The Passengers
Eight self-drive cars set on a collision course. Who lives, who dies? You decide.When someone hacks into the systems of eight self-drive cars, their passengers are set on a fatal collision course.The passengers are: a TV star, a pregnant young woman, a disabled war hero, an abused wife fleeing her husband, an illegal immigrant, a husband and wife - and parents of two - who are travelling in separate vehicles and a suicidal man. Now the public have to judge who should survive but are the passengers all that they first seem?

The Passengers Details

TitleThe Passengers
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 1st, 2019
PublisherEbury Digital
ISBN-139781473558526
Rating
GenreThriller, Science Fiction, Fiction, Mystery

The Passengers Review

  • myra
    January 1, 1970
    This was so good, I couldn not put this book down. Took one break in between to eat and went straight back reading. Can’t remember the last time i finished a book in one day. John Marrs had me shook!The plot twist in the end, my god. This is the first book that i have read by Mr. Marrs and I’m definitely going to give his other books a try. It’s better if you read The Passengers without knowing what the story is about. I think that it will make it more enjoyable. At least, for me it was.Anyway, This was so good, I couldn not put this book down. Took one break in between to eat and went straight back reading. Can’t remember the last time i finished a book in one day. John Marrs had me shook!The plot twist in the end, my god. This is the first book that i have read by Mr. Marrs and I’m definitely going to give his other books a try. It’s better if you read The Passengers without knowing what the story is about. I think that it will make it more enjoyable. At least, for me it was.Anyway, I highly recommend this book, especially if you like thrillers and science fiction.
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  • Susanne Strong
    January 1, 1970
    4 Stars“The Passengers” by John Marrs is a scream, I promise!Eight driverless cars. Eight passengers, all of whom have a secret and a specific plan for that morning. None arrive at their intended destination. There is a Hacker who knows everything about everyone and he has decided to take control. There are five members of the jury whose sole purpose is to decide who lives and who dies. The fear is real my friends. “The Passengers” will scare you. Yea, “The Jetsons” made the idea of a futuristic 4 Stars“The Passengers” by John Marrs is a scream, I promise!Eight driverless cars. Eight passengers, all of whom have a secret and a specific plan for that morning. None arrive at their intended destination. There is a Hacker who knows everything about everyone and he has decided to take control. There are five members of the jury whose sole purpose is to decide who lives and who dies. The fear is real my friends. “The Passengers” will scare you. Yea, “The Jetsons” made the idea of a futuristic car look cute, “The Passengers,” not so much. What this is, is a thrilling ride down the fast lane, going 100 mph. Can you say EEK?! This is the 3rd novel I’ve read by John Marrs and it is definitely my favorite so far. It’s crazy, insane and scary to boot. I had high hopes for a five star read but had to dock it one star for the ending, which left a little to be desired. I highly recommend this one for thriller fans as it contains a very unique premise which is sure to entertain. This was a buddy read with Ms. Kaceey! We really enjoyed discussing the premise of this one and think all of you will too.Thank you to Edelweiss, Penguin Publishing Group and John Marrs for an arc of this novel in exchange for an arc. Published on Edelweiss and Goodreads on 5.7.19.Will be published on Amazon on 8.27.19
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  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    Five billions, need an urgent brain transplant cause my old one is just blown away and out of order stars!!!My head still hurts like I tossed it against the wall thousand times and I started to see cartoon stars on my head as soon as I finish this one! I cannot say I’m speechless because I forgot four languages I’ve known ( including my native one) right now so I’m out of words. This is so revolutionary, innovative, creative book makes you think a lot, thrill a lot and numb your mind! It makes m Five billions, need an urgent brain transplant cause my old one is just blown away and out of order stars!!!My head still hurts like I tossed it against the wall thousand times and I started to see cartoon stars on my head as soon as I finish this one! I cannot say I’m speechless because I forgot four languages I’ve known ( including my native one) right now so I’m out of words. This is so revolutionary, innovative, creative book makes you think a lot, thrill a lot and numb your mind! It makes me you question your values, morals. On some parts I felt like a jury member and thought which one was worse? To be a decision maker of someone’s mortality or stuck inside a death trap car when all of your skeletons in the closet reveal one by one. I’m really doubtful that Mr. Marrs is from this planet because he outsmarted most of the genius writers with this book. He is so talented, knows how to deceive the readers with his conspiratorial moves and amazing twists. I liked “ One” a lot but I liked “ Passangers” sooo much more! This is the most surprising, exhilarating book I’ve really enjoyed! It really exhausted me because it was not easy adventure for everyone!
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  • Bibi
    January 1, 1970
    *Spoilers beyond here, you've been warned*There's nothing that makes you question yourself than when your opinions are the polar opposite of others'. In this instance, there are several issues which made this book somewhat mediocre, in my opinion of course. One, did Libby actually need to be in the room with the other jurors? Her presence felt like a big fat deus ex machina utilized to ensure the reader would care about the ensuing events. It was lazy and unimaginative.Two, why mastermind an act *Spoilers beyond here, you've been warned*There's nothing that makes you question yourself than when your opinions are the polar opposite of others'. In this instance, there are several issues which made this book somewhat mediocre, in my opinion of course. One, did Libby actually need to be in the room with the other jurors? Her presence felt like a big fat deus ex machina utilized to ensure the reader would care about the ensuing events. It was lazy and unimaginative.Two, why mastermind an act of revenge, against the system that not only cheated your family of a fortune but also was complicit in the death of three generations of the same family, when other innocent citizens' lives would be in peril? In addition, why those 8 passengers and what were the criteria for choosing them? More importantly, why did the author choose to eliminate, Bilquis and Shabana, the only POCs in the entire story? Did Marrs not understand the racial undertones surrounding that decision, especially in this Brexit nationalistic period, and considering there were several other white characters who could similarly have been eliminated. Three, why did Noah pretend to be Jude and for that matter, why go through the convoluted process of their initial meeting? It made no sense other than Marrs using that and numerous other coincidences to piece together the fracture within the story. That Libby happened to have witnessed the aforementioned deaths just seemed too convenient. Idk, something about the plot and execution seems convoluted and protracted. Don't misunderstand I thought the premise, of an Orwellian society with driverless cars, was brilliant. Likewise, the motivation for revenge, yet, the act itself was misplaced and unjustifiable IMO. In comparison, consider Marrs' other book The One (which I loved) wherein the motivation and justification for Matthew's revenge was without question. It just made sense and the punishment for Ellie's complicity matched the crime. Ultimately, it was certainly a great premise which was let down by the above issues. However, please do not let this stop you from buying the book as this is no more than the opinion of an outlier.
