Stargazing
Moon is everything Christine isn’t. She’s confident, impulsive, artistic . . . and though they both grew up in the same Chinese-American suburb, Moon is somehow unlike anyone Christine has ever known.When Moon’s family moves in next door to Christine’s, Moon goes from unlikely friend to best friend―maybe even the perfect friend. The girls share their favorite music videos, paint their toenails when Christine’s strict parents aren’t around, and make plans to enter the school talent show together. Moon even tells Christine her deepest secret: that she sometimes has visions of celestial beings who speak to her from the stars. Who reassure her that earth isn’t where she really belongs.But when they’re least expecting it, catastrophe strikes. After relying on Moon for everything, can Christine find it in herself to be the friend Moon needs?New York Times–bestselling author-illustrator Jen Wang draws on her childhood to paint a deeply personal yet wholly relatable friendship story that’s at turns joyful, heart-wrenching, and full of hope

Stargazing Details

TitleStargazing
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 10th, 2019
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781250183880
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Comics, Realistic Fiction

Stargazing Review

  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    Jen Wang has such a way with storytelling that always manages to make me smile and laugh while still punching me in the heart with feels (in a good way), and Stargazing followed that trend beautifully. I absolutely adored this graphic novel! Moon and Christine are both so precious, and they feel like real kids, you know? The diversity represented is so sweet and the commentary on biracial and/or Asian-American kids feeling "not Asian enough" made my chest ache for friends who have told me they'v Jen Wang has such a way with storytelling that always manages to make me smile and laugh while still punching me in the heart with feels (in a good way), and Stargazing followed that trend beautifully. I absolutely adored this graphic novel! Moon and Christine are both so precious, and they feel like real kids, you know? The diversity represented is so sweet and the commentary on biracial and/or Asian-American kids feeling "not Asian enough" made my chest ache for friends who have told me they've gone through similar things. On top of the story itself being so precious and offering up such a lovely story of friendship and overcoming insecurities and loneliness, there's also the art, which is iconic and stunning and sweet. I adore how expressive the characters are and the color palette used — Jen's style is one of my all-time favorites.I can't add this to my library's order list fast enough and know that I'm going to be recommending this book to anyone and everyone who will listen to me rave about it!Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!
    more
  • alexandra ling
    January 1, 1970
    ugh im EMO. full review tc because i have a lot of feelings
  • Kevin (Irish Reader)
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a cute and innocent story!I had already read The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang and loved it; so going into this one I was expecting to also love it and I most certainly did! This was such a unique story and I really loved it! The artwork was stunning but I did read an ARC copy so it was in black and white instead of the finished copy which will be in colour. I plan on getting a copy of the finished copy and rereading when it’s in full colour. There was a a lot of diversity This was such a cute and innocent story!I had already read The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang and loved it; so going into this one I was expecting to also love it and I most certainly did! This was such a unique story and I really loved it! The artwork was stunning but I did read an ARC copy so it was in black and white instead of the finished copy which will be in colour. I plan on getting a copy of the finished copy and rereading when it’s in full colour. There was a a lot of diversity in here too and I loved it! I also loved how a lot of the story was something that had happened to the author themself! That made me connect more with the story. I just loved it. The only reason it’s not a 5 for me is because I felt like I wanted a bit more!
    more
  • Kate (GirlReading)
    January 1, 1970
    This was full of the pure innocence only children have. It was utterly wonderful and the epitome of adorable. The story warmed my heart in so many ways and I have no doubt, whoever you are, wherever you were born, no matter your race, ethnicity, gender etc. there is a part of you that will be able to relate to a part of this story. The artwork was absolutely gorgeous and perfectly lifted the innocence of the characters and this story. I just want to put a copy of this into the library of every s This was full of the pure innocence only children have. It was utterly wonderful and the epitome of adorable. The story warmed my heart in so many ways and I have no doubt, whoever you are, wherever you were born, no matter your race, ethnicity, gender etc. there is a part of you that will be able to relate to a part of this story. The artwork was absolutely gorgeous and perfectly lifted the innocence of the characters and this story. I just want to put a copy of this into the library of every school around the world and the hands of every child and adult alike. This is the kind of story that will make you smile from ear to ear and cause your heart to swell and ache in unison.
