Alien
An original young adult novel of the Alien universeOlivia and her twin sister Viola have been dragged around the universe for as long as they can remember. Their parents, both xenobiologists, are always in high demand for their research into obscure alien biology.Just settled on a new colony world, they discover an alien threat unlike anything they’ve ever seen. And suddenly the sisters’ world is ripped apart.On the run from terrifying aliens, Olivia’s knowledge of xenobiology and determination to protect her sister are her only weapons as the colony collapses into chaos. But then a shocking family secret bursts open—one that’s as horrifying to Olivia as the aliens surrounding them.The creatures infiltrate the rich wildlife on this virgin colony world—and quickly start adapting. Olivia’s going to have to adapt, too, if she’s going to survive...An Imprint Book

Alien Details

TitleAlien
Author
ReleaseApr 9th, 2019
PublisherImprint
ISBN-139781250306302
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Science Fiction, Horror, Aliens

Alien Review

  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    Yessss!!!!Mira Grant tackles the Alien franchise.My heart may explode in anticipation!
  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    i don't even like alien stuff, but if mira grant is going alien, i'm right there waiting in line for it.
  • Tucker (TuckerTheReader)
    January 1, 1970
    I. CAN'T. EVEN.GiveItToMeNow!!!!
  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    People sure do love creating life. They forget that life, once created, carries no innate obligation toward whoever made it. Life does what it wants, and screw anyone who gets in its way.Loved this! And this is coming from someone's whose entire sum experience of the Alien universe comes from a vague feeling that I surely must have seen the original movie at some point in time and also a handful of viewings of Prometheus because screw you I find it entertaining. So basically what I'm saying is t People sure do love creating life. They forget that life, once created, carries no innate obligation toward whoever made it. Life does what it wants, and screw anyone who gets in its way.Loved this! And this is coming from someone's whose entire sum experience of the Alien universe comes from a vague feeling that I surely must have seen the original movie at some point in time and also a handful of viewings of Prometheus because screw you I find it entertaining. So basically what I'm saying is that you don't actually need anything more than a vague cultural knowledge of the Alien franchise to read this book. I'm sure there's a few Easter Eggs hidden in there for the die-hard fans, but I didn't feel lost at all while reading and I'm pretty sure the only things you need to know are generally what the aliens look like and also that they will mess you UP. Anyway, this was absolutely the perfect book for Seanan/Mira to write. It combines her love of aliens, horror, SCIENCE, and final girls into a single novel and because her amazingness truly knows no bounds we also get a LESBIAN PROTAG! Overall just a very fun and also insightful read, and as usual I think I had such a good time reading it in part because it is obvious that she had such a good time writing it. Would definitely recommend it to fans of her work, even if you haven't previously read/watched anything in the Alien franchise.
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  • ♠️ Tabi ♠️
    January 1, 1970
    honestly from mermaids to aliens I literally don't care where this author takes me I just want her to take me on whatever journey she decides to write next
  • Matisse
    January 1, 1970
    Man, I read this thing in two sittings. It's sensational. I feel many feels toward this tiny novel, but the overwhelming one is its statement on sci-fi and diversity. This pulse-pounding, grip-the-cover-so-tight-you-warp-it novel stars a young lesbian and her WOC girlfriend, with characters of various nationalities appearing throughout. The original two Alien films--the two that count!--were groundbreaking in that Ellen Ripley broke the mold for what a heroine could be. Going on forty years late Man, I read this thing in two sittings. It's sensational. I feel many feels toward this tiny novel, but the overwhelming one is its statement on sci-fi and diversity. This pulse-pounding, grip-the-cover-so-tight-you-warp-it novel stars a young lesbian and her WOC girlfriend, with characters of various nationalities appearing throughout. The original two Alien films--the two that count!--were groundbreaking in that Ellen Ripley broke the mold for what a heroine could be. Going on forty years later, 'Alien: Echo' realizes that Ripley can easily be critiqued as the dreaded White Feminist heroine, and so the title makes an effort to diversify its cast. Hell, one of the underlying conflicts is the nature of humanity, and what makes a person 'real'. ...And this is all while it's being the Alien franchise at its best. You can do a checklist of all the Alien sequences you'd want, and they're here: there're Xenomorphs creeping around silently outside your hideout, there're several chase sequences, there are shoot-em-up moments, there's the requisite jaunt into the Xenomorph hive, there's the walk through the abandoned, bloodied, and defeated human stronghold, there's the final log transmission of doomed characters, there are tons of jump-scares...the only thing we *don't* get is a full-on chestburster scene. And in a YA novel, that's understandable. On the topic of 'Alien: Echo' as a YA novel! I tried reading one of the recent Alien tie-in novels, specifically the one focusing on Newt. I couldn't do it. That book focused almost all of its time on characters that were doomed from page one, the titular beasts didn't show up until the last third, and the technobabble was a bit much. 