The Giver, Graphic Novel
Now in graphic novel format, Lois Lowry’s Newbery Medal–winning classic story of a young boy discovering the dark secrets behind his seemingly ideal world is accompanied by renowned artist P.Craig Russell’s beautifully haunting illustrations. 

The Giver, Graphic Novel Details

TitleThe Giver, Graphic Novel
Author
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherHMH Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780544157880
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Classics, Science Fiction, Fiction, Young Adult, Comics

The Giver, Graphic Novel Review

  • JenacideByBibliophile
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, via Edelweiss+, for an honest review. Opinion: I can picture it so clearly as if it were yesterday.I was sitting in class, a wee youngster at the time. A black book with an old man on the cover was dropped on my rickety desk; assigned reading for the semester. Audible groans and grumblings of “this looks boring” and “dude, come on. Something from this century, PLEASE” were heard throughout the room. The story of a young boy was given to us w Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, via Edelweiss+, for an honest review. Opinion: I can picture it so clearly as if it were yesterday.I was sitting in class, a wee youngster at the time. A black book with an old man on the cover was dropped on my rickety desk; assigned reading for the semester. Audible groans and grumblings of “this looks boring” and “dude, come on. Something from this century, PLEASE” were heard throughout the room. The story of a young boy was given to us with a cover so wise beyond our years, with words so eloquently written, that it almost felt too much for our wandering minds to grasp. A book we appreciated and grew to love, but one that still left a dryness across our eyes. If ONLY we had been given this beautiful version. You all know the story of young Jonas and his path to becoming the Receiver of Memory. Living in a place where color does not exist, and the memory of it is not taught. But when he is given his Life Assignment, he is given a job unlike his friends. He is to be the Receiver of Memory, the one who holds all the memories of the world, including those with color. So ensues Jonas’s journey to learning about the world, one filled with happiness and pain, sadness and elation. This version of The Giver pulls in readers of all ages and gives them beautifully illustrated images of Jonas’ story. This graphic novel is AMAZING.I honestly didn’t know how much I needed a graphic novel version of The Giver, until now. These illustrations are BEAUTIFUL and perfectly portray this story. Not only is it a great version for all us who had read this in school or when we were kids, but it is a FANTASTIC way to get the younger audiences and newer generations interested! I feel SO lucky that we were given a movie, and now this! The story is the same, but naturally, not every word from the original was transcribed to this rendition. This form of The Giver is much more direct with its delivery of the story, thanks to the illustrations being able to shorten the originals descriptions of scenery. Instead of the reader having to imagine Jonas learning about colors and the world, they get to SEE it happening as they read. It’s a movie and a book in one! I think all ages can enjoy this adaptation of the classic novel by Lois Lowry, but I feel that it might end up targeting a younger audience overall. Due to the writing being shortened to accommodate the illustrations, it seems that some of the more dark and somber moments from this book are reduced. The reader can see the emotion from the illustrations, but it definitely doesn’t have that gut-wrenching effect that the original has. Some things from the original were shortened, like Jonas’s big escape with the baby and some of the moments with the current Receiver of Memory. I also found it interesting that the illustrations only portrayed moments of full color for Jonas when he was receiving a memory, or when he had left. I would have expected him to have full color before then, but really, I suppose it doesn’t matter!In comparison to the original form of The Giver, I found this graphic novel to be breathtaking and VERY enjoyable. As a long-time lover of this book, I was hit with a rush of nostalgia and happiness while reading. This version is truly a masterpiece and will be a great interpretation for younger audiences. I cannot WAIT to get this in a print version.
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  • TJ
    January 1, 1970
    What an incredibly faithful adaption of The Giver! The art was beautiful and creative. Kids in elementary, middle, and high school will be celebrating this "faster" read version of the novel they're forced to read in school -- only they don't realize it's basically the exact text, just enhanced with images! Still, the novel is worth a read, always! 5/5 stars.
