Confessions of an Innocent Man
"Every person wrongfully convicted of a crime at some point dreams of getting revenge against the system. In Confessions of an Innocent Man, the dream comes true and in a spectacular way."--John Grisham, New York Times bestselling author of The Reckoning A thrillingly suspenseful debut novel, and a fierce howl of rage that questions the true meaning of justice.Rafael Zhettah relishes the simplicity and freedom of his life. He is the owner and head chef of a promising Houston restaurant. A pilot with open access to the boundless Texas horizon. A bachelor, content with having few personal or material attachments that ground him. Then, lightning strikes. When he finds Tieresse--billionaire, philanthropist, sophisticate, bombshell--sitting at one of his tables, he also finds his soul mate and his life starts again. And just as fast, when she is brutally murdered in their home, when he is convicted of the crime, when he is sentenced to die, it is all ripped away. But for Rafael Zhettah, death row is not the end. It is only the beginning. Now, with his recaptured freedom, he will stop at nothing to deliver justice to those who stole everything from him.This is a heart-stoppingly suspenseful, devastating, page-turning debut novel. A thriller with a relentless grip that wants you to read it in one sitting. David R. Dow has dedicated his life to the fight against capital punishment--to righting the horrific injustices of the death penalty regime in Texas. He delivers the perfect modern parable for exploring our complex, uneasy relationships with punishment and reparation in a terribly unjust world.

Confessions of an Innocent Man Details

TitleConfessions of an Innocent Man
Author
ReleaseApr 9th, 2019
PublisherDutton Books
ISBN-139781524743888
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Novels

Confessions of an Innocent Man Review

  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    Give me a debut novel where the author takes his own life work and translates this into a work of fiction. Just give me. There are SO many loopholes that can be found in the justice system and unfortunately we have seen throughout the decades of the wrongfully accused - some even sent to death. This story is about Rafael who is convicted and sentenced to die for the murder of his wife. Put on death row, six years of his life goes by and when he finally does get his freedom, it's time to make tho Give me a debut novel where the author takes his own life work and translates this into a work of fiction. Just give me. There are SO many loopholes that can be found in the justice system and unfortunately we have seen throughout the decades of the wrongfully accused - some even sent to death. This story is about Rafael who is convicted and sentenced to die for the murder of his wife. Put on death row, six years of his life goes by and when he finally does get his freedom, it's time to make those who put him behind bars pay.The writing took a little getting used to for me. At first it felt like when you watch a movie and it's just the narrator speaking and also doing the voice parts - do you know what I mean? I think it felt that way because the dialogue wasn't in quotes and that was starting to drive me bonkers - especially as sometimes these moments were in italics and sometimes they were not. But that could just be an ARC issue. I did end up getting used to this because the story line just greatly intrigued me.The author gives you Raf's life from when he met his wife, their short marriage, his experience through trial and on death row. I felt like I was right there with him and uff, boy did my heart go out to him. When he gets out and puts a plan in motion - well, DAAAAMMMNNNN. Is this justice? Is there ever such a thing as justice or does it just become a vicious circle of injustice? I forget exactly what Tieresse (Raf's wife) said in the book regarding this and I wish I had made note but it made sense to me when I read it. Either way, the subject matter of capital punishment and all the injustices that come about is extremely well done by the author who is experienced in this subject matter.If you can get past the writing style a little bit, I think you'll absolutely enjoy this journey. Although it's a work of fiction, the truth behind it certainly gives you something to think about.Thank you Dutton Books and NetGalley for this copy.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    I wept a lot at the end of this book. Wept for injustice and love lost. I could write a thousand word review of this book but urge you to read it for yourself instead. Thank you to Goodreads for a copy for my review.
  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. This is the first book I've read by the author. I started out a little confused by this book, it's a little outside of normal reading genres and I'm not really sure how to classify it. The characters are interesting and enjoyable. The flow is slow and easy, I was expecting some tension or suspense but nothing like that at all. The story is intriguing and while I thought this was going to be a 3 star book it grew on me as I read.
