The Forgiving Jar (The Prayer Jars #2)
What would happen if you found out someone has been impersonating you?   Sara Murray had never met her mother’s parents and was surprised to learn after her death that they were Amish living in Pennsylvania. When she is finally able to make the trip to meet them, she is shocked to learn someone else has been living with them and pretending to be Sara. Sara can’t understand how quickly her grandparents are willing to forgive the imposter.   Secrets and deceit seem to follow Sara, and she is so tired of it. Though soon she meets Brad Fuller who is visiting her grandparents for during Christmas. She likes him a lot, but even he seems to pull away from her, not being totally honest.   Struggling, Sara finds an old canning jar hidden in the barn that is full of encouraging prayers. Can Sara find a way to forgive the past and move on to building new relationships? This is Book 2 in the brand-new series, The Prayer Jars, from New York Times bestselling author Wanda E. Brunstetter. Book 1 -- The Hope Jar (August 2018) Book 3 -- The Healing Jar (August 2019)  

The Forgiving Jar (The Prayer Jars #2) Details

TitleThe Forgiving Jar (The Prayer Jars #2)
Author
ReleaseFeb 1st, 2019
PublisherShiloh Run Press
ISBN-139781624167485
Rating
GenreAmish, Christian Fiction, Fiction, Amish Fiction, Christian, Romance

The Forgiving Jar (The Prayer Jars #2) Review

  • Mary Jackson _TheMaryReader
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series the Prayer Jars. I was not really sure about Sara and Brad. I was not sure about Michelle either. It took some reading and thinking but in the end I liked all three of them.I even cried at one point in the book. So you know it was a good one. I can't wait for the next book in this series. The Healing Jar will be just a good as the first two I bet.I gave this book 4 stars. I recommend reading the series but The Forgiving Jar can be read as a stand alone.The Mary Reader received I love this series the Prayer Jars. I was not really sure about Sara and Brad. I was not sure about Michelle either. It took some reading and thinking but in the end I liked all three of them.I even cried at one point in the book. So you know it was a good one. I can't wait for the next book in this series. The Healing Jar will be just a good as the first two I bet.I gave this book 4 stars. I recommend reading the series but The Forgiving Jar can be read as a stand alone.The Mary Reader received this book from the publisher for review. A favorable review was not required and all views expressed are our own.
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  • Kelsie
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar by Wanda E. Brunstetter is book two in her The Prayer Jars series. This Amish fiction novel is another in the genre by this author of multiple bestsellers. The novel is part of a series but the author has done a good job of making it a standalone, still there are a few places where a bit more background would have enhanced the story. However, this does not detract from the overall enjoyment of this excellent book. Sara Murray has just learned that her deceased mother’s parents The Forgiving Jar by Wanda E. Brunstetter is book two in her The Prayer Jars series. This Amish fiction novel is another in the genre by this author of multiple bestsellers. The novel is part of a series but the author has done a good job of making it a standalone, still there are a few places where a bit more background would have enhanced the story. However, this does not detract from the overall enjoyment of this excellent book. Sara Murray has just learned that her deceased mother’s parents are members of an Amish community in Pennsylvania. She arrives at her grandparents’ home to find a young lady posing as her. Her grandparents forgive the imposter but Sara is still resentful. Sara’s feelings of betrayal and resentment hinder her relationships with the imposter, her grandparents and her new friend, Brad. Will the bible verses and other inspirational notes she finds in a canning jar help her to forgive and move forward with a positive outlook on life and love? Brunstetter has written an absolute gem. There are twists worthy of any action-adventure movie, except the excitement is from emotion instead of car chases and explosions. The author is writing from personal knowledge of Amish practices, so the novel is purely authentic.I give The Forgiving Jar 5 out of 5 stars. It’s a great read for fans of chaste romance and/or religious fiction. If you aren’t a fan of books with religious themes, take a pass on this one.My thanks to Barbour Publishing, Inc. and NetGalley for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book. However, the opinions expressed in this review are 100% mine and mine alone.
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  • Deanne Patterson
    January 1, 1970
    I am a big fan of Amish books, read them all the time and really enjoy them. I have read almost all of Wanda's, she has quite a few out. This book was a pure delight to read it picked up right where the first book in the series left off. I do recommend reading The Prayer Jars first to get the full benefit of the back story. It does explain the back story in this book but you'll really want to read the first one anyways. Tensions run high at the beginning of the book. Given the circumstances it i I am a big fan of Amish books, read them all the time and really enjoy them. I have read almost all of Wanda's, she has quite a few out. This book was a pure delight to read it picked up right where the first book in the series left off. I do recommend reading The Prayer Jars first to get the full benefit of the back story. It does explain the back story in this book but you'll really want to read the first one anyways. Tensions run high at the beginning of the book. Given the circumstances it is understandable despite the grandparents talking to both girls and trying to make a calm environment. Tensions abate though after awhile. The Amish are very forgiving people and aim to live their daily lives in honor of God. Whenever I read one of Wanda's books I always feel enriched for the life lessons I take away from it. Looking forward to reading the third book in this series.Feb 1, 2019 publication date.I was given a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing through NetGalley. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    THE FORGIVING JAR by Wanda E. Brunstetter is #2 in The Prayer Jars series and is a continuation of THE HOPE JAR #1 in the series. Although THE FORGIVING JAR can be read as a standalone, I recommend reading THE HOPE JAR first. This sweet, heartwarming novel set in a small community in Pennsylvania, will tug at your heartstrings. Two troubled young ladies with trust and other issues are shown love and forgiveness by an elderly Amish couple. I enjoyed learning about the Amish way of life, and watch THE FORGIVING JAR by Wanda E. Brunstetter is #2 in The Prayer Jars series and is a continuation of THE HOPE JAR #1 in the series. Although THE FORGIVING JAR can be read as a standalone, I recommend reading THE HOPE JAR first. This sweet, heartwarming novel set in a small community in Pennsylvania, will tug at your heartstrings. Two troubled young ladies with trust and other issues are shown love and forgiveness by an elderly Amish couple. I enjoyed learning about the Amish way of life, and watching Michelle and Sara grow and mature. I even shed a tear or two. This book of anger, hurt, love, suspense, faith, forgiveness and second chances should appeal to those who enjoy reading Amish fiction, Christian fiction, and sweet romance novels. My thanks to Barbour Publishing, Inc., Shiloh Run Press, and NetGalley for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book, which enables me to write my unbiased thoughts and opinions in this review.
