House of Trump, House of Putin
House of Trump, House of Putin offers the first comprehensive investigation into the decades-long relationship among Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin, and the Russian Mafia that ultimately helped win Trump the White House. It is a chilling story that begins in the 1970s, when Trump made his first splash in the booming, money-drenched world of New York real estate, and ends with Trump’s inauguration as president of the United States. That moment was the culmination of Vladimir Putin’s long mission to undermine Western democracy, a mission that he and his hand-selected group of oligarchs and Mafia kingpins had ensnared Trump in, starting more than twenty years ago with the massive bailout of a string of sensational Trump hotel and casino failures in Atlantic City. This book confirms the most incredible American paranoias about Russian malevolence. To most, it will be a hair-raising revelation that the Cold War did not end in 1991—that it merely evolved, with Trump’s apartments offering the perfect vehicle for billions of dollars to leave the collapsing Soviet Union. In House of Trump, House of Putin, Craig Unger methodically traces the deep-rooted alliance between the highest echelons of American political operatives and the biggest players in the frightening underworld of the Russian Mafia. He traces Donald Trump’s sordid ascent from foundering real estate tycoon to leader of the free world. He traces Russia’s phoenixlike rise from the ashes of the post–Cold War Soviet Union as well as its ceaseless covert efforts to retaliate against the West and reclaim its status as a global superpower. Without Trump, Russia would have lacked a key component in its attempts to return to imperial greatness. Without Russia, Trump would not be president. This essential book is crucial to understanding the real powers at play in the shadows of today’s world.

House of Trump, House of Putin Details

TitleHouse of Trump, House of Putin
Author
ReleaseAug 14th, 2018
PublisherDutton
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Politics, History, Audiobook, Cultural, Russia

