The Golden Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower, #8)
Can Olivia survive the crime and Gold Rush fever of 1849...and the countless marriage proposals? A series for fans of all things related to history, romance, adventure, faith, and family trees. The Daughters of the Mayflower series continues when Olivia Brighton finds herself widowed and working her brother’s restaurant in San Francisco during the height of the rush for gold. Even though she receives at least twenty marriage proposals a day, she will never marry a gold miner. Her brother’s friend Joseph Sawyer has gotten caught up in local politics and the plight of Chinese in forced labor. The more Joseph gets pulled into investigating crime in the city, the less Olivia sees of the compassionate man. And just when she thinks she could love again, a fire threatens to steal all hope.

The Golden Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower, #8) Details

TitleThe Golden Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower, #8)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 1st, 2019
PublisherBarbour Books
ISBN-139781683228912
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Fiction, Romance, Christian Romance

The Golden Bride (Daughters of the Mayflower, #8) Review

  • Loraine
    January 1, 1970
    Olivia's parents are dead and she is left with only debt and a farm that has to be sold. A shotgun wedding to Hezekiah Brighton seems to be her only choice as he will pay off her debt and is heading to the California gold fields where her brother lives. Then Hezekiah dies on the trail, and Olivia must now finish the trip and fend for herself. When she finally finds Daniel, she also finds that she is one of the few women amongst the thousands of gold miners and the stench, unlawfulness, and immor Olivia's parents are dead and she is left with only debt and a farm that has to be sold. A shotgun wedding to Hezekiah Brighton seems to be her only choice as he will pay off her debt and is heading to the California gold fields where her brother lives. Then Hezekiah dies on the trail, and Olivia must now finish the trip and fend for herself. When she finally finds Daniel, she also finds that she is one of the few women amongst the thousands of gold miners and the stench, unlawfulness, and immorality filling the streets of San Francisco.Olivia was one gutsy, feisty young woman. But her negativity and self-doubt as well as her lack of faith all seemed to hinder her from being all that she could be. Daniel and Joseph were both wonderful male heroes. Daniel was caring and supportive of Olivia and made sure his sister was kept safe. Joseph was a swoon worthy hero who had had a rough start in life; but once he found salvation, he became strong and caring towards his fellow man. I loved how they all support one another in their faith journey and thought the daily Bible study was a wonderful idea for this rough and tumble town. With a hint of suspense, a touch of romance, a strong cast of characters, and a well researched San Francisco setting, this was another great story in the series of the Daughters of the Mayflower. I will hate to say goodbye to the Lytton family and their descendants when this series ends.**I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Books through NetGalley. Opinions are mine alone. I was not compensated for this review.
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  • Missy
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series, and The Golden Bride was a great addition. It brought to life the happenings within San Francisco during the gold rush, not out in the fields finding the gold. It is the story of Olivia Brighton, a young woman on her own after tragedy takes her husband of just a few short weeks. Olivia is on her way to San Francisco to see her brother after her parents suddenly die. Her brother, Daniel owns a prosperous restaurant there and she is bound to get to him. Once there she works in I love this series, and The Golden Bride was a great addition. It brought to life the happenings within San Francisco during the gold rush, not out in the fields finding the gold. It is the story of Olivia Brighton, a young woman on her own after tragedy takes her husband of just a few short weeks. Olivia is on her way to San Francisco to see her brother after her parents suddenly die. Her brother, Daniel owns a prosperous restaurant there and she is bound to get to him. Once there she works in the restaurant and meets Daniel's best friend, Jacob Sawyer. Jacob is everything Olivia despises particularly a gold rusher. But it is his faith in God and his love for God that draws Olivia to him. With no actual law in the city, fires and crime are high on the city counsel's order to get underhand. But if George Banister and his silent partner have anything to do with the building of the city, they will do not so kindly, and it is up to Jacob to find out their secret.This was a lovely book about life in the city of San Francisco, before it was a state, the fact that it was basically a tent city and the danger of fires was high, and the fact there was no law to uphold any law there may be. It was the story of a very prosperous restaurant owner and his sister, along with their friend that tried to bring God to these wayward men that were there for nothing other than to get rich. But it was the story of a young widow, who vowed never to marry again because of circumstances in her marriage, but that love can break down those walls. I love that Ms. Woodhouse puts an epilogue in her books so we know what happens to the characters later in life. I love this series and cannot wait to continue and see where it leads next.I received this from Barbour Publishing and Netgalley. All opinions are my own and I was not compensated for a positive review.
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    “My sweet Olivia, it’s important to remember the hardships of those who have gone before us and to see how they persevered and survived.”In a relatable style, Kimberley Freeman shares the inspirational story of three Christians who help each other withstand temptation and shine the light of Christ into a very dark culture. Early on, the main character, Olivia, feels herself a failure and determines that she can never allow herself to know love and joy. Her stalwart brother Daniel encourages her “My sweet Olivia, it’s important to remember the hardships of those who have gone before us and to see how they persevered and survived.”In a relatable style, Kimberley Freeman shares the inspirational story of three Christians who help each other withstand temptation and shine the light of Christ into a very dark culture. Early on, the main character, Olivia, feels herself a failure and determines that she can never allow herself to know love and joy. Her stalwart brother Daniel encourages her by sharing journals left behind from their ancestors—women like Olivia who overcame hardship with God’s help. Olivia is awed to read the words of these brave women—some from as far back as the 1600s. “To think of generations before her. . . penning their words for future generations—like her—to read. The realization was almost overwhelming.”Through the testimony of these family members, Olivia grows in the Lord. Her negativity transforms to godly optimism. She learns to tap into God’s strength for the joy to face her future. Then she is able to trust the love of the third character, the upright and kind Joseph. “Oh, the promises that I have! Why haven’t I been clinging to them—because by them I’m a partaker of the divine nature! My way of escape is clear through Him. The encouragement that has thrilled my heart today, I can only wish that it seeps onto this page and I am reminded of it again and again.”This novel is sure to uplift females of any age—from teens on up to grandmas. I teach in a Christian high school, and it’s exactly the kind of story many my young readers will enjoy and learn from. Very well done! Thanks to NetGalley and Barbour Publishing for the opportunity to read this book!
