The Forest Queen
When sixteen-year-old Sylvie’s brother takes over management of their family’s vast estates, Sylvie feels powerless to stop his abuse of the local commoners. Her dearest friend asks her to run away to the woods with him, and soon a host of other villagers join them. Together, they form their own community and fight to right the wrongs perpetrated by the king and his noblemen.

The Forest Queen Details

TitleThe Forest Queen
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 7th, 2018
PublisherClarion Books
ISBN-139780544888197
Rating
GenreFantasy, Retellings, Young Adult

The Forest Queen Review

  • Cait • A Page with a View
    January 1, 1970
    Release date: August 7, 2018I love Robin Hoood and retellings, so I thought the main idea here was fun... but I wasn't too big on the story as a whole.Silviana is the daughter of Loughsley and her brother John is the cruel sheriff who tries to control her life. One day she escapes into the forest with her best friend Bird (Robert Falconer) where they meet up with Little Jane, a pregnant girl who's trying to kill herself. Their group ends up "rebelling" by trying to provide for themselves and be Release date: August 7, 2018I love Robin Hoood and retellings, so I thought the main idea here was fun... but I wasn't too big on the story as a whole.Silviana is the daughter of Loughsley and her brother John is the cruel sheriff who tries to control her life. One day she escapes into the forest with her best friend Bird (Robert Falconer) where they meet up with Little Jane, a pregnant girl who's trying to kill herself. Their group ends up "rebelling" by trying to provide for themselves and be free, but the story mostly just sets up the rebellion for the next book.The main character and tone of the story felt on the younger side, so I initially thought maybe this was just targeted at a younger YA crowd. But then it had multiple characters who had tried to kill themselves and went into the topics of suicide & abortion in a way that felt really poorly handled and definitely not for that age range.The only time the story really got any depth was when it went into a ton of detail about the hunting, killing, and eating of animals. I'm not against hunting and I live on a farm (so I've eaten my "pets" before), but still thought this was weirdly graphic... it just stuck out awkwardly. So if you don't like reading about animals suffering then maybe steer clear of this.Otherwise, the story was pretty simplistic. None of the characters were particularly well developed and I never really got into the story. At first I thought maybe it was just because the book was too short, but I actually reallllly wouldn't have wanted to read any more of this. I still think the author had a fun idea, though, and I did like the pretty forest setting!Thanks to the publisher for sending me an ARC!
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  • Korrina (OwlCrate)
    January 1, 1970
    I have a hard time forming a strong opinion on this one. It was just okay. Some parts were really interesting and others were not. Didn't love it; didn't hate it. I think I had a lot of really high expectations going into this, and it ended up being very different from what I anticipated. But I definitely think some people will really love it!
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    I'm with all the other readers who say they were immediately on board with this story once they heard the words gender swapped Robin Hood retelling. And I wasn't disappointed. Honestly, I could have read the lush, lyrical descriptions of the forest for days. But what really stands out to me about The Forest Queen - and makes it a particularly important book for this time - is the idea that people (specifically women) can build their own forms of community in the face of repression and exploitati I'm with all the other readers who say they were immediately on board with this story once they heard the words gender swapped Robin Hood retelling. And I wasn't disappointed. Honestly, I could have read the lush, lyrical descriptions of the forest for days. But what really stands out to me about The Forest Queen - and makes it a particularly important book for this time - is the idea that people (specifically women) can build their own forms of community in the face of repression and exploitation. A soft book that deals with harsh themes and spins the Robin Hood tale into considering what true social and economic equality could look like and how such a community enriches the personhood of both rich and poor.