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  • Rebecca Minnock
    January 1, 1970
    This is absolutely a one sitting read. Rafael Zhettah, chef and restaurant owner, married to Tieresse and living in Houston, is accused of murdering his wife. He cannot possibly have done it, yet he still ends up on death row.I had a lump in my throat for at least the first half of this heart stopping, tense debut. I went through such a huge range of emotions whilst reading it. For Rafael, death row isn't the end, it's the beginning and Dow's writing is just superb. An absolutely stunning debut!
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  • Maggie Holmes
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book in a day -- we were stuck at the airport for 6 hours as well as the flights. Because of the prologue, I knew what was coming, but had no idea how it would get there. This started like a mystery, but it was really a philosophical look at what jail and especially wrongful conviction might do to someone. Everyone -- except for a few prison guards -- had some kind of back story that might have mitigated what they did. The ending never could have been good, but it was probably a bit I read this book in a day -- we were stuck at the airport for 6 hours as well as the flights. Because of the prologue, I knew what was coming, but had no idea how it would get there. This started like a mystery, but it was really a philosophical look at what jail and especially wrongful conviction might do to someone. Everyone -- except for a few prison guards -- had some kind of back story that might have mitigated what they did. The ending never could have been good, but it was probably a bit too convenient. Will recommend.
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Didn't think it would be this good! A man is arrested and convicted of murder. We spend all his jail time wondering if they will ever believe he is innocent. So well written that I couldn't put it down. Not only is it a mystery but we learn about belief and faith in a spiritual world. Definitely recommend this to all mystery and thriller readers. And all this with any blood splatter!! David R Dow looking forward to your next masterpece!!
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  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    David R. Dow’s debut novel, CONFESSIONS OF AN INNOCENT MAN, introduces readers to Rafael Zhettah. Rafael is the Mexican-American owner and head chef of a restaurant in Houston, and the pilot of his own plane. He is married and much in love with his wife, who is bludgeoned to death early in the book. Following his arrest, Rafael is found guilty of her murder and is sent to death row. That is where the first half of this procedural takes off.Rafael’s journey through the legal system and his ultima David R. Dow’s debut novel, CONFESSIONS OF AN INNOCENT MAN, introduces readers to Rafael Zhettah. Rafael is the Mexican-American owner and head chef of a restaurant in Houston, and the pilot of his own plane. He is married and much in love with his wife, who is bludgeoned to death early in the book. Following his arrest, Rafael is found guilty of her murder and is sent to death row. That is where the first half of this procedural takes off.Rafael’s journey through the legal system and his ultimate landing on death row is the mirror image of the author’s career. Dow is “the founder and director of the Texas Innocence Network, which works to exonerate inmates who did not commit the crimes for which they were wrongfully convicted, and the Juvenile and Capital Advocacy Project.” His work with these agencies gives him a rare view of the criminal justice system and its shortfalls.Why should someone on death row be given a second chance? The answer is found within these pages. Sometimes the inmate truly is innocent and the real perpetrator is found. The book raises many questions about the who, what, when and where of the crimes that have been committed and how fastidious the investigation was. Dow is clearly in the corner of the death row convict, and as the narrative unfolds, readers are challenged to think about whether or not the death penalty should be repealed.How does Dow manage to work with clients wherein “the outcome will be devastating”? In an interview with his publisher, Dow says he cannot walk away from the people for whom he is working. “Often I think what drives me to continue is the belief that our legal or moral position is so strong, that we will in fact win.” He believes that being locked up and under the control of the prison rules and guards can lead to hopelessness and sometimes madness, which is rampant among death row inmates who wait for years to be executed.The second half of the novel delves into the machinations of the appeal system, including how difficult it is to open a death row case, even when exculpatory evidence, like finding DNA long after the fact, is unearthed. It often comes down to not wanting to spend time or money on a closed case that holds up the finding that possibly an innocent person has been locked up.CONFESSIONS OF AN INNOCENT MAN is very realistic, and readers will find themselves questioning if death row can be made better in any way --- not as a reward to the guilty, but to make it less stressful for the innocent. Dow says that “all the characters in the book, from inmates to judges to lawyers to prison guards to family members, are characters I could easily conjure up because I have met and gotten to know versions of those people in my professional life.”Reviewed by Barbara Lipkien Gershenbaum
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  • Vivian
    January 1, 1970