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  • NZLisaM
    January 1, 1970
    John Marrs' best, and most ambitious, book to date.Picture this! It's the near future and you're cruising along in your state-of-the-art driverless car. You might be eating breakfast, applying makeup, reading a book, talking on the phone, or just relaxing, when all of a sudden your car deviates from it's pre-programmed destination.Then a voice sounds from the centre console: ‘”It may have come to your attention that your vehicle is no longer under your management. From here on in, I am in charge John Marrs' best, and most ambitious, book to date.Picture this! It's the near future and you're cruising along in your state-of-the-art driverless car. You might be eating breakfast, applying makeup, reading a book, talking on the phone, or just relaxing, when all of a sudden your car deviates from it's pre-programmed destination.Then a voice sounds from the centre console: ‘”It may have come to your attention that your vehicle is no longer under your management. From here on in, I am in charge of your destination. “' This is what happens to eight autonomous British cars carrying eight passengers. And the worse news is still to come. The terrorist who's taken control intends to crash the cars into one another at full speed. Well, seven of them anyway. One of them will be spared, and each passenger will be given the opportunity to plead their case.And who will ultimately decide their fate? The internet public. Because everything that's happening is live streaming.Exciting, high-speed, pulse-pounding, as well as frightening and unsettling. This was the maximum tech-thriller. A timely and all too relevant insight into the potentially destructive nature of technology – how reliant on it we are, how it's changing the way we connect with the world, interact and view one another, exposing us to dangers that used to be the stuff of science fiction. The spread of social media features prominently, with mob and mass mentality, lack of personal responsibility and accountability, and vigilantism rearing its ugly head in judgemental and hateful ways.I was immersed in the story from the first sentence to the last, and the action was fast paced, and non-stop, from start to finish. There were ‘gasp out loud' moments, cliffhanger chapter endings, a satisfying, surprising conclusion, and relevant articles, newspaper clippings, paperwork, and internet posts preceding chapters. Every character was unique and complex, their fear and anxiety all too real.The high level of detail and research the author put into his futuristic driverless cars – the mechanics of how they operated, their features, governing rules, laws, and regulations, made this novel all the more fascinating and impressive. This was set in the same universe as The One, with Match Your DNA contributing to the plot.With just over a week left in May, The Passengers is in prime position to be crowned my top read of the month. Everything about it was crazy good, and I have no hesitation in recommending it to all readers. Fingers crossed, that like The One, this also gets picked up for a Netflix series.I'd like to thank Netgalley, Penguin Random House UK – Ebury Publishing, and John Marrs for the e-ARC.UK Release Date: 30th May, 2019.US Release Date: 27th August, 2019.
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  • Tan Markovic
    January 1, 1970
    When you want to write a review but have no idea how to do the book justice :')-John Marrs never disappoints....What an amazing book!
  • Dennis
    January 1, 1970
    I can't believe I was just able to binge read another 400+ page book in record speed. I recently read John Marrs's The One because I heard it was going to be a Netflix series, so I was very excited to pick up his latest Black Mirror-esque novel, The Passengers . The Passengers takes place in the not so distant future, and autonomous cars are now regulated and compulsory during UK's new plan to try and circumvent human error for fatalities, accidents, pollution, and other traffic related trage I can't believe I was just able to binge read another 400+ page book in record speed. I recently read John Marrs's The One because I heard it was going to be a Netflix series, so I was very excited to pick up his latest Black Mirror-esque novel, The Passengers . The Passengers takes place in the not so distant future, and autonomous cars are now regulated and compulsory during UK's new plan to try and circumvent human error for fatalities, accidents, pollution, and other traffic related tragedies. I'm not going to give too much about this story, because it's fast-paced and you'll need to be surprised as the story develops, but imagine eight people all trapped in their autonomous car with no means to escape. We have a refugee woman, a woman who doesn't speak English and provides for her family, a wife and husband of ten years, a pregnant mother, a young man, a famous legendary actress, and a double amputee army veteran. Each person is trapped, with their routes being taken over by a collective. This collective is here to make a statement—after two and a half hours, one of them will live, while the rest will die in a horrible accident. When the news reaches five influential people tasked to help decide the outcome, people's bigotry, xenophobia, sexism, homophobia, and dark rooted socio-economic opinions start unraveling. I won't go any further on Goodreads with the synopsis on this awesome story, but if you want to know more, let me know privately because I can go on and on about this story all day! I enjoyed the social commentary that Marrs provides in The Passengers , that seems to be lacking in many thrillers that I've seen before. We get hints of ignorance and micro-aggressions from people that we may not have expected, how society shames those that are different (you'll know what I mean when you see the hashtags), and how as a society we still need to change and keep ourselves in check. The Passengers is just light years ahead of it's competition when it comes to social intelligence and the surrounding environment. I hope you'll notice it too. A key aspect that I absolutely loved about The Passengers during the narrative was how shocking it was to see the misfortune of these eight passengers, and how it became a worldwide phenomenon. How would this be something that all of the media, and the people watching it, be tuned into? Then I realized, wait I fell victim too! I couldn't put the book down—I needed to know who was going to live, who was going to die, and how it was going to happen! I'm just as guilty as the portrayal of the spectators in the story. While The Passengers does touch on some key social commentary, the book is a thriller so it's here to entertain. You'll enjoy the pacing, and you'll enjoy that Marrs gives zero f's about who should, and who shouldn't die. Everyone has a target on their back, and just because you may think they should live, doesn't mean life turns out that way. The Passengers should be on your TBR, and expect to see big things when this book is released to the public.
