte This book was beautiful. From start to finish, I was absolutely mesmerized by the language and prose. I was immediately pulled into this whimsical south London town and into the Sloe household. Our main character, Minnie, is struggling with finding her place in her family of artists after the disappearance of their art famous mother, Rachel Sloe. She's also is hit with one of the worst things that could happen to an artist: she's lost her ability to see color.While there are a few other characters in this book, the focus is on the three sisters.  Minnie feels alone in her grief and it’s slowly sucking her further into a depression—into a life with no color. She doesn't realize that grief manifests in different ways and that her sisters are just as upset and confused as Minnie is.As she is learning things about her mother that she never noticed before, she sees that maybe her mom's highs and lows weren't just a part of her flighty and artistic personality—that something was actually really wrong and maybe Minnie inherited those same symptoms from her mom. This was a difficult, but stunning read that I recommend to any reader who is a little older and mature.Trigger warning for suicide, grief, and depression.I was sent an e-arc from NetGalley in exchange for honest reviews.
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  • 🌈⭐️RoseOfRainbows⭐️🌈💕
    January 1, 1970
    As a daughter of an artist, and as someone who suffers from mental illness; this book brought me to a beautiful place at the end. It's a well told story that makes you ugly cry. Yes, I said ugly cry. And yes you will by the end. But it's the best feeling. It's freeing in a way. And I'm thankful that this book is here. It's well written, thoughtful, emotional and every bit necessary as a song for those of us that have suffering from mental health issues.
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  • Book
    January 1, 1970
    This book is fabulous, which is not unexpected at all considering how much I loved her first novel.
  • Sage Thoughts
    January 1, 1970
    Content Ratinghttps://sagethoughtsonbooks.blogspot....
  • Harriet Reuter Hapgood
    January 1, 1970
  • Samantha Beverley
    January 1, 1970
    Kind of getting The Astonishing Color of After vibes. Also, I love books about artists.
  • Sarah Avallone
    January 1, 1970
    Really well done. Handling sensitive topics is not an easy thing to do but this was tactful, creative, and honest.
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