    4.5-star readI received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.Rafael Zhettah was a successful restauranteur. He wasn't a millionaire, but he was well-off financially speaking and his restaurant was booming. He was loved and respected by his staff. Although without any close family ties in the States, he wasn't really wanting for anything or so he thought until Tieresse walks into his restaurant. Their relationship began with Tieresse complementin 4.5-star readI received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.Rafael Zhettah was a successful restauranteur. He wasn't a millionaire, but he was well-off financially speaking and his restaurant was booming. He was loved and respected by his staff. Although without any close family ties in the States, he wasn't really wanting for anything or so he thought until Tieresse walks into his restaurant. Their relationship began with Tieresse complementing the food and progressed from there. In less than a year, 37-year-old Rafael was married to the 51-year-old billionaire socialite. Their marriage was unconventional by most standards, but they were definitely devoted to one another and head-over-heels in love. And then the unspeakable happens, Tieresse is murdered. Rafael has an alibi, but his unconventional marriage is misunderstood by most, and he is considered the prime suspect. Rafael is an innocent man and trusts the judicial system until he is found guilty of a crime that he did not commit. Adding insult to injury, he is given the death penalty. Rafael then spends over five years on death row then new evidence is uncovered that could potentially exonerate him. Surely, the Supreme Court of Texas will provide a stay of execution and allow the evidence to be tested? Thankfully, the federal courts did provide a last-minute stay of execution and Rafael is completely exonerated and released from prison. Rafael has lost the love of his life, his business, his good name, and over six years of his life. He doesn't blame his lawyers or even the jurors from his original trial for his legal debacle. He's incredibly grateful to his legal team for all of their hard work. He does, however, harbor growing animosity toward the two judges on the Texas Supreme Court that thwarted his legal team at every turn. Can he let go of this animosity and live his life in peace or is it time to teach these judges a lesson? How far is too far when exacting revenge? Confessions of an Innocent Man is the first fiction book written by David R. Dow and it packs quite a punch. The author provides an interesting glimpse into the troubled legal system where a suspect is often considered guilty with little presumption of innocence rather than innocent until proven guilty. This legal thriller shines a light on the miscarriages of justice that are often perpetrated against people of color within the judicial system. This book isn't a diatribe against the legal system. It does highlight the faults within the system, but it also highlights the things that work. Confessions of an Innocent Man is more than a story about an innocent man being railroaded on a murder charge, it's about unconventional relationships, vengeance, reparations, and more. Yes, there's a lot going on in this story. The reader gets a fascinating glimpse into the life of people on death row, the legal system (at least the Texas legal system) from arrest through trial and after, the emotional toll of being on death row and how inmates there are treated, the struggle to adjust after exoneration and release, in addition to witnessing the growing relationship between Tieresse and Rafael, and more. This book deals with some difficult subjects: murder, death row, abuse of prisoners, etc., but it was a compelling read. I couldn't put the book down until I got to the end and thoroughly enjoyed it even with the dark themes. If you enjoy reading realistic fiction or legal thrillers, then I urge you to get a copy of Confessions of an Innocent Man to read. This book is one of my #mustread recommendations for the year. I look forward to reading more fiction by Mr. Dow in the future.This review originally posted on 04/05/2019 at https://www.thebookdivasreads.com/201....
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  • Chaitra
    January 1, 1970
    It’s an interesting look at the death row system, and its flawed execution. I don’t think I’ve ever thought much about death penalty itself. Not sure why, but maybe it’s a belief (mistaken) in the justice system and thinking that while they would put an innocent man in jail, they wouldn’t also put him on the death row. (I mean both sexes, and use man only for convenience). But apparently they make mistakes, and they have their own particular biases. It should not be surprising, but it kind of wa It’s an interesting look at the death row system, and its flawed execution. I don’t think I’ve ever thought much about death penalty itself. Not sure why, but maybe it’s a belief (mistaken) in the justice system and thinking that while they would put an innocent man in jail, they wouldn’t also put him on the death row. (I mean both sexes, and use man only for convenience). But apparently they make mistakes, and they have their own particular biases. It should not be surprising, but it kind of was. I guess I was expecting Blackstone’s ten guilty men escaping better than a single innocent person convicted, at least when it came to death row. The author is a death row lawyer and has represented hundreds of death row inmates. So this book knows what it talks about. Props also for foiling my expectations. It just did not go where I was expecting it to go. Then again, I didn’t completely like or even buy the direction it went. I could not understand what Rafael was trying to prove. In any case it feels like he failed. Also you can’t bring up the Stanford Prison Experiment and not fully examine it. But overall it was a good book, and it challenged some of my preconceived notions about death row.