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  • Molly Jaber (Cover To Cover Cafe)
    January 1, 1970
    Many of y'all know me, and know that one of my favorite genres to read is Amish fiction. Among that Amish fiction, there is this really amazingly talented author who never fails to hook me, keep me focused on the story, and make me feel as if I was a character within the pages as I follow the ups, downs, ins and outs of her beloved characters' lives. That author is Wanda Brunstetter. She is phenomenal. So, I looked forward to opening up the next book in her Prayer Jars series. Let me tell you th Many of y'all know me, and know that one of my favorite genres to read is Amish fiction. Among that Amish fiction, there is this really amazingly talented author who never fails to hook me, keep me focused on the story, and make me feel as if I was a character within the pages as I follow the ups, downs, ins and outs of her beloved characters' lives. That author is Wanda Brunstetter. She is phenomenal. So, I looked forward to opening up the next book in her Prayer Jars series. Let me tell you this: She did not disappoint me. In fact, I was blown away with this story. Ms. Brunstetter has woven a tender story with this book. It's full of secrets and twists, but also full of hope, longing, forgiving and grace. Sara and Brad's characters are tenderly chiseled together to create a few sparks of romance blooming within the book, and Michelle's character.....well, let me say that at first, I wanted to hate her, for assuming a life that wasn't her own. But, through the words of Ms. Brunstetter, through the forgiving grace of God, I was able to see why she did it, and much like the story line suggests, and forgive her for it, the same as if she truly did it to me. The way Ms. Brunstetter makes me feel at the end of the book, like she wrote solely for me (which, of course, I know she did not but that's how good her writing is!), has once again left me ready for her next book in the series so I can feel this way again. The Forgiving Jar is a tender story, one that makes the reader sit and reflect about forgiving and letting go of the pain and the past, and focus on the here and now. Anything less than a 5 star praise for this book, would not be doing it justice. Well done, Ms. Brunstetter. Well done. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from Shiloh Run Press and was under no obligation to post a review, positive or negative.*
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  • Jennie
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second in the series of the Jar trilogy. The same characters are in each book, just a continuation of the story about a young woman who discovers her mother was Amish after her mother dies. She reaches out to her grandparents and when she comes to visit them she finds another young woman has pretended to be her. In this book Michelle and Sara are both living with the Amish grandparents. Anxious to,read the final book which comes out this August.
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  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    This is a lovely, feel good series that flows from front to back. Sara is the grand-daughter of an Amish couple living in Amish country Pennsylvania. She had not met her maternal grandparents until her mother’s death. She was quite surprised to find out her mother had been raised Amish. Sara was even more surprised to find out that her impostor (Michelle) was living with her grandparents, totally forgiven for her deceit. This is a story of transitions and sweet forgiveness with a dash romance an This is a lovely, feel good series that flows from front to back. Sara is the grand-daughter of an Amish couple living in Amish country Pennsylvania. She had not met her maternal grandparents until her mother’s death. She was quite surprised to find out her mother had been raised Amish. Sara was even more surprised to find out that her impostor (Michelle) was living with her grandparents, totally forgiven for her deceit. This is a story of transitions and sweet forgiveness with a dash romance and a sprinkling of suspense thrown in. Although this is the second in the series and it can stand on its own, I recommend reading The Hope Jar first because it is a beautiful story that provides rich context for the second in the series.
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  • Lilian
    January 1, 1970
    Review:I read The Hope Jar (first book in The Prayer Jars series), and I enjoyed it! So when I saw The Forgiving Jar on NetGalley, I knew I wanted to get it. And while it didn't exactly meet my expectations, I still think it has some good themes of forgiveness (of course hehe), love, and redemption. What I Liked:- Like I said, there are some great themes! I think the author did a good job in weaving them in.- I liked the setting! I've always liked reading Amish stories, and the book definitely s Review:I read The Hope Jar (first book in The Prayer Jars series), and I enjoyed it! So when I saw The Forgiving Jar on NetGalley, I knew I wanted to get it. And while it didn't exactly meet my expectations, I still think it has some good themes of forgiveness (of course hehe), love, and redemption. What I Liked:- Like I said, there are some great themes! I think the author did a good job in weaving them in.- I liked the setting! I've always liked reading Amish stories, and the book definitely showcased the Amish lifestyle.What I Didn't Like:- The main characters seem really pouty and spoiled at times, which really irritated me.- Most of the side characters, claiming to be Christian, were really unforgiving and annoying, and I found it unrealistic that they suddenly decided to forgive Michelle after one random thing she did. And the two characters who were forgiving towards Michelle forgave her a little too easily. I certainly think a good amount of balance could have been employed in this story.Overall:Definitely not my favorite by Mrs. Brunstetter. I do think I would've liked the book a little better if not for the annoying characters. :/ 1.5 stars.*FTC DISCLOSURE: I received a free ecopy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts are my own and a positive review was not required.*
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  • Gemma