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  • Daphne
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't sure what to expect from this book. I have to admit I don't know a lot about Robin Hood, as I'm fairly sure I've only seen the Disney version back when I was a kid, but I had a general idea of what the story is about. I think I expected it to be more action-packed than it ended up being.There were a few things in this book that didn't quite work for me, and I think most of it has to do with the fact that to me, the writing feels young and some of the themes in the book don't really refl I wasn't sure what to expect from this book. I have to admit I don't know a lot about Robin Hood, as I'm fairly sure I've only seen the Disney version back when I was a kid, but I had a general idea of what the story is about. I think I expected it to be more action-packed than it ended up being.There were a few things in this book that didn't quite work for me, and I think most of it has to do with the fact that to me, the writing feels young and some of the themes in the book don't really reflect that. It felt strange. A lot of the story hinges on having a certain suspension of disbelief and a very simplified view of the world, but then it also talks about dark themes like rape and the pregnancy resulting from that, and the entire thing between John and Sylvie. It just felt too different from the general feel of the story to me.I think a part of that is that the characters don't seem to face much hardship while living out in the wilderness. (view spoiler)[ Sylvie was very worried for winter, but when it actually came around anything bad about it was pretty much glossed over and we hardly see them struggle with the cold. (hide spoiler)] It just felt too easy to me, and every conflict was quickly solved.One last thing is that the romance didn't make much sense to me. There was nothing standing in the way of it except bad communication. If the two had talked openly for a single moment everything would have been solved, and with how close they were there wasn't really any reason why they wouldn't'. The obstacles in their way never felt real to me.But despite my complaints, I did enjoy the story and the way it was written. It was easy to read, and I liked the framing of the chapters in seasons. (view spoiler)[The scene where they give the village supplies by sending boats full of them down the river was really nice, I loved the visual of that. (hide spoiler)] I just think it lacked depth and tried to make up for that with mature themes that didn't fit the feel of the rest of the story.
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  • Luca
    January 1, 1970
    The Forest Queen is a retelling of Robin Hood in which Lady Silviana of Loughsley assumes the role of Robin Hood. Together with her friend Bird and others, she starts to rebel against her own brother John. John, who was recently made sheriff by the king is very harsh and cruel to his citizens. He raises the taxes they have to pay both to him, and to the king. If they do not pay or do not pay on time, the citizens will find out exactly how cruel John can be the hard way. Lady Silviana, in the bo The Forest Queen is a retelling of Robin Hood in which Lady Silviana of Loughsley assumes the role of Robin Hood. Together with her friend Bird and others, she starts to rebel against her own brother John. John, who was recently made sheriff by the king is very harsh and cruel to his citizens. He raises the taxes they have to pay both to him, and to the king. If they do not pay or do not pay on time, the citizens will find out exactly how cruel John can be the hard way. Lady Silviana, in the book simply called Silvie, has her personal reasons for hating her brother, as he has been bullying her all her life. As the opportunity presents itself, Silvie, her friend Bird and a villager named Little Jane run away to live in the nearby Woodshire forest where they start a community. To me, this plot sounded extremely promising. I love Robin Hood, and the idea of a retelling with switched gender roles is just incredibly cool. The story itself was fun to read, and I actually did enjoy reading it. However, there were a lot of aspects in this book that discouraged me from really appreciating it. First of all, there are so many characters, but none of them are fully developed. There are four main characters (Silvie, Bird, Little Jane, and John) but with neither of them, I feel that I really got to know the character. It was hard to guess what their motivations were for some of their actions, and most aspects of their backgrounds were simply nonexistent or very poorly introduced. With some of the characters, I was completely unsure why they were introduced at all? For example the characters of Silvie’s father and Alana Dale where given some attention, but are far from realizing their potential. Silvie’s father was introduced and some very kind things were said about him, but then they introduced a couple very shocking facts and just left it at that?!?! He just made a couple of random appearances throughout the book, and simply was not addressed in the conclusion of this book at all. The character of Alana Dale had loads of potential, but the execution of her character felt so compressed that it seems like she became just a mandatory character that was required for a Robin Hood retelling. Secondly, this book addressed some important matters. Obviously, it is about justice, kindness and compassion, but it also touches upon themes of birth control and abortion. Normally this would be something I am extremely grateful for to read about in Young Adult literature, but again it was so poorly executed here. There was one scene where it was briefly touched upon, and just one other moment where it was referred back upon. This made that the themes fell really out of place in this book and, according to my opinion, did not align with time and place in this book. Finally, the book has only 173 pages, which is just too short to create a fully developed world with so many characters in it. The story itself is fun, but it is very rudimentary in its implementation. It would have been so much stronger with more character and worldbuilding. All taken together I would rate this book 2,5/5 stars. I received a digital review copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are entirely my own. My review is susceptible to changes in the final copy of this work.