    more
  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    Christine doesn't know what to think of Moon Lin, the girl living in her parent's backyard carriage house. Moon is impulsive, confident, Buddhist and a vegetarian...and she beats up kids. She's everything Christine is not—and she just might be an alien. But slowly these unlikely friends become best friends, until Christine starts to question their relationship.I really, really enjoyed this book, and how it looked at Chinese-American children and how the sameness of experience makes any deviation Christine doesn't know what to think of Moon Lin, the girl living in her parent's backyard carriage house. Moon is impulsive, confident, Buddhist and a vegetarian...and she beats up kids. She's everything Christine is not—and she just might be an alien. But slowly these unlikely friends become best friends, until Christine starts to question their relationship.I really, really enjoyed this book, and how it looked at Chinese-American children and how the sameness of experience makes any deviation from the norm—like Moon—seem weird and not-Asian.Christine went from sheltered, uptight and rigid to learning to relax and enjoy life—although she still remained the same person that she was, being obsessed with grades and keeping her parents' love by being perfect. I enjoyed how she dealt with her feelings of discomfort, by putting up her defenses, slowly letting her guard down, and erecting her defenses again only to realize that you can't build a wall around your feelings.Moon was absolutely ridiculous, although I didn't like that much of her weirdness was explained by (view spoiler)[a brain tumor (hide spoiler)], although it didn't really change much about how she was different from the other kids. What I did like was that she knew she was different, and felt lonely and isolated by her difference, but still reached out and tried to make friends. And her beating up other kids was her way of protecting her friends from the pain she had felt (and also her way of self-defense when words didn't stop the laughter).I also liked how Moon was both "out of touch" with her heritage and also more in synch with Asian culture as a whole. She didn't speak Chinese, but she was obsessed with K-pop and knew more about trends than Christine and her friends, who were isolated by their parents' views and desires to maintain their Chinese culture. Moon's explanation of her differences was simple—she was so weird that of course she came from the stars, and she had visions to prove it. As a weird kid who didn't fit in with the others, I can totally agree with Moon on that end. When you're so weird, sometimes you have to find a way to explain your differences, and being an alien can often make more sense than any of the other reasons.Overall, this was a very quick and heartfelt #ownvoices graphic novel about friendship and the differences in the Chinese diaspora, and how being weird and different from your peer group is okay.I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.
    more
  • Jade Melody
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Everything about this story is adorable. After reading, and loving, The Prince and the Dressmaker I knew this was going to be one of my most anticipated releases this year. AND IT DID NOT DISAPPOINT. Jen Wang just has a way. A way of making me love her characters. When they cry, I cry. When they're happy, I'm still crying. Nah, I'm happy too. For real though, I love Jen Wang's work and I will most likely read anything she creates in the future. Ugh this story puts me in my feels. Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Everything about this story is adorable. After reading, and loving, The Prince and the Dressmaker I knew this was going to be one of my most anticipated releases this year. AND IT DID NOT DISAPPOINT. Jen Wang just has a way. A way of making me love her characters. When they cry, I cry. When they're happy, I'm still crying. Nah, I'm happy too. For real though, I love Jen Wang's work and I will most likely read anything she creates in the future. Ugh this story puts me in my feels. It's so cute. I immediately loved the characters from the very beginning. I wanted only good things for them and I wanted Christine and Moon to become best friends. I like how it wasn't always smooth sailing between them. There