'Alien: Echo' plays to the strengths of YA literature: we follow one teenager, through first-person present tense, and her supporting characters are all given plenty of time to develop. The Xenomorphs show up roughly 3/4ths of the way in, and all the good action happens at the half-way mark. It ends up being a deeply emotional, deeply human romp through the Alien universe. In all honesty, the pacing feels more akin to the Netflix Lost In Space than a by-the-numbers YA sci-fi novel. Lastly, I commend it for being easy on newcomers. The novel makes exactly ONE mention of Weyland-Yutani, and NO mention WHATSOEVER about LV-426, or the Sulaco crew, colonial marines are nowhere to be seen, and the narration doesn't even call the titular beasts Xenomorphs. We older nerds, who are familiar with the franchise, will be able to fill in the blanks (ie. when Olivia's mom talks about a shady megacorp on Earth, we know exactly who she means), but it amounts to non-intrusive continuity porn. You can hand it to a teen and tell them "so, there's a franchise about a space alien, called Alien." That's all you gotta know. I'm so mad I didn't purchase this for my library's collection. It's just so damn fun.
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    Cosa succede quando una delle autrici più brillanti, talentuose e originali che tu abbia mai avuto il piacere di leggere decide di scrivere un libro dedicato a uno dei tuoi franchise cinematografici preferiti di sempre?“Alien: Echo”, alias lo YA horror più divertente, incalzante, ironico, brutale e intelligente su cui mi sia mai capitato di mettere le mani: ecco che cosa succede. Se amate la quadrilogia originale di “Alien” (e se, come me, preferite far finta che quell’ampolloso pasticcio in sal Cosa succede quando una delle autrici più brillanti, talentuose e originali che tu abbia mai avuto il piacere di leggere decide di scrivere un libro dedicato a uno dei tuoi franchise cinematografici preferiti di sempre?“Alien: Echo”, alias lo YA horror più divertente, incalzante, ironico, brutale e intelligente su cui mi sia mai capitato di mettere le mani: ecco che cosa succede. Se amate la quadrilogia originale di “Alien” (e se, come me, preferite far finta che quell’ampolloso pasticcio in salsa Fassbender chiamato “Covenant” sia stato solo un brutto sogno…), leggete questo romanzo, e giuro che non ve ne pentirete. Perché Mira Grant adora questi film almeno tanto quanto noi e, se mai è esistita un’autrice degna di essere incoronata reginetta incontrastata del genere “survival horror”, posso assicurarvi che quella è sicuramente lei! Vi consiglierei, del resto, di fare un pensierino su questo titolo perfino se non foste particolarmente amanti del genere; credo infatti che “Alien: Echo” rappresenti una piccola, imperdibile chicca per qualsiasi fan del lavoro della Grant (o di Seanan McGuire, che poi è dire la stessa cosa…)Questo libro potrebbe facilmente aspirare a diventare un capitolo onorario (e sanguinosissimo) della serie “Wayward Children”, per quanto mi riguarda; immaginate solo di trovare un portale in grado di trasportarvi su Zagreus, e provate a pensare a quello che potrebbe capitarvi di affrontare, una volta arrivati laggiù…
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  • J.A. Ironside
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this. Mira Grant struck the perfect balance between sci-fi and horror with this YA novel set in the Alien universe. Fans of Ridley Scott's classic space horror series will find lots to like here as Grant hits key moments from the films. The suspense and tension were perfect - I was on the edge of my seat and read it in one sitting. This is slightly lighter on body horror - you don't actually see the face huggers for instance - but this is just as heavy on body count as the films and ther I loved this. Mira Grant struck the perfect balance between sci-fi and horror with this YA novel set in the Alien universe. Fans of Ridley Scott's classic space horror series will find lots to like here as Grant hits key moments from the films. The suspense and tension were perfect - I was on the edge of my seat and read it in one sitting. This is slightly lighter on body horror - you don't actually see the face huggers for instance - but this is just as heavy on body count as the films and there is plenty of gore, so be warned. The book starts with MC Olivia Shipp taking a field trip outside her family's residence. Oliva's parents are xenobiologists who have lived a nomadic existence across the universe, charting the ecostystems of newly settled planets. Olivia and her twin sister, Viola, have had little choice but to travel with them. Olivia is most concerned with finally seeing earth with her sister when she hits 18, and whether or not the hot colonial girls she has a crush on, likes her back. Things take a sudden horrific turn after her father is sent to check out a derelict ship orbiting the planet which the colonials want to cannibalise. There's something on the ship. Something which defies known biology...This was such a great read. If you like diverse SFF with a kick ass character who manages to not be a final girl, then this is for you. I'm surprised this isn't getting more hype. It was awesome.