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first Armish / christian book I have read and i found it delightful. Although this was the second in a series I didn't I couldn't catch up with the plot. I will however read the next book! There is alot that can be taken from this book and alot of lovely verses and references. A real lesson in love and forgiveness. Well written and very enjoyable. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar by Wanda E. Brunstetter has us returning to Strasburg, Pennsylvania. Sara Murray is returning to her grandparent’s farm for the Thanksgiving holiday. The dentist she worked for recently retired and Sara would like to relocate to Strasburg to be closer to her grandparents. She is hoping she can live with them while looking for a job and apartment. When Sara arrived at the Lapp farm for the first time, she was shocked to find a woman impersonating her. Sara has no tolerance for p The Forgiving Jar by Wanda E. Brunstetter has us returning to Strasburg, Pennsylvania. Sara Murray is returning to her grandparent’s farm for the Thanksgiving holiday. The dentist she worked for recently retired and Sara would like to relocate to Strasburg to be closer to her grandparents. She is hoping she can live with them while looking for a job and apartment. When Sara arrived at the Lapp farm for the first time, she was shocked to find a woman impersonating her. Sara has no tolerance for people who lie, deceive and keep secrets since she learned of her mother’s secrets. When Sara arrives at the farm, she is surprised to see Michelle Taylor, the imposter, is once again living with Willis and Mary Ruth Lapp. Her grandparents tell Sara that Michelle returned to explain her actions and apologized to them. They have forgiven Michelle and invited her to live with them. Sara does not understand how they can easily forgive Michelle’s deception. Sara moves into the farmhouse and struggles to live with Michelle. She meets Brad Fuller, a theological student, when he visits at Christmas who had met Michelle the previous summer. Sara is drawn to Brad and she can tell he is attracted to her. However, Brad seems to keep his distance which confuses Sara. One day Sara finds an old canning jar in the cellar filled with slips of paper. Each slip has a different Bible verse or inspirational message. These messages provide Sara with encouragement and hope. Can Sara find a way to overcome her mother’s deceptions as well as Michelle’s? Is forgiveness in Sara’s future? Come along for Sara’s journey in The Forgiving Jar.The Forgiving Jar is the second book in The Prayer Jar series. While The Forgiving Jar could be read as a standalone, I suggest reading The Hope Jar first. It will provide you with Michelle’s complete story and help you understand her motivations. I thought The Forgiving Jar was well-written with gentle pacing. I did find the story to be a little slow in the middle. I was drawn into the story and wanted to find out what would happen with Sara and Michelle. Sara has a hard time grappling with the concept of forgiveness. Her mother kept secrets from her and then Michelle impersonated her. Sara has trust issues and does not understand how her grandparents can easily forgive Michelle for her deception. We get to see how the slips of paper in an old canning jar help Sara understand the importance of forgiveness and being a Christian. The slips in the canning jar were encouraging, inspirational, guiding and thought provoking. With Michelle and Sara living in the same household, it is rife with tension. Mary Ruth talks with Sara about the issue. After that, Mary Ruth prays and leaves the issue in God’s hands. There is romance in the story as Michelle and Ezekiel King draw closer to each other. One of my favorite phrases was “turn your cares into prayers.” I did have trouble with Sara. She has a giant chip on her shoulder plus she is extremely resentful of Michelle. As time goes by, Sara along with Michelle mature. I liked seeing the women evolve, learn from their mistakes and grow in their faith. I look forward to reading The Healing Jar when it comes out. The Forgiving Jar is a sweet, heartwarming story that will touch your heart.
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  • Shirley Chapel
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar begins right where The Hope Jar ended. Michelle Taylor and Ezekiel King are on their way back to Willis and Mary Ruth Lapp's house . In the previous book Michelle had deceived the Lapps making them believe she was their granddaughter , Sara Murray. Before the truth had been discovered Michelle had fled to another town to escape the consequences of her past actions. Now as they draw closer to the Lapp farm she is riddled with anxiety and doubts as she fears Mary Ruth and Willis The Forgiving Jar begins right where The Hope Jar ended. Michelle Taylor and Ezekiel King are on their way back to Willis and Mary Ruth Lapp's house . In the previous book Michelle had deceived the Lapps making them believe she was their granddaughter , Sara Murray. Before the truth had been discovered Michelle had fled to another town to escape the consequences of her past actions. Now as they draw closer to the Lapp farm she is riddled with anxiety and doubts as she fears Mary Ruth and Willis will be unwilling to except her apology for all the hurt she has caused in their lives. Sara Murray unfortunately has lost her job in Newark New Jersey. She has decided to move to Strasburg Pennsylvania to be close to her Amish Grandparents. She hopes to find work there and take the opportunity to get to know them better. Sara's mother recently died leaving her with a lot of unanswered questions about her past. She had no idea who her biological father was. All these years of growing up with her mother and step father she didn't know that her mother had grown up Amish. Sara wrestles with unforgiveness towards both her mother and Michelle Taylor , the girl who pretended to be her, all summer long. Arriving at her grandparents she is surprised and not happy to learn she won't get to have time alone with them. Sara will have to share them with the pretender from last summer. Once again Wanda Brunstetter captured me from the beginning. I've really enjoyed both books in the series. I felt sorry for both girls. Michelle who basically had no family received love and forgiveness from Mary Ruth and Willis. Sara was hurt beyond words that her mother had never told her who her real father was or that she hadn't introduced her to her loving grandparents. Once again several times in the story this reader was bought to tears. The Forgiving Jar is a warm hearted story where two hurting girls find the love they needed from a wonderful older Amish couple. All readers of Christian Fiction , Amish Fiction or fans of Wanda Brunstetter will enjoy this book. I would advise that the Hope Jar, book one in the series be read first because this book continues on where book one stopped. I was given a copy of The Forgiving Jar from the author and publisher. I was not asked to give a positive review . In this review I have shared my honest thoughts and opinions on how I felt about this book.