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  • BookTrib.com
    January 1, 1970
    “If you ask a lucky person to tell you what happened on the worst day of his life, he can do so without hesitation.”For Rafael Zhettah, the chef and owner of an up-and-coming Houston restaurant, that day was when the police told him his wife of only two years had been murdered in their own home. The next worst day was when he found out he was the prime suspect. He had motive, opportunity, he’d been found with another woman, his fingerprints were on the murder weapon. But he insisted he was innoc “If you ask a lucky person to tell you what happened on the worst day of his life, he can do so without hesitation.”For Rafael Zhettah, the chef and owner of an up-and-coming Houston restaurant, that day was when the police told him his wife of only two years had been murdered in their own home. The next worst day was when he found out he was the prime suspect. He had motive, opportunity, he’d been found with another woman, his fingerprints were on the murder weapon. But he insisted he was innocent.“You can call me the harshest name you like, and I will not disagree….But there is one thing I am not. I am not a murderer.”The judge and jury disagree. Texas is a death penalty state, with a very busy death row, and that is where he lands. His shock is enormous – and so is ours. We’ve all read books about life in prison, seen the movies and television shows, read newspaper accounts, heard the podcasts. Nothing, however, will prepare you for the sheer visceral reality of what David Dow gives us in Confessions of an Innocent Man (Dutton).The rest of the review: https://booktrib.com/2019/03/guilt-an...
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  • Kim (booked4life)
    January 1, 1970
    The writing style of this book didn’t suit me as a reader. However, the messages of injustice, hope, and love are meaningful and made me enjoy parts of this book, especially the ending.
  • Ken
    January 1, 1970
    David R. Dow's," Confessions of an Innocent Man", is an extraordinary novel. While the narrative provides an entertaining love story full of vengeance. It also addresses an equally social confrontation with the death penalty and those facing it.As for me, I can't solve the moral dilemma of the pros and con of each but I do clearly understand Taking a Life is WRONG! Period. It's WRONG! The inmates on the row are as interesting and complex as the CO's are sadistic and brutal as the job allows. McK David R. Dow's," Confessions of an Innocent Man", is an extraordinary novel. While the narrative provides an entertaining love story full of vengeance. It also addresses an equally social confrontation with the death penalty and those facing it.As for me, I can't solve the moral dilemma of the pros and con of each but I do clearly understand Taking a Life is WRONG! Period. It's WRONG! The inmates on the row are as interesting and complex as the CO's are sadistic and brutal as the job allows. McKenzie was certainly at home on as a death row guard. The real intelligence comes from Seargent when he asks if the man makes the job or the job makes the man. The narrative reminds me of the great film, "A Clockwork Orange". Who's craziest? For me, cellmate Seargent and his eastern philosophy were my favorite character. His words of wisdom contrasted the ignorance of the penal system and the self-justifying views of Moss and Stream, ignoring any responsibility on their behalf. Tieresse may have been the wisest of all! Many sociological questions are to be answered. This is a great story by the well informed, David R. Dow!