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  • Sarita
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book and it is now probably my favourite of the series. The characters' interaction and the building romance reminded me a bit of Karen Witemeyer's books. The plot of the slave trade black market was intriguing and I enjoyed following Joseph's path to try and uncover this and set the slaves free. And then you have two Godly men who strives to always walk in God's will and Olivia who grew from a nagging fearful girl to a courageous women of God.One of my favourite parts was where Oli I loved this book and it is now probably my favourite of the series. The characters' interaction and the building romance reminded me a bit of Karen Witemeyer's books. The plot of the slave trade black market was intriguing and I enjoyed following Joseph's path to try and uncover this and set the slaves free. And then you have two Godly men who strives to always walk in God's will and Olivia who grew from a nagging fearful girl to a courageous women of God.One of my favourite parts was where Olivia stood up and befriended Julia, while everyone basically disowned her. And the theme of how God can change you, wipe your past clean and use you for good and His will was so beautifully displayed.What I've come to love about Kimberley Woodhouse's books is how her characters have a relationship with God and you are there, part of their journey in getting to know Him more intimately and allowing Him to change and grow them to become better versions of them.What I specifically loved from this book was how Olivia read her great-great-great-great (probably another great in there)' and great-grandmother's journals (from and ) since I loved both of there ladies and their stories as well.I think Kimberley Woodhouse did a great job of bringing a story about San Francisco's darker past to light and she had me smiling a very cheesy grin at the ending.*I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Books through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.*
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  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    1849 San Francisco is the setting for the 8th novel in the Daughters of the Mayflower series. Many are familiar with the gold rush from that time period. The author does a nice job of highlighting the formation of city government and rampant crime that existed as well.Widow Olivia is one of the few females in San Francisco. Having lost her husband and parents, she is thankful for her brother Daniel as she begins to start over. I loved her heart for those in need.This entire series has been wonde 1849 San Francisco is the setting for the 8th novel in the Daughters of the Mayflower series. Many are familiar with the gold rush from that time period. The author does a nice job of highlighting the formation of city government and rampant crime that existed as well.Widow Olivia is one of the few females in San Francisco. Having lost her husband and parents, she is thankful for her brother Daniel as she begins to start over. I loved her heart for those in need.This entire series has been wonderful. My gratitude to publisher Barbour for a complimentary NetGalley copy of the novel. I was not required to post a review and the opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Karen R
    January 1, 1970
    The newest addition to the Daughters of the Mayflower series brings interesting history, strong characters, and a lot of faith, plus a tender romance. Newly widowed Olivia Brighton needs all the courage and wit she can muster to face the daily challenges of life in chaotic 1849 San Francisco. Her kind and industrious brother Daniel provides a safe place to live and work at his busy restaurant. Along with his good friend, Joseph, they hope to bring light and order to the dark and dangerous city. The newest addition to the Daughters of the Mayflower series brings interesting history, strong characters, and a lot of faith, plus a tender romance. Newly widowed Olivia Brighton needs all the courage and wit she can muster to face the daily challenges of life in chaotic 1849 San Francisco. Her kind and industrious brother Daniel provides a safe place to live and work at his busy restaurant. Along with his good friend, Joseph, they hope to bring light and order to the dark and dangerous city. "For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind."Olivia has a lot to overcome from the loss of her parents and short-lived marriage. It was heartening to see her growth from being fearful and guilt ridden, to becoming a woman of faith and courage, reaching out to help others, instead of focusing so much on her own perceived shortcomings. I liked the journal entries from her ancestors, which were a real encouragement, boosting her faith and reminding her that she wasn't alone. Daniel and Joseph were great men of faith and integrity, noble and willing to sacrifice to help others. They were real lights in a dark place. The author does a good job of painting the picture of how crazy the city was at the time, and doesn't shy away from the dark side of the boom town era. The ending was exciting with some mystery and action adding interest to the plot.Readers who enjoy historical Christian fiction with faith and some romance, may like this one. It easily reads as a stand alone, with a few recaps from previous books. The author notes at the end highlight facts included in the story, sharing resources for further reading. 3.5 stars(An e-book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Debby
    January 1, 1970
    This is Book 8 of the Daughters of the Mayflower series that brings a lot of history, interesting characters, and a lot of faith, with a bit of romance intertwined. Olivia Brighton finds herself in need of a husband and also needs all the courage she can to face all of the challenges that San Francisco can bring in the year of 1849. It is “gold rush” and Daniel, her brother provides her a safe haven to live and work at his restaurant.Livvy has a lot to overcome as she deals with the lost of her This is Book 8 of the Daughters of the Mayflower series that brings a lot of history, interesting characters, and a lot of faith, with a bit of romance intertwined. Olivia Brighton finds herself in need of a husband and also needs all the courage she can to face all of the challenges that San Francisco can bring in the year of 1849. It is “gold rush” and Daniel, her brother provides her a safe haven to live and work at his restaurant.Livvy has a lot to overcome as she deals with the lost of her parents and short marriage. The gold mines, fires, brothels and other day-to-day chaos makes this book worth the read. This is a heartwarming story of a woman who reaches out to help others regardless of her circumstances. One note in this story that was very interesting was the journal readings of her ancestors that added to her faith in God and letting her know she was not alone in her journey. Her brother and Joseph his friend, were nicely written as men of integrity and who held the faith and beliefs that she did.As I have not had the privilege of reading all in this series and only a few, this story did not fail in keeping this reader interested. The author did a very nice job of letting you see into the city and all the goings on around. Very historical and well written even though there are some darker sides in the city during that era. I loved the plot and thought this was a nice historical Christian story full of faith with a bit of romance. It is an easy and comfortable read. I received a copy of this ARC provided by the Author/Publisher via NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions contained herein are my own.4-Starts
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  • Stacia | stacialovestoread
    January 1, 1970
    *thank you so much to Netgalley and Barbour Publishing for this free copy in exchange for an honest review*Another great book in the series! The California gold rush was a time of great luck, country expansion, and apparently rapid-fire marriage proposals. Instead of allowing herself to be swept up in the allure of a rich husband who’s struck gold, Olivia holds out for someone she know will truly love her and be a good match for her...even if he’s got a few bad qualities too. Ms Woodhouse does s *thank you so much to Netgalley and Barbour Publishing for this free copy in exchange for an honest review*Another great book in the series! The California gold rush was a time of great luck, country expansion, and apparently rapid-fire marriage proposals. Instead of allowing herself to be swept up in the allure of a rich husband who’s struck gold, Olivia holds out for someone she know will truly love her and be a good match for her...even if he’s got a few bad qualities too. Ms Woodhouse does so well with painting pictures in her work!
