David Lynch

David Lynch Details

TitleDavid Lynch
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 19th, 2019
PublisherPrestel
ISBN-139783791384702
Rating
GenreArt, Photography, Culture, Film, Historical, Biography

David Lynch Review

  • Tom Timmermans
    January 1, 1970
    David Lynch: Someone Is in My House is kind of a catalogue which supports the eponymous retrospective exhibition at Bonnefantenmuseum Maastricht, which takes place between the 30th of November 2018 and the 28th of April 2019, and which is showing the paintings, photography, drawings, sculptures and installations David Lynch made so far. It really informs you that David Lynch is a (visual) artist who also makes films, rather than being a filmmaker who also creates (visual) art. The book itself ha David Lynch: Someone Is in My House is kind of a catalogue which supports the eponymous retrospective exhibition at Bonnefantenmuseum Maastricht, which takes place between the 30th of November 2018 and the 28th of April 2019, and which is showing the paintings, photography, drawings, sculptures and installations David Lynch made so far. It really informs you that David Lynch is a (visual) artist who also makes films, rather than being a filmmaker who also creates (visual) art. The book itself has a nice design too, a real treat for the eyes. The accompanying texts provide further insights into his art and put his work in a broader context, but they don't diminish the air of mystery we breathe when we expose ourselves to or are exposed by anything that is or is related to David Lynch.
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  • Paulo Mota
    January 1, 1970
    The quality of the work is unclassifiable, it is brave, consistent in intent and substance, develops and explores new ways. There are visible cycles of a construction/deconstruction, fractal cycles, from every 5-8-10 years, a new way would emerge. The substance stayed the same, more or less, it took a major turn after the 70's, that's a fact, but to me, that substance only expanded in consciousness - meaning, the intentions are the same, to me, they felt the same. I am clearly talking about the The quality of the work is unclassifiable, it is brave, consistent in intent and substance, develops and explores new ways. There are visible cycles of a construction/deconstruction, fractal cycles, from every 5-8-10 years, a new way would emerge. The substance stayed the same, more or less, it took a major turn after the 70's, that's a fact, but to me, that substance only expanded in consciousness - meaning, the intentions are the same, to me, they felt the same. I am clearly talking about the paintings, the mix media paintings, the drawings, the lithographs. Unbelievably interesting and powerful. If it works on a page you only can imagine what it does on the real canvas/support/frame.Now for the photography part. Great stuff also, but unfortunately some are missing, things that I felt were important, the major thing is clearly the Small Stories Photographs, an exhibition I could see, twice and was somewhat sad about the fact that there were only two photographs from that series - Unless I'm totally off, there isn't a book about that exhibition. And I hope this doesn't have anything to do with the bad reception that was in a way represented by a bad french review. I connected with that exhibition and would love to revisit those photographs.I'm aware that the paintings are on several other books, which I don't own, and probably this book has some of those paintings and then some more and I even understood the choices in the lithographs, because I also have seen quite a bunch and even one of my favorites (Woman with Dream) isn't there, but the lithographs are consistent in approach and I saw connections between them. Clearly there is also a connection between the photographs shown, but the Small Stories had a very interesting universe on their own form. I loved it and it made me cringe.Then there is the upbeat surprise of the "The Angriest Dog in the World" short comic that was published in a newspaper for years. Some of them are present and I just loved them, it was nice to remember the funny side of David Lynch, brilliant humor that is consistent with the messages he wants to convey. I loved it.There are small surprises, even the matchbox paintings that DKL did when he was without the proper tools. Overall a very nice portfolio. There were some choices that in a way I would like to underline, for example, I can't for the light of me understand why they didn't print some high quality paintings horizontally (this would imply a 90ยบ physical turn while holding the book), specially when the ratio is rectangular. I have a Francis Bacon book and that does happen too, it's a common thing in painting books, I don't understand this, at all. But with Francis Bacon you are on an win-win situation because the ratio of most of his paintings are best presented vertically on a page.On the other hand there was some care with the Lynch paintings, some paintings appear twice, one with an enlarged part, amplified in two pages. That was indeed a nice touch.Some paintings are horizontal though, but they are in two pages, it works but only to a certain level. In the Francis Bacon book that I own this is done but with pages that fold themselves, extended-width pages, to avoid the distortion of the gutter. But it isn't a nightmare. It's just small things.The price is very low for such high quality printings and paper, I have to say. It is a very reasonable price I must add. The cover and the design in many ways is luxurious and everything is high quality. Compared to other books, I later found out, it is 40% higher, but this one seems more complete. But then again, this isn't a very fair comparison, since I don't own these other books.The texts tell nothing new, nothing that you wouldn't know already from Lynch on Lynch/Beautiful Dark/Room to Dream and so on. But they work as a small introduction, synthesis of some kind. It was done with care.Initially there is some introduction to the paintings, several actually, different points of view. I liked them, but they missed some big points, for me, somethings are highly subjective, clearly. So most probably this was on purpose. The texts focus more on an approach about time, texture, dimension, space. Somethings though I didn't even agree, and some were also very blank, naive, also. But in a way this is better than most of the explanations I found, for example, on my Francis Bacon Book. Trying to translate a painting to words, doesn't work, at all. Gilles Deleuze did it well, but only in a certain approach. So this book didn't went there, but sometimes people seem that they don't know what to write - in that case you shouldn't write anything. I understand that art is generally the best alibi to bring things to the surface with words, debates, essays. I am curious to read them, but I'm also very, very rigid about them. I want them to push my boundaries or make correlations that I would like to add or see mine in a different way. It's something that I normally don't find and when I find them they are in places were you wouldn't expect.I'm going to give an example, the introduction to the paintings talks about how David Lynch used painting to explore notions of time and it even starts very well with a small print of a painting from the 90's - a painting that I was glad to find in the book also, a much larger print - but for example he NEVER, EVER, talks about the mixed media paintings that divide the image in three "equal" segments and the middle part is enhanced and amplified, like a camera-zoom, which is a direct influence from cinema language in a painting. IT would be nice to underline those things, things that emerged 10/15y later since that painting from the early 90's that DKL did. And instead what is said about the mixed media paintings, that to me are very very very rich, isn't much.But that's me just being picky. I have to admit.In many ways. A great investment! I am eager to visit the exhibition and to rewatch these pages with a magnifying glass.
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