House of Trump, House of Putin Review

  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    There is nothing light-hearted about this book; it is frighteningly serious. If you want a giggle about the US Pres, well, there's Unhinged, Everything Trump Touches Dies, and several other more or less serious entries. This book will scare you shitless if you live anywhere in the so-called Western world. Unger paints Russia as basically a country controlled by organized crime lords (Oligarchs, if you like) with Putin being the capo di tutti capi and the richest man in the world (circa 200 billi There is nothing light-hearted about this book; it is frighteningly serious. If you want a giggle about the US Pres, well, there's Unhinged, Everything Trump Touches Dies, and several other more or less serious entries. This book will scare you shitless if you live anywhere in the so-called Western world. Unger paints Russia as basically a country controlled by organized crime lords (Oligarchs, if you like) with Putin being the capo di tutti capi and the richest man in the world (circa 200 billion!)...oh, and maybe a pedophile. Putin's aim is clearly to "conquer" the west and as such has useful idiots in virtually all countries working toward that end...Trump, Marine Le Pin from France, Viktor Orban from Hungary, Conte from Italy, etc. There is no doubt that Trump is deeply involved with the Russians and has been for decades. This review may sound paranoid as hell but you definitely will not be thinking that after reading this very scary book.
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  • Mary Abbott
    January 1, 1970
    Frightening!It's taking me longer than usual to write a review because I am speechless! I fear for Mr Unger's life with this book's release. Putin and his murderous thugs will find a way for him to have an accident.
  • Robert A. Yaffee, Ph.D.
    January 1, 1970
    Craig Unger, in his "House of Trump, House of Putin: The Untold Story of Donald Trump and the Russian Mafia presents a thesis as to how Donald Trump was compromised by Russian money laundering after having been followed by the Check STB, and later evaluated, targeted, and cultivated by Russians. The book is well researched, written, and replete with the scholarly documentation. However, Unger's approach focuses on the evolution of the personal connections and mob networks of Donald Trump and his Craig Unger, in his "House of Trump, House of Putin: The Untold Story of Donald Trump and the Russian Mafia presents a thesis as to how Donald Trump was compromised by Russian money laundering after having been followed by the Check STB, and later evaluated, targeted, and cultivated by Russians. The book is well researched, written, and replete with the scholarly documentation. However, Unger's approach focuses on the evolution of the personal connections and mob networks of Donald Trump and his real estate business and their links to Russia, it's "near-abroad", Brighten Beach, Israel, and New York since the Rise of Vladimir Putin. It provides an invaluable perspective of how Donald Trump ran for President. To understand the political forces within Russia that gave rise to Putin, Ambassador Michael McFaul's From Cold War to Hot Peace (2017) is an excellent analysis. Luke Harding's book, "Collusion: Secret Meetings, Dirty Money, and How Russia helped Trump Win (2017) is a superb treatment of a conspiratorial thriller. In the same genre to explain Trump's run for President, Michael Issikoff and David Corn's Russian Roulette (2017) is a similarly exciting work. Malcolm Nance's (2018) The Plot to Destroy Democracy and The Plot to Hack America (2016) yield a slightly more scholarly presentation of the background and development a Putin covert strategy to re-establish Russian dominance in world affairs vis-a-vis the West. Gen. Michael Hayden's The Assault on Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies, and James R. Clapper's (2018) Facts and Fears: Hard Truths from a Life of Intelligence (2018), provide essential critiques of Trump's organization and naive approaches to comprehend the challenges facing U.S. intelligence during recent years. Both of these books are more analytical treatments of the contemporary political situation in the U.S.. All of these works help to explain Putin's covert hybrid warfare waged against the 27 Western Democracies, in a endeavor to re-establish the pre-eminence of Russia in world affairs by overwhelming the influence of NATO and its member states. To understand what happened in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election, all of these works deserve a place on the required reading list. Both former Director of National Intelligence and Craig Unger believe that Putin succeeded in effectively swaying enough of the vote to give Trump the electoral victor because it only took about 78,000 votes in three swing states, each of which was targeted by Russian active measures, to make that difference. There are some educational implications. We will have to teach critical analysis in school. It may have to include studies of ontology and epistemology so our students develop the ability to apply a modicum of healthy skepticism, logic, and rationality in order to identify propaganda projected through information warfare. Youngsters will have to become sensitive to purveyers of inconsistency, exaggeration, hyperbole, mendacity, and frequent repetition of fallacies and falsehoods devoid of proper substantiation. Observation, measurement, testing, consistency, criterion validation, and replicability should be taught as the criteria of reality. Students should learn to be wary of salesman inclined to do use oversimplified stereotypical branding to mobilize a tyranny of fatuous partisan conformity. They will have to learn how to challenge such progenitors of political snake-oil to a civil debate. Rational and civil public debate should be used for conflict resolution rather than immature duels of honor around the corner at the OK Corral. There are political implications as well. We need to recognize that our system of elections is in serious need of periodic upgrading to fortify it against partisan gerrymandering, floods of dark money, and institutionalized bribery through legal loopholes allowing layered shell corporations to funnel unlimited funds to candidates from other countries (as provided for in the Citizens United vs. FEC (2010) majority opinion). Without such reforms we will be plagued with a flawed election system that will be targeted by other adversaries seeking to undermine governmental legitimacy in our polity.
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  • Christopher
    January 1, 1970
    There's not much "new" here. It's resourced thoroughly from journalists and FBI files. I'm only left wondering how he was allowed to run for president in the first place. He should've been and should be in jail.
  • Lance Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I was debating what to rate this book; a part of me felt it was worth five stars due to the contemporary relevance of the content but another part felt it was more of a three due to some flaws with the book. So, I split the difference and went with four stars. The book spends most of its time discussing the rise of the international Russian criminal organizations and their ties to both Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. While very interesting, the book doesn't really present much new information s I was debating what to rate this book; a part of me felt it was worth five stars due to the contemporary relevance of the content but another part felt it was more of a three due to some flaws with the book. So, I split the difference and went with four stars. The book spends most of its time discussing the rise of the international Russian criminal organizations and their ties to both Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. While very interesting, the book doesn't really present much new information since most of it seems to be pulled from old news articles rather than original research. In this sense the book functions best as a summary of what is known so far, a role which it performs admirably. However, it is not without flaws. There are many paragraphs where the author makes some broad claims as if they were fact but provides no indication as to where he got the information: no annotations, no mentions, nothing. In other areas the author is so vague about the connections he is describing that I felt unclear whether or not the relationships were legitimate or criminal in nature. Again, limited citations in these areas. Admittedly, this mostly occurred with smaller details and people rather than with the larger connections but it still irked me and left me feeling dissatisfied. It is a worthwhile read, but not a bombshell.
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  • Daniel Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely amazing! After reading this book many of Trump’s more bizarre moves suddenly make sense. If this information became well known, even the Trumpiest of Trumpsters might have to rethink their positions.
  • James Schiada
    January 1, 1970
    Tells it all ... Very readable
  • Ryland Quillen
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing eye-opening but it’s nice to have the timeline all in one spot, and to learn about Trump’s dirty money ties which I feel like the media doesn’t emphasize quite enough.
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    Not fun but certainly fascinating.
  • Cristy Harts
    January 1, 1970
    Well sourced. Terrifying.
  • Sean
    January 1, 1970
    Necessary and frightening.
  • Bettie☯
    January 1, 1970
    Though engaging, this fresh look at Donald Trump’s links to Russia adds little to the story
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