were some bumps in the road, but true friends make it past them. There was jealously and anger issues and guilt but these two girls knew how to get past it. There were sometimes throughout the story though where all I wanted to do was give Christine and Moon a hug. Like, please let me take away all of your problems. I also liked the harsh realities presented within the story. For example, Moon and her home not having much money and being called homeless at one point or when Moon has (view spoiler)[ seizures and discovers she has a brain tumor. (hide spoiler)] These are all pretty serious points to bring up in a middle grade graphic novel but it is done so well. I think it's important to be exposed to reality while also still existing in the "childhood bubble," and it's just done so well in this story. Anyways I love this and I still want to give Christine and Moon a hug. Pre-Review THIS WAS ABSOLUTELY PRECIOUS. LOVE LOVE.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    When I was in high school, I had a discussion with a Chinese-American friend of mine about what we were going to do in college. She told me she envied me, because I could major in anything I wanted, but she, she had to do what was expected of her, and become a doctor, even if she didn't want to.I bring this up, because, Christine, in the story, is envious of Moon the same way, because unlike her family, where she is supposed to do well in school all the time, Moon can get away with getting Cs, a When I was in high school, I had a discussion with a Chinese-American friend of mine about what we were going to do in college. She told me she envied me, because I could major in anything I wanted, but she, she had to do what was expected of her, and become a doctor, even if she didn't want to.I bring this up, because, Christine, in the story, is envious of Moon the same way, because unlike her family, where she is supposed to do well in school all the time, Moon can get away with getting Cs, and no one cares.And yet, they become friends. What I love about this story is that the odd child is not shunned, but people are drawn to her. I am so tired of reading about children that are different being on the outside looking in. I love how people like this difference in her.Wonderful, wonderful story.
    more
  • Maia
    January 1, 1970
    This is a sweet, quiet, surprising book. Considering that it just tops 200 pages, it packs more a of punch, and more of a twist ending, than I was expecting. It starts with an orchestral performance at a church, in which Christine plays violin. She tries hard to be everything her parents want: academic, musical, and serious- never painting her nails, taking Chinese language lessons and extra math after school. Then Moon and her mother move into the granny unit behind their house. Moon is a bundl This is a sweet, quiet, surprising book. Considering that it just tops 200 pages, it packs more a of punch, and more of a twist ending, than I was expecting. It starts with an orchestral performance at a church, in which Christine plays violin. She tries hard to be everything her parents want: academic, musical, and serious- never painting her nails, taking Chinese language lessons and extra math after school. Then Moon and her mother move into the granny unit behind their house. Moon is a bundle of contradictions: vegetarian, Buddhist, funny, loud, good at drawing, obsessed with K-Pop, uncool but supremely confident. She's less feminine than Christine but she wears nail polish, she watches youtube instead of studying but does well on her tests. She and Christine quickly become best friends, and Moon talks her into signing up for the talent show together. But when other people being to befriend Moon and hang out with her when Christine isn't available, she gets jealous and does something that might sabotage their friendship forever. Will they be able to mend it? And what about the visions Moon sometimes mentions, of celestial beings who say her real home isn't on planet Earth...? I picked up a black and white advanced reader copy of this book at BookExpo 2019. I can't wait to see what it will look like in full color, because the art is already wonderful. While you wait, go pick up any of Jen Wang's earlier books (In Real Life, Koko Be Good, or Eisner nominated The Prince and the Dressmaker) because they are all amazing!
