Have a Little Faith in Me
"Saved!" meets To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before in this laugh-out-loud romantic comedy that takes a meaningful look at consent and what it means to give it.When CeCe’s born-again ex-boyfriend dumps her after they have sex, she follows him to Jesus camp in order to win him back. Problem: She knows nothing about Jesus. But her best friend Paul does. He accompanies CeCe to camp, and the plan—God’s or CeCe’s—goes immediately awry when her ex shows up with a new girlfriend, a True Believer at that.Scrambling to save face, CeCe ropes Paul into faking a relationship. But as deceptions stack up, she questions whether her ex is really the nice guy he seemed. And what about her strange new feelings for Paul—is this love, lust, or an illusion born of heartbreak? To figure it out, she’ll have to confront the reasons she chased her ex to camp in the first place, including the truth about the night she lost her virginity.

Have a Little Faith in Me Details

TitleHave a Little Faith in Me
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Romance, Realistic Fiction

Have a Little Faith in Me Review

  • Rachel Solomon
    January 1, 1970
    Official blurb: "This book reminded me why I fell in love with YA. HAVE A LITTLE FAITH IN ME is both hilarious and poignant, with an unforgettable cast of characters led by fierce but vulnerable CeCe. She asks all the questions about relationships and sexuality I kept locked in my mind as a teen, and her desire for answers broke my heart and then filled it up. An immediate favorite."One of the best books I've read all year. Sonia's voice is authentic, clever, and utterly captivating. Everything Official blurb: "This book reminded me why I fell in love with YA. HAVE A LITTLE FAITH IN ME is both hilarious and poignant, with an unforgettable cast of characters led by fierce but vulnerable CeCe. She asks all the questions about relationships and sexuality I kept locked in my mind as a teen, and her desire for answers broke my heart and then filled it up. An immediate favorite."One of the best books I've read all year. Sonia's voice is authentic, clever, and utterly captivating. Everything is so respectfully, sensitively done, from discussions about religion to the topic of consent. Nothing is shied away from, and yet nothing feels heavy-handed. This book also has some of the most positive, woman-centered sex scenes I've read in YA, and I ADORE Paul.
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  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so happy I loved this as much as I'd hoped to based on the description. I love YAs that serve kind of a "sex ed" function and this one does a beautiful job with "emotional sex ed," which I think is really important and really underserved by the category. I also loved the summer camp vibes and the extremely shippable couple, and as a religious person, I just dig YA with religious themes in general, but I think this is a book that very much works whether you do too or not.
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  • Jennifer Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    3 Stars ⭐ 3 Stars ⭐️
  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Do... do you see those comps? "'Saved!' meets To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before"? Like seriously how was I not going to pick this up, those are straight up two of my favorite things in this world. But then I was scared because come on, could this really live up to two of my favorite things in this world? Why, yes, yes it freaking can, because it did. What I Loved: • The discussion/comm You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Do... do you see those comps? "'Saved!' meets To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before"? Like seriously how was I not going to pick this up, those are straight up two of my favorite things in this world. But then I was scared because come on, could this really live up to two of my favorite things in this world? Why, yes, yes it freaking can, because it did. What I Loved: • The discussion/commentary on religion was handled really well. So, CeCe is pretty solidly anti-religion at the start of the book. Obviously, she's upset that her crappy boyfriend dumped her, citing religion as his reason. Add to it that religion has never been an important part of her life, and she's thinking pretty poorly of Christians as a whole. But here's the main thing: the author doesn't vilify religion or Christianity. Does Ethan, the ex-boyfriend, suck? You bet. And yes, he happens to be Christian. But the author introduces so many wonderful examples of Christian people that it makes CeCe think twice about her views, which is a pretty great message.Likewise, she doesn't shy away from some of the more dangerous messages that religions (and often Christianity) can spread, especially to young women. Because shaming women for existing is simply not okay. In one example, CeCe is shamed for not wearing a "proper" swimsuit, because god forbid she owns a stomach. Ethan feels perfectly justified in painting CeCe as some kind of temptress, when clearly they were both consenting participants. He is welcomed back as "reformed", while CeCe basically has a scarlet letter painted on her.Essentially, through CeCe's journey, the author showcased that there are fabulous faith-driven people, while still acknowledging that there is work to be done in many religious organizations, especially in terms of women and LGBT+ communities. • Frankly, it's funny as hell. The whole book was just beyond compulsively readable because it was just so damn charming. CeCe cracked me up, her best friend Paul cracked me up, and some of the instances they found themselves in were hilarious. It's heartwarming as well, but the humor was just done so well that it brought the characters to life. • Sex positivity FTW! Obviously it's clear that sex is going to play a role in this story based on the synopsis, but I think the author handled it so, so well. She addressed consent and protection, as well as simply making it clear that it's okay to ask about stuff. That it's cool to have experience and it's equally cool to not have experience; fine to be ready and fine to not be. There was no shame in any choice whatsoever, as long as the character(s) in question was comfortable. It was great that the author was able to shine such a positive light on the topic while still making clear that it's not for everyone at every time. • Such a focus on friendships! One of the highlights that I wasn't expecting was CeCe's blossoming friendships with the other girls in her cabin. They all came from such different backgrounds, and yet they still came together and bonded. It's absolutely a highlight of the book, as proof that one can find their people in the least expected of places. • Romance and relationship talk abound! Look would this even be a book about a summer camp if there was no love drama? Well, there was and it was really fun. Some people I shipped together, a lot. I will keep it vague but. I was rooting for certain people from the start. And so many of the girls were discovering their own needs and desires from relationships, and it was just a really refreshing perspective. Bottom Line: This one lived up to my expectations and then some. It's fun, it's witty, it's heartwarming, and I flat out couldn't put it down. You need this book in your life.
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  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    THIS BOOK. I was able to read an early copy and it has my heart forever.Fiercely feminist, uproariously funny, and simultaneously heart-wrenchingly tender, this book is a true gem. It explores so many important issues (sex ed, healthy vs unhealthy relationships, religion) with both care and humour. I cannot wait to read it again.