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  • Flavia
    January 1, 1970
    I remember my first experience with The Giver. I was in grade 7 and I had just moved from Austria to Canada, and we were expected to read The Giver for class. Since it was the middle of term, the rest of the class was already almost done the book, so I felt really overwhelmed. English didn’t come easy to me yet, and I was so behind on the book that I didn’t understand anything that was going on. When the movie adaptation came out in 2014, I was hesitant to watch it because of my past experience, I remember my first experience with The Giver. I was in grade 7 and I had just moved from Austria to Canada, and we were expected to read The Giver for class. Since it was the middle of term, the rest of the class was already almost done the book, so I felt really overwhelmed. English didn’t come easy to me yet, and I was so behind on the book that I didn’t understand anything that was going on. When the movie adaptation came out in 2014, I was hesitant to watch it because of my past experience, but my boyfriend put it on the TV and I really found myself captivated by the story and what was going on!I still haven’t read the original novel, but when I found out that a graphic novel was coming out and that ARCs were available, I asked for one! The first impressions that I had with the graphic novel when I started reading it was that the ARC was in black and white, while the finished copy would be in full colour. And since colour plays a part in the story (I won’t spoil it by telling you how), I think that I can’t review that aspect of this book.The other thing I found was that the art style was not for me, but that it particularly suited the story of The Giver, so I could appreciate that they made a good choice in that. And the last thing was that there was a lot of text on each page, considering that it’s a graphic novel. But, I also understand that they needed to do that in order for the story to make complete sense. So, if you’re already a fan of The Giver, or think that this kind of story is for you (and you like the art on the cover), I recommend it.
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  • Amanda Carr
    January 1, 1970
    I'm always a little nervous when a book or story I loved is turned into a graphic novel, but I was NOT disappointed by this book. Russell's illustrations are the perfect pairing for Lowry's text. If you loved, The Giver, and it's been a while, I highly recommend revisiting it with this graphic novel.
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  • Stefanie Kellum
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent adaptation of one of my all-time favorite children's classics. 50 million times better than the movie.
  • Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)
    January 1, 1970
    Read my full review at between-the-shelves.com!The young adult classic, The Giver, has been adapted into a graphic novel format. When Jonas is selected to be the next Receiver, he doesn’t think much of it at first. After all, it’s just his placement. Who is he to argue with the committee? But they've been hiding a lot from the community, and it's up to Jonas to change that.I received an advanced copy of this book for review from Edelweiss and HMH Young Readers for review. As an avid reader of dy Read my full review at between-the-shelves.com!The young adult classic, The Giver, has been adapted into a graphic novel format. When Jonas is selected to be the next Receiver, he doesn’t think much of it at first. After all, it’s just his placement. Who is he to argue with the committee? But they've been hiding a lot from the community, and it's up to Jonas to change that.I received an advanced copy of this book for review from Edelweiss and HMH Young Readers for review. As an avid reader of dystopian lit, I was super excited to get approved for this book. Especially since The Giver is one of those books that has stuck with me ever since we read it in fifth grade. Plus, I used it as a basis for my Master’s thesis.The story itself lends itself well to a graphic novel format. While the version I read didn’t have the finished images, I can tell that they’ll have a positive impact on the story. Particularly, the use of color emphasizes Jonas’s journey toward knowledge. The more he learns, the more color we get in the book.The only aspect of the story that rubbed me the wrong way was the use of question marks and exclamation marks to show confusion characters. While I understand the point, and might be necessary for the target audience, I think there’s ways to show this in the illustrations instead. But this might be a fill in for the final draft as well; I’ll have to pick up a final copy when it comes out February 5th!This is a strong adaptation that will make a classic story more accessible for the generations to come.Follow me!Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook******I thoroughly enjoyed this adaptation; a fuller review to come on Thursday!