    more
  • Alison (Story-eyed Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    Stargazing is one of those books that I would love to hand to every kid in the world. And every adult, for that matter. This charming story about friendship, feeling alone in the world and defining who we are is a wonder of nostalgia and something that feels so original. I’m a huge fan of Jen Wang and she did not disappoint. One of my first reviews was another graphic novel by Jen Wang, The Prince and The Dressmaker, and I cannot recommend either of these books highly enough.There are so many go Stargazing is one of those books that I would love to hand to every kid in the world. And every adult, for that matter. This charming story about friendship, feeling alone in the world and defining who we are is a wonder of nostalgia and something that feels so original. I’m a huge fan of Jen Wang and she did not disappoint. One of my first reviews was another graphic novel by Jen Wang, The Prince and The Dressmaker, and I cannot recommend either of these books highly enough.There are so many good things to say about this book that I don’t know where to start. The characters are real and relatable, their problems and fears are important and I felt their falls and victories like they were mine. Wang does an incredible job of bringing her own experiences and authenticity to Stargazing and it pays off in spades.I loved so many things about Stargazing. Particularly, I loved the unique perspective that Moon brings to the story and the journey she undergoes. Though not for the same reasons, I too felt that I didn’t belong here as a child, that I was secretly from somewhere else and might one day go back there, where it all made sense and I fit. I felt her loneliness at learning that she is a child of this earth the way that we all are. I felt her loneliness at learning that some of us are always going to be looking upwards, looking for something fantastic, no matter how grown up we become.Christine, the other primary character in Stargazing, takes us on a different but just as valuable story, in trying to figure out how she’s supposed to be. From painting her nails, to the music she listens to, to her values and the friends she chooses, Christine is at an age where we all asked ourselves so many of these same questions. Do I fit in? Do I have to be who my parents/community/expectations tell me to be? Do I like who I am? Who do I want to be? Her journey was so relatable, especially so for those living in a community like Christine’s where she feels there is a “right” and “rewarded” way to be, like everyone else.I was so excited when I requested this ARC from Netgalley, and so lucky to have gotten my hands on it. Jen Wang has impressed me again with this beautiful, sweet, whole-hearted story of two new friends trying to find their way in the world. Stargazing is about friendship, forgiveness, and feeling otherworldly, but its also a powerful story of growing up. To anyone who has felt alone, that they don’t belong, or that there might be something greater waiting for them, don’t miss out on Stargazing. You won’t regret it.I received this ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This one hits shelves on September 10, 2019!“We can’t change the past. But we can learn from the way we hurt the ones we love, and try to do better.”
    more
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    A good realistic middle grade novel, when you're an adult, is one that can take you right back to being in that space and place (there are other markers of good, too, of course). I found myself getting a little teary about this story of friendship between two Chinese American girls who are from very different backgrounds -- one is solidly middle class and has parents who expect a lot from her, while the other is nearly homeless and who has a lenient mother. When one does something mean to the ot A good realistic middle grade novel, when you're an adult, is one that can take you right back to being in that space and place (there are other markers of good, too, of course). I found myself getting a little teary about this story of friendship between two Chinese American girls who are from very different backgrounds -- one is solidly middle class and has parents who expect a lot from her, while the other is nearly homeless and who has a lenient mother. When one does something mean to the other, as an act of jealousy, suddenly something scarier emerges and their entire friendship is called into question. Beautiful art, as always, from Wang. This one made me ache over how friendships are in those middle grade years and how tough it is to be yourself exactly as you are and understand that that's why people like you.
    more
  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars This new graphic novel from the author of Prince and the Dressmaker is so sweet and has a great message. It's a story of friendship, cultural and religious identity, and belonging. A quiet exploration of difference that nevertheless was touching and heartfelt. I can feel how much this book will mean to young Asian-American kids — Own Voices stories are so important and do resonate (author Jen Wang is Buddhist Asian-American like one of the main characters in this novel). Very subtly h 3.5 stars This new graphic novel from the author of Prince and the Dressmaker is so sweet and has a great message. It's a story of friendship, cultural and religious identity, and belonging. A quiet exploration of difference that nevertheless was touching and heartfelt. I can feel how much this book will mean to young Asian-American kids — Own Voices stories are so important and do resonate (author Jen Wang is Buddhist Asian-American like one of the main characters in this novel). Very subtly handles issues like prejudice and hierarchies within a culture (who is "Asian enough", what traits makes someone "authentic"?).I didn't feel the same way about this as I did her previous title though. Something about it was too simplistic and didn't go deep enough. I would have loved a little more about culture, religion, and self expression. The ending came up too fast and out of left field. Overall, such a heartwarming story that I know will please readers of Prince and the Dressmaker even if it isn't quite as good.
    more
  • Marissa
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, what an amazing, heartfelt book! I can't wait to put this into the hands of my patrons, regardless of age! Everyone should read this!