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  • Pauline
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a big fan of John Marrs books and I was delighted to receive an ARC of his new book The Passengers and I was not disappointed.I was hooked from the first page and I did not want to put it down.This thriller is about the dangers of technology. Eight driverless cars have their operation systems hacked and are on a collision course. The passengers are told this and we see their reactions and the reactions of the social media and television audiences.This book kept me on the edge of my seat with I'm a big fan of John Marrs books and I was delighted to receive an ARC of his new book The Passengers and I was not disappointed.I was hooked from the first page and I did not want to put it down.This thriller is about the dangers of technology. Eight driverless cars have their operation systems hacked and are on a collision course. The passengers are told this and we see their reactions and the reactions of the social media and television audiences.This book kept me on the edge of my seat with some great characters and lots of twist and turns.Thank you to NetGalley and Penguin Random House UK for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Mandy White
    January 1, 1970
    I read The Passengers by John Marrs with thanks to Pigeonhole Books. That meant that I was reading 10% of the book each day. I found this really hard to do with this book, especially the way that each stave ending on a cliff hanger. I just wanted to keep reading and I think that if I was reading it normally I would have read it in a day or so. I really enjoyed this book and looked forward to each days installmentIn a not so far off future we live in a world of self drive cars. Not everybody is a I read The Passengers by John Marrs with thanks to Pigeonhole Books. That meant that I was reading 10% of the book each day. I found this really hard to do with this book, especially the way that each stave ending on a cliff hanger. I just wanted to keep reading and I think that if I was reading it normally I would have read it in a day or so. I really enjoyed this book and looked forward to each days installmentIn a not so far off future we live in a world of self drive cars. Not everybody is a fan and personally the thought terrifies me - where is the control. On the day that the book is set, somebody hacks into the systems of 8 cars - belonging to a TV star, a war hero, an illegal immigrant, a pregnant woman, an abused wife, a suicidal man and a husband and wife travelling in separate cars. All of them have secrets and have to show the public that they deserve to live. The public will decide who dies and who lives. Scary stuff!
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    Hi below is my review for ‘The Passengers’ and next up a book by an author never read any previous books by so lets see....‘The Passengers’ by John Marrs published 16th May ( please note date ) by Penguin Random House UK Ebury Publishing/Del Rey!Hi, well fans, old and new, of John Marrs know that a new book will be good but you are never quite sure what the book will hold as they are all so different....one of my favourite books and the book that started me reviewing ‘The One’ is about to be tur Hi below is my review for ‘The Passengers’ and next up a book by an author never read any previous books by so lets see....‘The Passengers’ by John Marrs published 16th May ( please note date ) by Penguin Random House UK Ebury Publishing/Del Rey!Hi, well fans, old and new, of John Marrs know that a new book will be good but you are never quite sure what the book will hold as they are all so different....one of my favourite books and the book that started me reviewing ‘The One’ is about to be turned into a 10 part Netflix series ( will be brill ) and it was good to see this book’s story referenced a few times ( albeit briefly ) in relation to characters in this book...........So, this book....The world now has driverless cars, full on 100% driverless where the person needs do nothing except sit, its perfect and unhackable....until one day the system IS hacked....8 ‘passengers’ are on their way to various locations when suddenly they are told their car has been taken over......social media and a jury already sitting for another purpose ( related to driverless cars ) are to judge who lives....and who doesn’tIts fascinating stuff as the 8 are revealed ( and their lives ) and asked to speak about themselves and why they should be saved People decideBut do they know the truth behind the 8.....and how will peoples choices change as secrets are unearthedThe book cleverly weaves you into the same web as the voters are being led and I was sorry and scared for them, then horrified by them, then once again back on their side, well some of them....really this book changed my view on the 8 that many times and you never knew what was coming next, I felt I was part of the jury and got very involved in the plot, the characters and their outcomesThe book is so well written, enjoyable, scary, full on, exciting, terrifying, your emotions are all over the place The outcome and final part of the book takes unexpected turn after turn and the ending had me cheering 😃A short quirky social media/ news /poll /soundbite starts each chapter which was different and a good addition Its easy to say ‘unputdownable’ but this book is just thatLike ‘The One’ ‘The Passengers’ will stay with me and will you tooJust superb 10/10 5 Stars
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  • Sonja Arlow
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI went to a very interesting cyber hacking event this week and I couldn’t help myself, I had to just ask the host about the hacking capabilities of self-driving cars. I was loudly assured that at this point there are no threats…….. but quietly told that it can’t be ruled out in future as hackers evolve with technology.This story is set in the not too distant future where self-driving cars are ubiquitous. Traffic congestion, accidents and pollution has gone down dramatically. New industr 3.5 starsI went to a very interesting cyber hacking event this week and I couldn’t help myself, I had to just ask the host about the hacking capabilities of self-driving cars. I was loudly assured that at this point there are no threats…….. but quietly told that it can’t be ruled out in future as hackers evolve with technology.This story is set in the not too distant future where self-driving cars are ubiquitous. Traffic congestion, accidents and pollution has gone down dramatically. New industries and jobs have been built around this revolution in transportation.8 different people get up on a fateful morning, order their cars and get in to start their day. But they will never reach their destinations. Very quickly they realise that their cars have been taken over by someone else who is hell bent on ensuring that their cars will collide in the next few hours.The governing body that oversees the efficacy of AI technology are contacted by the Hacker, forcing them to choose which passengers live or die. The general public also get involved as footage of the panicked passengers are streamed to social media. A flurry of hashtags are born and the story almost takes on a reality TV feel. This is my second book by John Marrs and I think he will become one of my go-to authors for easy fun reads. I also enjoyed the way that mob mentality on social media was explored and how the secrets of each passenger was revealed. This is one of those books that should be saved for a holiday as you would probably want to read this undisturbed. RecommendedNetgalley ARC: Expected publish date 01 April 2019
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    John Marrs has gone and done it again! A timely technothriller premise and superb execution make this a pleasure to read; I'd even go as far as to say that it's his best thriller to date and that is indeed saying something. From the moment you eagerly consume the first page, you are expertly held in a vice-like grip where putting it down is simply not an option. This is the type of book that will make you read through the night despite having to work in the morning, the type of book that means y John Marrs has gone and done it again! A timely technothriller premise and superb execution make this a pleasure to read; I'd even go as far as to say that it's his best thriller to date and that is indeed saying something. From the moment you eagerly consume the first page, you are expertly held in a vice-like grip where putting it down is simply not an option. This is the type of book that will make you read through the night despite having to work in the morning, the type of book that means you burn your dinner, the type of book that makes you miss your stop on the train. In other words, the very best type of book. It's a long time since I encountered a novel quite as topical and absolutely riveting. Marrs has been one of my favourite writers for many years, but this cements his place even more and shows him at the very top of his game. In fact, this is so good it puts other crime fiction to shame.Now, the twists and turns in The Passengers are plentiful and although I read at least 500 books, most of which are from this genre, I failed to predict exactly what was going to happen, and boy, you have to love it when that happens. There's nothing worse than a predictable thriller now is there? Even though it is heavily based in a future world where technological advances have changed the way we live Marrs masterfully makes it plausible when it could've quite easily have been outrageously improbable. As always, it's well written with a cast of beautifully developed and engaging characters and thrilling from picking up until putting it down. If it doesn't have you on the edge of your seat then please book an appointment with your GP as there is seriously something wrong.A five-star page-turner which is an absolute must-read, and one of the most accomplished, addictive, unsettling and entertaining thrillers I've ever had the pleasure to devour. It will no doubt cement his status in the hearts and minds of long-term fans and gain him many new disciples.Many thanks to Del Rey for an ARC.