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  • Deanna Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    The Golden Bride swore she would never marry any man who was involved with gold mining in any way.. Wow! What a life she must have had in San Francisco during the gold rush. To find young men of faith, one being her brother, trying to make their home town more live-able and safe was an informative and interesting story. The way women were treated and then the poor souls forced into slavery when there was no police or laws yet in this town was quite an eye opener! I thought the ending was perfect The Golden Bride swore she would never marry any man who was involved with gold mining in any way.. Wow! What a life she must have had in San Francisco during the gold rush. To find young men of faith, one being her brother, trying to make their home town more live-able and safe was an informative and interesting story. The way women were treated and then the poor souls forced into slavery when there was no police or laws yet in this town was quite an eye opener! I thought the ending was perfect! I also liked the information the author shared about San Francisco at the end of the book, so interesting!I requested a book through NetGalley no review was required. My review is voluntary.
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  • Bess
    January 1, 1970
    This is book 8 in the series. I'm not sure if this is the last book in the series or if more will be published in the months to come.This is the tale of a woman, Livvy, who finds herself without a husband early on in the book. She ventures to San Francisco during the gold rush to find her one remaining family member. And she can't stand mine owners or workers. In walks Joseph, previously a mine worker and now a mine owner. Yep, you guessed it!Toss in some slave trade, devastating town fires, gol This is book 8 in the series. I'm not sure if this is the last book in the series or if more will be published in the months to come.This is the tale of a woman, Livvy, who finds herself without a husband early on in the book. She ventures to San Francisco during the gold rush to find her one remaining family member. And she can't stand mine owners or workers. In walks Joseph, previously a mine worker and now a mine owner. Yep, you guessed it!Toss in some slave trade, devastating town fires, gold mines, a couple of brothels and a bible study, and you have our tale.This is only the second book I've read from Ms. Woodhouse. While I'm not super sold on those two, I would gladly read others by her. She does weave a nice tale.I didn't quite understand the introduction of Julia or why the mysterious benefactor had to stay so mysterious. We didn't get his name until about 85% through the book. Around the time Julia was introduced. That, to me, felt very forced and weird. Why on Earth introduce a character so late in the game? Eh, it is what it is.I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • BlueJeansAndTeacups
    January 1, 1970
    COULD NOT FINISHWhen a book becomes too monotonous and no longer enjoyable, I have to admit defeat and lay it aside over forcing myself to plod through it. I normally finish a novel in 1-2 days, but with this, I keep looking for excuses to lay it aside and do something else.The story feels forced and the subject matter is depressing. 1849 Gold rush period of California territory set in San Francisco when it is still primarily a tent city and debauchery reigns supreme. A yet unnamed villain (I ha COULD NOT FINISHWhen a book becomes too monotonous and no longer enjoyable, I have to admit defeat and lay it aside over forcing myself to plod through it. I normally finish a novel in 1-2 days, but with this, I keep looking for excuses to lay it aside and do something else.The story feels forced and the subject matter is depressing. 1849 Gold rush period of California territory set in San Francisco when it is still primarily a tent city and debauchery reigns supreme. A yet unnamed villain (I have completed 41% of the book at this point) wants to appear good and decent, but is secretly vying for power and money and now kidnapping legal, Chinese immigrants for slave labor. "The fortune to be made was in gambling, liquor, and women." Our heroes are a sister and brother (Olivia and Daniel) and rich, recently come-to-Jesus gold mine owner (friend of the brother), Joseph Sawyer, who all want to see the town grow and succeed and direct the people towards God. The young sister has made some bad choices and chapter after chapter laments those choices and cannot forgive herself. While I appreciate the continued Christian theme, it seems forced rather than natural. Also, I noted that while reading her relative's journal from the 1700s the entries were quoted in today's modern English. I found that frustrating. Of practical note, I highlighted: "the woman studied God's Word on her own and wrote down her thoughts and life applications in the journal." Good advice for any of us.A quote I liked written by her mother about the women in her ancestry: "My sweet Olivia, it's important to remember the hardships of those who have gone before us and to see how they persevered and survived."I was approached by Barbour Publishing and asked to review an eVersion of this book without fee, expectation or compensation. My opinion is my own and offered freely. Please read other reviews for a well-rounded purchasing decision. © April 1, 2019, Barbour Publishing, 3 stars – writing is not horrible, simply not my cup of tea.