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  • Ami
    January 1, 1970
    As so many others, the first time I read The Giver, it was in middle school as required reading material. Since then, I blanked out most of it. When I picked up the graphic novel, I knew the story was about a dystopian world that included population control and I distinctly remembered a scene where (view spoiler)[there was a pair of twins born and one was killed to maintain their balance. (hide spoiler)] That was all I remembered.So I was really curious to see how true to the story this adaptati As so many others, the first time I read The Giver, it was in middle school as required reading material. Since then, I blanked out most of it. When I picked up the graphic novel, I knew the story was about a dystopian world that included population control and I distinctly remembered a scene where (view spoiler)[there was a pair of twins born and one was killed to maintain their balance. (hide spoiler)] That was all I remembered.So I was really curious to see how true to the story this adaptation was. But I found that the author didn't gloss over graphic moments to censor kids from what actually happens and I loved that. The illustrations were beautiful. This world is supposed to be in black and white and for an audience today, that's hard to do and hold someone's attention. Luckily, the illustrations have some gray-blue tones to them, so it wasn't just stark black and white, and then they slowly build up to colored images to show Jonas' character growth. The author also does a great job setting up the rules in this society by focusing on 2-3 character memories. I think it's a good book to read in general because kids get some perspective on how lucky they are. Everything is assigned to you in this world. And I mean everything. There's no choice in family, career, your spouse, what happens to you when you get old, your speech, etc. and while there's still some progress to be made in our world, it definitely beats this.Overall, it was a great adaptation and I would say less intimidating to read as a class assignment.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, I taught The Giver and loved The Giver reading it before I had to teach it but has it been too long that I need to go back and re-read it? I wonder because I did not like this adaptation in graphic novel format! And I'm sooo, sooo sad about it.The illustration choices do the story justice, so I won't take that away from the adaptation, but it the mood felt voyeuristic and downright creepy at times. I know the book is not sunshine and rainbows, but it changes the story when it feels the way Wow, I taught The Giver and loved The Giver reading it before I had to teach it but has it been too long that I need to go back and re-read it? I wonder because I did not like this adaptation in graphic novel format! And I'm sooo, sooo sad about it.The illustration choices do the story justice, so I won't take that away from the adaptation, but it the mood felt voyeuristic and downright creepy at times. I know the book is not sunshine and rainbows, but it changes the story when it feels the way it does in a visual format. There were some choices in story structure that I think also led to my dislike of the retelling-- emphasis on the wrong elements of the story. It's certainly an option, but in this case, the book will always be the go-to, not the graphic novel. Maybe they should have left well enough alone? Though I know a broader audience can be sought by having the graphic version.
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  • stop_tolkien_and_read
    January 1, 1970
    I think the appeal of The Giver for me has always been its reliance on the abstract, so I was apprehensive (precision of words) about reading a graphic novel adaptation. That being said, this novel was extremely true to the original story and visually presented the abstract ideas, like the transfer of memories and Jonas's arrival in Elsewhere, well. The reason I didn't give this a full five stars was because I do feel like the story lost some of its magic due to the concrete representation of ab I think the appeal of The Giver for me has always been its reliance on the abstract, so I was apprehensive (precision of words) about reading a graphic novel adaptation. That being said, this novel was extremely true to the original story and visually presented the abstract ideas, like the transfer of memories and Jonas's arrival in Elsewhere, well. The reason I didn't give this a full five stars was because I do feel like the story lost some of its magic due to the concrete representation of abstract ideas, which is not at all the fault of the author and lies completely in the nature of the source material. All in all, it's a beautiful adaptation of a poignant and nostalgic story!
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  • Xandra (StarrySkyBooks)
    January 1, 1970
    sign me the heck up for this graphic novel
  • Marisa
    January 1, 1970
    This book will be great in color when it is finally published. Arc provided by the publisher for an honest review. It’s been awhile since I revisited the story of The Giver. It was fun to read the book as a graphic novel-some scenes came through beautifully.