  • Rian *fire and books*
    January 1, 1970
    Not my favorite Jen Wang, but who cares cuz it’s full of her cute as hell artistry and of course a stunning plot line. Christine and Moon are both Chinese, but what exactly does that look like? Can you be Chinese if you paint your nails, are vegetarian, and a Buddhist? Or is it eating pork noodles, learning Chinese, studying hard, and going to church? Which experience is more Chinese than the other?In addition to a great theme, this book tackled issues about anger management, homelessness, and s Not my favorite Jen Wang, but who cares cuz it’s full of her cute as hell artistry and of course a stunning plot line. Christine and Moon are both Chinese, but what exactly does that look like? Can you be Chinese if you paint your nails, are vegetarian, and a Buddhist? Or is it eating pork noodles, learning Chinese, studying hard, and going to church? Which experience is more Chinese than the other?In addition to a great theme, this book tackled issues about anger management, homelessness, and serious health problems. Ultimately this is a story about Jen herself as she is very much so like Moon, and not Christine who is our main character. It was a cute book and very well written for a heartwarming middle grade graphic novel.
    more
  • Megan Sanks
    January 1, 1970
    Cute and I definitely cried
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This one is going to be very popular at my library as soon as the Guts craze dies down a little bit. (The audience for Stargazing is definitely going to overlap with the legions of Raina Telgemeier devotees, so it'll be particularly enticing since Raina herself gave a positive blurb for the cover copy.) While I wish that the side characters were a little bit more dimensional, this story will resonate with a lot of readers. Lonesomeness, guilt, and intense friendship were all managed well.
    more
  • Dani
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the Prince and the Dressmaker so I was very excited for Jen Wang’s newest. It was a bit of a departure from her last book, being more autobiographical and set in the present day. It was heartfelt and beautifully drawn; I highly recommend it for fans of Smile, Camp and other middle grade graphic novels!
    more
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) After The Prince and the Dressmaker I have been trying to read all of Wang's previous and forthcoming work. Stargazing is a touching middle grade graphic novel about new experiences, not feeling Asian enough, and friendship. It's a story about making mistakes, feeling so utterly alone, and trying to make up for hurting those we care about. I could deeply empathize with both Christine (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) After The Prince and the Dressmaker I have been trying to read all of Wang's previous and forthcoming work. Stargazing is a touching middle grade graphic novel about new experiences, not feeling Asian enough, and friendship. It's a story about making mistakes, feeling so utterly alone, and trying to make up for hurting those we care about. I could deeply empathize with both Christine and Moon, but Moon's story touched me the most emotionally.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
    more
  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    Christine is a traditional Chinese American girl who lives with her family including her hard on her father. But then Moon and her mom move into the apartment downstairs and Moon is the opposite of Christine: she's tough, she's artistic and she's strong minded. Can their friendship last? First off, I really enjoyed the author's illustrations, they were excellent. A plot twist came completely out of left field which didn't really make a huge amount of sense but after reading the author's endnotes Christine is a traditional Chinese American girl who lives with her family including her hard on her father. But then Moon and her mom move into the apartment downstairs and Moon is the opposite of Christine: she's tough, she's artistic and she's strong minded. Can their friendship last? First off, I really enjoyed the author's illustrations, they were excellent. A plot twist came completely out of left field which didn't really make a huge amount of sense but after reading the author's endnotes, it definitely gave the graphic novel a completely different text. This was a cute and quick read.
    more
  • Lily Williams
    January 1, 1970
    This book is beautiful.