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  • Vera Godley
    January 1, 1970
    The author takes readers into the lives of characters from the mid-1800s and on the western frontier of America during the Gold Rush that exploded in San Francisco and environs creating a ripe environment for meanness, crime, immorality to run rampart.The history of San Francisco is well developed in this novel although the author takes license to mold it a bit herself. The fires. The crime. The immorality. The stench.And yet all is not lost as people of good conscience do succeed in overcoming The author takes readers into the lives of characters from the mid-1800s and on the western frontier of America during the Gold Rush that exploded in San Francisco and environs creating a ripe environment for meanness, crime, immorality to run rampart.The history of San Francisco is well developed in this novel although the author takes license to mold it a bit herself. The fires. The crime. The immorality. The stench.And yet all is not lost as people of good conscience do succeed in overcoming obstacles and difficulties. As the book begins, Olivia is on the westward trail with her husband of mere weeks headed toward his dream of mining for gold. He dies in a gunshot accident leaving an ill-prepared Olivia to continue her journey to San Francisco in search of her older brother, Daniel.She arrives and discovers that it is not a place for a lady to be on her own and is much relieved to find her brother. From this point on, the story progresses with twists and turns that delve into the covert operations of the criminal element to control the growth and activities of the city.Much lawlessness exists and there is no law enforcement as there is no statehood, no governor, no police, no fire department.As the story unfolds Olivia, her brother Daniel, and his best friend Joseph are involved in dangers and yet their faith keeps them strong.A highly recommended story.DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy to facilitate this review. Opinions are mine, alone and are freely given.
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  • Trisha Robertson (Joy of Reading)
    January 1, 1970
    Widowed after only 6 months, Olivia has come to know more than her fair share of hardship and grief.  She blames herself for the accident that took her husband's life and has built up a wall around her heart. Will she be able to forgive herself and discover the life that God has planned? Working along-side her brother at his restaurant in San Francisco she sees first hand the hardship of these people. Olivia joins with her brother and his friend, Joseph Sawyer to make changes that will improve t Widowed after only 6 months, Olivia has come to know more than her fair share of hardship and grief.  She blames herself for the accident that took her husband's life and has built up a wall around her heart. Will she be able to forgive herself and discover the life that God has planned? Working along-side her brother at his restaurant in San Francisco she sees first hand the hardship of these people. Olivia joins with her brother and his friend, Joseph Sawyer to make changes that will improve the town. With this 8th book in the Brides of the Mayflower collection, we travel to the wild and unruly gold town of 1849 San Francisco.  This stand-alone story is sure to pull you in and carry you along on a delightful mystery as you try to discover who is the mastermind behind the slave-trade, among other nefarious deeds. I loved the dynamic characters and a rich historical tapestry of this delightful story. You are sure to be enchanted with this story. Be sure to pick-up your copy today!(I receive complimentary books for review from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including Netgalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own.)
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    The Golden Bride was an enjoyable story with fascinating history. It was an easy read based in San Francisco during the time of the gold rush. The story did a good job of explaining the conditions of the city during that time.I really wanted more about the characters themselves, but these books are slightly larger than a novella...but not as long as a novel. For the word count, the author did a great job with the story.My favorite part was the sweet pieces of history from the previous books in t The Golden Bride was an enjoyable story with fascinating history. It was an easy read based in San Francisco during the time of the gold rush. The story did a good job of explaining the conditions of the city during that time.I really wanted more about the characters themselves, but these books are slightly larger than a novella...but not as long as a novel. For the word count, the author did a great job with the story.My favorite part was the sweet pieces of history from the previous books in the series! What a treat that was... I also enjoyed the strong faith theme in the book.This is another delightful read in the Mayflower Bride Series.I received this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book! If you are looking for a book that is full of suspense, drama and romance, this book is for you! It is very well written and keeps you on the edge of your seat, This book is set in San Francisco during the Gold Rush of the 1880's, and is very eye-opening about how nasty and lawless it was back then. I highly recommend this book. Thank you Barbour Publishing via NetGalley for the ARC copy of this book. This is my honest review.
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  • Jeanie
    January 1, 1970
    This is my favorite novel so far in the Daughters of the Mayflower series – I love it! The characters are extremely likable, the mystery is intriguing, and the historical research and setting is fascinating. This is a San Francisco that few of us imagined before many worked together for governance and safety in the California territory.It is 1849. Olivia’s parents died, and she sold their farm to pay the debts. She then married a man she just met to help with debts and head toward her beloved br This is my favorite novel so far in the Daughters of the Mayflower series – I love it! The characters are extremely likable, the mystery is intriguing, and the historical research and setting is fascinating. This is a San Francisco that few of us imagined before many worked together for governance and safety in the California territory.It is 1849. Olivia’s parents died, and she sold their farm to pay the debts. She then married a man she just met to help with debts and head toward her beloved brother’s home and restaurant in San Francisco. Her bridegroom changed his mind almost daily on what quick-money deal he wanted in on. Finally, he purchased gold mining equipment with their last dollar, leaving them no money for food. Hezekiah Brighton died while trying to hunt something for dinner and Olivia carries the guilt for his death like a huge sack of boulders.San Francisco was not what Olivia expected. She traveled through miles of tents and shacks to get to her brother’s place. Livvy’s brother Daniel was thrilled to see her and welcomed her into his home over the restaurant. Since it was not safe for her to go anywhere alone in the city, Livvy was happy to work at his restaurant. Then she met some of the men who dined there. One man was a little too friendly and she delivered his pie directly to his face.Daniel’s best friend Joseph saw it and was immediately attracted by her feisty personality. Daniel sees San Francisco as the mission field the Lord led him to, and Joseph was one man he ministered to. They grew into a close friendship and fellowship. Now they discuss what they can do to shine their light in the city teeming with evil. They begin a Bible study group during the afternoon at the restaurant and Olivia meets a remarkable woman. Together they seek the source of the adult and child slave trade in the city while Joseph works with the city council to get good police and fire departments.Joseph is interested in Olivia, but she believes Hezekiah died because of her complaining and poor attitude, vowing to never marry again. Livvy begins to read the journals of her ancestors, including the woman who came over on the Mayflower more than 200 years earlier. As she reads their histories and returns to reading her Bible, her heart changes. Upcoming events will call upon every attribute she gains from the Lord and her ancestors’ writings, as their lives will soon be at stake.The characters are very well defined. I really like and empathize with Olivia. She is interesting, genuine, and has challenges with grace and receiving God’s forgiveness. Daniel and Joseph are strong in their faith; the three learn from each other even as Olivia gets back to her relationship with the Lord that can change her from the inside out.What I appreciate most is the faith portrayed by Daniel, Joseph, and Olivia, and the transparency of Olivia with her faith struggles. This sets it apart from many Christian novels, as the witness of faith from Joseph and Daniel are powerful. I also appreciate Olivia’s new friend, Julia, who may not be accepted by society, but she certainly helps the three friends with their quest to find the slave traders to free the adults and children, no matter the cost. I highly recommend this fabulous novel of God’s love, second chances, and learning from the past to have a better future.From a grateful heart: I received an e-ARC of this novel from the publisher through NetGalley, a positive review was not required.