The Moment of Lift
A debut from Forbes' third most powerful woman in the world, Melinda Gates, a timely and necessary call to action for women's empowerment.For the last twenty years, Melinda Gates has been on a mission. Her goal, as co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, has been to find solutions for people with the most urgent needs, wherever they live. Throughout this journey, one thing has become increasingly clear to her: If you want to lift a society up, invest in women.In this candid and inspiring book, Gates traces her awakening to the link between women's empowerment and the health of societies. She shows some of the tremendous opportunities that exist right now to “turbo-charge" change. And she provides simple and effective ways each one of us can make a difference.Convinced that all women should be free to decide whether and when to have children, Gates took her first step onto the global stage to make a stand for family planning. That step launched her into further efforts: to ensure women everywhere have access to every kind of job; to encourage men around the globe to share equally in the burdens of household work; to advocate for paid family leave for everyone; to eliminate gender bias in all its forms.Throughout, Gates introduces us to her heroes in the movement towards equality, offers startling data, shares moving conversations she's had with women from all over the world—and shows how we can all get involved.A personal statement of passionate conviction, this book tells of Gates' journey from a partner working behind the scenes to one of the world's foremost advocates for women, driven by the belief that no one should be excluded, all lives have equal value, and gender equity is the lever that lifts everything.

The Moment of Lift Details

TitleThe Moment of Lift
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 23rd, 2019
PublisherFlatiron Books
ISBN-139781250313577
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Autobiography, Memoir, Womens, Leadership, Sociology, Biography, Audiobook, Gender

The Moment of Lift Review

  • Bill Gates
    January 1, 1970
    I would say this even if I weren’t married to the author: The Moment of Lift is a terrific read.It is a wise, honest, and beautifully written book about how empowering women lifts up everyone. (None of that will be surprising to anyone who knows Melinda.) Although it took her about a year to write, in a way she has been working on it her whole life. The Moment of Lift is about the women who have inspired Melinda, starting with her own mother, through her colleagues at Microsoft, and continuing t I would say this even if I weren’t married to the author: The Moment of Lift is a terrific read.It is a wise, honest, and beautifully written book about how empowering women lifts up everyone. (None of that will be surprising to anyone who knows Melinda.) Although it took her about a year to write, in a way she has been working on it her whole life. The Moment of Lift is about the women who have inspired Melinda, starting with her own mother, through her colleagues at Microsoft, and continuing today with the amazing scientists, farmers, educators, and leaders she meets through her work with our foundation.Melinda opens up about her personal journey from private citizen to public advocate. You see how she pushed our foundation to focus more on women’s empowerment. She shares insights about our marriage, the path we took to become equals in our work, and how she has helped me grow as a father and husband.But to me, what is really impressive about the book is the way Melinda combines her mastery of data with her ability to tell powerful stories about individual women she has met. In an especially memorable passage about how she handles seeing people in desperate circumstances, she writes: “All of us have to let our hearts break; it’s the price of being present to someone who is suffering.” Your heart will break more than once when you read this book. But more often, you will be enlightened and inspired.In this free excerpt, Melinda writes about her final conversation with our friend Hans Rosling, a touching discussion about why it is so important to help mothers protect their children. I encourage you to pre-order the book now. Melinda will donate all the amounts she receives from this book to charity.Melinda is the most important person in my life: an amazing wife, mother, partner, and friend (and now accomplished author!). I am lucky that she has shared these insights with me for all these years, and delighted that she is now sharing them with the rest of the world too.
    more
  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    A woman on a mission to save other women from despair, poverty, and the ills that effect every aspect of society today.It's a man's world and nothing has changed. Yet Melinda Gates is determined to weave a new pattern in this bundle of yarn one that will help those around the world get the help they deserve through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.Empowerment! Validation! Assurances of a better life!Sounds so cozy but can it be accomplished and I wonder can we start at home before going abr A woman on a mission to save other women from despair, poverty, and the ills that effect every aspect of society today.It's a man's world and nothing has changed. Yet Melinda Gates is determined to weave a new pattern in this bundle of yarn one that will help those around the world get the help they deserve through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.Empowerment! Validation! Assurances of a better life!Sounds so cozy but can it be accomplished and I wonder can we start at home before going abroad?Look I have not had the white picket fence dream fulfilled. I married a man I thought would love, honor, obey but instead I got a devil in disguise. After being left homeless, bankrupt, without income assets or savings I had to pick myself up, dust off, and try again.So I did but not without helping others first.As a 20 yr volunteer with over 13 nonprofits in my community I seen first hand the power to inspire, transform, and honor those who feel they have lost all hope. I've been both a recipient and a volunteer especially with regards to food insecurities. In fact this past year while passing out 10,ooo frozen turkeys my back went out, pinched on my nerve, and legs became temp paralyzed yet I continued to work as people need us. I watched people come up to me with a sad look in their eyes one you could read on their face and when I said,"It's ok, I 'm also below poverty with 3 kids from abusive marriage" they welled up and tears flowed. It's ok to know that they are not alone and in need of assistance. I was also on the front line in attending the walk for homeless women in which several of the women were escaping abuse. Many found themselves in situations they couldn't escape including mounting medical bills from illnesses they simply couldn't afford. We're all just one paycheck away. I've been on the front line at the food banks and job centers seeking better ways . Hell I graduated with a dual masters and gave up my career to raise my 3 kids (oldest son born med disabled with Vater