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  • Shannon Wise
    January 1, 1970
    So. I was scrolling Instagram not too long ago and Dutton Books asked if anyone was interested in receiving an advanced copy of Confessions of an Innocent Man by David R. Dow. I messaged and said I was because I'd read Autobiography of an Execution and it blew me away. Well, Confessions also blew me away. I finished reading it over the weekend, but waited to write a review so I could sort out the very complicated emotions this book made me feel. David Dow is a great writer. He knows how to tell So. I was scrolling Instagram not too long ago and Dutton Books asked if anyone was interested in receiving an advanced copy of Confessions of an Innocent Man by David R. Dow. I messaged and said I was because I'd read Autobiography of an Execution and it blew me away. Well, Confessions also blew me away. I finished reading it over the weekend, but waited to write a review so I could sort out the very complicated emotions this book made me feel. David Dow is a great writer. He knows how to tell a story. The book flowed and there were not any wasted words or scenes. The plotting was tight and made sense. It is a suspenseful story. Mr. Dow knows how to wind up the tension at just the right moments. Plot. The plot is this - a restaurant owner meets a rich socialite and they hit it off. She is older than he and has a condition that makes sex painful so she tells him he can have sex with other women. They get married and are truly happy. Until she is killed. Suspicion ultimately falls on Rafael because - it's always the husband. He is tried and ultimately convicted. He is sent to death row. He is in prison for six years when he is exonerated. He then plans surprising revenge. And that is all I'm saying about the plot. I do not want to spoil anyone's pleasure at reading this book. I probably could have given this book five stars. Except for the fact that I was not fond of the ending. It made me cry, actually. This story brought up so many emotions. I have long believed in the death penalty - that is that some people do things that are so heinous and awful they deserve to die. But. I also think that our death penalty is applied so unfairly that it does not serve the purpose it was intended to serve. It is disproportionately applied against the poor and minorities and the innocent, that I do not support imposition of the death penalty anymore. We are just too flawed to do justice. This book made me sad and angry and heartbroken. The fact that I felt all of those emotions is a testament to the kind of story that David Dow has told in this book. His writing about death row in Texas is heartbreaking and infuriating. We manage to rob people of their freedom, but more importantly, of their humanity. And that should never happen. As Bryan Stevenson says, "None of us are the worst thing we have done." David Dow makes that point so eloquently in this book. I'm not going to lie. At times, this book was really, really hard to read. But it was so worth the hardship. It is beautifully written and tells a very important story. If you are interested in the law or like legal thriller or just lie a really well-told story, I highly recommend this book. I received an advanced copy of this book and got no other compensation in exchange for this review. The opinions expressed herein are mine and mine alone. Thank you Dutton Books for allowing me to read this book.
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    I was drawn to this debut because of the Texas connection but after the first 10 pages, I was fully engaged and needed more. A promising but humble chef, Rafael is the least likely guy that an older sophisticated billionaire like Tieresse would fall for but she does and the two fall deeply in love despite the odds. Then, despite the odds, Tieresse is brutally murdered and the guy they pin it on is her husband, Rafael. The odds again are not in his favor and he ends up on death row. Stunned and s I was drawn to this debut because of the Texas connection but after the first 10 pages, I was fully engaged and needed more. A promising but humble chef, Rafael is the least likely guy that an older sophisticated billionaire like Tieresse would fall for but she does and the two fall deeply in love despite the odds. Then, despite the odds, Tieresse is brutally murdered and the guy they pin it on is her husband, Rafael. The odds again are not in his favor and he ends up on death row. Stunned and still maintaining his innocence he turns to a group of dedicated attorneys who work towards his release. Is he bitter about what happened to him? Is he sad beyond belief at the death of his beloved wife? Is he willing to forgive and forget? - not hardly. David.R.Dow delivers a powerful thriller that takes the reader inside death row and into the complexities of forgiveness and revenge. Was justice served? You be the judge and jury. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Dutton Books for the free copy in exchange for my honest reviewGoing into this book I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect – was it fiction, was it nonfiction? With so many true crime books out there as well as the documentary series, I wouldn’t have been surprised if that were the case. Well, CONFESSIONS OF AN INNOCENT MAN is fiction but it has the authenticity to it that is feels 100% real.David R. Dow’s background in working against capital punishment shines through in this book. His Thanks to Dutton Books for the free copy in exchange for my honest reviewGoing into this book I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect – was it fiction, was it nonfiction? With so many true crime books out there as well as the documentary series, I wouldn’t have been surprised if that were the case. Well, CONFESSIONS OF AN INNOCENT MAN is fiction but it has the authenticity to it that is feels 100% real.David R. Dow’s background in working against capital punishment shines through in this book. His knowledge on the topic and experience with death row inmates is very apparent in the details of this novel. You feel what Rafael is feeling as he faces the death penalty, you feel his struggles with trying to prove his innocence and as he tries to remove the title of “murderer” from his name. You’ll be brought through all the emotions with this one but it had the pacing of a thriller. I don’t want to say too much about the details because I loved going into this one blind.Dow’s knowledge and expertise is evident, but the book doesn’t get too fact heavy. The characters are well-developed and he makes the reader think about capital punishment in a different way. You never really get to see through the eyes of a death row inmate that could potentially be innocent. I think he captured this flawlessly. If you’re a fan of true crime but like the flow of fiction better, then this is perfect for you!