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    I ran across Kimberly Woodhouse some years ago when I reviewed two suspense novels she wrote for Broadman & Holman with her daughter, Kayla. Suspense is my favorite genre', so I was hooked. However, not all of her books are suspense, though many do have some element of suspense in them. I blame this author for my foray back into romance novels. As a guy - and for other reasons, I have steered clear of romance books, other than romantic suspense for years. However, when you really like an au I ran across Kimberly Woodhouse some years ago when I reviewed two suspense novels she wrote for Broadman & Holman with her daughter, Kayla. Suspense is my favorite genre', so I was hooked. However, not all of her books are suspense, though many do have some element of suspense in them. I blame this author for my foray back into romance novels. As a guy - and for other reasons, I have steered clear of romance books, other than romantic suspense for years. However, when you really like an author, you read whatever they write. So here I am reading romance novels. (Smile) This is the eighth book in the Daughters of the Mayflower series. Woodhouse has written three books in this series: The Mayflower Bride (#1), The Patriot Bride (#4), and this one. I really enjoyed the previous two, especially Patriot Bride, but I enjoyed Golden Bride even more. Many of Woodhouse's books are historical, and she excels at historical accuracy, and I have learned a lot by reading her books. I am one of those readers who will Google things to see if it really did happen or exist, and she never disappoints. The Golden Bride is such an example. I have read about the Gold Rush before, but she focused more on the city of San Francisco and what it was like at that time. This book was more suspenseful than her other two in this series, and had bad guys who were more evil and unlikable than the other two books. I did find the descriptions of life there in that time fascinating, and liked the three main characters: Olivia, Joseph, and Daniel. There was a lot to like and find interesting, including the running of a restaurant in that time and setting. The illegal slave trade brought the reminder how evil can be, and how evil is not bound to any time or place. The secondary character Julia was a reminder that God can reach, save, and change any individual, no matter how wicked and sinful they are. I try not to give spoilers away, but will say I also liked the minor character Luke, and how that played out. The romantic element of the story was well done....not gushy or overdone, and I was rooting for it throughout the book. The Golden Bride had a very satisfying and suspenseful ending, and I only wished it had gone on a little longer....a normal feeling when a good book ends. This series can be read out of order, and each book stands independently of each other. I have only read the three by Woodhouse, and definitely recommend them....especially The Golden Bride...but I am sure the whole series is good and worth reading. The Golden Bride is available from Barbour Publishing. I was given a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Scarlett
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Barbour Publishing for an ARC of this book! Release date - April 1, 2019I've enjoyed previous books in the series (and because I requested one NetGalley keeps sending me new ones without being requested), but this was definitely my least favorite. It's the first one in the series I've read by Kimberley Woodhouse and I kinda think her style is just not right for me. First of all, there's really not much plot here AT ALL. The storyline with the secret slave trade sounded Thank you to NetGalley and Barbour Publishing for an ARC of this book! Release date - April 1, 2019I've enjoyed previous books in the series (and because I requested one NetGalley keeps sending me new ones without being requested), but this was definitely my least favorite. It's the first one in the series I've read by Kimberley Woodhouse and I kinda think her style is just not right for me. First of all, there's really not much plot here AT ALL. The storyline with the secret slave trade sounded great in theory, but really nothing happened. It was a lot of "something bad is going on here, I hope we can figure out what it is and stop it," without anything actually happening. The love story between Olivia and Joseph was mostly "I really like him but he probably doesn't like me" and "I really like her but she probably doesn't like me." It was painfully obvious that they would end up together from their first meeting and there was nothing reasonably keeping them apart besides some lack of communication. If they'd have just been like "hey I like you," they'd have been married on page 10. My second problem was the very heavy-handed religious agenda. Previous books in the series only fell into the "Christian" genre in my opinion because they were clean and a character would occasionally be like "God help me" in a tough situation. And those things didn't bother me. But this book had such in depth Scriptural references and so much detail about different individuals "finding God." I'm a religious person but I don't really like religion in my books. It was so much in here that I feel like this was the only reason for writing the book, since the plot was pretty non-existent. It was so overbearing that I considered not finishing the book but I didn't want it to count against me on NetGalley and it wasn't a very long book.Last complaint is a spoiler. At first I thought they were hinting that the wicked "mysterious benefactor" who pretended to be a good person was going to be revealed to be Olivia's brother Daniel or at least a character we knew in the book. But it ended up being a completely random person we hadn't been previously introduced to. And his identity wasn't "revealed" until like 90% into the book. It just made no sense for this to be a mystery and a big reveal because it didn't mean anything to the reader. It would have been terrible for it to have been Daniel or any other supposed good character, but at least that would have been interesting. Overall this book was just not for me. I'm sure I'll be sent another ARC of the next book in the series automatically by NetGalley, so I hope it's better.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    As with each installment in the Daughters of the Mayflower series, “The Golden Bride” does not disappoint. Kimberley Woodhouse has written earlier books in this sequence, and this one delivers just as much vigor and dynamism. These books are fairly short for novels, but they are nevertheless overflowing with spiritual truths and faith in action. Aligning the plotlines with significant events in American history underscores the Christian foundation of our nation and its perseverance throughout ti As with each installment in the Daughters of the Mayflower series, “The Golden Bride” does not disappoint. Kimberley Woodhouse has written earlier books in this sequence, and this one delivers just as much vigor and dynamism. These books are fairly short for novels, but they are nevertheless overflowing with spiritual truths and faith in action. Aligning the plotlines with significant events in American history underscores the Christian foundation of our nation and its perseverance throughout times of war, personal trials, and provincial struggles. Realizing how much our forebears overcame provides strength for our own journey and an illuminating perspective for dealing with contemporary issues.Indeed, the world of California in 1849 as illustrated in “The Golden Bride” bears a striking resemblance to today’s world. Corruption and immorality run rampant in the territory as people, mostly men, flock to the fields in search of gold. San Francisco is a lawless den of iniquity when newly widowed and heartbroken Olivia Brighton arrives in search of her brother, Daniel. He owns and runs Livingston’s Restaurant, and along with his best friend, Joseph Sawyer, serves as a beacon of hope in the face of evils such as gangs, brothels, and human trafficking and slave labor. Olivia joins their efforts to uplift and redeem the town despite opposition. Their ministry is deeply inspiring because they are able to truly make a difference in their community through determination, sacrifice, and most of all a strong reliance upon the Lord. Olivia’s development as a character spoke to me more than any other. At the beginning of the novel, she is filled with self-loathing and guilt, but reading journals from her ancestors, who were women featured in previous stories in this series, positively influences her faith journey. One of my favorite passages describes so many of us: “she’d prayed for help but kept tight hold of the reins of her life.” We so often do the same. We carry burdens that were never meant for us and we allow fear to control us instead of trusting in the One who promises to work all things together for our good. As Olivia comes to realize, He has a plan and a purpose for each of us and can bring about goodness and blessing from every situation if only we will surrender to Him and trust Him. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.