Syndrome requiring round the clock care) but it wasn't rewarded with compensation for lost wages but rather a statement of 'she's just a mom' and 'get a job' after giving up my career for my spouses. Please can we address child care in America. Can we address compensation for lost wages as you've mentioned our work is free but it's still work. Raising a family and taking care of a household is WORK! It's unpaid labor yet there's no monetary value in exchange for the 24-7 duties many women perform daily. Might I add women have a right to have children and those who have different circumstances should have a right to abort if they choose. Why are we continuously telling women how to live? By the way I've also been a counselor free of charge helping women heal from NPD and DV on my FB page,"The Lost Self Life After Narcissism" so yes it's a global issue with violence.I absolutely love what I do and an award was never the end result for years of volunteering but I'm so honored to have received the Points of Light Award for my service.So I understand the movement here, the motivation, the inspiration I truly do!From one viewpoint I can join hands with you on this notion of feminism because as someone who fought to just survive I get it!What I'm concerned about is this travelling to far off third world countries with all the riches of the marriage to help others when we have dire needs here at home.As a product of a broken civil legal system in dealing with malignant narcissist we need the help here before going outside of our country.My hope is that women and children no longer have to live in fear , in poverty, in abusive situations yet I know there's much more behind closed doors.I lived as a prisoner in my own home while married to a man that could sway from one persona to another known as Jekyll and Hyde. He was a true chameleon able to adapt to any change in environment while going undetected. This is the scary part as woman's voices are being silenced all around the world to violence.It's not just in one centralized spot it's a worldwide epidemic in which if caught it's a resignation, a slap on the wrist, and back at it.Mine violated his PFA , arrest for ICC violation, 3 month probation, alcohol and drug treatment, anger management, warrant for failure to pay and appear 15 k arrearages yet still had parental rights with documented police reports of abuse and removal from our home and yes I had every document to show proof including arrest reports, pics of abuse, transfer of hidden funds, etc.It didn't matter -- not believable or credible with every legal document shown during divorce proceedings! As you may have noticed our country is now experiencing the same insanity by the very same type of toxicity. I wish I could say good luck but it takes an act of Congress to receive change. When you file 15 exceptions from lies and the other person shows up and receives everything based on simply money, power, connections, and gender there's something wrong. We need to end the preferential treatment, the corruption, the pay to play schemes and start treating women fairly.If this continues women and children are in jeopardy of losing everything without even having a say.There's no legal aid available. There's no safety net. There's a brick wall! Public assistance over 2 yr wait lists. Housing the same. No alimony nor child support for over a year while living off credit.You see I'm all for helping everyone but can we please begin right here at home!We need all the help we can get.Survivor of NPD and DV!Thank you!
    more
  • (a)lyss(a)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from a Goodreads First Reads Giveaway in exchange for an honest review.This book was around 3.5 stars for me. While Melinda Gates is open about her faith and her experience and why she believes in supporting women I wish this book had dug deeper. There are powerful anecdotes about child brides and women who died in childbirth where Gates explained these are the experiences that moved her and even stories about her own marriage and how the Gates' discuss their domes I received a copy of this book from a Goodreads First Reads Giveaway in exchange for an honest review.This book was around 3.5 stars for me. While Melinda Gates is open about her faith and her experience and why she believes in supporting women I wish this book had dug deeper. There are powerful anecdotes about child brides and women who died in childbirth where Gates explained these are the experiences that moved her and even stories about her own marriage and how the Gates' discuss their domestic duties. However, there aren't a lot of facts about how letting women plan their family size and care improves economies, improves child welfare outcomes, and other positive attributes. Perhaps this book is written to preach to the choir, so to speak, but anyone who has doubts about advocating for women who picks up this book will be faced with heartwrenching and heartwarming stories, but not a number or facts. It may also be written this way to make this story more accessible and readable like a narrative, as it is a fairly simple read, but for such a platform I was hoping for a bit more depth.That being said Gates is a strong advocate for women and uses this book to share their story as well as parts of her own to explain why the Gates' launched their Foundation. This is a thoughtful read.
    more
  • Jayne Gerdeman Homsher
    January 1, 1970
    I have to say this book by Melinda Gates has grabbed my attention from start to finish. I cancelled my entire day to read her book cover to cover and then I sent her a message on Twitter. My senses of well being and support for other women have been encouraged in the right ways from this book. I have always tried to inspire women of all ages to get involved in working in science, and technologies that are coming to the marketplace. I only wish I could do even more well this book really drives it I have to say this book by Melinda Gates has grabbed my attention from start to finish. I cancelled my entire day to read her book cover to cover and then I sent her a message on Twitter. My senses of well being and support for other women have been encouraged in the right ways from this book. I have always tried to inspire women of all ages to get involved in working in science, and technologies that are coming to the marketplace. I only wish I could do even more well this book really drives it home for me and I will be sharing this book with many women who need to read and become inspired as well. She has always set her goals high and to listen and use her ideas going forward to help and build. She found a way to fit right in working with men and even leading men. She is smart, driven and open in her mindset to develop change with leadership, hard work and purpose that is inspiring to those around her efforts. After reading this particular book I have allowed myself to garner some smart ways to build on her ideas and comments to help in my current work. I am semi retired now as I started my own career in bleeding edge technology a long time ago but now I use my past business experience to help those with disabilities not feel left out in their own careers.