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  • gem
    January 1, 1970
    A gender-swapped retelling of Robin Hood... what more could you want?This book was fully immersive, and the cinematic descriptions really brought the story to life. I haven't read Mechinna, but didn't feel as if I was missing out on anything, and will now read this too.The characters were brilliant, there were some I loved, and some I loved to hate, but they all added to the plot. If you are a fan of fantasy with a twist, this is the book for you! Perfect for fans of Marissa Meyer, Once Upon A T A gender-swapped retelling of Robin Hood... what more could you want?This book was fully immersive, and the cinematic descriptions really brought the story to life. I haven't read Mechinna, but didn't feel as if I was missing out on anything, and will now read this too.The characters were brilliant, there were some I loved, and some I loved to hate, but they all added to the plot. If you are a fan of fantasy with a twist, this is the book for you! Perfect for fans of Marissa Meyer, Once Upon A Time and Disney.
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  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    January 1, 1970
    OMG, the re-designed cover is so much better than the original! ---Never read Mechanica, and I do not really have plans to, but gender-swapped Robin hood? I am here for it!
  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    Somehow I missed the fact that this was a gender swap retelling of Robin Hood. I'm always a hit or a miss when it comes to retellings. This one I did find entertaining as a simplistic read for the young adult crowd. I did love the gender swaps too and it seemed almost one for one for each swap (almost).What I found most interesting is that while there wasn't a ton of layers or depth to the storyline or characters, the story did touch on some deep subjects such as rape, suicide and abortion that Somehow I missed the fact that this was a gender swap retelling of Robin Hood. I'm always a hit or a miss when it comes to retellings. This one I did find entertaining as a simplistic read for the young adult crowd. I did love the gender swaps too and it seemed almost one for one for each swap (almost).What I found most interesting is that while there wasn't a ton of layers or depth to the storyline or characters, the story did touch on some deep subjects such as rape, suicide and abortion that seemed to contradict the simpler side of the story. A quick read at 300 pages, this will go over well for those who like the retellings of a class tale with the added twist of a gender swap. Robin Hood, meet The Forest Queen.I now want a hooded cape, a pet owl and a big ass tree house. Can anyone help me with this?A fantastic idea for a storyline... great descriptions of the forest and I probably most enjoyed the Maypole dancing scene as it reminded me of my childhood. Completely different than what I had expected.
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  • Erin Arkin
    January 1, 1970
    The Forest Queen by Betsy Cornwell was a book that caught my eye when I was wandering around ALA and when I read the summary, I immediately added it to my to read shelf. I love a good re-telling and it’s the first one I’ve read that is a Robin Hood story. The Robin Hood in this story happens to be a sixteen-year-old girl named Silvie. When her brother, John, becomes the sheriff of Woodshire, she feels powerless to stop the abuse he heaps on the local commoners. When she finds out that he plans t The Forest Queen by Betsy Cornwell was a book that caught my eye when I was wandering around ALA and when I read the summary, I immediately added it to my to read shelf. I love a good re-telling and it’s the first one I’ve read that is a Robin Hood story. The Robin Hood in this story happens to be a sixteen-year-old girl named Silvie. When her brother, John, becomes the sheriff of Woodshire, she feels powerless to stop the abuse he heaps on the local commoners. When she finds out that he plans to marry her off to one of his friends, Silvie has to make a choice. Stay and live a life she doesn’t want or run away with her best friend and be who she wants to be. I thought Cornwell did a great job of building out who these characters are. I got just enough back story regarding the relationship between Silvie and John to understand her reasons for not wanting to stay under his thumb. I also thought that she revealed enough about John along the way to make me really not like him, leading right up to, and after their confrontation. I thought the other characters were well done too. Bird is Silvie’s best friend and they have grown up together but in different roles. Where Silvie is from a noble family, Bird is the son of the huntswoman and despite their differing backgrounds, they became close growing up. It is clear there is still misunderstanding between them due to their backgrounds, but I was happy to see them overcome these challenges and be able to depend on each other throughout the story. There are a number of other characters that added so much more to the story – Mae Tuck and Little Jane are just two of them.As the daughter of a nobleman, Silvie has lived a comfortable life and has never wanted for anything…at least materially. Unfortunately, she doesn’t always agree with John’s methods with