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  • Matthew Galloway
    January 1, 1970
    It was interesting to see the franchise through the eyes of someone else and to see how some of the staples of the series were revealed in this installment. One of those reveals initially bothered me because it seemed as if it should have changed reactions to that person, but almost immediately I realized how beautiful that acceptance was and should just be a real world thing. I was also initially bummed when Olivia got hand-wavy about biology because it was uncool parent stuff since I LOVE alie It was interesting to see the franchise through the eyes of someone else and to see how some of the staples of the series were revealed in this installment. One of those reveals initially bothered me because it seemed as if it should have changed reactions to that person, but almost immediately I realized how beautiful that acceptance was and should just be a real world thing. I was also initially bummed when Olivia got hand-wavy about biology because it was uncool parent stuff since I LOVE alien ecologies and all. However, apparently the daughter of a biologist can't help but soak up all that science, so she let it all out and I got my world building. :DAs for fright level -- I'm more a creeping horror type of horror person, so it didn't get my hackles raised. It was more an exciting adventure with suspense worrying about the characters you care about. (except for one over the top awful character) And that's what I wanted -- the discovery of the xenomorphs, what they can do, and the cat and mouse games played afterwards. It's great to have an intelligent protagonist, as well!
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  • Roz
    January 1, 1970
    I’m conflicted.
  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    I normally like this author and her alter ego, Seanan McGuire, however this one wasn't the best for me. I didn't care for Olivia, she was too girl crazy and a bit too cocky for me. Cora never really came off as somebody worth Olivia's effort, she had to work too hard to get any place and I hated that Cora really didn't believe Olivia about her sister. Now the sister, Viola, was more interesting, especially when her secret was revealed. I'm not sure how I feel about it. Part of me thinks that the I normally like this author and her alter ego, Seanan McGuire, however this one wasn't the best for me. I didn't care for Olivia, she was too girl crazy and a bit too cocky for me. Cora never really came off as somebody worth Olivia's effort, she had to work too hard to get any place and I hated that Cora really didn't believe Olivia about her sister. Now the sister, Viola, was more interesting, especially when her secret was revealed. I'm not sure how I feel about it. Part of me thinks that the parents did a good thing, part of me thinks the parents should have let things be. In the end the made the choice they did, everyone living their lives. The one thing you can't argue was how devoted the two sisters were to each other.Now the parents, I feel like they were irresponsible dragging the girls with them on their jobs. They were going to dangerous places where bad things could happen. This was proved when the drama started up in this book. From here things were a comedy of errors, all of them bumbling around and many many people dying at every turn. Things were left on a bit of a cliffhanger, but I found I was indifferent about it because by then I was just glad to be done with the book.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so much fun!!! I've been a fan of 'Alien' since I first saw it on TV as a teen but I never read any of the books or graphic novels associated with the world. (I also wasn't a huge fan of the sequel movies but I did enjoy them.) However, this book was written by one of my favorite authors so I decided to give it a shot and I am so very glad that I did! 'Alien: Echo' works on many different levels. It's a great, fast-paced action-adventure novel perfect for young adults (and adults) This book was so much fun!!! I've been a fan of 'Alien' since I first saw it on TV as a teen but I never read any of the books or graphic novels associated with the world. (I also wasn't a huge fan of the sequel movies but I did enjoy them.) However, this book was written by one of my favorite authors so I decided to give it a shot and I am so very glad that I did! 'Alien: Echo' works on many different levels. It's a great, fast-paced action-adventure novel perfect for young adults (and adults) who enjoy sci-fi, adventure and monster stories. It's also a wonderful dip back into the world of 'Alien', bringing back all the angst and horror the movie is associated with. The main characters are great, the aliens are perfect and the open ending reminded me so much of the movie that I got chills. My one complaint is that I want MORE. Why is there not more story??? I need more!! I highly recommend this book to everyone who loved the movie 'Alien' and to everyone who's never seen (but will want to watch it as soon as they've finished reading).