    more
  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    Just over halfway through, and I am enjoying it. I was inherently interested in what her perspective might be, since she is so uniquely informed and positioned to speak on global health and welfare issues as well as what drives the wealthy to charity. In that sense, whatever she says will be interesting. Which is good, because this is not a gripping tale. She's informative, includes personal stories, and shares inspiring stories from others. However, this book would hardly carry the same weight Just over halfway through, and I am enjoying it. I was inherently interested in what her perspective might be, since she is so uniquely informed and positioned to speak on global health and welfare issues as well as what drives the wealthy to charity. In that sense, whatever she says will be interesting. Which is good, because this is not a gripping tale. She's informative, includes personal stories, and shares inspiring stories from others. However, this book would hardly carry the same weight if it were not written by Melinda Gates.I found her discussion of family planning really helpful and eye-opening. Her discussion of gender dynamics, unpaid work, and power reminded me of Lean In, except they had more urgency/validity given the populations she is addressing -- rigid, poverty-stricken, caste cultures in the poorest parts of the world. I appreciated her sharing how faith has played a part in her working through some of these issues. I was surprised by a few of the gaps she revealed -- like when she said (paraphrasing), "What is the point of hierarchy if not to give people below you the tasks you don't want to do?" I think the military or any other organization with an understanding of servant leadership could answer that question rather well (tho she intended it rhetorically).So, I don't agree with her about everything, but I'm glad I've heard her perspective, and she did change my thinking in at least one area. I'll give a star rating once I'm done reading.
    more
  • Chris Roberts
    January 1, 1970
    Joan of Arc spit on her death proclamation at the stake. That is empowerment. Tell me when you can be that Joan ladies. We will not see the likes of Joan again in the history of this dying, dead earth.So we know. Mother Theresa wore a habit and drank donkey milk. What saint?Joan of Arc, I love you crazy days higher, I have for you a bouquet of shimmering nights skies.Joan of Arc slew the English at 17, she didn't wear pink, she wore entrails, at 19, she gouged out a guard's eye at the stake. * I Joan of Arc spit on her death proclamation at the stake. That is empowerment. Tell me when you can be that Joan ladies. We will not see the likes of Joan again in the history of this dying, dead earth.So we know. Mother Theresa wore a habit and drank donkey milk. What saint?Joan of Arc, I love you crazy days higher, I have for you a bouquet of shimmering nights skies.Joan of Arc slew the English at 17, she didn't wear pink, she wore entrails, at 19, she gouged out a guard's eye at the stake. * I don't see you, Melinda, wearing entrails, every oxygenated breath a warrior.And there was Sappho, her lyric love poetry, elevated by its sublime sensuality, she inhaled the erotic and spit out ferociously that was not to her liking, how could any woman compare, fare against her? #amwriting #poem #poetryChris Roberts, God of Very Many Eyes
    more
  • Fully.Booked
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 - LADIES AND GENTLEMEN this is a must-read👏🏼 Gates opened my eyes to a whole other side of women empowerment💃🏼 She adressed a lot of different issues, many that seem forgotten in today’s society - there’s a particular focus on developing countries and on her and Bill’s foundation. She’s clearly educated and passionate about her work but her tone is very down-to-earth, which I loved. A lot of what she said resonated with me and I think this is exactly what its intended to be - educational ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 - LADIES AND GENTLEMEN this is a must-read👏🏼 Gates opened my eyes to a whole other side of women empowerment💃🏼 She adressed a lot of different issues, many that seem forgotten in today’s society - there’s a particular focus on developing countries and on her and Bill’s foundation. She’s clearly educated and passionate about her work but her tone is very down-to-earth, which I loved. A lot of what she said resonated with me and I think this is exactly what its intended to be - educational, motivating and uplifting👏🏼
    more
  • J. April
    January 1, 1970
    Rounding up from 3.5. I received a free advanced reader copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.Gates's basic argument in this book is that in order to lift up the world and end a host of systemic tragedies - including infant and child death, malnourishment, culturally-sanctioned abuse, and generational poverty - we must also (or perhaps first) lift up women. Through chapters focused on a range of world-wide social issues, Gates examines the problems at hand and shares stories of ways tha Rounding up from 3.5. I received a free advanced reader copy of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway.Gates's basic argument in this book is that in order to lift up the world and end a host of systemic tragedies - including infant and child death, malnourishment, culturally-sanctioned abuse, and generational poverty - we must also (or perhaps first) lift up women. Through chapters focused on a range of world-wide social issues, Gates examines the problems at hand and shares stories of ways that she has watched those issues be alleviated - or at least start to get better - on smaller scales when gender equity was improved within a given geographic area. These stories are things she tells first or second hand, and largely come from the women, leaders, and workers she has traveled to meet and speak with in person around the world. She then follows the chains of logic, using the stories to illustrate the ways in which the empowerment of women is intrinsically tied to the welfare of humanity as a whole.This narrative style took some getting used to, and ultimately I think I greatly respect the ways that Gates has packaged this information. This book deals with global issues that destroy quality of life for billions of people at a time, but manages to make those issues intensely personal by conveying their realities through the stories of actual, living people, with names and families and unique experiences. We're not talking about the impersonal statistics of mothers who die during childbirth; we're talking about a specific doctor, with a name, who lost a specific patient, with a name, during childbirth at a specific clinic, due to lack of education for the mother and her rural community. In some ways, this left me frustrated and skeptical of what Gates was trying to pitch. Really? I thought. You're going to tell me that reducing gender inequity in a region of southeast Asia is going to improve the area's poverty levels because of the impact on farming, without giving me charts and graphs and other data readouts to support the idea? But the thing is, conveying her points through story makes the issues at hand so much more real, meaningful, and (I imagine) approachable to a larger population of people who may otherwise be