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4.5 StarsCeCe thought she meant something to Ethan, but after her broke up with her, in the name of the Lord, she was hurt and determined to prove to him that his faith was also important to her in order to win him back. "Jesus camp" proved to be quite a challenge for CeCe, but there she found friendship, love, and understanding.Let me tell you, I utterly adored this book, and here are some reasons why:• I thought the characters in this book were stupendous, and I enjoyed getting to know Rating: 4.5 StarsCeCe thought she meant something to Ethan, but after her broke up with her, in the name of the Lord, she was hurt and determined to prove to him that his faith was also important to her in order to win him back. "Jesus camp" proved to be quite a challenge for CeCe, but there she found friendship, love, and understanding.Let me tell you, I utterly adored this book, and here are some reasons why:• I thought the characters in this book were stupendous, and I enjoyed getting to know them. They were interesting and layered, and many really surprised me. I was so happy, that Hartl resisted painting them as stereotypes, because they played a huge role in my enjoyment of this story. • The friendship between CeCe and Paul was so wonderful. They had so much history, and I loved all the small peeks we got into their past. • Paul was just flawed perfection. Maybe he held people at a distance, and maybe he was resistant to getting into any serious romantic relationships, but he had a huge, soft, and tender heart. • THE STORIES!! Paul and CeCe would tell each other these really meaningful made up stories. I think I was more partial to Paul's, because they were epic, but I enjoyed this facet of their relationship very much. • The girls of cabin 8 were such a fantastic group. I adored the friendship that developed between this group of young women, and was so happy CeCe had the luck of meeting them all. • Hartl did a wonderful job exploring the emotional side of sex, as well as delving into the many aspects of consent. This is something I would love to see more of in YA, and not only was it a big part of CeCe's story, it was done well, in my opinion. • The story also puts CeCe's fauxmance with Paul side-by-side with her past relationship with Ethan. It was a great way to show a healthy versus an unhealthy relationship, which is something I definitely would have benefited from as a teen. • I appreciated that the author did not villainize all Christians or Christianity in general, but rather, showed that there are some bad people who choose to weaponize religion. CeCe encountered several characters like that, but she also met a lot of really wonderful Christians too, and I liked that Hartl elected to show both sides. I expected a wholly hilarious book, and this book was indeed funny, but it was also really emotional, heartfelt, and meaningful. I laughed, I raged, I nodded my head in agreement, and most importantly, I finished this story with a smile on my face. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Sierra Elmore
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come!! But this slaps
  • Cari
    January 1, 1970
    I've been following the author since she announced her deal on Twitter, and I was so pleased to get an early copy from NetGalley. Although I'm not a YA librarian, I love the occasional YA read, and this book did not disappoint. The protagonist, CeCe, is hilarious and real. I came from a school that was heavily evangelical/Christian, so I super-identified with her. CeCe falls for Ethan, a super-Christian, formerly homeschooled boy. After they have sex, he dumps her, and she's totally blindsided. I've been following the author since she announced her deal on Twitter, and I was so pleased to get an early copy from NetGalley. Although I'm not a YA librarian, I love the occasional YA read, and this book did not disappoint. The protagonist, CeCe, is hilarious and real. I came from a school that was heavily evangelical/Christian, so I super-identified with her. CeCe falls for Ethan, a super-Christian, formerly homeschooled boy. After they have sex, he dumps her, and she's totally blindsided. Ethan claims he was tempted and that he needs to reclaim his virginity - so of course, CeCe decides to follow him to Jesus camp to get him back. One problem - CeCe isn't a Christian.CeCe has to fake her way through camp - but luckily, she's convinced her best friend, Paul, to come with her and help. Paul's deadbeat dad was once a minister, and he'd been to the same camp years ago. She's all set to get Ethan back, but of course, things don't go as she planned.I loved this book so much - I laughed so hard I almost peed a few times (I've had two babies, don't judge). I couldn't put it down - read it in two sittings. So many important issues of consent and religion, and a girl becoming a woman in the most true way.
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  • Zaneta @ I'm Fully Booked
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for providing and eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Have a Little Faith In Me is a book that talks about really important issues, like consent, sexuality, religion, to mention a few, yet is very hard to rate, as it doesn't really deliver. I went into it expecting a funny but poignant story about a girl who goes to Jesus camp to win over her ex-boyfriend, but ends up falling for someone else, and I got the first part, but not the second. If I were to rate Thank you to NetGalley for providing and eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Have a Little Faith In Me is a book that talks about really important issues, like consent, sexuality, religion, to mention a few, yet is very hard to rate, as it doesn't really deliver. I went into it expecting a funny but poignant story about a girl who goes to Jesus camp to win over her ex-boyfriend, but ends up falling for someone else, and I got the first part, but not the second. If I were to rate the first ¾ of the book, it would've definitely gotten 4 stars from me. But, unfortunately, the last ¼ was more worthy of 2 stars. This ending made me nearly give this whole book 2 stars, but I didn't think it was fair.Let's start with things I enjoyed. I liked CeCe at the start of the book. She was a strong main character and fought hard to hide her insecurities. Loud and kind of impetuous, she was a great narrator. He ex-boyfriend, Ethan, dumped her 2 days after they had sex, to get closer to God and reclaim his virginity, yet she was still hell bent on winning him back. She had spirit, she was driven. A bit brash as well. Very enjoyable to read from.The plot of the book was what I enjoyed the most. A typical romcom with an unusual setting, it was something I didn't think I wanted to read, but ended up appreciating. I do think it would work better in a movie, though. A girl making friends she'd never think she could be friends with, and falling for her best friend. Nothing new or ground breaking, but definitely enjoyable. That's where the praise ends.This book was trying to teach about what it means to give consent, about sexuality, about how religion deals with sexuality, about slut shaming and victim blaming. I think it gave a good effort, but the ending ruined any kind of message the book had going on. CeCe didn't develop at all. She was getting there, understanding what went wrong with her relationship with Ethan, how what she wanted wasn't a boyfriend, just attention. She admits to being selfish, yet doesn't change. What made me starting to dislike the book was the incredibly graphic yet clinical sex scene, and the dialogue and build up, or rather the lack of any kind of build up, to it. I would happily glance over CeCe having no obvious reasons to be in love with Paul, other than the attention she was getting from him, but the whole - let's go and have sex because I want to teach other girls about enjoyable sex and I'm also jealous other girls that were ultra Christian had an orgasm before me – when she clearly wasn't ready, and Paul, who was supposed to be the voice of reason, going along with it and saying stuff like (actual quotes) “I'd rather spend the rest of my day and night buried inside you.” And “I don't care what you've got on; you won't be wearing it long anyway.” I mean, I'm no prude, but Jesus Christ, it's just... bad. Very bad.I also wasn't a fan of the way religion was portrayed in this book. I consider myself an atheist, and I don't agree with a lot of the Christian church teachings, much like CeCe, yet I feel like I have enough respect for people and their beliefs to let them have their camp, teachings, etc. CeCe was an intruder in the camp. Even if she's taught some girls who were clueless about certain things involving sex, she took it too far at the end of the book. She acted like a child throughout the book, and I had hopes she'd learn and develop, but unfortunately she didn't. The more I talk about this book, the more I realise it deserves 2, not 3 stars, at least from me. It was a good idea, and the execution wasn't half bad for some of it, but most of it was unfortunately a miss. A missed opportunity to convey an important message.
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  • Isabel Ibañez
    January 1, 1970
    This is such a wonderful story, I seriously devoured it in one sitting. It’s all about sex, and healthy consent, and that beautiful, tough, and breathless first love that may or may not last forever. Part of me felt like I was reading a Judy Blume book, in the best possible way. Highly recommend!!!