  • Emily Scheinman
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite graphic novels releasing this Fall
  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I've loved the books I've read from Jen Wang before, and I was excited to pick up an advanced copy of her latest graphic novel.Stargazing is a wonderful middle grade graphic novel about friendship and finding yourself. Christine's world feels rocked when she meets her new neighbor Moon, who introduces her to things like dancing, Korean pop stars, and nail polish. Christine works hard to be the perfect daughter for her parents, but with Moon's encouragement she begins to discover new things about I've loved the books I've read from Jen Wang before, and I was excited to pick up an advanced copy of her latest graphic novel.Stargazing is a wonderful middle grade graphic novel about friendship and finding yourself. Christine's world feels rocked when she meets her new neighbor Moon, who introduces her to things like dancing, Korean pop stars, and nail polish. Christine works hard to be the perfect daughter for her parents, but with Moon's encouragement she begins to discover new things about herself and her passions. But when Moon starts becoming popular at school, Christine worries she may be losing her new friend.This is a short book but it packs a punch. Christine's feelings of not living up to her parent's expectations, wanting the room to explore new things without their restrictions, and the feeling of not being enough for a friend were portrayed with heart and depth. Her story is relatable and one I think young readers will connect with. Meanwhile, we discover later in the novel that a secret Moon's been keeping is actually quite dangerous. All ends well, but I admittedly got a little teary at the end. The book also explores Asian identity and the way that certain behaviors or attitudes are labeled as "not Asian" by the community. Wang discusses this in her afterword as well, when sharing the personal inspiration behind this story.Funny, sweet, and moving, this is a graphic novel that I'd definitely recommend for middle grade readers and fans of Wang's work!
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Not just charming, but emotionally and socially profound without ever seeming to be so. It's astounding how many social themes Wang covers with the warm and colorful patchwork quilt of the story--like a cat rolled up underneath, unless you're looking out for them you probably won't even notice they're there until you sit on them. And sit on them you should--this is a definite read-it-twice, not just for the art but also for the nostalgic (and less-than-nostalgic) reminder of the simultaneously s Not just charming, but emotionally and socially profound without ever seeming to be so. It's astounding how many social themes Wang covers with the warm and colorful patchwork quilt of the story--like a cat rolled up underneath, unless you're looking out for them you probably won't even notice they're there until you sit on them. And sit on them you should--this is a definite read-it-twice, not just for the art but also for the nostalgic (and less-than-nostalgic) reminder of the simultaneously simple and complicated world of friendships and family relationships at the end of childhood. This book is probably a keeper for me--which is both good and bad, since my graphic novel shelf is now officially overflowing. If This Was Our Pact and Stargazing are both nominated for Goodreads choice awards (as they should be!) I have no idea what I'm going to do!
    more
  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    Cute story with a good message! P.S. Ellen, because of certain sad parts you might want to wait to read it.
  • Dipali
    January 1, 1970
    So poignant and beautiful. A must-read!
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    4.5This was so good! Recommended age around 10
  • Queen
    January 1, 1970
    Short and sweet. Full of feels!
  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Jen Wang is so flippin amazing!!! Was lucky enough to read an ARC of this gem and oh boy is it ever good!! The sweetest depiction of young female friendships and the confusion and heartache and love that make them special. I cried on my porch reading this, and 10/10 would do again.
    more
  • Nic
    January 1, 1970
    I got an ARC of this at Book Expo! Yay!Maybe 4.5 stars, just because I don't love it as much as I love some books (like Jen Wang's FABULOUS graphic novel The Prince and the Dressmaker). Still, I'm happy to round up. It's very cute and sweet, and the art is great. Stargazing is only slightly autobiographical, but I would definitely recommend it to fans of graphic childhood memoirs like Raina Telgemeier's Smile, Cece Bell's El Deafo, and Vera Brosgol's Be Prepared.
    more
  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    There are real lessons here for kids on friendship, jealousy, communication, and illness. Just a complete joy of a book to read, as well.
  • Jennifer Mangler
    January 1, 1970
    This is a sweet story about friendship. I wish there'd been more to it, as it felt a bit slight, but I liked what was there.
Write a review