turned off by data-heavy scientific studies. This isn't to say that Gates doesn't explain her reasoning effectively. Despite the lack of "scientific" justification (i.e., said charts and graphs), she explains each issue as a very rational progression of logical events and realities. She traces the pathways of cause and effect, illustrating them with the stories she has collected and categorized. I still wouldn't complain about having an appendix of citations and references for further (more scientific) reading, but for getting the larger message out there in a digestible, yet factual way, she's chosen a format that does the job.I found myself almost expecting to be disappointed with Gates's presentation, but she held me off each time. In addressing a specific topic, she would reference her own experiences with the idea in her own life. I would immediately catch myself thinking, "really? You're going to compare your own experience, as an educated, wealthy, white American woman to that of women providing for their families by farming in rural Africa while living below the poverty line?" As soon as I had the thought, I would read the next line of the paragraph. "Now let's be clear," Gates would inevitably say. "I am in no way trying to compare my own privileged experiences to those of the women I've just told you about." I would then chuckle at her anticipation of her readers' response, and then continue reading, giving a renewed benefit of the doubt. It's clear (and not surprising) that Gates thought long and hard about her audience and how to make her point.Outside of the lack of an appendix (and therefore the option to check out some hard data on the topics she's covering), my biggest complaint was that we get a bit too much information about Bill. There are times when, I think, in an effort to keep things personal, Gates gives us nuggets of insight into how her husband and her relationship with him work, his philosophy in the work he does, etc. Sometimes it's relevant; sometimes I just didn't really care. I wanted her to get back to the women whose stories she had been telling. Other than that, keep in mind that this is not a novel. The writing is not the most elegant, but it works, and it gets her thoughts across. All in all I found this book definitely worth the read, and more engaging and personal than I typically find nonfiction to be. I think that Gates could have real success in using this work as a tool to spread her message, and to win over people who may be on the fence about whether gender equality should really be ranked at the same priority level as addressing world hunger and the like. She takes a rational and yet empathetic approach to issues of empowering women, and rather than standing on a purely moral ground ("we need to empower women because it's the right thing to do") she convinces the reader that there is sound logical justification for making inequity a priority, if we really want to tackle other systemic issues of human suffering. I'll be glad to pass this one along to others as food for thought in how we think about the world, and the ways we can make it better.
    more
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I took so long reading this book because I was reading on my 30 minute lunch breaks at work and honestly this book needs and deserves more time and attention than 30 minutes at a time. The beginning of the book is why I didn't give the 5 stars. It seemed repetitive and rambling, but I pushed through and Melinda really found her flow about a quarter of the way through. From there on this book took up a lot of my free thinking-time and I realized this is and will be a very important book, for wome I took so long reading this book because I was reading on my 30 minute lunch breaks at work and honestly this book needs and deserves more time and attention than 30 minutes at a time. The beginning of the book is why I didn't give the 5 stars. It seemed repetitive and rambling, but I pushed through and Melinda really found her flow about a quarter of the way through. From there on this book took up a lot of my free thinking-time and I realized this is and will be a very important book, for women AND men. There are sad, heart-breaking stories and realities all over the world that marginalized people and especially women are living and Melinda and her husband working so hard to help change those lives. I love that she doesn't just show up to different villages and try to say "here's how it will be done from now on and if you don't like it you don't get help". Melinda truly seems to work her ass off researching and gathering data and working tirelessly to get the results out to the world to make it a better place. It is so sad to see that in 2019 the world is still so far behind in some places. Surprisingly, America is one of the top offenders for bias against women and it's nice to see that Melinda isn't picking here or there as her choice of places to try and make better but instead she picks the world. She works just as hard for herself and women in America as she does for women in India and Africa. This is a powerful book that people need to read or hear-this would be an EXCELLENT audio book for on the way to work or something like that. It is as inspiring as it is sad and to see how much progress has been made but still needs to be done is sad but SO MOTIVATING to at least start making little changes in your own communities. I cannot express how important it is for the world to hear why it's important that women be lifted up and become equal to their men counterparts worldwide, so please go read this book.*Thanks to Flatiron books on the Goodreads giveaway page for my free advanced copy to review!
    more
  • Laurie May
    January 1, 1970
    “If you want to lift up humanity, empower women.” This is the insight that Melinda Gates shares so powerfully in her new book. Backed up by statistical research and her own personal experiences, the author presents a powerful argument for social change, from third world countries to the American workplace. The Moment of Lift came into my hands at a most opportune time. I had just returned from a trip to some of the poorest areas of the Dominican Republic, where I was able to see firsthand the st “If you want to lift up humanity, empower women.” This is the insight that Melinda Gates shares so powerfully in her new book. Backed up by statistical research and her own personal experiences, the author presents a powerful argument for social change, from third world countries to the American workplace. The Moment of Lift came into my hands at a most opportune time. I had just returned from a trip to some of the poorest areas of the Dominican Republic, where I was able to see firsthand the struggle of people to provide food, clean water, and education for their children. Melinda Gate’s words resonated in a powerful way. The mothers are the key to bringing people out of poverty. Gates doesn’t only address empowering woman in poverty, but she is also candid about her struggles as a woman in the tech industry and about finding her own voice as the wife of an extremely influential man. I don’t generally take notes when I read, but this book is festooned with post-it notes. There are many sections I would like to revisit. Highly recommended!Thank you to Flatiron Books for providing me with a complimentary Advance Reading Copy.