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  • Rebekah Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    My thoughts: 5/5 stars Kimberley Woodhouse does it again!Interesting historical facts delivered in an amazing way, feisty characters, and a sweet love story! Evil villains, beautiful (clean) romance and history galore run rampant in Woodhouse's newest novel. And I must say, she did not disappoint! This book, I think, is my favorite of this author's! I loved the characters; the story was amazing as usual, though difficult to read at times. Woodhouse captured 1849, San Francisco in all its real ha My thoughts: 5/5 stars Kimberley Woodhouse does it again!Interesting historical facts delivered in an amazing way, feisty characters, and a sweet love story! Evil villains, beautiful (clean) romance and history galore run rampant in Woodhouse's newest novel. And I must say, she did not disappoint! This book, I think, is my favorite of this author's! I loved the characters; the story was amazing as usual, though difficult to read at times. Woodhouse captured 1849, San Francisco in all its real hardship. I was surprised to learn it was very much like "modern" day Sodom and Gomorrah. As always with Kimberley Woodhouse's books I learned an abundance (Thanks for writing amazing stories that count as my history lesson for the day!) My heart soared and melted with the cute scenes of Olivia and Joseph! But they weren't all cute. Woodhouse went into deep topics (though I was shocked to discover she didn't write all the horrific details, I shuddered and cried at what she did write ) with this newest installment of "The Mayflower Brides Collection." Human slave trade, terrible sin, greed, this author is not afraid to speak about the things we shy away from. In the midst of these difficult topics there was light hearted banter, a sweet brother/sister relationship, and a sweet, sweet love story, not just man/woman but Child/God. Olivia and Joseph (and Daniel because I liked him too much not to mention!) were relatable, encouraging, and inspired me to deepen my faith in Christ. I appreciate the life lessons Woodhouse weaves into her stories, I'm always so blessed by her writing.I can't tell you the number of times I sighed with delight and contentment I was really into these characters and this story, I'm heart broken to let them go. But the ending could not have been more beautiful.I leave with a full and happy heart, with a love bursting for these new friends that will forever live in my heart. Definitely, definitely don't miss The Golden Bride!~Rebekah**Thank you so much to the author/publisher for a free copy of this book. I was in no way obligated to leave a positive review. All thoughts and opinions expressed are purely by own. **
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  • Becca-Rae Weidel
    January 1, 1970
    I sincerely hope that they once again decide to add more books to this series. I've enjoyed each one so far and I really liked how it was formatted to slowly move forward through time. While each of the books can be read as a stand-alone, the knowledge that the characters are related through the generations ties a stronger bond to the history of our nation. We are a product of the generations before us, and how this series ties that concept together is remarkable. While this book is similar in t I sincerely hope that they once again decide to add more books to this series. I've enjoyed each one so far and I really liked how it was formatted to slowly move forward through time. While each of the books can be read as a stand-alone, the knowledge that the characters are related through the generations ties a stronger bond to the history of our nation. We are a product of the generations before us, and how this series ties that concept together is remarkable. While this book is similar in that it can be read as a stand-alone, it also contains journal entries from previous characters. It wouldn't necessarily lead the reader to feel lost in any way, but if you've read the previous books it will certainly give you a deeper appreciation for their connections.I enjoyed each of the books in this series, but I have to admit that the ones written by Kimberley Woodhouse are my absolute favorites. The author's love of history is clearly observed in her writing. Not surprising, I read this book in a single evening. It was well written and highly engaging. I appreciate Kimberley's intent to be respective of history while wanting something a bit more light-hearted. In my opinion I think she was able achieve a satisfying balance.I think my favorite piece of this story is the concept that life often doesn't turn out as we expect--both the good and the bad. When Olivia's brother Daniel moved to San Francisco, there was no way he would know how quickly the area would boom. With the reason for that growth circling around a wide-spread, selfish desire for wealth--it's no wonder that it brought with it a whole lot of trouble. Yet despite the conflict, Daniel continues to seek the Lord in his steps for the future. In the beginning Olivia was hit with the recent death of her parents which resulted in a quick marriage of convenience followed by unexpected widowhood. How does one move forward when life throws the unexpected at you? I really liked how the author fleshed this out in the story.I honestly don't think I can recommend this series enough. While I admit I had my favorites, I've enjoyed each story and appreciate the generational history contained in the pages (fictional or not). I hope they decide to continue moving through history, but if not I can at least say I've appreciated the time I've already been able to spend in it.*I received a copy of this book from NetGalley. Thoughts and opinions expressed are mine alone.