the commoners and when she leaves, she finds herself taking from the stores within the Abbey to help the people in the city. And she keeps doing it. It’s fair to say that Silvie struggled with this at first but it was great to see her grow into something more than a nobleman’s daughter. She learned how to survive and take care of herself and those around her.The world that Cornwell has developed a world was great. The forest and the abbey were so well described that I could picture them in my mind. I really enjoyed Cornwell’s writing style and her ability to pull me right into the story alongside the characters was fantastic.If you are looking for a quick read packed with action, great characters, and an interesting story, definitely consider picking up The Forest Queen. Based on this book, I will be picking up more books by Cornwell.Thank you to the publisher for the copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    So I really did like this book! I think its different than others I have read and I kept finding myself wanting more. The main character of this book is amazingly written. I think she's so different from our typical heroine because she has her own fears to work through before she can help others. I think this part of her makes her so real and relatable to so many people.I did like this book but I didn't love it. There was something missing from the plot that made it less interesting to read. I t So I really did like this book! I think its different than others I have read and I kept finding myself wanting more. The main character of this book is amazingly written. I think she's so different from our typical heroine because she has her own fears to work through before she can help others. I think this part of her makes her so real and relatable to so many people.I did like this book but I didn't love it. There was something missing from the plot that made it less interesting to read. I think if there was a lot more action and more focus on the main characters skills with hunting it would have changed the whole book.But it almost felt like reading two different books because this book gave off such a light feel with some mentions of dark tones but not enough to properly mingle the two. The characters were well written I found myself wondering what they were up to whenever I was away from the book, however, I think its really missing that action element that I expected to see in this book! All in all its a pretty good book I'm not sure if there will be a sequel but I'm excited to read more if there is!
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  • J.A. Ironside
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review3.5 stars rounded upGender bent Robin Hood? I was so in and I wasn’t disappointed. First of all if you’re looking for something with great historical context this probably isn’t for you. Likewise if you want magic and dragons. It’s a fantasy in that it’s a reimagining of several original folktales around the mythic Robin Hood. (I have to admit that my head cannon on Robin Hood always sets it in 12th Century England and having researched t ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review3.5 stars rounded upGender bent Robin Hood? I was so in and I wasn’t disappointed. First of all if you’re looking for something with great historical context this probably isn’t for you. Likewise if you want magic and dragons. It’s a fantasy in that it’s a reimagining of several original folktales around the mythic Robin Hood. (I have to admit that my head cannon on Robin Hood always sets it in 12th Century England and having researched that period certain things made my teeth hurt, or would have done if I hadn’t accepted this book on its own terms.) I would also suggest that if you go in looking for sweeping tales of derring do with lots of action you may be disappointed, because that’s really not what this is about.  So what do you get? Well, every major character from the Robin Hood tales and ballads is female in this book, which is an absolute treat. It’s a story about claiming your own freedom, and with that comes responsibility for your actions and a refusal of ignorance. The Forest Queen is about building a community having rejected an unfair system riddled with inequality and reached instead for a radical overhaul of the status quo. Something we sorely need with Britain’s current PM and America’s current President! It explores issues of class and poverty, justice and inequality. The cast is suitably diverse and the characters are engaging and often loveable. What Cornwall does well is put women in the driving seat without making them pseudo-men or subscribing to stereotypical gender norms. And on top of that it’s just an utterly charming book, written with delicacy and strength. My one big bugbear is that it’s way too short for me. That’s very much a personal opinion because a book only needs to be long enough to tell the story, which it does. But I could have gobbled it up if it was three times as long, slow burner or not. My other very minor bugbear was that as much as I love Bird and really ship him and Sylvie, he was quite condescending and on occasion, mansplain-y – but perhaps that was the point, because Slyvie had a lot of growing up and cluing up to do. I really, really enjoyed this. Highly recommend for lovers of quiet fantasy starring found-family.
