How Long 'til Black Future Month?
In these stories, Jemisin sharply examines modern society, infusing magic into the mundane, and drawing deft parallels in the fantasy realms of her imagination. Dragons and hateful spirits haunt the flooded city of New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In a parallel universe, a utopian society watches our world, trying to learn from our mistakes. A black mother in the Jim Crow south must figure out how to save her daughter from a fey offering impossible promises. And in the Hugo award-nominated short story “The City Born Great,” a young street kid fights to give birth to an old metropolis’s soul.

How Long 'til Black Future Month? Details

TitleHow Long 'til Black Future Month?
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 27th, 2018
PublisherOrbit
ISBN-139780316491341
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Fantasy, Fiction, Science Fiction, Speculative Fiction, Science Fiction Fantasy

How Long 'til Black Future Month? Review

  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t think I could be more excited for this.
  • Leah Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    How Long ‘Til Black Future Month? is simply superb. There wasn’t a story in the twenty-two that didn’t impress. Jemisin is a science fiction and fantasy powerhouse, and that is clear by the sheer variety of tales told—there are a dozen novel-worthy worlds crafted in this volume. Jemisin opens with “The Ones Who Stay and Fight,” a direct story response to Ursula K. Le Guin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas.” It ends with a parallel—a story about a man defending his city, post-Katrina New Orle How Long ‘Til Black Future Month? is simply superb. There wasn’t a story in the twenty-two that didn’t impress. Jemisin is a science fiction and fantasy powerhouse, and that is clear by the sheer variety of tales told—there are a dozen novel-worthy worlds crafted in this volume. Jemisin opens with “The Ones Who Stay and Fight,” a direct story response to Ursula K. Le Guin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas.” It ends with a parallel—a story about a man defending his city, post-Katrina New Orleans, from hateful spirits alongside dragons. There’s a rebellion about many of these tales, an insistence, a resistance towards being told to leave, to abandon, or to be any less than you know you can be. One of my favorite tales in the collection was “Valedictorian,” a story about a black girl who refuses to underachieve even though being the best in her class will have dire consequences. Other stars include two stories about food: "L’Alchimista,” about a chef fallen from grace who finally finds a challenge worth her skills when a magician brings her strange materials with unexpected power; and “Cuisine des Mémoires,” where a restaurant serves people meals from history—or from their own pasts. In “On the Banks of the River Lex,” Death and other deities try to get by after mankind is gone; in “The You Train,” a woman keeps glimpsing ghosts of NYC subway lines that don’t exist; in “Non-Zero Probabilities,” one-in-a-million chances suddenly become day-to-day probabilities in the city. Those are just some of my favorites, but any of the 22 stories about destruction, rebirth, and redemption could have been featured here. How Long ‘Til Black Future Month? is a stunning short story collection from one of the best SFF writers of all times, let alone ours. It comes out November 27, 2018 from Orbit Books, but I recommend preordering it now.
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  • Sana
    January 1, 1970
    'In a parallel universe, a utopian society watches our world, trying to learn from our mistakes.'UM NEEEEEED. THIS AND THE REST OF THE SHORT STORIES
  • Katy
    January 1, 1970
    I was utterly delighted to get my hands on a copy of How Long ’til Black Future Month. Short story collections are generally a struggle for me, but I’ll read anything Jemisin writes. The variety of these 22 stories is stunning. Some are set in our own world with magical elements, while others unfold in more fantastical settings. I was thrilled that one of the stories is set in the universe of her Broken Earth Trilogy. I did prefer the stories set in imagined worlds, but it’s possible that’s only I was utterly delighted to get my hands on a copy of How Long ’til Black Future Month. Short story collections are generally a struggle for me, but I’ll read anything Jemisin writes. The variety of these 22 stories is stunning. Some are set in our own world with magical elements, while others unfold in more fantastical settings. I was thrilled that one of the stories is set in the universe of her Broken Earth Trilogy. I did prefer the stories set in imagined worlds, but it’s possible that’s only because it’s what I’m used to from Jemisin. This is a rich collection that I’ll be revisiting in the future.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    MOST ANTICIPATED!!!!
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