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  • Patricia Bond
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar is the second book in New York Best Selling author, Wanda Brunstetter's The Prayer Jar series. Her first book in the series is titled, The Hope Jar and the story in The Forgiving Jar picks up where The Hope Jar ended.Sara Murray has moved to Lancaster County Pennsylvania to live with her grandparents, Willis and Mary Ruth Lapp. When Sara arrives she is surprised to find Michelle Taylor, the young woman who passed herself off as Sara ( in the book The Hope Jar) living with them. The Forgiving Jar is the second book in New York Best Selling author, Wanda Brunstetter's The Prayer Jar series. Her first book in the series is titled, The Hope Jar and the story in The Forgiving Jar picks up where The Hope Jar ended.Sara Murray has moved to Lancaster County Pennsylvania to live with her grandparents, Willis and Mary Ruth Lapp. When Sara arrives she is surprised to find Michelle Taylor, the young woman who passed herself off as Sara ( in the book The Hope Jar) living with them. Sara is not thrilled that MIchelle is living there and the two of them are not getting along. They both are in competition for the Lapp's attention. Can the Lapps cope with the jealousy between the two girls, for long. Sara also does not trust Michelle motives, especially when she learns that Michelle wants to become a member of the Amish community. While in the cellar, Sara discovers a jar that is filled with slips of paper that contain scripture, prayers and words of encouragement. Sara starts to read the slips and still the writer of them is still a mystery.Love is blooming for Michelle and Ezekiel King, but in order to take their relationship to the next level, maybe marriage, Michelle must join the Amish Church. Can Michelle go through this commitment and also there a still a few members of the Amish community, who have their doubts about Michelle. Love may also be blooming for Sara and Brad Fuller, the young man who is studying to become a minister and who also worked on the Lapps farm during the summer. Sara though must deal with her past, and like the quote on one of the slips found in one of the Prayer Jars: "Leave the past where it belongs - in the past. Look forward to the future that has been planned for you." Will it take a tragedy to make Sara realize this.I really, really enjoyed reading The Forgiving Jar and highly recommend that you read this wonderful book. I would suggest reading The Hope Jar first, if you can, so you can become familiar with how this story began.If you are looking to read a story that is about overcoming jealousy, forgiveness, romance, new beginnings, and some encouragement. I recommend getting a copy of The Forgiving Jar.I was provided with a complimentary copy of The Forgiving Jar by Barbour Publishing and the great author who wrote it, Wanda Brunstetter. I hope you will enjoy reading it, as much as I did This is most certainly a FIVE STAR book.w
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  • Marilyn
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar picks up where The Hope Jar ended, however; there’s enough background that it could be read as a standalone. The Lapp’s biological granddaughter, Sara had difficulty accepting that they would allow Michelle, the imposter granddaughter in the Hope Jar, to reside with them after all her deceitfulness and stealing from them. There’s plenty of action, with characters learning to forgive, some having to suffer more heartbreak and losses before they found that God truly loved them. A The Forgiving Jar picks up where The Hope Jar ended, however; there’s enough background that it could be read as a standalone. The Lapp’s biological granddaughter, Sara had difficulty accepting that they would allow Michelle, the imposter granddaughter in the Hope Jar, to reside with them after all her deceitfulness and stealing from them. There’s plenty of action, with characters learning to forgive, some having to suffer more heartbreak and losses before they found that God truly loved them. A story that at times was unrealistic (I know its fiction). There are plenty of family regrets for Sara and Michelle that they needed to heal from and find forgiveness. An old jar filled with scriptures, prayers and thoughts that Sara found in the basement, just may be the answer for her when she’s called back to Newark, NJ with her step father’s accident. There is a good faith message in this book and gems individuals can apply to their own lives in learning to forgive others that have hurt them deeply. I look forward to reading The Healing Jar, book three, to see the conclusion to The Prayer Jars series by Brunstetter. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review, but have expressed my own sincere thoughts.
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  • Vera Godley
    January 1, 1970
    It has been awhile since I read one of Wanda Brunstetter's books. Her books are always gentle reads, clean, and filled with heart warming Christian tenets that aid in straightening out lives of flawed characters.The two feminine protagonists, Michelle and Sara, have lived prior to the opening pages of The Forgiving Jar lives vastly different from the Amish whose community they have now embedded themselves. They are lying, deceitful, spiteful, and a host of other unpleasant characteristics that r It has been awhile since I read one of Wanda Brunstetter's books. Her books are always gentle reads, clean, and filled with heart warming Christian tenets that aid in straightening out lives of flawed characters.The two feminine protagonists, Michelle and Sara, have lived prior to the opening pages of The Forgiving Jar lives vastly different from the Amish whose community they have now embedded themselves. They are lying, deceitful, spiteful, and a host of other unpleasant characteristics that really made me dislike them. As they go about living within the confines of the grandparent's Amish home and associating in church, work, and social events with the Amish they see and envy the peace that these dear folks have.There are sweet romances in the story and there are times of sorrow. The need for and act of forgiveness are uppermost in this read. Ms. Brunstetter has penned another story that her followers will love.DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy from the publisher to facilitate this review. Opinions are my own and are freely given.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar ( The Prayer Jars Book #2 )By: Wanda E. BrunstetterThe Forgiving Jar is book two by Wanda Brunstetter in her new series The Prayer Jars. I would suggest reading the first book, The Hope Jar, first . Love the story and the characters , both were well written. I did read The Hope Jar and was proud that The Forgiving Jar picks up where the first book left off. I could not put it down, I was not disappointed. The author writes of love, faith, forgiveness, and second chances. Sarah The Forgiving Jar ( The Prayer Jars Book #2 )By: Wanda E. BrunstetterThe Forgiving Jar is book two by Wanda Brunstetter in her new series The Prayer Jars. I would suggest reading the first book, The Hope Jar, first . Love the story and the characters , both were well written. I did read The Hope Jar and was proud that The Forgiving Jar picks up where the first book left off. I could not put it down, I was not disappointed. The author writes of love, faith, forgiveness, and second chances. Sarah and Michelle both have some issues and mistrust is a big problem. I really enjoyed the grandparents and how trusting they were. I highly recommend The Forgiving Jar. I cant wait to read book three .I was given a complimentary copy of this book by Barbour Publishing , but was not told that I had to give a positive review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Sheila Samuelson
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book in this series by Wanda!! Glad both Sara and Michelle got happy ending in this book. Can't wait for book 3 in August!!