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    So much love! I love it so! If you know me or follow my review you know that fairy tale retellings are my weakness, and of them all, Robin Hood is my favorite. I've been hoping for this book since MECHANICA, where there was only a whisper of The Forest Queen, before it even existed. I was thrilled to finally read it and friends, it's as good as you all hope. I love the forest and Silvi and just about everyone else in this book (except the obvious, but I'd never want to meet a person who roots fo So much love! I love it so! If you know me or follow my review you know that fairy tale retellings are my weakness, and of them all, Robin Hood is my favorite. I've been hoping for this book since MECHANICA, where there was only a whisper of The Forest Queen, before it even existed. I was thrilled to finally read it and friends, it's as good as you all hope. I love the forest and Silvi and just about everyone else in this book (except the obvious, but I'd never want to meet a person who roots for the sheriff in a Robin Hood story). Bird! (Swoons.) The characters, the story, the world; they're all so vivid and alive. I hope people read and love this story as much as I do!I'm hoping for some more in this universe!
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  • Ang -PNR Book Lover Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    To me this plot sounded super promising. I love Robin Hood, and the idea of a retelling with switched gender roles is just incredibly fantastic. The story itself was fun to read, but I dunno I just couldn't love it. I do love the cover, super pretty! I am interested to see what other people think of this book. I haven't check any review yet, but I am wonder if people had the same annoyances that I did.There are so many characters, but none of them are fully developed. There are four main charact To me this plot sounded super promising. I love Robin Hood, and the idea of a retelling with switched gender roles is just incredibly fantastic. The story itself was fun to read, but I dunno I just couldn't love it. I do love the cover, super pretty! I am interested to see what other people think of this book. I haven't check any review yet, but I am wonder if people had the same annoyances that I did.There are so many characters, but none of them are fully developed. There are four main characters, they are Silvie, Bird, Little Jane, and John but with neither of them, I feel that I really got to know the character. And I love Character driven stories... It isn't a fairly long book either, you can read it within a day.
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  • Olivia Williford (LivTheBookNerd)
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by HMH Teen for an honest review TW: abuse, elder abuse, rape, and sexual harassment 5/5 stars This book was BEAUTIFUL. The story was so charming and lovely. I loved the themes throughout and I absolutely adore the characters. I really did not want to put this book down. I could have just sat and read it all day. It was lovely.More thoughts and a full review to come!www.livthebooknerd.blogspot.com
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book! It was fresh and original, despite being a re-telling. It really stood on it's own two feet and didn't feel like reading a re-telling of Robin Hood. It was a quick and easy read, as I read it in one afternoon, but it was highly entertaining and I loved the character development over the novel. Highly recommend.
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  • MsArdychan
    January 1, 1970
    Please Note: I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions in my review in any way.When I first picked up The Forest Queen, by Betsy Cornwall, I didn't know what to expect. Would this be a story of female empowerment? An adventure story? Would there be intrigue and romance? The answer is YES to all of it. I found this book to be fun, and moving. Once I started it, I could not put it down.What I Liked:Setting:As with m Please Note: I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions in my review in any way.When I first picked up The Forest Queen, by Betsy Cornwall, I didn't know what to expect. Would this be a story of female empowerment? An adventure story? Would there be intrigue and romance? The answer is YES to all of it. I found this book to be fun, and moving. Once I started it, I could not put it down.What I Liked:Setting:As with most stories with "Queen" in the title, this book takes place in an unnamed medieval country with plenty of lords and ladies, castles, and forests. What made this setting unique was that there were also people of color mixed in. There has been a controversy in the book world about diversity in books such as these. Some people say, "Well, there weren't people of color in Europe in the Middle Ages". Others correctly point out that in a fictional novel you can make your characters any color you want! I am happy to report that the author chose the latter view. In this story, it's the people with darker skin who are the "noble" families. But there has been so much inter-mingling between groups that most people have traits of many cultures. I loved that.Characters:I really enjoyed how all the characters changed over the course of this book. Sylvie starts the story as a somewhat naive, privileged young woman. She does know that others have a much harder time in life, but she hasn't seen it firsthand. The nobles take almost everything through taxes, leaving peasants to nearly starve. When she is confronted with this reality, Sylvie begins to see everything differently.There are many other memorable characters such as Little Jane, Bird, Mae Tuck, and the troubadour Alana Dean. All have experience with the unjust treatment of the nobles towards peasants. Little Jane, in particular, haunts me. She is pregnant (from rape), and goes from a frightened, hopeless girl, to a warm, confident mother. Her healing was heartening to see.Story:It doesn't mention it in the synopsis, but this story is loosely based on Robin Hood. This may seem silly, at first. But the author uses this story to show a world where people who are oppressed finally fight back to gain freedom.There was plenty of suspense as Sylvie runs away from her comfortable life as a noble and into the forest. Will she be caught by her lecherous brother, Sheriff John? As more and more people join them, I was worried for everyone's safety!Later, as Sylvie starts to "take from the rich and give to the poor', there's also the constant threat of discovery and imprisonment. I like that while Sylvie is doing this for honorable reasons, she also acknowledges the lines she is crossing (and that she gets a thrill from stealing).Romance:I enjoyed the tension and possible romance between Sylvie and Bird. Childhood friends, these two must set aside questions of attraction in order to survive out in the woods. They are too busy finding enough to eat to worry about romance. I like that later, as they settle in, they are reluctant to be a couple as they don't want to ruin their friendship.There is also some fun, same-sex romance for other characters! I love that in this universe women and men find their own way to happiness without judgement.Trigger Warning for Rape:Rape is a theme in this book. While there are no actual descriptions of the act itself, this may be upsetting to some readers.