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  • Tania
    January 1, 1970
    As always John Marrs does not disappoint. This time round he introduces is to a world where self-driven vehicles are the norm, although not everyone is convinced that this should be so. Libby, the main protagonist, is one of the few who have doubts about the safety of the vehicles. On her second day on a jury deciding blame in driverless fatal accidents, eight of these cars gets hacked and their passengers informed that they will be dead in a few hours. The above event is televised, and the whol As always John Marrs does not disappoint. This time round he introduces is to a world where self-driven vehicles are the norm, although not everyone is convinced that this should be so. Libby, the main protagonist, is one of the few who have doubts about the safety of the vehicles. On her second day on a jury deciding blame in driverless fatal accidents, eight of these cars gets hacked and their passengers informed that they will be dead in a few hours. The above event is televised, and the whole situation turns into a social media circus. What I enjoy most about this authors books is that he tends to create quite a lot of characters, and then to give them all very different, very interesting backstories. I liked the focus on social media, but felt this book was a bit more far-fetched than some of his others. He has definitely created his own little niche, and his books are perfect for a quick bit of escapism.
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  • The Book Review Café
    January 1, 1970
    I’m all for advances in technology, especially if it involves self-drive cars as someone who never got the hang of driving it sounds like the perfect mode of transport or so I thought! Now I’ve read The Passengers by John Marrs I’ve done a U turn (excuse the pun) and I will definitely stick to riding my bike! The Passenger a futuristic novel set in the not to distance future blew me away its original, taut and brilliantly written. I read this book at every opportunity, irritated by the slightest I’m all for advances in technology, especially if it involves self-drive cars as someone who never got the hang of driving it sounds like the perfect mode of transport or so I thought! Now I’ve read The Passengers by John Marrs I’ve done a U turn (excuse the pun) and I will definitely stick to riding my bike! The Passenger a futuristic novel set in the not to distance future blew me away its original, taut and brilliantly written. I read this book at every opportunity, irritated by the slightest disturbance, which for me is always a sign of a fantastic read. The Passengers begins with eight driverless cars have their systems hacked and set on a collusion course, unfortunately for the eight passengers, but even more so when their fates are in the hands of the public who have to vote via social media which one should survive, and that’s where the story gets very interesting. Each passenger appears to be an ordinary person going about their day-to-day life’s, it’s only when the author digs deeper into each character you realise that some are lying by omission, others have dark secrets or appear to be living a lie. What terrible things has each person committed, that they find themselves caught up in hackers very twisted games?John Marrs has created a bunch of fascinating but flawed characters and none of them are as they first appear, as each of their stories unfold you will gasp with shock, fight back the disgust, and sympathise with some characters, but you can’t help forming an opinion of which passenger should die. Which leaves you with a dilemma what if you choose the wrong passenger swayed by the bare facts or what you read or saw on social media? This gives the read an interactive feel as you ponder various moral dilemmas the hacker presents. From the moment someone hack the passengers cars, you sense their bewilderment, and as events take a far more sinister tone, their fear is palatable. The Passengers is an edge of your seat read, one where you are thrown into the thick of the action from the start, where every chapter leaves you with a mother of a cliffhanger, urging you on to its explosive conclusion. I love the way the author has constructed a novel that plays on the fear of what happens when technology falls into the wrong hands future and is used against us.This novel without any doubt is one of the most exciting Sci Fi thrillers I’ve had the pleasure to read in a long time. I’m sure this book will be snapped up for a TV adaptation following in the footsteps of The one , yes it really is that good. Would I recommend The Passengers? it’s a HUGE “yes”, it’s definitely one that will be on my top reads of 2019. A word of advice buy it now, expect the unexpected and buckle up for a hell of a ride. All my reviews can be found at http://thebookreviewcafe.com
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  • Lainy
    January 1, 1970
    Time taken to read - 1 dayPages - 400Publisher - Ebury DigitalSource - NetgalleyBlurb from Goodreads Eight self-drive cars set on a collision course. Who lives, who dies? You decide.When someone hacks into the systems of eight self-drive cars, their passengers are set on a fatal collision course.The passengers are: a TV star, a pregnant young woman, a disabled war hero, an abused wife fleeing her husband, an illegal immigrant, a husband and wife - and parents of two - who are travelling in separ Time taken to read - 1 dayPages - 400Publisher - Ebury DigitalSource - NetgalleyBlurb from Goodreads Eight self-drive cars set on a collision course. Who lives, who dies? You decide.When someone hacks into the systems of eight self-drive cars, their passengers are set on a fatal collision course.The passengers are: a TV star, a pregnant young woman, a disabled war hero, an abused wife fleeing her husband, an illegal immigrant, a husband and wife - and parents of two - who are travelling in separate vehicles and a suicidal man. Now the public have to judge who should survive but are the passengers all that they first seem?My Review A jury, carefully selected with a government official and members of the public having to take their turn to "vote" on who is at fault in car accident. Set in the not to distance future we have level five cars, they control everything and the driver can just relax, as a passenger. When one of the meetings is interrupted by a hacker who has taken control of eight of these cars and advising in two and a half hours they will die. Tempers flare, emotions are high, the public will get a say in the votes, eight seemingly innocent people's lives hang by a madman's decision, who will survive.So we hear a wee bit about the passengers, the government official is warned there will be consequences for failure to comply. The public and watching and voting, the poor people are trapped in their cars and chapter after chapter the tension is building. Just when you think you have it sussed where the book is gone the author flings a curve ball, you know nothing, only what the hacker chooses. Corruption, lack of morality, trial by public, life and death, lies, destruction, love and absolute anarchy. The tension builds up quickly and keeps you hooked, you just want to see what is coming next, who will be next, will anyone survive. The book also lets you look at the darker side of humanity, yes it is a fiction book but go onto almost any social media and look at the comments. You could easily see this being a reality and I think that is what is scary about this book, the potential. We see how dark humans can go, how fast technology is developing and how much humans rely on it, but when it goes wrong.....fantastic read. This wasn't my first by Marrs and it won't be my last 4/5 for me this time.