    more
  • Mary Anne Shew
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book because I didn’t know what to expect from Melinda Gates, about whom the only thing I knew was she worked at Microsoft and married Bill. The way I found out about the book was via her husband’s blog, which I enjoy. As you’ll find out in the book, Melinda never wanted the spotlight to turn from Bill to her, which is understandable because of what media scrutiny means today. Then her work in the foundation she runs with Bill forced the issue because her v I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book because I didn’t know what to expect from Melinda Gates, about whom the only thing I knew was she worked at Microsoft and married Bill. The way I found out about the book was via her husband’s blog, which I enjoy. As you’ll find out in the book, Melinda never wanted the spotlight to turn from Bill to her, which is understandable because of what media scrutiny means today. Then her work in the foundation she runs with Bill forced the issue because her voice was needed to give voice to the other women she was meeting around the world.The book is a primer on what it takes to implement change in the thinking and practices of people, especially when you find it hard to understand why they refuse a change that makes perfect sense to you. Empathy is critical to getting the community to use the tools and techniques in a way that integrates with the issues in their world.Gender bias is the poisonous (my word, not hers) undercurrent holding back social improvements worldwide for women that would actually release benefits for everyone in their communities.She covers contraception as the most empowering technological change for women. So many have no power not to become pregnant when they know in a heartbreaking way they can’t care for the children they already have.The next crucial ingredient is education, another resource often shut off for girls because they are needed back home to help with cooking, childcare, etc.“This is the secret of an empowering education: A girl learns she is not who she’s been told she is.”Her main theme is that lack of diversity holds back progress for everyone on just about every front. When women take their power to improve their lives and their children’s, everyone benefits.Her book is also about having and using your voice: “It takes courage to ask for what you want—especially when it’s more than people think you should have.”The book is also part memoir of her own growth, both personally and in her marriage. I was interested to learn how she navigated Microsoft as a female in technology. There wasn’t a lot on this but it’s clear it was a challenge as a woman. And she shared some differences that she and Bill have had to navigate as her taking responsibility for her own voice. The reason I gave her book four stars instead of five is I felt a little whipsawed as she went back and forth on her timeline, losing a sense of what she experienced / learned, when, and why.That said, I recommend it for her insights on social change and how their foundation learns and evolves to make a better world.
    more
  • Zhexi (Bonnie)
    January 1, 1970
    There are many parts of the stories told in the book, I feel so connected. For example, A girl who is given love and support can start to break the self-image that keeps her down; What I realized much later, paradoxically, is that by trying to fit in, I was strengthening the culture that made me feel like I didn’t fit in; And if I tell myself I shouldn’t overprepare, then another voice tells me I’m being lazy. for me perfectionism means hiding who I am.I want to create a workplace where everyone There are many parts of the stories told in the book, I feel so connected. For example, A girl who is given love and support can start to break the self-image that keeps her down; What I realized much later, paradoxically, is that by trying to fit in, I was strengthening the culture that made me feel like I didn’t fit in; And if I tell myself I shouldn’t overprepare, then another voice tells me I’m being lazy. for me perfectionism means hiding who I am.I want to create a workplace where everyone can bring their most human, most authentic selves—where we all expect and respect each other’s quirks and flaws, and all the energy wasted in the pursuit of “perfection” is saved and channeled into the creativity we need for the work. That is a culture where we release impossible burdens and lift everyone up.
    more
  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book that you need to have on your shelf so you can read a little of it and then think about it.Melinda Gates has soo much information packed into this book that it will take several readings to get all the great nuggets of truth.I am hoping that by reading this book, I will be inspired to do something in my community.
    more
  • Peg
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book on so many different levels.
  • Glenda Nelms
    January 1, 1970
    Very empowering, motivated and inspiring.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know a ton about the work that the Gates Foundation does before I read this book, so it was really interesting to learn more. I admire Gates' mission to improve the lives of women around the world, and I wholeheartedly agree with her premise that the only way we can do that is by lifting up those around us. The best parts of the book are her stories of the women she's met who have endured incredible hardships but are still eager to create better lives for themselves and their children. I didn't know a ton about the work that the Gates Foundation does before I read this book, so it was really interesting to learn more. I admire Gates' mission to improve the lives of women around the world, and I wholeheartedly agree with her premise that the only way we can do that is by lifting up those around us. The best parts of the book are her stories of the women she's met who have endured incredible hardships but are still eager to create better lives for themselves and their children. I think this is a great read for anyone interested in charity work or in how they can inspire positive change in the world.
    more
  • Sherrie
    January 1, 1970
    I won an uncorrected proof copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways.Though I knew very little about Melinda Gates, the issues in this book are not new to me. Ms. Gates has a way of distilling data and conveying information in a clear, concise, and motivating manner with humility and passion that shines through. This book resonated powerfully and potently with me and I can’t stop talking about it. As I read it I kept thinking of friends whom I wanted to give a copy to. It is easily one of th I won an uncorrected proof copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways.Though I knew very little about Melinda Gates, the issues in this book are not new to me. Ms. Gates has a way of distilling data and conveying information in a clear, concise, and motivating manner with humility and passion that shines through. This book resonated powerfully and potently with me and I can’t stop talking about it. As I read it I kept thinking of friends whom I wanted to give a copy to. It is easily one of the most moving books I’ve read. The following may sound hyperbolic, but it is not. I truly believe that if more humans would think and act in the way Ms. Gates lays out, our world would be unprecedentedly better for everyone.As she says in the book “…elevate women to equality with men in every culture and every level of society. No other single change could do more to improve the world.”