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  • Gloria
    January 1, 1970
    This well-researched, thought-provoking debut is written by the founder and director of the Texas Innocence Network which works to exonerate inmates who did not commit the crimes for which they were wrongfully-convicted. The author's experience is evident throughout. Who gets justice, poor court proceedings, and examples of psychologically wrenching prison life will stay with readers long after the last page.This is riveting because it seems so plausible. How can someone end up on death row and This well-researched, thought-provoking debut is written by the founder and director of the Texas Innocence Network which works to exonerate inmates who did not commit the crimes for which they were wrongfully-convicted. The author's experience is evident throughout. Who gets justice, poor court proceedings, and examples of psychologically wrenching prison life will stay with readers long after the last page.This is riveting because it seems so plausible. How can someone end up on death row and still be innocent? The temptation is to say 'how could this happen' and yet it does. My only reserve regarding the story is I believe the author created some rather unlikely extremes in order to point out issues of racism and make the revenge plot work. Example: not many men marry a woman much older than he is who just happens to be one of the wealthiest people in the entire country. He is a poor Mexican American man and she is white so when she dies, it seems easy to place the crime upon him. And then there is the private get-away home they bought that just happens to have the most unique hide-away ever...This is a page-turner, but definitely its social value is in helping readers understand the flaws in the justice system and thus is not to be missed. An excellent nonfiction book is Shane Bauer's American Prison which provides both a contemporary and historical perspective on prison life.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Rafael maintains his innocence even as he sits on Death Row. He didn't kill his wife, the fabulously wealthy Tieresse. Dow has given us a novel about crime, justice, prison, law, and faith all wrapped up in one. This is about more than one man, it's about how we look at everyone who is convicted of a heinous crime and what happens when they go to death row. The characters are well drawn and there's enough suspense, even though you can probably guess what is going to happen, to keep you turning p Rafael maintains his innocence even as he sits on Death Row. He didn't kill his wife, the fabulously wealthy Tieresse. Dow has given us a novel about crime, justice, prison, law, and faith all wrapped up in one. This is about more than one man, it's about how we look at everyone who is convicted of a heinous crime and what happens when they go to death row. The characters are well drawn and there's enough suspense, even though you can probably guess what is going to happen, to keep you turning pages. Maybe what you THINK is going to happen doesn't- maybe something else does. Dow has a long history of working death penalty cases and he's clearly drawn on that to write a novel which will linger. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. A good read.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great read! The author, David R. Dow, did a fantastic job of making the characters relatable and building on their storylines. I really enjoyed reading this book. It was an interesting and heartfelt read. I have not read a book yet from the point of view of "an Innocent Man." The plot had twists and turns and kept me guessing. I look forward to reading more from this author in the future.
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  • John Wintersteen
    January 1, 1970
    Debut novel. Interesting plot line Good ratings. Low numbers. Tom Nolan writes this book up. Author Dow has a long history of involvement with the criminal justice system and death row in a series of nonfiction books. Very interesting.
  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved this book, I thought it was great...but,the ending just left me hanging...kinda disappointed in the way it wrapped up...what about the detective being on the way & the judges,how did that all play out?And the step-son,what about him? Loved the story plot,though!
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  • Jay
    January 1, 1970
    I'll be reviewing this one for Mystery Scene magazine. I liked it and found it problematic at the same time. I'm looking forward to seeing what I end up writing for a review.
  • Faith 09
    January 1, 1970
    Finished the book in one sitting, I really enjoyed it.
  • Anita C.
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed this book--couldn't put it down!
  • Melissa Dunlavey
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book - thoroughly enjoyed the first half - Showed some of the real flaws in the criminal justice system - did not like how the book just ended - left me wanting more closure
  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Great read. For me a bit of a slow start, but glad I stuck with it. Love his writing style, and it's a good story. Grisham readers will like it.
  • M.
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good read.
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