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  • georgia ☽
    January 1, 1970
    gender-swapped robin hood???SIGN ME TF UP
  • Jan farnworth
    January 1, 1970
    This was a refreshing intriguing take on the legend of robin hood, we get robin hood as a female in this retelling that in no way takes away from the heart of the robin hood legend.  Which is take from the overly rich and give to the lowly poor.  The best part is that our Robin hood is a female who runs away from her rich life  and strives with all her heart to to the best she can for her merry men.  Their are some themes in this book that maybe hard for some readers to handle so be wary -they i This was a refreshing intriguing take on the legend of robin hood, we get robin hood as a female in this retelling that in no way takes away from the heart of the robin hood legend.  Which is take from the overly rich and give to the lowly poor.  The best part is that our Robin hood is a female who runs away from her rich life  and strives with all her heart to to the best she can for her merry men.  Their are some themes in this book that maybe hard for some readers to handle so be wary -they include abuse, elder abuse, rape, and sexual harassment.  They are by no means described in detail but more like told they happened and what the end results of some these are.  I think our author did a great job with the story and i wish it had only been longer. 
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    *Source* Publisher/NetGalley*Genre* Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Adaptations*Rating* 2.5-3*Thoughts*Betsy Cornwell's The Forest Queen is supposed to be the retelling of Robin Hood with a feminist angle. It's a story about how a corrupt, too-powerful leader and his inner circle thrive at the expense of the common people and how one girl fights for what's right and makes a difference. Lady Silviana of Loughsley chooses to make a stand against her older brother, who just happe *Source* Publisher/NetGalley*Genre* Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Adaptations*Rating* 2.5-3*Thoughts*Betsy Cornwell's The Forest Queen is supposed to be the retelling of Robin Hood with a feminist angle. It's a story about how a corrupt, too-powerful leader and his inner circle thrive at the expense of the common people and how one girl fights for what's right and makes a difference. Lady Silviana of Loughsley chooses to make a stand against her older brother, who just happens to be Sheriff John of Loughsley, after she learns that he is as much as a brute outside of the home, as he is at home.*Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews*http://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/201...
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  • Zoe Gardiner
    January 1, 1970
    The Forest Queen is a book of rebelling for the right reasons. Its a book that gives hope to the little guys. Its a book that gives the feeling that things will always get better. Its a book that shows all different forms of love. If you cant tell already from my intro I really enjoyed this book and all it had to offer my ever starving brain. The main character is a lady of a noble house and has the benefits of all that comes with it. Until one day she finds herself second guessing all of her re The Forest Queen is a book of rebelling for the right reasons. Its a book that gives hope to the little guys. Its a book that gives the feeling that things will always get better. Its a book that shows all different forms of love. If you cant tell already from my intro I really enjoyed this book and all it had to offer my ever starving brain. The main character is a lady of a noble house and has the benefits of all that comes with it. Until one day she finds herself second guessing all of her reasons for staying where she is and the adventure begins. I learned a few things in reading The Forest Queen. Love in all its forms is not easy, it's rough and it's raw.Always have hope, even in the unknown, even when you think there is nothing left to hope for. You never know where it will get you if you just keep hold of that sliver of hope. And most of all I learnt I need to know what other books have been written by the wonderful Betsy Cornwall.Happy Reading booknerds =]
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    This gender-swapped Robin Hood tale is a satisfying peek into the backstory of the world of Mechanica, but can certainly be read and enjoyed by readers who haven't read the other two books in the series. I want to re-read this book before I write a more thorough review, since I flew through it in one night, but I can say with certainty that this book was wonderful. Betsy Cornwell's writing is thoughtful and rich, as always, and I quickly found myself immersed in the characters and the world. I w This gender-swapped Robin Hood tale is a satisfying peek into the backstory of the world of Mechanica, but can certainly be read and enjoyed by readers who haven't read the other two books in the series. I want to re-read this book before I write a more thorough review, since I flew through it in one night, but I can say with certainty that this book was wonderful. Betsy Cornwell's writing is thoughtful and rich, as always, and I quickly found myself immersed in the characters and the world. I will definitely be recommending this book at the store when it comes out in August.