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar is the fabulous addition from Wanda Brunstetter’s The Prayer Jars series. I just loved this book and enjoyed catching up with the characters from the first book of the series. I highly recommend for readers to read The Hope Jar before starting this one. The is a perfect story for anyone struggling to forgive themselves or others. Mrs Brunstetter has the best books for faith and inspiration and this one is no exception. The Forgiving Jar would be getting one hundred stars if it The Forgiving Jar is the fabulous addition from Wanda Brunstetter’s The Prayer Jars series. I just loved this book and enjoyed catching up with the characters from the first book of the series. I highly recommend for readers to read The Hope Jar before starting this one. The is a perfect story for anyone struggling to forgive themselves or others. Mrs Brunstetter has the best books for faith and inspiration and this one is no exception. The Forgiving Jar would be getting one hundred stars if it was possible. I loved it and highly recommend it. It is among my favorites of Amish Fiction.I received this book from the publisher. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.
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  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar is a warm hearted lovely story. I did not read the first book in the series, but I had no trouble understanding this one. I like Amish set books, and this one is so good! You will love it if this is your type of book.
  • Leslie M.
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed the first book in the series, so I was excited to read this one, and I found it to be just as enjoyable.The story continues to follow Michelle and Sara, who’s now returned to stay with her grandparents. Therefore, it would be quite helpful to read the books in order. Characters are realistic, though Sara does come across as a bit annoying at times with her tendency to hold on to her jealousy and anger. I enjoyed watching each girl go through struggles and insecurities on their w I really enjoyed the first book in the series, so I was excited to read this one, and I found it to be just as enjoyable.The story continues to follow Michelle and Sara, who’s now returned to stay with her grandparents. Therefore, it would be quite helpful to read the books in order. Characters are realistic, though Sara does come across as a bit annoying at times with her tendency to hold on to her jealousy and anger. I enjoyed watching each girl go through struggles and insecurities on their way to becoming who God designed them to be. There is a bit of romance along the way. While there were a couple twists, some parts were a bit predictable. However, it was a sweet, relatively quick read overall. I look forward to reading the next book in the series.On another note, I’m looking forward to trying the two included recipes (Sara’s Pumpkin Bread and Mary Ruth’s Turkey Vegetable Soup. Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy, but I wasn’t required to leave a positive review.
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  • Susan F
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this second book in the series. Sara is the featured character in the book as she comes to live with her Amish grandparents, Mary Ruth and Willis King. Michelle is questioning her future. Sara is living with challenges from her past. Both she and Michelle are searching in the mysterious jar with the messages of encouragement and Bible verses. Ezekiel and Brad are important characters in the story after being possible love interests for Michelle in the first book. I like how the author I enjoyed this second book in the series. Sara is the featured character in the book as she comes to live with her Amish grandparents, Mary Ruth and Willis King. Michelle is questioning her future. Sara is living with challenges from her past. Both she and Michelle are searching in the mysterious jar with the messages of encouragement and Bible verses. Ezekiel and Brad are important characters in the story after being possible love interests for Michelle in the first book. I like how the author handles the friction between the girls and the living ways of the older Amish couple. The two young women grow in maturity and faith as the story progresses. I am pleased with how the book ended.Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for my copy of this book. I really hope that the series continues. I want to know what happens with cousin Lenore. This is a very good story about the power of being an unforgiving person and how things change when forgiveness is chosen.
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    I have read most of Wanda Brunstetter's books. I enjoyed The Prayer Jar, the first book in this series. Although each of these books can be read as a stand alone book, I think you will benefit from reading The Prayer Jar first. We are introduced to the same characters and we learn more about them in The Forgiving Jar, the second book. The grandparents, Willis and Mary Ruth King are just darling people. Both Michelle and Sara have had a difficult past, both are not sure about their future. The gi I have read most of Wanda Brunstetter's books. I enjoyed The Prayer Jar, the first book in this series. Although each of these books can be read as a stand alone book, I think you will benefit from reading The Prayer Jar first. We are introduced to the same characters and we learn more about them in The Forgiving Jar, the second book. The grandparents, Willis and Mary Ruth King are just darling people. Both Michelle and Sara have had a difficult past, both are not sure about their future. The girls learn and mature from handling the friction between each other. Forgiveness is the main theme of this story, but there is so much more.I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. My opinions expressed in this review are my own.
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  • Jeanie
    January 1, 1970
    Second in The Prayer Jars series, Wanda Brunstetter welcomes the reader back to Strasburg, Pennsylvania and the home and farm of Mary Ruth and Willis Lapp. I appreciate this powerful novel much more than The Hope Jar. The Lapps are folks I think many of us would like to have as grandparents!After the death of Rhoda, her mother, Sara Murray found a letter in Mom’s Bible that changed her life. The letter explained how her mother had been raised Amish. When Rhoda learned she was pregnant, she left Second in The Prayer Jars series, Wanda Brunstetter welcomes the reader back to Strasburg, Pennsylvania and the home and farm of Mary Ruth and Willis Lapp. I appreciate this powerful novel much more than The Hope Jar. The Lapps are folks I think many of us would like to have as grandparents!After the death of Rhoda, her mother, Sara Murray found a letter in Mom’s Bible that changed her life. The letter explained how her mother had been raised Amish. When Rhoda learned she was pregnant, she left her loving parents, never returning. Sara does not know who her father is, only her stepfather, Dean. Sara has since visited and spent time with the Lapps after a young woman, Michelle, deceived them, letting them think she was their granddaughter. She left when she knew the real Sara was arriving, and her Amish friend Ezekiel brought her back to apologize to them. They forgave her and invited her to stay with them again until she gets back on her feet. She is determined to get a job and earn money to pay back the cash she borrowed from their stash when she left.Sara returns to stay at her grandparents’ home as her job has ended, and she hopes to find one near their home so she can get to know them. She finds Michelle in the barn, stunned and angry that she is there again. Certain Michelle is going to try to get something from them, Sara wants her far away from her grandparents. She refuses to forgive the deception Michelle acted out. When the Lapps arrive at home, they find their beloved granddaughter Sara talking about leaving, and unable to understand how they could forgive Michelle.Sara is a bitter young woman who feels people have lied to her all their lives. She is unforgiving, even of her late mother, for keeping her away from her grandparents and her birth father. She won’t even try to get along with Michelle. When in the basement of the house one day, she finds a jar full of scripture verses and quotes that someone has saved. Curious, she reads a couple, and returns more than once to see what she will find in it. Sara doesn’t believe in God, however, certain that if God exists, He would care about her, listen to her prayers, even answer them. It takes more than one crisis and a deception of her own, before she is willing to listen hear what Michelle might have to share with her and begin to understand forgiveness.Sara is the primary focus of The Forgiving Jar, even though we do see the continuous changes in Michelle’s life. Both young women are described well, as are the Lapps. Sara was easy to have empathy for when realizing that I have struggled with some of the same emotions. Mary Ruth and Willis, being faithful people of prayer, continue to bring the situation before the Lord. It will be like meeting a new person if the writer of scriptures and quotes in the prayer jars is revealed!Forgiving others is a focus for several people in this novel. I have had to look at my own “history” of forgiving others, and how often I think the slate is clean until remembering a person or event. This delightful yet serious novel is a lesson in many ways. There are twists in the plot, some sweet and some not as sweet, that truly make the story what it is. I highly recommend this to fans of the author and of well-written Amish Christian fiction.From a grateful heart: I received an ARC of this novel from the publisher and NetGalley, and this is my honest review.