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  • Andrea Contos
    January 1, 1970
    This is the book you didn't know you needed and won't be able to forget.There's so much I loved, it's difficult to know where to start. It's the perfect blend of smart and swoony, hilarious and heartwarming. Sonia writes characters with such depth--and even side characters feel developed and real. CeCe is messy and honest, and someone you immediately love and cheer for. Her relationship with Paul--who is amazing--is filled with so many layers of feelings, each of them fleshed-out and relatable. This is the book you didn't know you needed and won't be able to forget.There's so much I loved, it's difficult to know where to start. It's the perfect blend of smart and swoony, hilarious and heartwarming. Sonia writes characters with such depth--and even side characters feel developed and real. CeCe is messy and honest, and someone you immediately love and cheer for. Her relationship with Paul--who is amazing--is filled with so many layers of feelings, each of them fleshed-out and relatable. But beyond the wickedly-smart humor and endlessly entertaining plot, is a nuanced and vitally important and unflinching discussion of consent. Sonia tackles the subject with grace and heart, while never losing the message or preaching. The result is a book that teaches without condescending, and is gloriously feminist, sex-positive, and empowering.This book is an absolute must-read. Pre-order the second you're able.
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  • Sydney Springer
    January 1, 1970
    "How do I look?""Like you just had your heart broken."I rearranged my features. "How about now?""Like you're going to make whoever did it pay." *4.8 stars rounded up* When I heard about this book on Twitter I think every blood cell in my body went on high alert for news of arcs. I needed this story in my hands so bad. A feminist, sex positive romantic comedy set at a conservative Christian camp? Sign. Me. Up. As someone who is also Christian (not the exact branch in the story, as I feel like I' "How do I look?""Like you just had your heart broken."I rearranged my features. "How about now?""Like you're going to make whoever did it pay." *4.8 stars rounded up* When I heard about this book on Twitter I think every blood cell in my body went on high alert for news of arcs. I needed this story in my hands so bad. A feminist, sex positive romantic comedy set at a conservative Christian camp? Sign. Me. Up. As someone who is also Christian (not the exact branch in the story, as I feel like I'm not that extreme about anything? But I do know some are. To each their own *shrugs*) I was prepared to find some of the humor a little offensive. Except I didn't. I might place a sensitivity warning regardless, but Hartl doesn't cross any lines while still showing the toxicity of a conservative religion in a progressive time, as well as remaining respectful and openminded to exploring how religion can both save and destroy someone, sometimes simultaneously.When I was approved for an advanced copy I sat down and read the entire thing in two sittings. I didn't even notice that this was a debut novel, the character building and natural writing style were so smooth. Paul is just so *flails* and CeeCee is one of my favorite narrators I've read this year. She is so fierce and sassy, yet insecure and wide-eyed. Her impulsiveness landed her chasing after her ex-boyfriend, Ethan, and then it's what made her pretend Paul was her boyfriend. And it was made me fall in love with the whole story. You never know what she's going to do next. I love how Hartl wrote the side characters, particularly the girls of Cabin 8. Their religion is grounded in how they were raised and how they view the world, yet it doesn't define them wholly or control their personality. I would love a spinoff or bonus epilogue or something where we meet up with them in a year and see what's going on with them. The most important part of Cabin 8 in my opinion, though, is how much CeeCee learned from the girls, and in return how much they learned from her. Religion is simply an element of a person; it doesn't need to a chalk circle drawn around them. It's just something unique about the individual. And with that, each interpretation of the religion is also different for each person, which is something that could have been explored a bit more in the story. Regardless, the way the Christian camp was approached was interesting and thoughtful and realistic, in my opinion.Another realistic element of the story was the romance. CeeCee is chasing Ethan, who dumped her after they both lost their virginity and he didn't call her back the next day. Her best friend Paul helps her realize why that night ended so differently for the two of them, and how consent is more than just saying "yes" the one time, or even saying "yes" at all. And that it's not just the male who should be dominating the conversation between them. I have always loved books that explore the importance of consent and sexuality--especially for women--and this did not disappoint. The topic is discussed very openly and detailed, in a way that I've never seen anywhere else. And it's mentioned how many in Christian or other conservative religions/homes do not receive any kind of proper sex education other than the basic biological aspects of it. As CeeCee points out in the book, you can't exactly Google this kind of thing. You need to talk to someone about it. But who can you turn to when you abstinence is the only thing taught? Bless books like these for bringing these discussions to light. (Another great option, and one that talks more about sex that isn't just heterosexual, is The Birds, The Bees, and You and Me.)This wasn't a full 5 star read for me because I wanted a little more from both Paul and Ethan. I wish we saw more of a redemption arc for Ethan, as I felt he was written solely to be the villain of CeeCee's story, but I feel he played more of a significant role than being the virginity stealer. Paul was such a wonderful character, but I would have loved to go a bit deeper with him., see the side of him that isn't dominated by his pastor father. I also think some of the boys from the male cabin could have more to them instead of one of them being addicted to pornography and the other being in a relationship with another character. I wanted a bit more in general with those characters, and that's really my only complaint. I think CeeCee and the girls of Cabin 8 had fabulous characters arcs, and the overall narrative voice was strong and distinct. I will definitely be rereading this when I want a fast pick-me-up to get a smile on my face and some swoony, consensual romance.This is truly a debut to be on the lookout for when it shelves September 3rd, 2019. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing an early copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    How much do I love this book? So much that I want to go back in time and give a copy to every girl I knew that went to church--including myself. Maybe especially myself. I identify hard with this one. Extremely hard.♥ CeCe is my own personal hero. She's brash, loud, proud to be a girl, and unapologetic about it. When she decides she's going to follow her ex to church camp to try to win him back, her best friend Paul volunteers to go with her--after all, he's been there before and knows what to e How much do I love this book? So much that I want to go back in time and give a copy to every girl I knew that went to church--including myself. Maybe especially myself. I identify hard with this one. Extremely hard.