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  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    4.5* --> 5*Bloody hell, what the frickety-frack was that?! 😱Welcome to the world of autonomous cars. Get in, tell your car where you want to go and sit back, relax, have breakfast, read a newspaper or have a nap. Sounds good, doesn’t it? Until, someone somewhere takes control of your car and there’s nothing you can do about it. There’s no steering wheel, no pedals and no manual override and suddenly this relaxing journey turns into a wet-your-knickers one.This is what happens to eight passeng 4.5* --> 5*Bloody hell, what the frickety-frack was that?! 😱Welcome to the world of autonomous cars. Get in, tell your car where you want to go and sit back, relax, have breakfast, read a newspaper or have a nap. Sounds good, doesn’t it? Until, someone somewhere takes control of your car and there’s nothing you can do about it. There’s no steering wheel, no pedals and no manual override and suddenly this relaxing journey turns into a wet-your-knickers one.This is what happens to eight passengers when their car systems are hacked. The cars are set on a fatal collision course. But hey, there’s good news too! Because the wonderful (ahem) people on social media get to play and decide which one of these passengers should survive this harrowing journey. As a reader, I myself found myself so utterly engrossed that I couldn’t help but think about what I would do, who I would choose. But boy, did that make me feel bad about myself.This entire premise scared the crap out of me! Not only the idea of autonomous cars, which in my mind is just preposterous. But also the power of social media, the way they’re so quick to judge and the hacker plays into that brilliantly. It’s clear he’s holding back information, manipulating viewers by not giving them the full story. But there’s a reason for that and all shall be revealed.The Passengers is by far one of the most original thrillers I’ve ever read! It is insanely on-the-edge-of-your-seat tense, brilliantly paced, immensely thought-provoking and massively addictive! It had me glued to the pages from the very beginning and I just couldn’t put it down. This would quite frankly make a fantastic film!John Marrs is an author whose name I’ve seen pop up quite a lot and yet, this is the first time I’ve picked up one of his books. It definitely won’t be the last time though because I’ve quite obviously been missing out here. If you’re a fan, I’m sure you won’t be disappointed. If like me you’re only just getting introduced to his work, this is a fabulous one to start with!Strap in for the ride of your life! Bring clean underwear. 😉
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  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Berkley Books!ARC received.This will be my first Marrs and I'm pretty pumped for it.This premise fascinates me.It's like The Purge set in a Tesla.
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so gripping; totally plausible (- because we all know how incompetent any Government are at anything to do with transport!!) and absolutely terrifying all at the same time. I am extremely uncomfortable with the idea of autonomous vehicles anyway and this story hasn’t reassured me in any way.The Passengers is set in the future, where all cars are driverless. Older models have manual override but the latest, Level 5, are completely autonomous and used with an app. You just programme This book was so gripping; totally plausible (- because we all know how incompetent any Government are at anything to do with transport!!) and absolutely terrifying all at the same time. I am extremely uncomfortable with the idea of autonomous vehicles anyway and this story hasn’t reassured me in any way.The Passengers is set in the future, where all cars are driverless. Older models have manual override but the latest, Level 5, are completely autonomous and used with an app. You just programme in where you want to go and the car takes you. It works out the best route, it will even collect you at a given time – taxis even operate this way. You can drink, watch a film – it sounds great doesn’t it? The Government has assured the public that the AI security levels mean that hacking is impossible, that there will be fewer accidents and that the whole concept is completely safe!Our passengers are a varied bunch and include a pregnant woman, an abused wife and an ageing TV star. They all have a different backstory or reason for being in the car – some might be purely mundane whereas others’ have a more complicated and sordid story to tell. However, things soon get interesting because the Hacker has some surprises in store. One the main characters is Libby. Libby is a young mental health nurse totally opposed to these cars for reasons which are gradually revealed. She is called to serve as a juror on an inquest into accidents involving driverless cars. These inquests are held in secret and are not as wholly independent as we would hope, however one random member of the public is always in attendance and in this instance it’s Libby’s turn. She tries to get her points across but keeps being shouted down by the forceful (and obnoxious) MP in charge. Libby was a standout character for me, I admired her for the way she tried to stand up for her own beliefs even when under pressure.At a given time, the hacker starts live streaming the passengers’ reactions whilst trapped helplessly in their cars and also has live access to the jurors whose building he has hacked into. From then on, the fate of every single passenger is up to the jurors and also up for the public vote – mob mentality is very much the focus here and it was quite frightening. No detail is spared for public consumption, however horrifying – cameras are everywhere. I really enjoyed this and flew through it. The concept is original and entertaining and makes reference to the idea that technology is/could be so advanced that our every move could be tracked, and that the authorities would have access to every single detail about each and every person. In this futuristic story, the value of one life was weighed against another. It makes you think about how we judge people without knowing the full facts and how easy it is to manipulate people into thinking a certain way.With plenty of brilliant twists and surprises throughout, The Passengers is a thrilling and engrossing read. Some of the characters I felt great empathy for and others I could happily have driven the car to the collision point myself they were so awful. However, one thing is certain. I am never getting into a driverless car. Ever.
