Let's Go (So We Can Get Back)
The singer, guitarist, and songwriter—best known for his work with Wilco—opens up about his past, his songs, the music, and the people that have inspired him.Few bands have inspired as much devotion as the Chicago rock band Wilco, and it's thanks, in large part, to the band's singer, songwriter, and guiding light: Jeff Tweedy. But while his songs and music have been endlessly discussed and analyzed, Jeff has rarely talked so directly about himself, his life, and his artistic process.Until now. In his long-awaited memoir, Jeff will tell stories about his childhood in Belleville, Illinois; the St. Louis record store, rock clubs, and live-music circuit that sparked his songwriting and performing career; and the Chicago scene that brought it all together. He'll also talk in-depth about his collaborators in Uncle Tupelo, Wilco, and more; and write lovingly about his parents, wife Susie, and sons, Spencer and Sammy. Honest, funny, and disarming, Tweedy's memoir will bring readers inside both his life and his musical process, illuminating his singular genius and sharing his story, voice, and perspective for the first time.

Let's Go (So We Can Get Back) Details

TitleLet's Go (So We Can Get Back)
Author
ReleaseNov 13th, 2018
PublisherDutton
Rating
GenreMusic, Autobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Biography

Let's Go (So We Can Get Back) Review

  • Elizabeth Amilkavich
    January 1, 1970
    Total babe/badass/cool dude. I already knew Jeff was a great songwriter, and reading his memoir has let me appreciate his talents as a writer in long form as well. He’s funny and cynical yet accessible. Liked the book an awful lot and will always love Wilco.
    more
  • Jay Gabler
    January 1, 1970
    Self-aware even about his self-awareness, Jeff Tweedy seemed like he might be either the worst or the best guy to write a memoir. In fact, the answer is much closer to the latter. Like a Wilco song, Let's Go (So We Can Get Back) breezes past, but is full of moments of acute insight, wry humor, and surprising poignancy. As music memoirs go, this is just the kind of book a lot of fans are looking for: neither a comprehensive catalog or an indulgent ramble, at a very reasonable 292 pages, Let's Go Self-aware even about his self-awareness, Jeff Tweedy seemed like he might be either the worst or the best guy to write a memoir. In fact, the answer is much closer to the latter. Like a Wilco song, Let's Go (So We Can Get Back) breezes past, but is full of moments of acute insight, wry humor, and surprising poignancy. As music memoirs go, this is just the kind of book a lot of fans are looking for: neither a comprehensive catalog or an indulgent ramble, at a very reasonable 292 pages, Let's Go has only the parts you want.I reviewed Let's Go (So We Can Get Back) for The Current.
    more
  • natalie
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone who knows me knows that I hate Wilco with the passion of thousand burning suns (or whatever the expression). That's because I once loved them with the same passion. There it is on page 197. Jeff acknowledges us. Those who loved Jay Bennett's Wilco. Even before I got to that passage, I had already fallen in love with this book. Jeff is genuinely likable, thoughtful, funny, and charming. I can relate to how he thinks about life. I'm sorry that I can't listen to Wilco anymore. This book wo Everyone who knows me knows that I hate Wilco with the passion of thousand burning suns (or whatever the expression). That's because I once loved them with the same passion. There it is on page 197. Jeff acknowledges us. Those who loved Jay Bennett's Wilco. Even before I got to that passage, I had already fallen in love with this book. Jeff is genuinely likable, thoughtful, funny, and charming. I can relate to how he thinks about life. I'm sorry that I can't listen to Wilco anymore. This book won't change that. But I will give the new solo album a listen. Thanks for writing this, Jeff.
    more
  • Roger
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed Tweedy's breezy intelligent voice here. Reading this makes me want to revisit the Wilco oeuvre again and pay more attention. I don't think I have ever operated this way before. Usually I fall for the music and then I read about the creator or creators responsible. ("Low Key" is one of my all-time favorites, but it's technically not a Wilco song.)
    more
  • Mark Eleveld
    January 1, 1970
    He is a wonderful writer. Strong narrative, clever, a bit of the passionate smart ass. This certainly is a tell all about Jay Farrar, Jay Bennet, Jeff's drug abuse, and the Lounger Ax in Chicago. It thins out a bit in the middle and toward the end, but well done throughout. The poems, songs at the end of the book are beautiful.
    more
  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    This was the best.
  • HobbitFromPA
    January 1, 1970
    Wilco is one of my favourite bands. I have seen them many times and Jeff solo several times. Was nice to get some more insight into Uncle Tupelo days and erly Wilco days.
  • Kathy (Bermudaonion)
    January 1, 1970
    4.25 stars
Write a review