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  • Shanah
    January 1, 1970
    For this review and many others, please visit - https://bionicbookwormblog.wordpress.comThe Giver has a very special place in my heart. When I first got back into reading, this series was a bit of a turning point for me. This was the first book that I couldn’t wait to wake up and start reading! I actually woke up at 5:30am (which was an hour earlier than I needed to get up) so that I could get in an hour of reading before I started work. I couldn’t read fast enough and I couldn’t get this series For this review and many others, please visit - https://bionicbookwormblog.wordpress.comThe Giver has a very special place in my heart. When I first got back into reading, this series was a bit of a turning point for me. This was the first book that I couldn’t wait to wake up and start reading! I actually woke up at 5:30am (which was an hour earlier than I needed to get up) so that I could get in an hour of reading before I started work. I couldn’t read fast enough and I couldn’t get this series out of my head! So, naturally, when I heard that it was being turned into a graphic novel, I did everything I could to get my hands on it! Though I wouldn’t say that it’s as good as the novel itself, I really enjoyed the experience!Having read the novel before this, I will say that there were certain elements of the story that worked REALLY well accompanied with the illustrations. There are scenes where the main character has visions of the world before his own time. Their lives are so protected and controlled, and he was able to see the chaos of war, the beauty of colour and nature, pure joy, death, and so much more. I remember reading those scenes in the book thinking how they must have looked to a person who had never seen anything outside of his bubble. These illustrations helped these scenes immensely!The illustrations themselves were absolutely beautiful! I was lucky enough to read this as an ARC, but all of the pictures were in black and white. Regardless of their lack of colour, each picture depicted so much emotion. The expressions on the characters and the body language was spot on, really assisting with the emotional depth that you can sometimes lack when reading a graphic novel. I really need to find a finished copy and compare them!I also liked that there seemed to be more writing throughout. Sometimes graphic novels rely heavily on the illustrations to carry the story through. But, in this case, I feel that the writing and the illustrations worked so well together.I did struggle a little bit with the lack of emotion though. I think that it’s because I had read the novel before. I remember there being so much more emotion and impact with the novel opposed to the graphic novel. That aside, this was still an INCREDIBLE new way to experience this book!Thank you so much to Raincoast Books and Razorbill for the chance to read this in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own and are uninfluenced.
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  • Ryley (Ryley Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    I remember really enjoying the Giver, first when I read it in grade 7 and a few years later when I read the whole series, so this was a nice refresher and reminder of what I enjoyed about the book!Thanks so much to Raincoast Books for sending me an ARC of this book for an honest review, as always, all opinions are my own.This book follows Jonas, an Eleven who is anxiously awaiting his career placement and transition into being a Twelve. I'm not going to go into a ton of detail on the synopsis be I remember really enjoying the Giver, first when I read it in grade 7 and a few years later when I read the whole series, so this was a nice refresher and reminder of what I enjoyed about the book!Thanks so much to Raincoast Books for sending me an ARC of this book for an honest review, as always, all opinions are my own.This book follows Jonas, an Eleven who is anxiously awaiting his career placement and transition into being a Twelve. I'm not going to go into a ton of detail on the synopsis because this is a sort-of retelling and I'm assuming that if you are interested in the graphic novel version of this book you probably know the storyline.First off, it was really great to experience this story again. My perspectives have changed since the other times I had read the story and the graphic novel gave me some of the visualizations that I didn't get when reading it before. That being said, I don't feel like there was a lot that changed from the original text to this one. Now don't get me wrong, I'm glad it was faithful and the author didn't completely change the story, but I just felt like I was reading the original book with pictures. For me - and this might just be me - you should adapt the text in a way that remains true to the story, but isn't ~essentially~ the exact same. I was under the impression that this would be a take on the Giver, in graphic novel form - not the Giver in graphic novel form. I absolutely don't hate any part of the illustrations or storyline, I just feel like they could have pushed the envelope a little bit with where they wanted the story to go.I will say, though, that for readers that are new to the story or those who are required to read it for school, this would be a great addition to class discussion and for use by those who learn better visually. I think it's a close enough adaptation that nothing vital is left out and it would perhaps get those more reluctant readers engaged in the story.Overall, a faithful adaptation that, while could have pushed a little further, will likely resonate with a new generation of readers.
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  • Molly Lazer
    January 1, 1970
    I have read the prose version of The Giver too many times to count, so I was excited when the graphic novel version was announced and eager to read it when it arrived. P. Craig Russell does an excellent job of illustrating Jonas's world and bringing "sameness" to life. The use of blues instead of greytones to indicate the lack of color is extraordinarily effective, as is the use of a single color in most of the memories that Jonas receives from the Giver. I read an interview with Russell in whic I have read the prose version of The Giver too many times to count, so I was excited when the graphic novel version was announced and eager to read it when it arrived. P. Craig Russell does an excellent job of illustrating Jonas's world and bringing "sameness" to life. The use of blues instead of greytones to indicate the lack of color is extraordinarily effective, as is the use of a single color in most of the memories that Jonas receives from the Giver. I read an interview with Russell in which he discussed his interpretation of the book's ending (no spoilers here, and we're just going to ignore that the other three books in the Giver Quartet exist) and was pleased to read that he and I shared our view of how the book ends. The graphic rendering of the ending is very well done--and still somewhat open for interpretation. All that said, the fact that I was able to SEE all the horrors of Jonas's society made everything so much worse. It was one thing reading it and imagining it myself, but it was a completely different animal when it was laid out in visual form on the page. Again, no spoilers, but I was extremely affected by chapter 20 and onwards, to the point where I can say that this is an extraordinary and important graphic novel that I never want to read again.