♥ CeCe is my own personal hero. She's brash, loud, proud to be a girl, and unapologetic about it. When she decides she's going to follow her ex to church camp to try to win him back, her best friend Paul volunteers to go with her--after all, he's been there before and knows what to expect. He wants to help her through it, because he is The Best.But when they get there, CeCe finds that Ethan has already moved on and is in a new relationship. Since she can't admit that she came there for him, she tells everyone that Paul is her boyfriend. He goes along with it, again, because he is The Best."Paul pulled me against him and nuzzled my ear. "I'm not very happy with you right now," he whispered.""Just go with it. I'll explain later."But CeCe doesn't just sit idly by and let camp pass her by. She gets to know her bunkmates, she hangs out with Paul, and when she hears some of the things that are being preached in the workshops, especially to girls, she can't stay quiet. She goes off on one of the lecturers, a woman who advises that girls should dress modestly so they don't distract boys. Cece stands up to say that, in no uncertain terms, this is bullshit, but she also asks where the responsibility is for the boys in this scenario? Why are girls always made to feel shame about their own bodies? This is the kind of shit I grew up hearing, so like I said, CeCe=my hero.♥ Paul is the BFF we all need: Paul and CeCe live next door to each other and have been best friends forever. Paul's dad is a pretty well-known pastor, and he grew up much like I did-going to church every Sunday, youth group every week, church camp, Sunday school, etc., etc., forever and ever amen. But after his dad cheated on his mom, Paul dropped religion entirely, quitting both church and camp. He never liked CeCe's boyfriend, but after Ethan dumped her, Paul is completely there for her."He put the hideout up the day after Ethan had ended things with me. Paul drew a bunch of little fish and told a story about a girl who created an ocean with her tears and learned how to swim."Once they're at camp, he helps her with all of the religion business she doesn't know, even sneaking out at night to prep her for the next day. He lets her do her own thing, make her own choices, but he just can't help but feel fiercely protective over her around Ethan, after the way he he dumped her right after sleeping with him for the first time."Paul held Ethan's gaze, like in a game of chicken, until Ethan turned his attention back to his food. "Forget it, man. I'm not here to fight. I'm trying to get closer to Jesus.""I'm not. Remember that the next time you breathe a word about CeCe to me."TBH, this gives me shivers every time I read it. And Ethan was being a real ass just before this. But Paul is at camp for CeCe. And if she had decided to leave, he would be gone, too.♥ Ethan is a bag of dicks. Maybe this is a mild spoiler, because the synopsis tries to be *vAgUe* about him, but he's an ass. Anyone who pushes a girl to have sex with him only to break up with her the day after she finally does is, and I don't care what your reasoning is. But for the record, his reason is shit. You don't get to beg your girlfriend to have sex with you for months, then tell her she's a temptress and dump her to focus on your relationship with god the next day, conveniently blaming satan when she tries to get answers later. Ethan is every religious kid I knew growing up--being taught that sex is evil and then either flying to pieces or becoming a repressed monster as a teenager, because religion doesn't mean you don't still get the hormones that everyone else does. It just means that you're taught that they're bad. [I know this is definitely not every religion, but this is my experience].♥ The girls of cabin 8 are all QUEENS. They are just all so damn supportive of each other from the start, and they include CeCe even though no one knows her and it's clear that she's not really a good Christian girl like they are. Even when one of them actually has a good reason to hate CeCe, she doesn't. She acknowledges it, they discuss it, and move past it as friends which is just...??? How? Most adults can't even manage this. It took my best friend and me ten years and more than one friend breakup to get to this point. (Hi Laura! Still mad at you about the time you promised the video recorder was off in high school!)♥ The lessons in consent are heartbreakingly honest. I legitimately learned a lot from this book, and it all comes down to the author's work around explaining consent, just when I start thinking I might somehow know it all. Paul, (unsurprisingly, because he is The Best), drops these lines that would leave me reeling. Stuff like:"He didn't take advantage of me, or just plow his way in. He asked me, and I said yes.""How many times did you say no first?"And BAM. By the end of this chapter I was wrecked, immediately flooded with memories of all the times when I first said "no", but felt pressure to go further even though I was never actively forced. It had never, ever occurred to me that this was wrong. If anything, I blamed myself--I made him wait too long, he's gone further before so it's hard for him to be satisfied with just kissing, etc."Yes is just a word. You have to mean it for it to be consent."It's the same thought as above, but something about the way this is worded stopped me dead in my tracks. How many times have I not? How many times have I just said the word and not really meant it? How many times has the guy taken that word as "I heard a yes!" and never stopped to see how I was really doing? And if I can look back after 30 plus years and see it in hindsight, what must it be like for girls like CeCe who are still actively in it right now?Final Thoughts: I am in love with this book, and I want to make it required reading for everyone whether you're religious or not. Please preorder it for yourself and your favorite teen--I'll be sending a copy to my cousin starting her freshman year of college!Favorite Quotes: "They say you never forget your first time, but I wonder if that's just because the shame sticks with you forever and ever.""This was the stuff they needed to teach in sex education. If I didn't know consent was a conversation, and these girls didn't know, I was willing to bet there were a whole lot of girls just like us. Girls who technically, legally consented because they said yes once and thought the emptiness they felt afterward was all their fault."All quotes are taken from an uncorrected proof of the book
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  • Novel Novice
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED THIS BOOK! It's both hilarious & heartfelt, covering some serious, significant subjects that are incredibly timely and important to teens (like sex, faith, personal responsibility, and empowering girls to feel strong and confident in their bodies & in their sexuality) -- but in a way that feels fun and lighthearted. The author never downplays the seriousness of these topics -- but she tackles them in a way that feels fun and natural to the narrative of the story. And the story it I LOVED THIS BOOK! It's both hilarious & heartfelt, covering some serious, significant subjects that are incredibly timely and important to teens (like sex, faith, personal responsibility, and empowering girls to feel strong and confident in their bodies & in their sexuality) -- but in a way that feels fun and lighthearted. The author never downplays the seriousness of these topics -- but she tackles them in a way that feels fun and natural to the narrative of the story. And the story itself is just GREAT. I mean, I love a fake relationship trope and a friends-to-lovers trope in romance -- and the way she uses these tropes in this YA story is just excellent. I loved Cece and Paul, and the girls of Cabin Eight. Cece faces some ridiculous but believable obstacles at Jesus camp (like being shamed for wearing a bikini and told it's up to HER to stop boys from being tempted by her body) -- and yet, she's also surprised by discovering true and meaningful friendships, and learning valuable lessons from the people she meets there. Plus, there's her BFF turned fake boyfriend Paul. OH PAUL. I love Paul. Cece loves Paul. We should all love Paul. This book kept me laughing constantly, while also pulling on the ol' heartstrings (yes, I still have some) and making me wish this book had been around when I was a teen.
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  • Jalina
    January 1, 1970
    This book was everything I wanted it to be and more! CeCe had such great sass and Paul had the perfect personality to go along with it. The girls of Cabin 8 have a special place in my heart. And some of those girl talks, boy, was I laughing. But most importantly, this book gave a really good lesson about what it means to give consent, using a perfect every day (heterosexual) example.