    more
  • Ben Jones
    January 1, 1970
    1-10 Takeaways:1) Other cultures already have a "full cup" when it comes to issues such as birth control, child marriage, house/family work, etc. For example, many cultures don't use condoms because it is a sign of distrust, child marriage has cheaper dowries or certain work is forbidden for specific genders by religious beliefs. To help solve these problems, you need to first understand what is in their "cup." 2) A woman makes the majority of economic decisions in the home. If she is empowered, 1-10 Takeaways:1) Other cultures already have a "full cup" when it comes to issues such as birth control, child marriage, house/family work, etc. For example, many cultures don't use condoms because it is a sign of distrust, child marriage has cheaper dowries or certain work is forbidden for specific genders by religious beliefs. To help solve these problems, you need to first understand what is in their "cup." 2) A woman makes the majority of economic decisions in the home. If she is empowered, then the household will make better economic decisions. 3) If the space between children is ~3 years, the health, education and economic status of the family increases. 4) If unpaid work (house/family responsibilities) was factored into the GDP, it would be the biggest sector. Men who share unpaid work (40%+) are less likely to engage in addictive behavior and suffer from depression. (Bill Gates takes turns driving his kids to school). 5) Being known but not loved is scary. Being loved but not known has little impact. Being loved and known is the type of relationship that fosters change. We need to love others and relinquish our feigned superiority so that we can know them. 6) Group intelligence depends on 3 factors: average social sensitivity, ability to take turns contributing and the proportion of females. Groups with at least 1 woman, on average, outperform men. 1-10 Questions: 1) If birth control is payed by taxpayers and provided as a free service, would that decrease the overall cost for the taxpayer? Meaning, by paying for free birth control, would the taxpayers be avoiding the heavy costs of well fare, incarceration, etc. by paying a potentially smaller fee on the frontend? 2) Why do we occasionally feel uncomfortable around people of "other" status? Is it because we recognize our own social and economic fragility and we don't want to lose our status or sense of superiority? Is it deeper than pride and more of an evolutionary psychology issue surrounding imagined threats like potential violence, illness, etc.?3) Gates occasionally measures the status of women by comparing them to men (equal number of men and women in STEM fields, venture capital, etc.). Should we be measuring indicators for equality of outcome or equality of opportunity? Perhaps measuring indicators for equality of outcome is unrealistic seeing how the more egalitarian a society becomes, the more pronounced gender decision trends become (https://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...).4) Gates mentions that women are payed less than men. Is that true? The popular figures on the wage gap seem to be bad science and adjusting for work life decisions the gap seems to disappear (https://harvardmagazine.com/2016/05/r..., https://scholar.harvard.edu/bolotnyy/..., etc.).
    more
  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    “Saving lives starts with bringing everyone in. Our societies will be healthiest when they have no outsiders. We should strive for that. We have to keep working to reduce poverty and disease. We have to help outsiders resist the power of people who want to keep them out. But we have to do our inner work as well: We have to wake up to the ways we exclude. We have to open our arms and our hearts to the people we’ve pushed to the margins. It’s not enough to help outsiders fight their way in - the r “Saving lives starts with bringing everyone in. Our societies will be healthiest when they have no outsiders. We should strive for that. We have to keep working to reduce poverty and disease. We have to help outsiders resist the power of people who want to keep them out. But we have to do our inner work as well: We have to wake up to the ways we exclude. We have to open our arms and our hearts to the people we’ve pushed to the margins. It’s not enough to help outsiders fight their way in - the real triumph will come when we no longer push anyone out.”.I have long believed that the change in the world we are so desperately seeking will come first through the empowerment of women. They are the ones that first demonstrate love, kindness, empathy, and compassion. Because many of our societies are patriarchal, I believe, women hold the power to be the change agents. While that’s easier to say in some cultures than others, it’s through the awareness and work of people like Melinda Gates that the opportunities are being created for all women to share in this powerful movement..This book is a true gem - full of insightful and educational information, I quickly had to get a highlighter because there was so much here to digest. It’s a book I will continually return to because Gates has not only presented us with some of the life-changing work she has embarked on, but she also gives us - privileged people - ideas and ways to also help empower all women of the world, especially those that are poor. She gives hope throughout the book and I have a lot of respect for the work she and her husband, Bill Gates, are doing to heal societies and to give women around the world a chance to succeed.4.5 stars rounded up to 5 stars.
    more
  • Amanda Fagenson
    January 1, 1970
    The Moment of Lift by @melindafrenchgates is an important read in our changing society. It shows the ways societies hurt women and how we can come together to create a paradigm shift, without losing traditions.•Through her and her husband’s foundation, Melinda Gates has been trying to solve the problems for various urgent needs in the most poverty struck areas. One common factor she keeps running into is that women are suppressed, and she being to light that “if you want to lift a society, you n The Moment of Lift by @melindafrenchgates is an important read in our changing society. It shows the ways societies hurt women and how we can come together to create a paradigm shift, without losing traditions.•Through her and her husband’s foundation, Melinda Gates has been trying to solve the problems for various urgent needs in the most poverty struck areas. One common factor she keeps running into is that women are suppressed, and she being to light that “if you want to lift a society, you need to stop keeping women down.” This novel tells the raw stories of the heroes who had inspired her along her journey through female empowerment.•From Amanda: This nonfiction read like a self help book. I felt empowered through reading this, in a way I’ve never felt before. Melinda and Bill’s journey to help those living on the margin is inspiring. Melinda includes personal narratives throughout the novel as well, discussing her own journey and struggle with female empowerment in a male run industry. Her voice is truly humbling. I hope everyone takes the time to stop what they’re doing and read this book. It starts with us.•“Being a feminist means believing that every woman should be able to use her voice and pursue her potential, and that women and men should all work together to take down the barriers and end the biases that still hold women back.”•“Empowerment starts with getting together.”•“Every society says its outsiders are the problem. But the outsiders are not the problem; the urge to create outsiders is the problem.”•“The supreme goal for humanity is not equality but connection.”•Thank you @flatiron_books for sending this ARC. Released April 23, 2019.