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  • Unseen Library
    January 1, 1970
    For this week's Waiting on Wednesday review, I will be looking at one of the more interesting looking movie tie-in books of early 2019, Alien: Echo by Mira Grant. If you look back at some of the books I have reviewed in the past, it is pretty clear that I love novels that tie in to movies, television shows, video games and comic book series. Therefore, when I saw this tie-in to the classic Alien movies, I knew that I would have to read it, especially as it's being written by skilled horror autho For this week's Waiting on Wednesday review, I will be looking at one of the more interesting looking movie tie-in books of early 2019, Alien: Echo by Mira Grant. If you look back at some of the books I have reviewed in the past, it is pretty clear that I love novels that tie in to movies, television shows, video games and comic book series. Therefore, when I saw this tie-in to the classic Alien movies, I knew that I would have to read it, especially as it's being written by skilled horror author Mira Grant.Horror is not my favourite genre in the world; however, I have read a couple in the last year, and one of my favourites has got to be Into the Drowning Deep by Mira Grant. So far this is the only Mira Grant book I have read, except for a short story in a Night of the Living Dead zombie short story book, but I have been intending to check out some of her other series, such as her Newsflesh or Parasitology series. However, if Grant can make mermaids bloody terrifying like she did in Into the Drowning Deep, I can not wait to see what she does with one of film's most iconic horror creatures.As you can see, this book has a pretty cool synopsis, and I like the sound of two young people fleeing through a strange new planet, being pursued by an entire planet of aliens. I am also loving the cover of this book, especially the alien eggs appearing in both of the young women's eyes. Early prediction based off the synopsis: the girls are either clones, part alien, androids or some variation of the three.Alien: Echo is apparently going to be an original young adult novel, and I will be interested to see how writing it for a young adult audience will affect the horror elements of the Alien franchise. This book is coming out in early April 2019, and I will probably get it in its audiobook format, which will apparently be narrated by Kate Marcin. I have not heard anything narrated by Marcin before, but I am hoping that the audiobook format will bring the reader right into the middle of the horror. Plus, at around eight hours, it should allow me to breeze through this book fairly quickly and get out a review ASAP.I am really looking forward to this one, and do not be surprised if this kick-starts me into reading a few more Mira Grant books in 2019.Check out my reviews for some of Mira Grant's previous books here:https://unseenlibrary.com/2018/05/30/...https://unseenlibrary.com/2018/05/30/...For other great reviews visit my blog at:https://unseenlibrary.com/
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  • Katya Becerra
    January 1, 1970
    I'm. So. Here. For. This.
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    When I heard there was an Alien novel coming out, I was cautiously intrigued. When I heard it was being written by Mira Grant (Seanan McGuire) I immediately bought Alien: Echo: An Original Young Adult Novel of the Alien Universe and sat down to read it. One of my favorite horror franchises together with one of my favorite, most consistently excellent authors–I knew it was going to be good! It managed to be every bit as amazing as I dared to hope it would be.I love the fact that Olivia’s intensiv When I heard there was an Alien novel coming out, I was cautiously intrigued. When I heard it was being written by Mira Grant (Seanan McGuire) I immediately bought Alien: Echo: An Original Young Adult Novel of the Alien Universe and sat down to read it. One of my favorite horror franchises together with one of my favorite, most consistently excellent authors–I knew it was going to be good! It managed to be every bit as amazing as I dared to hope it would be.I love the fact that Olivia’s intensive life-long exposure to her parents’ xenobiology work has left her able to comment on and theorize about the aliens’ biology, providing possible explanations for things like the secondary “mouth”. It also enables her to convey a fascinating amount of information about the planet Zagreus both before and after the aliens show up. The flora and fauna are wonderfully detailed and original. Since the citizens of Zagreus make a big deal about not pillaging their environment (although it isn’t as simple as that), it sets the scene for some interesting musings on Earth-like worlds.The writing is extremely vivid, from the orange sky to the color of drying blood on the walls. I had no trouble “seeing” exactly what was going on, whether I was reading about Olivia setting out bait to attract new wildlife, or a tense chase scene through a variety of local terrain.The characters are wonderful. I particularly liked Olivia and Viola’s parents, who aren’t always perfect, and don’t always have a perfect relationship, but who are nonetheless nifty people doing interesting things. The kids in this book interact with adults in very natural ways–they aren’t artificially made to be the heroes. They just do their damndest to stay alive and save their loved ones. I particularly loved the burgeoning and possibly fragile relationship between Olivia and Kora, which is a delightful young romance. It’s threatened first by a classmate who’s also in love with Kora, and then of course by the appearance of the aliens themselves.Ahh, the aliens. This book is a part of the franchise, so we knew they’d show up. They’re handled really well, and are absolutely as scary as in the movie(s). (In fact, the book was so tense that I kind of welcomed pausing to make dinner.) Using Olivia’s experience and knowledge to explore them kept Grant from having to shoehorn in explanations of the various aspects of their biology that we’ve seen so far. As a fan of the Alien franchise, I gobbled this book up. As a fan of Mira Grant, I loved it. I knew as soon as I heard she’d written this book that she was the perfect author for it, and I wasn’t disappointed!Original review (including a few fun quotes) posted on my blog: http://www.errantdreams.com/2019/04/r...