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    A female Robin Hood story!
  • Mel (Daily Prophecy)
    January 1, 1970
    I hated Mechanica, but gender-swap Robin Hood?Please.Please be good.
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    **You can see this full review and more at Book Briefs: https://bookbriefs.net**The Forest Queen is a young adult fantasy retelling by Betsy Cornwell. It is labeled as being book 0.5 in the Mechanica series. While I have not read Mechanica, I believe this is a standalone story that is set in the same world. Mechanica is a retelling of Cinderella but The Forest Queen is a female retelling of Robin Hood. I loved that Robin Hood was in fact our main character, Sylvie. In fact, the Forest Queen has **You can see this full review and more at Book Briefs: https://bookbriefs.net**The Forest Queen is a young adult fantasy retelling by Betsy Cornwell. It is labeled as being book 0.5 in the Mechanica series. While I have not read Mechanica, I believe this is a standalone story that is set in the same world. Mechanica is a retelling of Cinderella but The Forest Queen is a female retelling of Robin Hood. I loved that Robin Hood was in fact our main character, Sylvie. In fact, the Forest Queen has a very strong female empowerment vibe throughout. I enjoyed The Forest Queen. I am a fan of the tale of Robin Hood and I thought the Forest Queen provided a new spin on that story. That being said, while I liked this book, it didn't completely blow me away. It was a good novel, but something stopped me from completely falling in love with it. In the Forest Queen we meet Sylvie and her brother John. I got the impression that Sylvie and her brother John used to be pretty close, but I never really felt any of the effects of their previous closeness. John was every bit the tyrannical sheriff, and I didn't feel like he had a ton of depth. But Sylvie was a great character. I liked seeing her and her friends band together to rid their town of inequality and social injustice. I also liked her friends, Bird and Little Jane. They made a good group, and I would have liked to see more form them as a whole. The plot of the Forest Queen was very intriguing to me, but because of the short length of the novel, we didn't have enough time to delve into the level of depth I was hoping for on the character side or plot detail side.I can see this book being perfect for young adult readers who want a quick read and who love retellings. The gender swap for Robin Hood is an idea I am really into and I enjoyed the way Betsy Cornwell told this retelling. I enjoyed The Forest Queen but ultimately it was over too quickly for me to fully fall in love. If you are looking for a retelling that you can read in one sitting, check out The Forest Queen. This review was originally posted on Book Briefs
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  • Tracy (The Pages In-Between)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you HMH Teen #Partner for gifting me this book, in exchange of an honest review. All opinions are my own.I rate this book a 4 out of 5 Stars.I loved this book, it was addicting, and so much fun! For those who are not aware, this is a Robin Hood Re-telling. And yay for no Insta love!! This was about Sylvie finding herself, figuring out her family wasn't what she thought they were, and realizing what she would be laying down, to stand up for those who were wronged. It was about friendship, p Thank you HMH Teen #Partner for gifting me this book, in exchange of an honest review. All opinions are my own.I rate this book a 4 out of 5 Stars.I loved this book, it was addicting, and so much fun! For those who are not aware, this is a Robin Hood Re-telling. And yay for no Insta love!! This was about Sylvie finding herself, figuring out her family wasn't what she thought they were, and realizing what she would be laying down, to stand up for those who were wronged. It was about friendship, partnership, and being fierce. Sylvie is a character that most young girls should look up to. I really loved her, I actually loved every character in this book, with the exception of sheriff John. This was a cast of loveable characters.Cornwell, is a great story-teller, and world builder, I love that she added a real person from history into this book too, I thought that was a clever touch. The whole time I was reading this, I kept thinking about the movie Robin Hood Prince Of Thieves and it's made me want to watch it so bad!! Once I got to the end of the book, I was starting to get a bit emotional, I can't spoil it for you guys, but if you've read it, you know what I am speaking of. I kept thinking "This cannot be it, It cannot end like this" and then Surprise!! I was happy all over again. I am not sure if this is a standalone, or if there is going to be another book, the way it ended, I feel like it's just the one book, but I'm not going to lie, I wouldn't be mad if there was another one coming!I love that Cornwell, didn't write a super cheesy, fluffy,  insta love filled re-telling. There was depth to this book, I found myself rooting for Sylvie, and rooting for her merry band of misfits! After the past three books I read, being 2 stars, this one was like the light and the end of a dark reading tunnel! I am officially out of my book slump! This is my first Betsy Cornwell book, and I want more!!