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  • Tiff at Mostly YA Lit
    January 1, 1970
    Very similar to the book, extremely closely adapted. The ARC I read only had pencil drawings (none of the inks or the colour were ready), which is unfortunate because I think the colours would play a big role in this story. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the graphic novel take on this book and thought the illustration was thoughtfully done. I really appreciated how much sensitivity and care the artist took on some of the more shocking/sad scenes in the book - and some of the more sensual ones. I think Very similar to the book, extremely closely adapted. The ARC I read only had pencil drawings (none of the inks or the colour were ready), which is unfortunate because I think the colours would play a big role in this story. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the graphic novel take on this book and thought the illustration was thoughtfully done. I really appreciated how much sensitivity and care the artist took on some of the more shocking/sad scenes in the book - and some of the more sensual ones. I think the fact that I cared more about Gabriel in this version of the book than in the original says a lot about me as a now-mother, but it also says that the artist did an incredible job rendering a believable story and bond between Jonas and the baby. I don't know if readers of the original will get a TON out of the graphic novel version of The Giver, but I definitely feel that new and young readers will be astounded by how much this book still resonates decades later. I hope it finds a new middle grade audience with this format.
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  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    It's not this book's fault I'm weary of it -- as is be weary of any of my favorite books -- after teaching it two years in a row. Initially, that was what I had to contend with; it's so true to the original that I fought through my text burn out at the start. However, it quickly moves on to the adventure, and I was recaptivated and fell in love all over again with the Giver, my original wonder intact, as I got further in the book. Additionally, with my new lens, I was able to draw parallels betw It's not this book's fault I'm weary of it -- as is be weary of any of my favorite books -- after teaching it two years in a row. Initially, that was what I had to contend with; it's so true to the original that I fought through my text burn out at the start. However, it quickly moves on to the adventure, and I was recaptivated and fell in love all over again with the Giver, my original wonder intact, as I got further in the book. Additionally, with my new lens, I was able to draw parallels between the dystopian world of The Giver and the concept of White Fragility in ways that I'd love to explore further. Thank you, P. Craig Russell, for a faithful adaptation that moves briskly and helped me recapture my wonder.
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  • Shelby
    January 1, 1970
    I'll be honest, but I had no idea this graphic novel was a thing until I went to YALL fest in Charleston last year and there was a stack of ARCs being given away at a publisher's booth. I snatched a copy up without really looking at what else was on the table! I remembered reading The Giver in high school and I love graphic novels and the new imagery they provide even for already well loved stories. I finally got around to reading the graphic novel and even with the movie adaptation already avai I'll be honest, but I had no idea this graphic novel was a thing until I went to YALL fest in Charleston last year and there was a stack of ARCs being given away at a publisher's booth. I snatched a copy up without really looking at what else was on the table! I remembered reading The Giver in high school and I love graphic novels and the new imagery they provide even for already well loved stories. I finally got around to reading the graphic novel and even with the movie adaptation already available, I still got new insights into the world of The Giver. The art was amazing and really did the story justice, and I absolutely love how as Jonas sees colors, the readers see them too! It was like a whole new experience!