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  • Tracy Fenton
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone who follows me on Facebook or is a member of THE Book Club knows that I am a HUGE fan of John Marrs and am lucky enough to call him a friend and also honoured to be featured in a cameo role in his last 5 books. When John wrote THE PASSENGERS he kept telling me I wouldn’t enjoy it, but as usual I totally ignored him and started the book with an open mind.If you’ve read any of John Marrs’ previous books then you know you are in for an original story line full of fascinating characters who a Anyone who follows me on Facebook or is a member of THE Book Club knows that I am a HUGE fan of John Marrs and am lucky enough to call him a friend and also honoured to be featured in a cameo role in his last 5 books. When John wrote THE PASSENGERS he kept telling me I wouldn’t enjoy it, but as usual I totally ignored him and started the book with an open mind.If you’ve read any of John Marrs’ previous books then you know you are in for an original story line full of fascinating characters who all tell their story through their own voices and chapters and somehow are all brought together in a clever and gripping way and THE PASSENGERS does exactly that.THE PASSENGERS is set in the not-too-distant future and is similar in concept to THE ONE which focuses on what happens when technology is taken to the next level and the consequences on the human race. In this book driver-less cars are now the norm and in the level 5 automobiles there isn’t an override option, a steering wheel or even brakes and the passengers rely 100% on technology to take them from A to B.Eight seemingly random and unconnected “Passengers” get into their driver-less cars one morning and within moments their cars are hacked, they are told they will die within 2.5 hours and their fate is streamed live to the world via social media. Meanwhile over in a non-disclosed government building a select group of MP’s, doctors, lawyers and religious representatives are taking part in a top secret jury and inquest. Within moments of the hacker hijacking the cars he has made contact with this group and given them sole responsibility for the deaths of the 8 passengers.In the usual “Marrs manner” you can expect the unexpected, twists, turns, shocks and several OMG moments. I absolutely love how John manages to weave connections between the characters, make you feel sympathy one moment and utter disgust the next and keep you, the reader, on your toes throughout the journey. Another cracking read.
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  • preoccupiedbybooks
    January 1, 1970
    A thrilling and entertaining story with many twists, which will have you questioning your values and morals!I will keep this brief and spoiler free, as this story is best if you experience all of the plot twists first hand!8 driverless cars, set to collide. Who lives? Who dies?In this tale, set in the not too distant future, driverless cars are used everywhere in Britain. Then one day, someone hacks into the systems of eight of these cars. In the cars are a collection of different people with th A thrilling and entertaining story with many twists, which will have you questioning your values and morals!I will keep this brief and spoiler free, as this story is best if you experience all of the plot twists first hand!8 driverless cars, set to collide. Who lives? Who dies?In this tale, set in the not too distant future, driverless cars are used everywhere in Britain. Then one day, someone hacks into the systems of eight of these cars. In the cars are a collection of different people with their own secrets and stories. But is everyone who they seem?I really enjoyed myself reading The Passengers and gasped out loud continuously throughout it! I was full of fear and anxiety from the word go, hooked in straight away from the first few pages. I seriously could've put updates on Goodreads every few minutes, there were that many shocking revelations! The social commentary was great, and it was scary how social media played such a huge part in this.This was my first John Marrs novel, but I already have two more lined up to read! This was a standalone book, but it was set in the same universe as one of the author's other books called The One, which was referenced a few times. It's not necessary to read that first, but I feel like I should have?I would definitely recommend this if you like science fiction, thrillers or 'Black Mirror.'
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  • Holly B
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to pause this one. I'm enjoying my other books too much and haven't wanted to finish it. I may finish it another time.
  • Ingstje
    January 1, 1970
    Do you want the long version or the short one? For those who don't want to wait for the punchline: put it on your readlist, now!This novel is legit one of the best thrillers I've ever read, it's brilliant, timely and I loved it 100%. If you enjoyed reading The One then it's guaranteed that you'll love The Passengers too. Even though the subject in the novel is completely different, it follows the same format again, involving multiple (8!) characters with alternating POV's. Each person has secret Do you want the long version or the short one? For those who don't want to wait for the punchline: put it on your readlist, now!This novel is legit one of the best thrillers I've ever read, it's brilliant, timely and I loved it 100%. If you enjoyed reading The One then it's guaranteed that you'll love The Passengers too. Even though the subject in the novel is completely different, it follows the same format again, involving multiple (8!) characters with alternating POV's. Each person has secrets to hide, secrets you'd never EVER thought of and will catch you completely off guard!I have to be honest, I was completely pro the idea of driverless cars. You see, I don't have a driver's license myself so the thought of a stress-free ride where you don't have to navigate yourself (there's not even a steering wheel in level 5 cars so you have all the time in the world to eat breakfast, apply makeup or, oh yes, read a book) sounded more than wonderful but what happens to The Passengers was anything but stress-free. There's a hacker who controls the cars and don't think he doesn't mean it! If I had any doubts in the first minutes it becomes clear right away that he is dead serious!The entire novel is high on tension and plays on the reader's moral compass. Who would you choose to survive a collision? The pregnant woman? The police woman with two children? The foreign woman who doesn't speak English? Marrs plays this so well, he even adds the opinions of jurors and those on social media as well, leaving us even more hesistant to pledge our loyalty to one specific person. And then, just when you've almost decided he shuffles the deck of cards and secrets come out that might change your thoughts, again and again... The people I felt most loyal to suddenly find themselves ranked quite differently when I had to consider which secret was the worst to have.Marrs really doesn't let up until the end, he always seems to have another twist up his sleeve. I don't know how he can be so imaginative but I really fell from one surprise into another and even when I thought it was finally all over, there was still more to come.I can't find any fault in The Passengers, it gets my golden buzzer! The novel is original, fresh and shows a frightening glimpse of what the future might hold. In case you didn't get it yet: put it on your readlist, now!