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  • Leelynn (Sometimes Leelynn Reads) ❤
    January 1, 1970
    Review will be posted on September 1st for the Fantastic Flying Book Club Blog Tour on my blog Sometimes Leelynn Reads
  • Diana Urban
    January 1, 1970
    I had the pleasure of reading an early copy of Sonia Hartl's feminist romcom Have a Little Faith in Me, and I gobbled it up in one sitting. It's SO good, with a well-paced plot that kept me hooked. The protagonist CeCe is so much fun to read; she's hilarious, relatable, and such a joy to root for. The character development and motivations are brilliantly crafted, and every character felt three-dimensional. This book tackles such important subject matter (sex, religion, and the meaning of consent I had the pleasure of reading an early copy of Sonia Hartl's feminist romcom Have a Little Faith in Me, and I gobbled it up in one sitting. It's SO good, with a well-paced plot that kept me hooked. The protagonist CeCe is so much fun to read; she's hilarious, relatable, and such a joy to root for. The character development and motivations are brilliantly crafted, and every character felt three-dimensional. This book tackles such important subject matter (sex, religion, and the meaning of consent) without feeling preachy, and I'm excited for this book to be out in the world.
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  • Simant ♥ Flipping Through the Pages
    January 1, 1970
    Full review on: Flipping Through the PagesHave a Little Faith In Me follows the story of CeCe, who decides to attend Camp ThreeSixTeen in the hopes of winning back her ex-boyfriend, Ethan, who dumped her days after having sex with her. He wanted to get close to Jesus and CeCe wanted to get closer to him. But she knows nothing about Jesus or the Bible. But her best friend Paul, though warning her this was a bad idea, decides to go with her where ultimately CeCe introduced him as her boyfriend(fak Full review on: Flipping Through the PagesHave a Little Faith In Me follows the story of CeCe, who decides to attend Camp ThreeSixTeen in the hopes of winning back her ex-boyfriend, Ethan, who dumped her days after having sex with her. He wanted to get close to Jesus and CeCe wanted to get closer to him. But she knows nothing about Jesus or the Bible. But her best friend Paul, though warning her this was a bad idea, decides to go with her where ultimately CeCe introduced him as her boyfriend(fake) to make Ethan jealous. But Ethan already had another girlfriend and over the time CeCe realises that her feelings for Paul are more than just for a friend.This book was a super fun summer novel. It has two of my favourite tropes- fake dating and friends to lovers, and both the tropes have been done so beautifully. I was laughing so hard in a few places. CeCe and Paul’s friendship was awesome. Cece never thought of Paul as anything more until the camp. And this camp changes their relationship forever. Paul was a guy who deserves everything. He was funny and lovely. He was a kind of friend who would go to any length to make his best friend smile. He was certainly a king among men.I loved CeCe bunkmates- Mandy, Astrid and Sarina. Those were known as the girls of Cabin 8. Cece was initially afraid of living with all Christian girls as she was not sure if she would be able to keep her cover as a fake Christian. But soon their friendship grew stronger and they formed a strong group depicting girl power. All these girls had some talent and were fierce and were trying to find their place within their faith.I didn’t like CeCe’s character in the beginning. She was a little annoying and took stupid decisions. But as the story progressed, we see an incredible transformation in her character. She realises what she actually wanted to be. She came out as a strong, determined and fierce girl and she was never afraid of putting out her bold opinions, even though she was in a Jesus camp. She learned how to fit in with the people where she was least expected to be.Apart from being a book about summer romance and finding your place, there is one very much important topic, and that is the concept of CONSENT. This book heavily explores the topic of consent and I am glad it did because this topic is so less talked about in YA and this certainly needs to be improved. This book is framed beautifully around this topic.I am not a Christian so I don’t know much about all the beliefs and stuff. But I was so glad this book talked about sex education. This book also talks about how your opinions can be different from the others but you need to respect those. It highlighted what needs to be changed in the community but it can’t be done by blaming and shaming others who think differently than you.I am not sure about this but I think this book can be a little problematic for some, especially Christians?? This book takes place at a very conservative Evangelical Christian Bible camp. There are some opinions expressed by some of the side characters in the book that certain people can find a bit troubling. So read this book with CAUTION if this is something that can trigger you.Overall, I really enjoyed this book and would definitely recommend this. This is a fun summer book which you can finish quickly. Besides having a lot of humor and fun, this book is packed with important topics of consent and sex ed. It also talks about finding your beliefs and going down the path which you find suitable for you.Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | Facebook | Ko-fi | Amazon | Bloglovin'
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  • ReadingWritingAndMe
    January 1, 1970
    Have a Little Faith In Me by Sonia HartlOverview: CeCe and Paul have no reason being at Jesus camp. Paul gave up his faith years ago when his paster father abandoned his mother, and CeCe never really believed to start with. They're not there to find their faith again, though. CeCe is on a secret mission to win back her born again boyfriend who dumped her after having sex. Whether it's love or just proving something to herself, CeCe is determined to get Ethan back, even if that means fake dating Have a Little Faith In Me by Sonia HartlOverview: CeCe and Paul have no reason being at Jesus camp. Paul gave up his faith years ago when his paster father abandoned his mother, and CeCe never really believed to start with. They're not there to find their faith again, though. CeCe is on a secret mission to win back her born again boyfriend who dumped her after having sex. Whether it's love or just proving something to herself, CeCe is determined to get Ethan back, even if that means fake dating her best friend, Paul, and listening to hours of sermons. While CeCe shakes the camp up, she starts to shake up some ideas of her own about what happened with her and Ethan. Overall: 5Characters: 5 I love CeCe. She's bold, unflinching, bright, and impulsive. Unafraid to be quiet about her own beliefs she challenges a lot of the misogynistic happenings at the camp and vocally questions why girls are left to shoulder the responsibility for "tempting" boys by not being modest or doing a billion other things they should be allowed to do. Though she causes a lot of problems for the camp, she digs at the root of a lot of problems that come from society constantly shaming women. Reflecting on her first time, she starts to see some of the same problems that came from her own warped view of how things should be. This makes her an even louder crusader for spreading empowerment and the real meaning of consent among a bunch of people preaching abstinence. The girls in her cabin- Mandy, Astrid, and Sarina- are all also excellent characters. They all come from different backgrounds and are actually devout Christians, but they accept CeCe and learn a lot from her. While keeping their faith with them, they start to question some of the teachings that they've never quite felt right about, and the girls form a sisterhood, cheering each other on and protecting one another. Then there are the boys across the lake. Paul is a total cinnamon roll. He's a crush worthy character that's sweet and thoughtful. He paints a sharp contrast to problematic Ethan, but each additional character has their own place to add meaning to the book. Plot: 5 I normally hate fake dating because the person they're trying to win or win back is usually so obviously not worth it, but the way that Hartl opens CeCe's eyes to Ethan's toxic ways almost the second he gets to camp allows the fake dating to melt away into a perfect device to facilitate this best friends to lover's romance. Their existing bond and friendship made Paul and CeCe such a fun, lovely couple to root for, and they made. me smile the whole time. I also love the other side of the book's plot where CeCe causes a sort of reckoning with everyone. She and Paul have seen how hypocritical the belief system can be and they work to call attention to that. Like in the real world, not everyone cares to examine themselves closely in the mirror, but their actions make for some great educational and entertaining moments. Writing: 5 Hartl had me hooked. She made. me fall for a trope I didn't even think I liked, and she made me feel like I was at camp too. I fell for her loud, sarcastic, strong narrator, and her love interest made me truly swoon. She also makes you think about society and how certain beliefs and values are actually really screwed up when you stop to think about them. She doesn't flinch when discussing how women's bodies are often subtly shamed and seen as weapons almost, and she dives into the lasting harm that attitude can have this book gets an A+ all around.