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  • Christine Brunt
    January 1, 1970
    I love The Giver and enjoyed returning to the story through this graphic novel adaptation. I enjoyed the graphic novel's gradual increase in color as Jonas was introduced to color. However, I didn't love the illustration style or color scheme. Even before Jonas could see the color blue, it seemed liked some objects were blue or had a blue tint to them. I would have preferred pure black and white color palette. This might be a good supplement for low readers required to read the classic novel for I love The Giver and enjoyed returning to the story through this graphic novel adaptation. I enjoyed the graphic novel's gradual increase in color as Jonas was introduced to color. However, I didn't love the illustration style or color scheme. Even before Jonas could see the color blue, it seemed liked some objects were blue or had a blue tint to them. I would have preferred pure black and white color palette. This might be a good supplement for low readers required to read the classic novel for school, as it stays close to the original story and interprets the events graphically. Overall, I am giving this book 3 stars.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an ARC for review*While I enjoy the graphics being in black and white until the character is able to see colors, the illustrations were just off to me. Story followed the book very closely and got all of the same points across. I think this would be best used as a reading copy for children who get lost easily with traditional books or need something else to help them get engaged in the story (such as pictures). It doesn’t seem as daunting to read a book with pictures for a child who *I received an ARC for review*While I enjoy the graphics being in black and white until the character is able to see colors, the illustrations were just off to me. Story followed the book very closely and got all of the same points across. I think this would be best used as a reading copy for children who get lost easily with traditional books or need something else to help them get engaged in the story (such as pictures). It doesn’t seem as daunting to read a book with pictures for a child who is struggling to read.
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  • Gillian
    January 1, 1970
    I was given this ARC by the publisher for an honest review. I loved the Giver when I first read it years ago. I enjoyed the movie as well and was excited to see how the graphic novel would be. I was not disappointed. I loved that it followed the story closely and it really brought the book to life for me. I can’t wait to read it again when it is in colour. I feel like that will bring the story to life even more as I can experience Jonas seeing colour for the first time with him.
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  • Alicia Adams
    January 1, 1970
    I was delighted when I heard about the graphic novel adaptation of The Giver. I received an ARC from Edelweiss and I was not disappointed. The graphic adaptation depicted the sameness of the world and the emotions of the story well. As I read, I became emotionally invested even though I already knew the story. I liked the gradual introduction of color leading up to the burst of color at the end. This is a good read for people new to the story and for fans of the original.
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  • Samantha Fondriest
    January 1, 1970
    A faithful adaptation of one of my favorite books of all time. I love how the illustrator was able to transmit the ideas of “sameness” and lack of emotion in the community with the monochromatic blue-grey lines. I also loved the gradual introduction of color. The ending made me tear up just as it does in the original.
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  • Andrew Kline
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully faithful adaptation of one of my all-time favorite novels. P. Craig Russell does an excellent job of presenting a world of Sameness while still providing engaging art. It is certainly a different (somewhat lesser) experience from reading the novel, but I think it can successfully exist along side the book.
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  • Tara Mickela
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure: Didn't read it all/won't read it all. When the original is your favorite book of all time, the movie and/or a graphic novel makes it someone else's vision. Nope. Not happening. The three stars are for the little I perused of the awesome illustrator. But can't tell you if it stuck with original because well, I just can't do it...
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    The Giver is probably one of my childhood books that I hold dearest. This is a very faithful adaptation of the book, no real surprises to be had. The three stars is really for the artwork, because I get that doing faces in a bare bones color pallet would be very difficult, but they looked mutated and warped in places.
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  • Mr. Armstrong
    January 1, 1970
    I have read every single word of the original novel out loud word for word about 64 times over the past ten years of teaching, and it is my favoeite book of all time, so please know I don't say this lightly: this graphic novel is a 100% flawless adaptation. Someone please buy me 30 copies so I can start teaching it tomorrow.
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  • Paul Hankins
    January 1, 1970
    Advanced Reader Copy of a later release. Excited to see what the full-color version of the book will look like. A feature of this adaptation is a series of questions posed to Lowry and Russell both. The author and the illustrator have interesting things to say about art and the necessity of the story even though it is likely to face challenges again.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Non-inked pencils are always disappointing but when it’s P. Craig Russell it’s a tragedy. I understand what they were going for but it is such a shame to see the muddy reproduction of his pencils. We got a few pages inked towards the end though. The adaptation of the story was good otherwise.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 At first I thought the black and white illustrations were because I was reading a review copy, but then I realized it was the grey landscape from the story with the color showing up in Jonas' visions. Faces of characters sort of looked generic. Sticks closely to the original novel.
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  • Stacy
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this gratification adaptation of the classic by Lois Lowry. One of my favorite books as a child and still a great book as an adult. Russell does a fantastic job of creating a visual representation of the world in this book and I didn't feel like any parts were missing from the original story.
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