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    In the not too distant future a new wave of autonomous vehicles has been approved by the government with the assurance they will minimise fatalities on our roads. Perhaps a touch ironic considering eight Passengers have just been informed they are going to die after being held hostage by their own driverless cars.Is it a case of the computer says ‘no’ or something way more sinister? One thing’s for sure, this is a journey where no one is eager to say, “are we nearly there yet?” With The Passe In the not too distant future a new wave of autonomous vehicles has been approved by the government with the assurance they will minimise fatalities on our roads. Perhaps a touch ironic considering eight Passengers have just been informed they are going to die after being held hostage by their own driverless cars.Is it a case of the computer says ‘no’ or something way more sinister? One thing’s for sure, this is a journey where no one is eager to say, “are we nearly there yet?” With The Passengers’ rerouted and their phone signals jammed, their terror is a macabre spectacle being streamed live, via an uncensored video feed. The reality of just how insanely powerless and desperately alone they are increases with every page turn, especially after learning their fate will be decided by complete strangers. How can anyone determine whose life is worth more, or is worthless? Well, things get ugly real quick and there are some mammoth shockers. The Passengers will cause every reader’s moral compass to lose all sense of direction until they arrive at their final destination.To some this whole scenario may sound fantastically far-fetched, or perhaps it will feel a little too close for comfort. Whatever your conclusion this author sows the seed of future nightmares, especially when the cause of our fear is unnervingly plausible. Whip-cracking retorts and a chillingly exhilarating ride made it immensely difficult for me to put this one down. LOVED IT.(Huge thanks to the publisher for providing a copy of this title via Netgalley, which it was my pleasure to voluntarily read and review.)
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  • michelle
    January 1, 1970
    It’s the age of the driverless car. Eight passengers, completely different from each, other go on a journey in their day to day lives. When the cars are hacked and suddenly their journeys are changed and they are told by the hacker, that they are on a collision course to their deaths.Meanwhile in a secret facility, a jury and a group of MPs’ are attending a inquest. When, The Hacker gets in contact with them and gives them the power to decide who lives and who dies. Also, Social media get involv It’s the age of the driverless car. Eight passengers, completely different from each, other go on a journey in their day to day lives. When the cars are hacked and suddenly their journeys are changed and they are told by the hacker, that they are on a collision course to their deaths.Meanwhile in a secret facility, a jury and a group of MPs’ are attending a inquest. When, The Hacker gets in contact with them and gives them the power to decide who lives and who dies. Also, Social media get involved and then the media. The hacker like with social media, we find out a fraction of what goes on in each passengers’ lives, to determine which one of the passengers should survive.I must confess this is the first John Marrs book I have read. I do own a copy of The One but not around to reading it yet and I know how highly John Marrs is recognised for work. I really like this book not just because of the originality and the gripping storyline. But because of the ethics and morality behind this book. How well really do we know people that are famous which can be celebrity or government or just come into the public eye for something they have done and that we only see part of their lives. How can we decide if they live or die in that small bit of information? How do we as a person like to be perceived? I think when this book comes out it will be one of them books that people will talk about for some time. The only quibble I have with this book Part three of the book seems a bit farfetched. So, in that case I give this book 4.5 stars.Thank you NetGalley and Penguin Random House for a copy of this book.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    This book had loads and I mean LOADS of 5 star reviews so I went into this with sky high expectations. And for me, the story didn’t live up to them
  • Roz
    January 1, 1970
    Hmm..
  • Jenny - TotallybookedBlog
    January 1, 1970
    “The only thing you need to know at this point is that in two hours and thirty minutes from now, it is highly likely that you will be dead.” John Marrs has done it again and we think this may just be our favourite book by this Author to date. Wow…just wow! Honestly, if you haven’t picked up a book by this magnificent Author yet, you are doing yourself a disservice. Not only is John Marrs a master of the written word, but he is also a master of character development, storyline twists, suspense, “The only thing you need to know at this point is that in two hours and thirty minutes from now, it is highly likely that you will be dead.” John Marrs has done it again and we think this may just be our favourite book by this Author to date. Wow…just wow! Honestly, if you haven’t picked up a book by this magnificent Author yet, you are doing yourself a disservice. Not only is John Marrs a master of the written word, but he is also a master of character development, storyline twists, suspense, relevance, intelligent writing and the gift of creating something inherently unique. John Marrs has mastered the art of compelling his readers by sucking them into his world, turning something conceivably possible into reality whilst fictionalising concepts that on the whole aren’t entirely unrealistic. Whilst creating a thrilling tale, he drops in current mainstream subjects, baring naked souls in a magnifying mirror which highlights the imperfections in humanity as well as the importance of issues close to every single one of us. We want to give a standing ovation to John Marrs for writing a fast-paced story of intensity, thrilling intrigue and suspense with a focus on human behaviour and the consequences of innovative greed and corruption. “I have taken eight of your autonomous cars – the same vehicles your government promised were impossible to penetrate or corrupt – and taken them over to operate as I see fit. These passengers represent different walks of modern British life.” On a ‘regular’ day eight individuals get into a self-drive car, which has now become the chosen and imposed way to commute, promoting safety as well as reducing congestion. Two of these people are sadly caught up in a horrific web of vengeance, whereas the other six have been chosen for reasons known only by the man dubbed, ‘The Hacker’. “Sensitive material is supposed to be removed from the public domain and erased.”