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  • chloe ♡
    January 1, 1970
    i received a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. all opinions below are my own.in my arc august post, i mentioned my excitement for have a little faith in me, since it has some of my all-time favorite tropes – best friends to lovers, fake relationships, childhood friend romance and the clichést cliché – boy who pretends he doesn’t love girl but actually does, and it did not disappoint!this book reminded me of frat girl by kiley roache, in which the protagonist, cassie, gav i received a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. all opinions below are my own.in my arc august post, i mentioned my excitement for have a little faith in me, since it has some of my all-time favorite tropes – best friends to lovers, fake relationships, childhood friend romance and the clichést cliché – boy who pretends he doesn’t love girl but actually does, and it did not disappoint!this book reminded me of frat girl by kiley roache, in which the protagonist, cassie, gave a sex ed class to frat boys. in have a little faith in me, the main character, cece, teaches her cabinmates and other female campers about safe sex and how to protect themselves, and i loved seeing girls who are raised and taught to view premarital sex as a sin treat this with open minds.the author did a good job exploring the topics of sex and feminism. the parts about consent, and how women do not have to be responsible for dressing conservatively just to prevent sexual assault from males, are handled so amazingly well, and i loved it. i also loved how the characters are open about their sexual experiences and are not afraid to share what they know with the less experienced.other than that, the friendship in this book is the best. cece’s cabinmates clearly know that cece’s not really a christian, but they don’t judge her at all, and even offer to become her friend. they even back cece up when she challenges the camp director’s values and how some people interpret christianity, and it was truly moving seeing them bond and trust in each other. they are the sweetest girls ever, and i love how they forgive each other quickly after a fight, and try to understand each other’s views.paul and cece’s relationship was also so stinking adorable. they have a tradition of making up and telling stories to cheer each other up, and i was already rooting for them from the very beginning. paul is not perfect – after his dad left him and his mom for another woman, he starts to get himself into casual relationships to protect himself from getting heartbroken again, but i loved him so much because he always makes cece feel safe and loved, and he knows how to respect and properly treat women. must protect paul at all costs.on top of everything, this book is hilarious. i was literally shaking with laughter when reading it (, earning me some weird stares on the train). cece is so sassy and funny and i love her personality and the way she narrates the story and describes everything. it made cece more three-dimensional as a character, and the story, so much more enjoyable.this book has its flaws though. growing up catholic, and having attended a catholic primary school and an anglican secondary school, i have made many devoted christian friends, and none of them talk like the characters in the book. they don’t throw bible quotes at each other. they don’t refer to their ex as a “seductress sent to them by satan”. different people have different ways of worshipping, and i’m not saying the author’s depiction of christians is completely wrong, but i simply find it a bit unrealistic. still, i liked how the author showed in her writing that while some christians can be utter assholes, like cece’s ex, ethan, others, like cece’s cabinmates, can be amazing people.have a little faith in me is a book full of important messages and beautiful relationships, served with a huge heap of laughs. i’m looking forward to reading more of sonia hartl’s books 😀
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  • Mari Johnston
    January 1, 1970
    This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl.I COULD SCREAM ABOUT THIS BOOK ALL DAY.Never in my life have a read a more sex-positive, empowering, and fiercely funny story. Sonia Hartl has really done something special with her debut, Have a Little Faith in Me, and I so desperately wish this had been available to me in high school. Everything about this is remarkably important and what the young adult genre has been missing.I know young adult isn’t actually a genre it This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl.I COULD SCREAM ABOUT THIS BOOK ALL DAY.Never in my life have a read a more sex-positive, empowering, and fiercely funny story. Sonia Hartl has really done something special with her debut, Have a Little Faith in Me, and I so desperately wish this had been available to me in high school. Everything about this is remarkably important and what the young adult genre has been missing.I know young adult isn’t actually a genre it’s more of an age range but I tried for ten minutes to come up with a different word and couldn’t so I’M SORRY.Something I loved about this was the plot started as one thing and morphed into several additional things. As CeCe evolved as a character and her desires and thoughts changed the story did, too. Everything felt connected and purposeful and I just really enjoyed how many layers there were to this novel.I have encountered in real life every single character that Hartl created. Each of them was authentic and multi-faceted. They all showed growth and development throughout the book but I loved how none of them lost the essence of who they were to begin with. At the start, they are messy and real just like they are at the end because they’re teenagers and they’re human.I really can’t emphasize enough how amazing the sex positivity is. Young adults need this. Too often, female-presenting individuals are made to feel like garbage for simply existing while those that are male presenting get off scot-free. Hartl has reinforced that both parties deserve respect, consent, and enjoyment out of everything a relationship has to offer.There wasn’t much queer representation in this, but we did see a brief moment where one of the characters mentioned liking both girls and boys while another gave off vibes of liking girls. I was so glad to see that Hartl included those of us that are queer into her narrative.Even as an adult, I finished Have a Little Faith in Me feeling better about myself than I did before I started it. Sonia Hartl has crafted the ultimate empowering feminist story that is going to make such a huge difference in how people view sex and themselves.A digital ARC was provided through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Additionally, all quotes should be checked for changes against the final copy.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    Have a Little Faith in Me follows CeCe, who’s had her heart broken by the boy who took her virginity. He’s a confused, Christian boy who takes no responsibility for his actions. She wants to show him she’s a different person and win him back by following him to some Jesus camp (despite not being a Christian and against her best friend Paul’s advice). Paul - a former Christian and camp attendee, decides to go with CeCe for support and maybe to laugh a little at her expense. However, what ensues i Have a Little Faith in Me follows CeCe, who’s had her heart broken by the boy who took her virginity. He’s a confused, Christian boy who takes no responsibility for his actions. She wants to show him she’s a different person and win him back by following him to some Jesus camp (despite not being a Christian and against her best friend Paul’s advice). Paul - a former Christian and camp attendee, decides to go with CeCe for support and maybe to laugh a little at her expense. However, what ensues is a journey of maturing for the many characters involved.First, let me start with the positive points. This story contains an incredible wealth of information about consent and sexuality in general, which is so important for young people to understand before they get into relationships. CeCe manages to make some incredible female friendships despite their different upbringings. There is plenty of judgement between them to at first, but they find they have more in common than not. I appreciated that this story really showed girls building each other up more than pitting them against each other. Paul is like a breath of fresh air for a male MC in a YA novel. He’s the one that teaches CeCe about proper consent, having been properly taught by his mother. Finally, I really appreciated that this book didn’t come off as anti-Christian. I’m not into reading books that bash anyone’s faith or lack thereof. I thought the author did a great job of pointing out certain shortcomings in this particular faith community, but she was also able to point to some of the ways that community is unfairly judged.So while this book has so much to offer, the storyline itself was so incredibly predictable. I felt like I’d read it before, and I knew the basic plot after reading the first chapter. That’s not exactly a problem if contemporary YA is your jam because plenty of plot overlap happens. My other main issue occurs once Paul explains the concept of consent to CeCe, she goes from being pretty clueless to an expert doling out advice seemingly right away. Parts of this topic also seemed to read more like an info pamphlet than casual conversation between friends. In conclusion, there was a lot to like about this book content-wise, but it could have been more deftly executed. 3.75 stars.