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  • Suzie Waltner
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsI love it when a previous author of this series comes back to write another book because there is some connection to their past characters. It’s now 1849 and Olivia Brighton is on the other side of the country than her ancestors, but the wisdom of the women who have endured the challenges of life before her stands the test of time.Olivia’s a grieving young woman when she arrives in San Francisco in search of her older brother Daniel. She’s made up her mind about what her future will—or 4.5 starsI love it when a previous author of this series comes back to write another book because there is some connection to their past characters. It’s now 1849 and Olivia Brighton is on the other side of the country than her ancestors, but the wisdom of the women who have endured the challenges of life before her stands the test of time.Olivia’s a grieving young woman when she arrives in San Francisco in search of her older brother Daniel. She’s made up her mind about what her future will—or won’t—hold for her. Yet when she reads the journals of her ancestors, she’s challenged to live in faith instead of fear.And then there’s her brother’s best friend. Joseph is a more recently converted Christian but he’s a man who strives to live his faith in everything he does even if it means putting himself in danger and not seeing the woman he’s falling in love with to keep her safe.The perspective of the villain in The Golden Bride enhances the atmosphere of evil and greed that pervaded San Francisco during a time before the city was truly established.Kimberley Woodhouse gives readers a story that proves faith, love, and people are greater treasures than gold.Disclosure statement:I receive complimentary books from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including NetGalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.
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  • Gail Hollingsworth
    January 1, 1970
    This is the eighth book in The Daughters of the Mayflower series and I’ve enjoyed everyone. Reading about American history using fictional characters (some even actual people) makes learning so much fun! Kimberley Woodhouse has done her research in The Golden Bride and it was quite eye-opening.Centered around the California Gold rush of 1849, Olivia Brighton finds herself in a wicked, filthy, overcrowded environment when she travels to find her brother. Her last living relative after losing her This is the eighth book in The Daughters of the Mayflower series and I’ve enjoyed everyone. Reading about American history using fictional characters (some even actual people) makes learning so much fun! Kimberley Woodhouse has done her research in The Golden Bride and it was quite eye-opening.Centered around the California Gold rush of 1849, Olivia Brighton finds herself in a wicked, filthy, overcrowded environment when she travels to find her brother. Her last living relative after losing her parents and her husband, Daniel offers her a job in his restaurant and a place to live above it. She is intrigued after meeting his best friend Joseph. Daniel and Joseph seem to be the only decent Christian men in a developing town of greedy self serving males.According to the authors notes in the back (which are a must read) the actual evil and filth was underplayed in the novel. So I can’t imagine how bad it really was. The faith element was wonderfully written, the romance subtle and the hinted at suspense page turning. I had to stay up late just to finish it I was so drawn in.I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    Wow!! What a wonderful message this author has weaved into this fantastic story!!.I love this book in the whole series best so far!! This author has also added some mystery, a little action and a whole lot more to make u sit on the edge of your seat to see what will happen next!!Olivia astounds me!! I have loved watching her change in this book. Isn't God wonderful my friends? He will never forsake us nor leave us and if we let Him guide us through our lives I think it would be much easier to ge Wow!! What a wonderful message this author has weaved into this fantastic story!!.I love this book in the whole series best so far!! This author has also added some mystery, a little action and a whole lot more to make u sit on the edge of your seat to see what will happen next!!Olivia astounds me!! I have loved watching her change in this book. Isn't God wonderful my friends? He will never forsake us nor leave us and if we let Him guide us through our lives I think it would be much easier to get though life. Too often we want to do things on our own and not keep our eyes on the Lord.I wished I had a big brother like Daniel. He's awesome! I love his get go and get things done. Mr. Sawyer I especially like!! Mmm hmmm!! My my!! He has a great personality and I love his protective side. I like how he doesn't flaunt his wealth around town and he's your normal down to earth guy. I just can't say enough good things about him!!All in all I did learn some things about San Francisco I never knew.This is why I love reading historical fiction
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  • Teri
    January 1, 1970
    I so very much enjoyed the story of Olivia and Joseph, along with the people they meet along the way. There were a number of moral, emotional and environmental obstacles in the time of the California Gold Rush as well as in San Francisco itself, to overcome, but eventually Olivia and Joseph recognize the depth of their true feelings and have a lovely courtship. Naturally disaster strikes when least expected, and Olivia feels abandoned and forsaken. She has to lean on God, as well as the wisdom f I so very much enjoyed the story of Olivia and Joseph, along with the people they meet along the way. There were a number of moral, emotional and environmental obstacles in the time of the California Gold Rush as well as in San Francisco itself, to overcome, but eventually Olivia and Joseph recognize the depth of their true feelings and have a lovely courtship. Naturally disaster strikes when least expected, and Olivia feels abandoned and forsaken. She has to lean on God, as well as the wisdom from her ancestors journals to help guide her along her way. Olivia is somewhat more retiring than some of the other Brides in this series but it’s lovely to see how deeply she and Joseph care for each other, as well as the relationships they share with Olivia’s brother Daniel. A beautiful and well crafted story! I received A complementary copy of this story from the Barbour Publishing via NetGalley and was under no obligation to leave a review.