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  • Trixi
    January 1, 1970
    Life's situations can become an opportunity for transformation. 3.5 starsThis line holds true for both Michelle and Sara as they face one another after Michelle's deception. The main theme of this story is about forgiveness and the oftentimes painful path to both giving & receiving it. Not only do negative actions result in someone's hurt, but it can create resentment and bitterness as we see in Sara's heart. She already feels cheated when her mom never told her of her loving Amish grandpar Life's situations can become an opportunity for transformation. 3.5 starsThis line holds true for both Michelle and Sara as they face one another after Michelle's deception. The main theme of this story is about forgiveness and the oftentimes painful path to both giving & receiving it. Not only do negative actions result in someone's hurt, but it can create resentment and bitterness as we see in Sara's heart. She already feels cheated when her mom never told her of her loving Amish grandparents, but when she finally meets them, she comes face to face with the woman who impersonated her. To add insult to injury, her grandparents have forgiven Michelle and asked her to live with them. Sara has a hard time dealing with the situation and facing herself will be the most challenging thing she has ever had to do! Will prayers and thoughts written on pieces of paper in an old jar she finds bring peace and healing? I wondered how Sara would react when meeting Michelle and this book tells her side of the story. I couldn't blame her for her negative attitude and was looking forward to seeing her find what her heart needed. The Forgiving Jar was an emotional journey for Sara & Michelle as they worked toward forming a peaceful friendship. There were also threads of romance as we see Ezekiel and Michelle's relationship deepen and grow. I enjoyed catching up with Mary Ruth and Willis, the grandparents who play an important role in both young women's lives. Their prayers never ceased for either one and their unconditional love was certainly a balm to wounded hearts. I really enjoyed the second installment to The Prayer Jars and it boosted my belief that true forgiveness with the Lord's help can heal any rift and bring peace to the believers heart! I look forward forward to The Healing Jar coming August 2019 about Sara's cousin Lenore. I have to agree with other reviewers here, the only drawback was the oftentimes immature attitude and snarkiness in Sara. While I understand there's a real hurt there, I just felt it was overplayed to the point of being annoying. However, it doesn't deter me from wanting to read book three to finish out this series though! *I received a complimentary copy from Barbour Publishing through Netgalley and was under no obligation to leave a favorable review. All opinions are my own. *
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  • Lisa Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Title: The Forgiving Jar (Prayer Jar #2) Author: Wanda Brunstetter Pages: 320 Year: 2019Publisher: Shiloh PressMy rating: 5 out of 5 starsIn the first novel, we meet a couple of female characters who have had tough lives. They live with broken hearts and dreams every day. One of them is named Michelle. Although she played herself off to a set of Amish grandparents as their long-lost granddaughter, she now returns to set the record straight. But will the woman who really is their granddaughter, S Title: The Forgiving Jar (Prayer Jar #2) Author: Wanda Brunstetter Pages: 320 Year: 2019Publisher: Shiloh PressMy rating: 5 out of 5 starsIn the first novel, we meet a couple of female characters who have had tough lives. They live with broken hearts and dreams every day. One of them is named Michelle. Although she played herself off to a set of Amish grandparents as their long-lost granddaughter, she now returns to set the record straight. But will the woman who really is their granddaughter, Sara, ever forgive her? Will the Amish community embrace her or shut her out?Sara cannot understand how her grandparents so easily forgive Michelle. Sara wants them to make her leave the house, but will they do it? Michelle is contemplating and praying about changing from the English world and becoming Amish. Sara is determined to put distance between her and Michelle while jealousy seems to be the main emotion in her heart.Throughout the novel, this tension between Sara and Michelle is mounting. Reading how each of the girls handles their fragile relationship is eye opening. The story is more than about forgiveness. I found it to be about discovering what true love looks like in life. Not from other characters but from God. Can the various characters discern how real and loving God is? In no way does the author make it seem cheesy or easy for the various heart struggles the girls go through, which I thought was brilliant. It made the tale more believable and enjoyable. There were no quick fixes or easy ways to reconcile the two girls, but with others who known the Lord and His Word plus showing them His love, perhaps Sara and Michelle can move beyond the obstacles of the heart.The third book titled, The Healing Jar, is set to be released in August 2019. To thoroughly enjoy what I suspect to be an exciting conclusion to the series, please read The Prayer Jar followed by The Forgiving Jar. You won’t regret it!Note: I received a complimentary copy for an honest review of this book. The opinions shared in this review are solely my responsibility.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    It never fails to amaze me how talented and wonderful Wanda Brunstetter is!! I just love her books and I look forward to her next book because she never disappoints!lI love how she can make her characters feel like real life people doI also enjoy her messages she puts throughout the bookFor example here is one Therefore of any man be in Christ, he is a new creature; old things have passed away; behold , all things are new."I think Jesus meant for me to finish this book because this message was m It never fails to amaze me how talented and wonderful Wanda Brunstetter is!! I just love her books and I look forward to her next book because she never disappoints!lI love how she can make her characters feel like real life people doI also enjoy her messages she puts throughout the bookFor example here is one Therefore of any man be in Christ, he is a new creature; old things have passed away; behold , all things are new."I think Jesus meant for me to finish this book because this message was meant for me to read because of an incident that happened to me this week. Believe it or not it was at church too!!Forgiveness is of course the true message here. I believe forgiveness has to truly come from the heart and I feel that if you don't forgive then it will eat at you until you do or at the very least make you miserable. I'm speaking from experience. My Dad is a perfect example. It took me a very long time to forgive him because of the things he said and did. I prayed for help and it feels so wonderful to be free of that burden!!I liked it that Michelle and Sara were able to forgive each other and learn to live in harmony for Sara's grandparents sake. It's strange how things work out isn't it? Both have pasts to overcome and I enjoyed reading about how that worked out.I loved it that Willis and Mary Ruth are back stronger than ever!! I loved getting to know them in the first book. I wish they were my grandparents!! I wish they were my grandparents because of the kindness and love they show to one another and the people around them.God has truly blessed them!There is a part in the book where I sniffled and a few years welled in my eyes but I am glad that too worked out!! God has a way of working things out if we just pray about it. He may answer or not just not how we'd like him to.I look forward to her next book with eager anticipation!!I received this book from the publishers with compensations received. All opinions are my own