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  • Rosie Danan
    January 1, 1970
    Even before I had the opportunity to read HAVE A LITTLE FAITH IN ME, I was glad just knowing it existed in the world. A YA novel that deftly and humorously handles issues of faith and sex for teens set in the best place in the world (IMO)—summer camp?! Yes, yes, a thousand times yes. When I had the chance to read an ARC I jumped on it and not only did HALFIM live up to my expectations, it exceeded them. CeCe, the protagonist, is so loveable. She's funny and vulnerable and smart and kind and she Even before I had the opportunity to read HAVE A LITTLE FAITH IN ME, I was glad just knowing it existed in the world. A YA novel that deftly and humorously handles issues of faith and sex for teens set in the best place in the world (IMO)—summer camp?! Yes, yes, a thousand times yes. When I had the chance to read an ARC I jumped on it and not only did HALFIM live up to my expectations, it exceeded them. CeCe, the protagonist, is so loveable. She's funny and vulnerable and smart and kind and she loves with her whole body. I identified so much with her attempts to win back her "Nice Guy" ex-boyfriend, her struggle to understand that, just because he wears goofy clothes that make him approachable and brings her flowers, doesn't mean he's worthy of being with her. This book hit all the awkward bittersweet notes of an unrequited love that I devour in YA, but it also added to the conversation with discussions of content and an open-minded but honest portrayal of how religion manifests in people today and truly heartwarming portrayals of friendship and loyalty. Without getting too far into spoilers, there is a tender love story here that is built on trust and understanding and longing, just not the one you might initially expect. This is the book I want every teen to read, heck, I wish I could have read it as a teen. It would have shown me how to recognize the signs of a healthy relationship, how to stand up for my friends and what I believe in, how to recognize love when it finds you, how to make decisions about my body and who I share it with. I could go on and on.This is the book I'll be recommending to everyone for the rest of the year. Sonia Hartl is a true talent and I hope she continues to write brilliant books with wide-open arms, like this one, forever.
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  • Laura Gallant
    January 1, 1970
    I work for this publishing company and am friends with this books editor, but I promise this has no bearing on this review.I wish I could give this more than 5 stars, I could write a long review, but I think this rambling incoherent text I sent the editor perfectly sums up my thoughts and feelings (a coherant wrap up is after the below type too)“I’m almost done with Have A Little Faith in me and THIS BOOK. It’s amazing. I wish I had a book to read like this when I was a teenager. It explaining t I work for this publishing company and am friends with this books editor, but I promise this has no bearing on this review.I wish I could give this more than 5 stars, I could write a long review, but I think this rambling incoherent text I sent the editor perfectly sums up my thoughts and feelings (a coherant wrap up is after the below type too)“I’m almost done with Have A Little Faith in me and THIS BOOK. It’s amazing. I wish I had a book to read like this when I was a teenager. It explaining the importance of respect and communication amongst partners and the true meaning of consent has made me cry at least 3 times. Just finally seeing the truth, self respect and positivity on the topic of sex and relationships is so so so important and too rare a resource that I, and I’m sure many other women, never got or learned too late. So to read a book that teaches that to young woman is amazing. And the fact that it elicited such a strong emotional reaction in me shows how rare and important these kinds of books and resources are. I am so happy and proud to work for a company that is publishing a book like this.Also it has a great story too haha”While the above text refers to how much young women would benefit from reading this book, it’s lessons are ones that are critical for all people to understand, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, and age.I sincerely and whole heartedly recommend this book for anyone who wants themselves, their children, and loved ones to truly understand what it means to be truely valued and respected in a relationship, the difference between healthy and toxic relationships, self value, and a thourough understanding of what consent really means for all parties involved.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun book that also covered some very serious topics. The best part of the book, for me, was the discussions centered around consent and what it means. But there's also a strong theme of girls supporting girls and believing each other and standing behind them. And it could have been presented so differently. And the fact that it stands out so much that these girls support each other is a little bit sad. Even while reading it, I kept expecting something to happen that would cause a big This was a fun book that also covered some very serious topics. The best part of the book, for me, was the discussions centered around consent and what it means. But there's also a strong theme of girls supporting girls and believing each other and standing behind them. And it could have been presented so differently. And the fact that it stands out so much that these girls support each other is a little bit sad. Even while reading it, I kept expecting something to happen that would cause a big fight or blowout but it didn't and I loved that. Friendships are so important to teen girls and we need to start showing them that women aren't always out to get other women. I also appreciated the way the religious camp was presented and that while some people are skeptical of those who call themselves Christians, not everyone within that religion uses that status for the same thing. Just like in all facets of life, there are good people and bad people. I'm not religious myself but I really liked all the different Christians and non-Christians that were shown in this book. I also liked the relationship between CeCe and Paul and I liked that she was so clueless about him for such a long time. CeCe makes a lot of mistakes like most people and that makes her real. Some of the topics discussed in this book were difficult but it was still kept light, for the most part. Sex is discussed a lot and one scene was almost like a lesson in Sex Ed 101, which made it less romantic but also a good example of consent and respect, so I understand why it was done the way it was. Overall, this was a very quick read that was fun and not heavy, even considering the topics. It was fun and informative and probably better for the 14+ YA readers, just because of the sex and swearing.