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  • Laura Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    The Golden Bride takes you on a journey to historic California. A land of gold, danger, & full of men starved for the opportunity to make money. Some who were willing to make it by any means available. Yet for all those men, there were few women. So why does a Godfearing woman head to this lawless town? Will she be able to stand, or once her faith is tested by the firery trials headed her way, will her faith be left in ashes? Find out for yourself in this well researched novel by Kimberley W The Golden Bride takes you on a journey to historic California. A land of gold, danger, & full of men starved for the opportunity to make money. Some who were willing to make it by any means available. Yet for all those men, there were few women. So why does a Godfearing woman head to this lawless town? Will she be able to stand, or once her faith is tested by the firery trials headed her way, will her faith be left in ashes? Find out for yourself in this well researched novel by Kimberley Woodhouse. I've enjoyed reading this book, and once again glimpsing some of the trials that people went through to help form this great country. The history buff in me was able to enjoy the descriptive background, while the romantic side of me appreciated the journey to finding love. I received a copy of this book from the publisher under no obligation. All opinions expressed are entirely my own:-)
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    This is another great addition to The Daughters of the Mayflower. I have read all the other books to this series and find them all educational and entertaining. Even though they are fictional novels, there are a lot of parts to the books that are taken from our history. I look forward to reading the authors notes at the end to learn which is historically accurate and what parts are from the author.Kimberly has a special way of making a scene come to life. That along with her ability to craft int This is another great addition to The Daughters of the Mayflower. I have read all the other books to this series and find them all educational and entertaining. Even though they are fictional novels, there are a lot of parts to the books that are taken from our history. I look forward to reading the authors notes at the end to learn which is historically accurate and what parts are from the author.Kimberly has a special way of making a scene come to life. That along with her ability to craft interesting, believable characters makes for a very good read.The story is set in San Francisco during the Gold Rush. I have read several stories with that location and during the same time period. That was a very hard and lawless time. It has been referred to as the Sodom and Gomorrah of America. I liked the way Kimberley included these facts without going into great detail. I am sure it would be hard to write about, it is hard to read some of what went on. I think Kimberley did a wonderful job of drawing light out of this darkness. This book is about sacrifice, forgiveness, hope, romance,faith and family trees. If you are a fan of Christian historical romance, you will not be disappointed with Kimberly Woodhouse's new book.I received a copy of this book from Barbour Books through NetGalley. The opinions in this review are my own.
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  • Esther
    January 1, 1970
    I am very much enjoying the entire Daughters of the Mayflower series. Each book builds my knowledge of history and appreciation for our country. While each book stands alone, I eagerly look forward to each new installment.This book, like the ones before it, has characters that bring history to life. Some of that is not so pretty. I was unaware of the atrocities that happened during the gold rush of 1849. The human trafficking, crime, and pitiful living conditions that most of the newcomers to Sa I am very much enjoying the entire Daughters of the Mayflower series. Each book builds my knowledge of history and appreciation for our country. While each book stands alone, I eagerly look forward to each new installment.This book, like the ones before it, has characters that bring history to life. Some of that is not so pretty. I was unaware of the atrocities that happened during the gold rush of 1849. The human trafficking, crime, and pitiful living conditions that most of the newcomers to San Francisco endured were things that I was unaware of prior to this book. With that being said, the author did a very good job of keeping the book from being a downer. I enjoyed this book and the characters within. I plan to follow up on the historical notes at the end of the book and learn even more about this fascinating period of history.I follow the GoodReads rating system. Please note that this means even the 3-star books are ones I liked.1 star – didn’t like it2 stars – it was OK3 stars – liked it4 stars – really liked it5 stars – it was amazing; I’ll read it over and over and/or it will impact my daily life.I received a complimentary copy from the publisher through NetGalley. I was not required to give a positive review. The thoughts and opinions expressed here are entirely my own.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    The Golden Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse is a novel with a mixture of history, romance, mystery and faith. Throughout the story and with each character we learn how wonderful our Lord is. It is evident in every character‘s life, how God works with and in each individual. I learned some of the history of San Francisco and the gold rush of 1849. The Daughters of the Mayflower is a series that is enjoyable to read and from a Christian perspective are written by authors who love to tell the story of The Golden Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse is a novel with a mixture of history, romance, mystery and faith. Throughout the story and with each character we learn how wonderful our Lord is. It is evident in every character‘s life, how God works with and in each individual. I learned some of the history of San Francisco and the gold rush of 1849. The Daughters of the Mayflower is a series that is enjoyable to read and from a Christian perspective are written by authors who love to tell the story of Jesus. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Netgalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. I appreciate the opportunity and thank the author and publisher for allowing me to read, enjoy and review this book.
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  • Kelly Tyree
    January 1, 1970
    I just loved The Golden Bride. I have read all of the books in this series and they are all equally good. Each of them are written by great authors and each from a different period of time. The Golden Bride is from the mid 1800's and set in San Francisco during the gold rush. Olivia Brighton has lost both of her parents and her husband whom she had only been married to for six weeks. She married him after only knowing him for a day and their brief marriage was not good. Now Olivia finds herself I just loved The Golden Bride. I have read all of the books in this series and they are all equally good. Each of them are written by great authors and each from a different period of time. The Golden Bride is from the mid 1800's and set in San Francisco during the gold rush. Olivia Brighton has lost both of her parents and her husband whom she had only been married to for six weeks. She married him after only knowing him for a day and their brief marriage was not good. Now Olivia finds herself in San Francisco. She is working and living with her brother, Daniel, in his restaurant. The town of San Francisco is dirty and dangerous. But in Daniel's restaurant, Olivia is safe. Daniel is a Christian and in him she finds hope again. Daniel gives Olivia a box that belonged to her mother. It was a treasure that had been passed down from generation to generation. In the box, Olivia finds the journals of three wonderful women. In those journals, Olivia finds strength and healing. Joseph Sawyer is a gold miner that has been very successful. He is Daniel's best friend and he is a Christian. He, Daniel and Olivia begin a Bible study in the afternoons. Olivia has a wall built up around her heart due to feeling unworthy of love, but as those walls fall down she finds herself longing for love again. Joseph and Olivia have found a way into each other's hearts. But they live in dangerous times and Joseph has become aware of a danger that he cannot ignore. As Joseph goes undercover to try and rescue imprisoned men, women and children, his safety is in jeopardy. He longs for a future with Olivia but must try to fulfill a promise he made to rescue his foreman's family. The Golden Bride is beautifully written. The romance between Olivia and Joseph is so endearing. There is enough suspense to keep you on the edge of your seat. The ending is just perfect. I received an ARC of this book and this is my honest feedback.
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