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  • Liz L
    January 1, 1970
    This was a solid Aliens book.I, much like Murderbot ("I didn’t want to see helpless humans. I’d rather see smart ones rescuing each other"), prefer my protagonists smart and put in situations where they can use their smarts to their advantage. This book was always going to be a good time because it's Mira Grant and it's xenomorphs and you really can't go wrong. But I was delighted to realize that on top of that, it was really, really fun to see a character not only be smart in a specific and use This was a solid Aliens book.I, much like Murderbot ("I didn’t want to see helpless humans. I’d rather see smart ones rescuing each other"), prefer my protagonists smart and put in situations where they can use their smarts to their advantage. This book was always going to be a good time because it's Mira Grant and it's xenomorphs and you really can't go wrong. But I was delighted to realize that on top of that, it was really, really fun to see a character not only be smart in a specific and useful way (xenobiology) but also to be downright competent and clear-headed in all sorts of other ways. This also followed the Aliens formula of a slow beginning where you really get to know your characters and take sides on who you want to survive and who you can't wait to see get their face eaten. One of my few complaints is the imbalance of that spreadsheet - I didn't care about pretty much any of the supporting characters enough to care if they became alien chow or not. This reinforced the feeling of us-against-the-world, so I see what the author was going for, but it made the beginning of the book a weird kind of meh. Like if the cast of Aliens was Ripley, Newt, Carter Burke, and then like 10 iterations of Gorman. I would have liked to see more meaningful interactions with more characters I cared about. That would have made this truly great. As it is, it's a real good time.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    So, I never read book reviews, or even book descriptions, I know almost nothing about a book before I buy it. Thus, I had no idea that Alien: Echo a YA novel set in the Alien universe. There's lots of teen angst, kids having to grow up real fast surrounded by alien killing machines, the idea that adults are fallible etc. The violence is dialed down, characterization dialed up. I'm giving it 4 stars because Grant is a great writer, and Alien: Echo is everything a YA novel should be, and then some So, I never read book reviews, or even book descriptions, I know almost nothing about a book before I buy it. Thus, I had no idea that Alien: Echo a YA novel set in the Alien universe. There's lots of teen angst, kids having to grow up real fast surrounded by alien killing machines, the idea that adults are fallible etc. The violence is dialed down, characterization dialed up. I'm giving it 4 stars because Grant is a great writer, and Alien: Echo is everything a YA novel should be, and then some.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a few days to read this book and another two times before I can say more than, Yes this! I love the Alien franchise and this book kept the love going. We get to see strong females carrying and expanding the story as well as having new experiences. I enjoyed being able to see and experience not only the terrifying beauty and violence of the Aliens taking a new world but the human drama of living or not through it. The author delivered an amazing story for old and new fans alike.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 This YA scifi horror is exactly like an Alien movie, but with teenagers and first love. Olivia's life is forever changed as her xenobiologist parents accidentally discover those horrible terrors of space. The xenobiologist part of this was fascinating, but the F/F love story was just ok. It definitely made me want to watch Prometheus again.
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  • May Walsh
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve tried reading other books set in the Alien universe, none have captured my attention like this one. I could not stop myself from devouring it in a day! Gripping plot, diverse characters, LGBTQA friendly, and lets not forget terrifying.Fingers crossed Mira Grant will be able to write more Alien books.
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  • John Clark
    January 1, 1970
    Scary, fast-paced and with some neat twists as well as a couple of matter-of-fact girls in love with each other and aliens who if you met them personally would require CPR and clean underwear, sum up this story. Teens who like scary science-fiction with a cliffhanger finale (strongly suggesting a sequel). I liked it big time.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my god!!!Seanan/Mira is just the GOAT!Loved this entry into the Alienverse.
  • Kelli
    January 1, 1970
    2.5
  • Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    A YA spin-off of the Alien movies. Unfamiliar planet, familiar monsters, lots of blood and gore and running and screaming, and some romance (because, of course, it's YA). Lots of fun!
  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent tale. I love Mira Grant's writing and turn of phrase, and Olivia's voice was very real. I kind of saw the twist coming, but that doesn't mean it wasn't good. Recommended!
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