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  • Tarah Schaeffer
    January 1, 1970
    Losing your virginity as a teenager is a dramatic experience whether it turns out good, bad or just plain awkward. Losing your virginity and then being told by your boyfriend that you need to break up so that he can “absolve himself of sin and be Born Again” Is just about the most asshole stunt I can think of and is exactly what happens to CeCe our main character in this gem of a novel.From this point, CeCe is a woman on a mission. She hatches a plan to win him back by going to the Christian cam Losing your virginity as a teenager is a dramatic experience whether it turns out good, bad or just plain awkward. Losing your virginity and then being told by your boyfriend that you need to break up so that he can “absolve himself of sin and be Born Again” Is just about the most asshole stunt I can think of and is exactly what happens to CeCe our main character in this gem of a novel.From this point, CeCe is a woman on a mission. She hatches a plan to win him back by going to the Christian camp that he goes every summer and show him he made a mistake. It took a little (or maybe a lot) of exaggeration on her part to be invited as a Jr. staff member but she figures it will be worth it.Her best friend Paul even agrees to tag along. He has been to the camp before (though since his parent’s divorce, not in recent years) and figures she needs all the help she can get because shes barely religious and anything but a devout Christian.The whole plan becomes a whole lot more difficult once they arrive and CeCe is devasted when she finds out he already has a new girlfriend who she has to bunk with! These changes though just seem to make her more determined then ever.This book was wonderful. I appreciated it that even though Christianity was part of the plot the author of this novel did not try to shove an entire bible down our throats. The romantic parts were very sweet and hardwarming and hit me right in the feels. This novel was also funny with my favorite moment making me laugh out loud. I have 2 words for you. MuuMuu bathing suit. Are you intrigued? Then you should order this book!
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Have a Little Faith in Me is a fun and fiercely feminist read, taking on the issues of sex education and consent for a YA audience.Firstly, I love the exploration of female friendship. Although CeCe is originally wary around her ultra-conservative Christian campmates, she soon learns to love and respect them, as they accept each other for who they are. It is refreshing and heart-warming to see the relationships between a group of girls portrayed so positively, and I enjoyed seeing them learn fro Have a Little Faith in Me is a fun and fiercely feminist read, taking on the issues of sex education and consent for a YA audience.Firstly, I love the exploration of female friendship. Although CeCe is originally wary around her ultra-conservative Christian campmates, she soon learns to love and respect them, as they accept each other for who they are. It is refreshing and heart-warming to see the relationships between a group of girls portrayed so positively, and I enjoyed seeing them learn from and support each other.Unfortunately, CeCe is the least likeable amongst these girls. While her brash and impulsive personality is originally endearing, she becomes increasingly annoying throughout the book. Despite the lessons she learns, her character doesn't develop, and it feels like she steamrollers toward her happy ending far too easily.It's brilliant to read a YA novel that is so sex positive, openly discussing issues around consent, pressure, expectations and awkward first-time experiences. On the one hand, I wish the exploration of these issues could have been a little more organic – at times, the narrative is sacrificed for some awkward and overly dogmatic sex-ed spiels. But on the other hand, I appreciate the lack of subtlety – there's a lot of myth-busting and frank conversations that teens need to hear. It's hard to fault a writer who is clearly approaching her topic with the best intentions.Have a Little Faith in Me is an enjoyable read with plenty of humour, some memorable messages and a lot of heart.*Thank you to Netgalley for the arc in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    This book was SUCH a pleasant surprise. I did not expect to enjoy a book about Jesus camp so much. And while some of the parts of the story made me boil inside—which I realize was the point—I couldn't get enough of the overall storyline. CeCe is a spunky, strong female character that made me more times than I have with a book in a long time. Her attitude toward Christianity and the teachings of those sorts of camps are very similar to mine, and I loved her for it. But I did appreciate that she l This book was SUCH a pleasant surprise. I did not expect to enjoy a book about Jesus camp so much. And while some of the parts of the story made me boil inside—which I realize was the point—I couldn't get enough of the overall storyline. CeCe is a spunky, strong female character that made me more times than I have with a book in a long time. Her attitude toward Christianity and the teachings of those sorts of camps are very similar to mine, and I loved her for it. But I did appreciate that she learned something while there too (and not just how to do her eye make up); not all Christians are cultists and some of the teachings are actually beneficial.Apart from CeCe just being a total badass, I loved Paul the most. He had a past of his own and reasons for doing the things he did. I love how much he stood up for and protected CeCe yet still let her make decisions for herself but was there to comfort her with things went astray. He also was all the good parts of Christianity with his respect toward women and firm understanding of consent. But I think my favorite parts were the stories he'd tell her about the boy and the girl. The way he finally told her he was in love with her made me swoon so hard, and I loved their relationship because it started from such a strong foundation of friendship.Overall, this book was an incredible surprise. It's so positive and empowering yet swoon-worthy at the same time.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This book cracked me up and I raced through it in less than a day. I adored Cece’s friendship with Paul and how he knew more about consent and respect for women than she did at times. Their hijinks at Jesus camp are hilarious and I adore Cece’s courage in standing up for how women’s bodies shouldn’t be portrayed as a source of sin or temptation or shame and how boys not girls should be responsible for curbing their own hormones. Paul was a dreamboat the whole time but without being too perfect- This book cracked me up and I raced through it in less than a day. I adored Cece’s friendship with Paul and how he knew more about consent and respect for women than she did at times. Their hijinks at Jesus camp are hilarious and I adore Cece’s courage in standing up for how women’s bodies shouldn’t be portrayed as a source of sin or temptation or shame and how boys not girls should be responsible for curbing their own hormones. Paul was a dreamboat the whole time but without being too perfect- he read like a real guy. It also had the most laugh out loud awkward depiction of teen sex, which also turned out to be fun and hot (tho not graphic) while being so realistic I almost couldn’t take it.I enjoyed the heck out of the teen girl friendships in here and how supportive they were. I am always wishing for more books that show Christians in a realistic light- they aren’t all perfect angels or judgmental villains and few books bother to make them more than one or the other. In this book Christianity has strengths and weaknesses as a doctrine, and it’s followers have virtues and flaws and nuance just like everyone else. Absolutely adored this book- meaningful topics teens need to hear wrapped up in a funny and endearing story!
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  • Kelli Cross
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, first of all Saved is one of my favorite movies so I was definitely sold the minute I saw that blurb. And it really was a pretty accurate comparison. I loved this book - I didn’t expect to finish it in one night but I couldn’t put it down. It was absolutely hilarious. It dealt with a lot of important conversations, specifically involving sex and sex education, but it also touched on religion and acceptance within Christianity. And it gave us glimpses into diversity in a pretty undiverse se Okay, first of all Saved is one of my favorite movies so I was definitely sold the minute I saw that blurb. And it really was a pretty accurate comparison. I loved this book - I didn’t expect to finish it in one night but I couldn’t put it down. It was absolutely hilarious. It dealt with a lot of important conversations, specifically involving sex and sex education, but it also touched on religion and acceptance within Christianity. And it gave us glimpses into diversity in a pretty undiverse setting ((view spoiler)[Serina being bi, her and Autumn, and is it just me or did it seem to hint that Astrid was ace? (hide spoiler)]). CeCe was the feistiest - she was out of her element and surrounded by people who didn’t think like she did, and that never stopped her from speaking her mind in a potentially hostile environment. I wish I’d had her nerve when I was her age - I spent many a summer in similar church camps and the older I got the more I noticed all of the BS that was happening around me. And Paul was just a delight - as were the girls in cabin eight. I really kind of wish something terrible had happened to Ethan, but it’s fine.
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