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes sequels struggle to continue the storyline and keep the reader interested, but that is not the case with Wanda Brunstetter’s “The Forgiving Jar”. Picking up where “The Hope Jar” left off, book two in The Prayer Jars series focuses mainly on Sara Murray, although Michelle’s story continues to unfold as well. The two young women clash when they both begin living with Sara’s grandparents because of Michelle’s former deceit. Sara’s character was not very genial for a large portion of the b Sometimes sequels struggle to continue the storyline and keep the reader interested, but that is not the case with Wanda Brunstetter’s “The Forgiving Jar”. Picking up where “The Hope Jar” left off, book two in The Prayer Jars series focuses mainly on Sara Murray, although Michelle’s story continues to unfold as well. The two young women clash when they both begin living with Sara’s grandparents because of Michelle’s former deceit. Sara’s character was not very genial for a large portion of the book, and while I did not like her attitude, the author does a good job of explaining it, and the feelings that Sara experiences are ones that everyone can relate to in some form or another. This is contrasted with Michelle, who has become a Christian and is turning her life around. It did not seem as though there would be a resolution by the end of the novel, but thankfully things came together near the end.“The Forgiving Jar” is a thought-provoking novel that truly engages the reader. Being given the advantage of viewing situations from both Sara’s and Michelle’s point of view adds depth to the reading experience and challenges how readers themselves respond to each scenario. Brunstetter adroitly incorporates Pennsylvania Dutch words into the dialogue while also defining them so that there is no confusion. Learning about how contemporary Amish folks have incorporated some aspects of modern living into their lifestyles while still remaining separate from the modern world is fascinating. Likewise, Sara’s and Michelle’s characters illustrate two different responses to the simple life, both coming from a place of past hurt. This is an excellent novel for those who have read book one and who enjoy a wholesome story full of redemption and healing from the past. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.
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  • Jessica Baker (A Baker's Perspective)
    January 1, 1970
    Since I finished reading book one in this series last year, I have been anxiously awaiting to see what would happen between Sara and Michelle if they were to meet. Plus, see how their futures shaped out. I really wasn't sure what would happen, and formulated many different scenarios in my mind. Let me just say the plan Ms. Brunstetter had was much better then any I imagined!I will say this - Sara was very whiny and immature throughout a good portion of the book. And while it bothered me, I'm act Since I finished reading book one in this series last year, I have been anxiously awaiting to see what would happen between Sara and Michelle if they were to meet. Plus, see how their futures shaped out. I really wasn't sure what would happen, and formulated many different scenarios in my mind. Let me just say the plan Ms. Brunstetter had was much better then any I imagined!I will say this - Sara was very whiny and immature throughout a good portion of the book. And while it bothered me, I'm actually glad Brunstetter wrote it this way. I think had Sara's character been written any other way, her character growth and progression wouldn't have held the same meaning. Sara's journey was my favorite. Yes, Michelle had a lot of growth too, but Sara's was easier to connect with for me. I could see myself reacting exactly as she did throughout much of the book, and then scolded myself for thinking it! But that's what good books do - they make you think.Forgiveness is such a difficult topic to read about, think about, and put into practice. Anytime I see that is going to be a big theme in a book, I almost cringe a little bit because I know it's going to get to me, and it did here too. Yes, it's a hard pill to swallow - but it's so worth it, as shown in several characters in this book.Amish fiction fans will love this book. It's classic Brunstetter, easy to read and fun. The scirptures mentioned were great reminders, and ones that should be highlighted in all of our bibles. That another great thing about Brunstetter - she easily weaves the scriptures into her stories! And while it may seem like it should be easy to do in an Amish book, it really isn't. But Brunstetter makes it look that way :)I received a complimentary copy of this book. I was not required to write a favorable review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Loraine
    January 1, 1970
    I can always depend on Brunstetter's Amish fiction to be clean, gentle and spiritually filling. This second book in The Prayer Jars series fits these descriptors. Sara and Michelle, both characters from book 1, have had difficult past histories with family dysfunction. They both have fallen in love with the Amish town of Strasburg Pennsylvania and Sara's Amish grandparents. Antagonistic to one another because of Michelle's prior duplicity in pretending to be Sara, both girls are encouraged by Sa I can always depend on Brunstetter's Amish fiction to be clean, gentle and spiritually filling. This second book in The Prayer Jars series fits these descriptors. Sara and Michelle, both characters from book 1, have had difficult past histories with family dysfunction. They both have fallen in love with the Amish town of Strasburg Pennsylvania and Sara's Amish grandparents. Antagonistic to one another because of Michelle's prior duplicity in pretending to be Sara, both girls are encouraged by Sara's grandparents to try to be kind to one another. Each of them finds a prayer jar filled with encouraging slips of paper, one in the laundry room and one in the barn, that helps them begin to draw closer to God. I also thought that both Brad and Ezekiel were models of their faith in acknowledging they could not marry unless their partners were Christians as well. I liked the spiritual depth that Brunstetter always writes within her Amish fiction. Both girls grew in faith especially Sara after accepting Jesus as her Savior. The book is filled with forgiveness, models of family support and unity, as well as a couple of sweet, slowly developing romances. I hope that there is a book 3 because I would like to find out more about the story behind the prayer jars themselves. Well written Amish fiction that does not follow the usual formulaic patterns of so many Amish books.**I received a complimentary copy of this book from Shiloh Run Press through NetGalley. Opinions are mine alone. I was not compensated for this review.