    more
  • Hannah Currier
    January 1, 1970
    I won an advanced copy of The Moment of Lift by Melinda Gates in an International Women's Day giveaway from Flatiron Books. I was so excited to receive this and immediately started reading it once it was delivered at my door.This book incredible and empowering for me to read as a woman, but also someone who is highly concerned with poverty cycles and birth rates. The information on how we can empower and lift up women around the world, no matter the circumstances, had me pumped up! I am all abou I won an advanced copy of The Moment of Lift by Melinda Gates in an International Women's Day giveaway from Flatiron Books. I was so excited to receive this and immediately started reading it once it was delivered at my door.This book incredible and empowering for me to read as a woman, but also someone who is highly concerned with poverty cycles and birth rates. The information on how we can empower and lift up women around the world, no matter the circumstances, had me pumped up! I am all about girl power and gender equality and this book hit so many nails on the head. But what I might have enjoyed the most is that Melinda never neglects men and overall equality in the conversation. Her arguments are so well-rounded and her information is objective and well-researched.Melinda shares enlightening and heartbreaking stories from women all over the world that put the need for gender equality, women empowerment, and the need to help the poverty cycle in the spotlight. She writes about tough issues. Uncomfortable issues. She writes with grace and never once presents herself as a know-it-all, but someone who continues to and will continue to learn and serve.This book was extremely informative in general and also about Melinda's philanthropic work. I admire her work and I admire her sharing these stories. I will be reflecting on this one for a while!
    more
  • Dale Wyant
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone needs to read this thoughtful and self-effacing memoir. Yes, Melinda is an incredibly privileged, wealthy white woman. However, she has faced abuse, discrimination and the male-dominated business world that the majority of women do. Her education by the people on the ground in third world countries has taught her to listen and appreciate that "her" solutions aren't what is actually best for the situation.There are so many great lines I could quote, but here is one of may favorites:"When Everyone needs to read this thoughtful and self-effacing memoir. Yes, Melinda is an incredibly privileged, wealthy white woman. However, she has faced abuse, discrimination and the male-dominated business world that the majority of women do. Her education by the people on the ground in third world countries has taught her to listen and appreciate that "her" solutions aren't what is actually best for the situation.There are so many great lines I could quote, but here is one of may favorites:"When people see the effects of poor nurture and call it nature, they discourage the training of women for key positions, and that strengthens the view that the disparity is due to biology. What makes the biology assertion so insidious is that it sabotages the development of women, and it relieves men of any responsibility for examining their motives and practices."This is a must read for both men and women. I really hope colleges put it on their lists to be read by incoming freshmen classes.
    more
  • Negar
    January 1, 1970
    I got a complimentary ARC of this book through the Goodreads giveaway and I was really pleased to be reading this before it comes out. I think this a great read for anyone interested in having a positive impact in the world regardless of their gender. Each chapter revolves around a different theme, but they all come together as to how empowering the marginalized and outsiders can benefit society while it has a special focus on gender bias and women's issues.I give this book 4 stars. Although the I got a complimentary ARC of this book through the Goodreads giveaway and I was really pleased to be reading this before it comes out. I think this a great read for anyone interested in having a positive impact in the world regardless of their gender. Each chapter revolves around a different theme, but they all come together as to how empowering the marginalized and outsiders can benefit society while it has a special focus on gender bias and women's issues.I give this book 4 stars. Although the book seems more as an introductory to the topic, it is more emotional than providing facts and solutions. While touching readers' emotions can be an effective way of grabbing their attention, I'm not sure about the long term impact of it. I would have like to see more solutions to be given by the book that everyone can follow (rather than idealistic general notions), especially regarding the women in tech chapter and I would have definitely liked to see a chapter on women in religion (compared to the one-page discussion of it).
    more
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I loved loved loved this book. I think that Melinda did a fantastic job of highlighting the works of such inspiring women from so many walks of life. Her point of view is knowledgeable, to the point, but also so very sensitive and caring to the points she is discussing. I really got a sense of just how much Melinda cares about every subject she writes about in this book, from gender equality and lack of contraception, to child marriage and more. Regardless of the topic, I felt like how deeply sh I loved loved loved this book. I think that Melinda did a fantastic job of highlighting the works of such inspiring women from so many walks of life. Her point of view is knowledgeable, to the point, but also so very sensitive and caring to the points she is discussing. I really got a sense of just how much Melinda cares about every subject she writes about in this book, from gender equality and lack of contraception, to child marriage and more. Regardless of the topic, I felt like how deeply she cares about each one of these situations, really does shine through in her writing. I was so incredibly moved by each and every one of the subjects in this book. I was especially moved by the subject on family planning and Melinda's visit to a Malawi health center. Overall, I just found this book to be incredibly moving, eye opening, and a must read. These are subjects that shouldn't be ignored. I do really wish that Melinda had written more about these types of things that are happening here in America as well, but it does not take away from this book and the subject matter in anyway.