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    In this well told revisionist Robin Hood, Lady Silviana of Loughsley is entreated by her best friend Bird to run away from her cruel brother John, the sheriff appointed by the king. At sixteen, Lady Silviana is a bit naive about the lives of the common folk, but she is motvated to flee when her brother offers her in marriage to an older nobleman. Once she escapes to the forest with Bird and Little Jane, a pregnant peasant girl, she begins to realize the extent of the cruelty and deprivation suff In this well told revisionist Robin Hood, Lady Silviana of Loughsley is entreated by her best friend Bird to run away from her cruel brother John, the sheriff appointed by the king. At sixteen, Lady Silviana is a bit naive about the lives of the common folk, but she is motvated to flee when her brother offers her in marriage to an older nobleman. Once she escapes to the forest with Bird and Little Jane, a pregnant peasant girl, she begins to realize the extent of the cruelty and deprivation suffered by the common folk at the hands of not only John but most of the noble class. As she and her little band grow, she and her band of followers rob the rich to give to the poor. All in all, Cornwell has fashioned an engaging and affecting retelling of the Robin Hood legend, peopled by vivid characters, especially Sylvie, Little Jane, and Mae as the female versions of Robin, Little John, and Friar Tuck. Young adults who love retellings will eat up this novel. #TheForestQueen #NetGalley
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  • Karen Barber
    January 1, 1970
    This is a telling of the Robin Hood legend, with some parts familiar and others changed to suit the characters.Sylvie has got used to the cruelty of her brother, the new sheriff of the land. He is accustomed to treating others as he sees fit in order to improve his own standing. There comes a time when Sylvie can take it no more and she runs away to live in the forest with her childhood friend.We watch Sylvie - the forest queen as she comes to be known - as her pairing quickly becomes a ragtag g This is a telling of the Robin Hood legend, with some parts familiar and others changed to suit the characters.Sylvie has got used to the cruelty of her brother, the new sheriff of the land. He is accustomed to treating others as he sees fit in order to improve his own standing. There comes a time when Sylvie can take it no more and she runs away to live in the forest with her childhood friend.We watch Sylvie - the forest queen as she comes to be known - as her pairing quickly becomes a ragtag group of rebels, people who are determined not to give in to the sheriff’s demands.The story has some interesting moments, but it really seemed to focus on exploring how their rebellion might continue.Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read this prior to publication in exchange for my thoughts.
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  • Atasteforbooks (M)
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in exchange for an honest review.A gender-bent Robin Hood retelling?! I was immediately sold by the premise and enjoyed reading this fun story about a young Lady (in the Noble sense) who has to face the harsh truths of her privileged life. However, there were some things I found problematic about the plot and character development that took away from my enjoyment of the story. Most detailed review to follow!
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  • thebookiv
    January 1, 1970
    Simple story, really. It goes down as a light, fluffy read, though there was some challenging content implied. It was a bit flat and uninspiring, even for a gender bent retelling. Not a necessary read by any standard.
  • ALEXA
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. I quite liked all the nods to familiar elements of the Robin Hood tale, and I enjoyed the way the author wove a lot of females into the story too.
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