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  • Fizzy
    January 1, 1970
    How would you react if someone stole your identity, created a relationship with your grandparents (that you have never met!) pretending to by you, and the ran for the hills with money they ‘borrowed’ without asking from said grandparents? How would you react when you return back to visit and find this same person living with your grandparents. . .again? Could you forgive them? Would you even want to? I’ll be honest. I’d probably want to throat punch them every day of the week, not just Thursday. How would you react if someone stole your identity, created a relationship with your grandparents (that you have never met!) pretending to by you, and the ran for the hills with money they ‘borrowed’ without asking from said grandparents? How would you react when you return back to visit and find this same person living with your grandparents. . .again? Could you forgive them? Would you even want to? I’ll be honest. I’d probably want to throat punch them every day of the week, not just Thursday. I think the idea of forgiveness would make me see red and make we want to have them see stars, forget the actual act of forgiveness. I think if each one of us were honest that would be our reaction. I think it would even be hard to give ‘lip service’ to the idea of forgiveness. The difference between myself and Sara is that with time, she can see a way forward. The difference between me and Willis and Mary Ruth is night and day. I pray to have a heart of forgiveness that they have cultivated. I’m not a hothead by any stretch, I’m more a mad crier, but I don’t know that I wouldn’t react more viscerally to something like this. Hopefully I never have to find out!While I can, and do, completely commiserate with Sara she is the one that really and truly got on my nerves this time. She is the one that started trending to the unlikable. I think in her quest to vindicate herself she is vilifying Michelle, beyond what is truly necessary. Brad, who professes to simply want to get to know the real Sara, is quick to latch onto Sara’s judgement and also way too quick to decide they might have a future together. It felt a little too much too fast tossed with a side of might be insta-love. Ezekiel on the other hand is just head over heals all is well with the world. I feel like he was too caught up in Michelle before either one of them made any decisions that greatly impact their actual future. I am trying to tread lightly here so as not to spoiler anything. So basically, Sara needs to stop talking to her self so much and dumping on Brad so much because that might make me like her a bit better. Brad needs to slow his romance roll a smidge while Michelle and Ezekiel are floating in a bubble of love that no one can rain on their parade. The things that annoyed me in a nutshell. However, it truly was not annoying as I did absolutely love this book. Like in ‘The Hope Jar‘ they were mere hiccups.I love that the jars came back into play, and actually played into a bonding opportunity for Sara and Michelle. I wish they had been featured more prominently though there was more meat to the jars this time around. There are still so many unanswered questions too. Like who wrote them!?! I would love to see the girls add to these jars or even start their own. I mean, these jars have helped them both to right their wrongs and find their way to faith. These jars have helped Michelle find her place in the world, a family she has never had, and her ever after. They have started that journey for Sara as well. Do you ever come across something in a book and wish you had thought of it. An ‘I could have done that’ moment. And there’s a part of you want wants to do it and a part of you that feels like you are too old to do it and another part altogether that wishes you had done it ‘back when’. I feel that. I also wish someone before me had done this for me to find as I struggled through the years that are stereotypically agnsty. I know there has to be another book. There are too many loose ends for my personal satisfaction. Like who wrote them! I will wait ever so impatiently for that book to find it’s way into the world.I was provided a complimentary copy of this book by Barbour Publishing, NetGalley. I was not compensated for this review and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own. I was not required to write a positive review. Originally posted at https://fizzypopcollection.com/the-fo....
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  • Anne Rightler
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgiving Jar by much-loved author Wanda Brunstetter is the second book in her new series, The Prayer Jars. Readers will follow the characters from the first book in the series, The Hope Jar. The author has given enough of the back story of the characters that one could read The Forgiving Jar as a stand-alone without getting lost and having a lot of questions. I loved the characters --strong, resilient, and realistic with depth to their emotions, strengths, and foibles that readers will conn The Forgiving Jar by much-loved author Wanda Brunstetter is the second book in her new series, The Prayer Jars. Readers will follow the characters from the first book in the series, The Hope Jar. The author has given enough of the back story of the characters that one could read The Forgiving Jar as a stand-alone without getting lost and having a lot of questions. I loved the characters --strong, resilient, and realistic with depth to their emotions, strengths, and foibles that readers will connect well with. Mary Ruth and Willis Lapp, trusting and compassionate. Michelle is filled with self doubt and feelings of unworthiness. Sara is flat out suspicious, angry and pretty much unforgiving towards Michelle who had 'wormed her way' into Sara's grandparents' hearts. Will the canning jars with notes of wisdom like "Broken people are made whole by God's love." be the key to a change of heart for each of the young women? Can they recognize that what's done is done and can't be changed or would each of their pasts continue to haunt them? The Forgiving Jar is a beautifully captivating story of forgiveness, family, finding faith, and lots of romance too. You won't want to miss this sweet Amish romance. I can't wait for the next book in the series, The Healing Jar. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.
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