    more
  • Carla Suto
    January 1, 1970
    THE MOMENT OF LIFT by Melinda Gates is an educational and motivational book about her life experiences, her faith and the strong men and women that have influenced her commitment to making positive changes in the world with funding from the foundation she co-founded with her husband, Bill Gates. It is her philosophy that empowering women and other marginalized groups can have a beneficial effect on all aspects of society. She shares powerful stories of courageous women she has met in rural areas THE MOMENT OF LIFT by Melinda Gates is an educational and motivational book about her life experiences, her faith and the strong men and women that have influenced her commitment to making positive changes in the world with funding from the foundation she co-founded with her husband, Bill Gates. It is her philosophy that empowering women and other marginalized groups can have a beneficial effect on all aspects of society. She shares powerful stories of courageous women she has met in rural areas around the globe that routinely face malnutrition, child marriage, infant mortality and abuse. She is clearly very knowledgeable on these global issues, but what struck me was the empathy and compassion she brought to the subject by sharing her own personal experiences as a wife, mother and a women in a male-dominated industry. This was a powerful and thought-provoking book and I thank Flatiron Books for the chance to read an early copy.
    more
  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This book is an amazing work exploring how we as society can only truly be successful if we include ALL members as equal parties. The stories and insights shared in this book are insightful and deeply thought provoking. Melinda and her husband have been able to use their privilege to helps shine spotlights in many plights in our world and as Melinda shares, through their experiences of learning how to best help those who need help have discovered many unexpected insights. Everyone is valuab Wow! This book is an amazing work exploring how we as society can only truly be successful if we include ALL members as equal parties. The stories and insights shared in this book are insightful and deeply thought provoking. Melinda and her husband have been able to use their privilege to helps shine spotlights in many plights in our world and as Melinda shares, through their experiences of learning how to best help those who need help have discovered many unexpected insights. Everyone is valuable and to be the change we want to see in the world, we need to remember that we are not any better or any worse than any one else. Everyone is worthy of love and support. We can only progress forward in a positive way as humanity once we treat others with that insight.I will be reading this again and encouraging others to read as well.
    more
  • beth sommer
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely AmazingThis is a Must Read book. For everyone. I consider myself a voracious reader and actively search for books who will challenge and inspire me. And I just admit that I pride myself on not judging others, but found myself debating reading this book because I am guilty of thinking I knew who Melinda was (a very rich probably spoiled socialite). And I am sorry. Amazing stories about and for women. I have my group of women who support and hold me and I have felt sad knowing me m usua Absolutely AmazingThis is a Must Read book. For everyone. I consider myself a voracious reader and actively search for books who will challenge and inspire me. And I just admit that I pride myself on not judging others, but found myself debating reading this book because I am guilty of thinking I knew who Melinda was (a very rich probably spoiled socialite). And I am sorry. Amazing stories about and for women. I have my group of women who support and hold me and I have felt sad knowing me m usually don't experience friendships the way women do. Thank you Melinda for your words. Equality can not be the endgame. The endgame is inclusion, love and options for everyone. Such a lovely message and so timely. Keep up the good work and keep up your sense of values and honesty. I am already recommending this book to everyone I know.
    more
  • Michelle Arredondo
    January 1, 1970
    When you find a book that you put away a current book and finish that book in one sitting....okay maybe two sittings. The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World by Melinda Gates is everything I hyped it up to be inside my head. I need to meet this woman in person...surely she can change solmemn gut wrenching helpless souls into positive moving forward ones. Dynamic thoughts...quotes that resonate...thought provoking....engaging words. I take so much of this book with me into what When you find a book that you put away a current book and finish that book in one sitting....okay maybe two sittings. The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World by Melinda Gates is everything I hyped it up to be inside my head. I need to meet this woman in person...surely she can change solmemn gut wrenching helpless souls into positive moving forward ones. Dynamic thoughts...quotes that resonate...thought provoking....engaging words. I take so much of this book with me into what I hope for my future. Powerful. Highly recommend....and then I recommend you recommend this book to others so you have someone to discuss it with. Thanks to goodreads, author Melinda Gates and to the publishers for my free copy of this book won via giveaway. I received. I read. I reviewed this book honestly and voluntarily.
    more
  • Neil McGee
    January 1, 1970
    74% through the Audiobook, I have to say that it very informative and personal information has been disclosed in effort to benefit the global population as a whole. I have strong personal beliefs which are contrary to those purported by this novel, yet I believe that Melania, raised as a practicing Catholic has been forced to, and has given much thought and has received much council on her decision(s).I am encouraged in the belief that personal education will increase, social norms will evolve a 74% through the Audiobook, I have to say that it very informative and personal information has been disclosed in effort to benefit the global population as a whole. I have strong personal beliefs which are contrary to those purported by this novel, yet I believe that Melania, raised as a practicing Catholic has been forced to, and has given much thought and has received much council on her decision(s).I am encouraged in the belief that personal education will increase, social norms will evolve allowing for more respectful family unions.I am also encouraged that the empowerment of 50% of the global population and source of life will equally allow society to evolve with similar results to that of her husband's contributions. 1,000% Melinda is a equal partner and is more than contributing equally.
    more
  • Lyn
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t give five stars, hardly ever. Maybe five times? This book has been instructive, insightful, inspiring. The things I learned on the first read have helped me rethink and review my views about myself,others, societies and cultures, what is important and what isn’t. I’m going to start re-reading it again tonight. I know there is so much I missed on the first go around. This review, admittedly doesn’t have any spoilers, or hardly a hint about the content, only about how it affected me. Let j I don’t give five stars, hardly ever. Maybe five times? This book has been instructive, insightful, inspiring. The things I learned on the first read have helped me rethink and review my views about myself,others, societies and cultures, what is important and what isn’t. I’m going to start re-reading it again tonight. I know there is so much I missed on the first go around. This review, admittedly doesn’t have any spoilers, or hardly a hint about the content, only about how it affected me. Let just say one thing - through out I learned the importance of listening, really listening to others. We would all be better if we could listen with our heads and our hearts before acting. This book is a testament of two people who feel compelled to act and have started by listening.
    more
Write a review