“Nothing disappears any more. Everything is somewhere. All that’s private becomes public in the end.” John Marrs skilfully introduces us to the six passengers, and in a few chapters, he ensures that we have a connection, an opinion and an emotional connection to each and every one of them. However, as with everything in life, we either see what we want to see or what we’re led to believe through what is cunningly portrayed. How well do you truly know someone from the persona that they’ve chosen to portray? Not only that, how many can hold a hand up and say they haven’t experienced regrets of actions or words in their past? Magnify this with the additional curse of social media and the ease of one clicking online hiding behind a screen. “You cherry picked nuggets of information to encourage us and social media to vote in a particular way…You told the people what they wanted to hear to make their decision easier.” Six people on way to a grand crescendo of inevitable death, each having to face their own truth and the judgement of the world that is watching online. Another group of individuals in charge of the harrowing decision forced upon them of who lives, whilst listening and watching the tragedy play out before their eyes through a direct live connection to every single car. A world watching, tweeting and voicing their opinions through hashtags; it’s a voyeuristic train crash of compulsion. The Hacker is the master puppeteer who forces truths and the unmasking of his passengers. What are the motives and why have these passengers been handpicked? What is the influence of social media and how much weight does it hold? At times we felt we were reading a truth, a compelling insight into the world we live in today with a somewhat advanced spin from which we couldn’t look away. “When people are part of a mob, they stop being individuals, their inhibitions disappear, they don’t follow their normal moral compass.”“But mob mentality and the anonymity of being behind a keyboard means people are braver when they’re together.” We cannot stress how much we love John Marrs. He has written some of our favourite books and when we need that suspenseful thrill, the psychological drama and the relevance of humanity today, we know he will deliver every single time. Once again, through his fiction, John Marrs shines a spotlight on social issues today; the pitfalls of social media, mob mentality and standing in judgement with limited knowledge. His writing is outstanding, his characters have such depth and his storylines are addictive. An added bonus was a reference to the first book we read by this Author, The One. We didn’t move, we skipped breaths and we once again sat in compelled astonishment at just how bloody amazing John Marrs truly is!Available to purchase belowAmazon USAmazon UKCome and say hi, at:✲ TotallyBookedBlog✲ TBB on Facebook✲ TBB on Instagram✲ TBB on Twitter✲ TBB on Pinterest
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Boy, does this book make one question their morals?! John Marrs is bang on the money with relevant trend in the current focus on AI in this wondrous age of technology! AI is something that no longer seems utopic or unachievable. In The Passengers, Marrs has taken AI and cars- the natural next step- making human life ever/even more so comfortable… now, we can drive to work and do our make up in the cars without worrying the cops will fine us. Now, we can drive to anywhere at all without ever gett Boy, does this book make one question their morals?! John Marrs is bang on the money with relevant trend in the current focus on AI in this wondrous age of technology! AI is something that no longer seems utopic or unachievable. In The Passengers, Marrs has taken AI and cars- the natural next step- making human life ever/even more so comfortable… now, we can drive to work and do our make up in the cars without worrying the cops will fine us. Now, we can drive to anywhere at all without ever getting lost again. Now, we can sit in a car and read a newspaper, play a video game or speak on the mobile phone. Market for hands-free sets went down, down, down with the government bill that put fully autonomous cars on the roads! Welcome to the future! On one of the days, 8 people, Passengers, get in their new swanky, super duper uber awesome cars to go about their busy lives. It is on one of those days, these 8 AI equipped cars, get hacked. Funnily enough… Human error in everything we do is the biggest risk and we have come to think that with technology, the human error does not exist anymore. How bloody wrong we are. I don’t trust technology to be more perfect in anything than what a human does. Anyway… Government is clever, too! They push through the bill, altering everyone’s lives but they also know that the devil is in the detail. As accidents happen, a group is set up – of officials and random civilians to judge whether accidents involving AI equipped cars are the fault of the car or the victims. Clever, I tell yous! So – Cars, hacked, 8 poor souls on their way to the death. The countdown is on! We have the 2 hour and something wracking up our blood pressure as we come nearer to the end of the innocent souls. But, how innocent are they really? And should their innocence or guilt really allow anyone to decide who should live or die? And can you really know enough about someone in this short space of time to decide whether they are worthy of continuing their life as part of society? I love how this book explores the advancement of technology- making the plot of this book, this very book, ahead of the game on the fiction market whilst at the same time showing the potential everything that can go wrong! Government and diverse cast of characters thrown into the mix and we got ourselves a right cabbage-soup! But that is not all… because- wait for it- the power of the tweet and the hashtag is also thrown into pot as the whole world witnesses the events live and are prompted to have their say! Can you imagine? And bloody hell does it get nasty! Marrs has yet again taken something unique and innovative and turned it into a proper page-turner. As a bonus, if you’re familiar with his earlier works, the concept from The One is also referenced which I truly enjoyed!
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  • Andreia ♡The Butterfly Lover♡
    January 1, 1970
    DNF 50%. Do NOT agree with the parameters in which the people involved are being judged and chosen to live or to die, but at the same time I could NOT relate to, root for or have compassion towards any of the characters, so, to spare my time, I would choose #killthemall if I was to decide their fates. Yes, hashtag kill them all!
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  • Lel Budge
    January 1, 1970
    An inquest is being held to determine who is at fault during accidents with driverless cars…..the car or the human…a jury watches videos of accidents and makes decisions on quite basic information….the car is usually exonerated.But, then 8 driverless cars are taken over by The Hacker, the inquest jury, headed by MP Jack Larsson is told to decide who of the 8 will survive…They are given a chance to interview each person to make an informed decision, Libby though, knows one of the Passengers….Jude An inquest is being held to determine who is at fault during accidents with driverless cars…..the car or the human…a jury watches videos of accidents and makes decisions on quite basic information….the car is usually exonerated.But, then 8 driverless cars are taken over by The Hacker, the inquest jury, headed by MP Jack Larsson is told to decide who of the 8 will survive…They are given a chance to interview each person to make an informed decision, Libby though, knows one of the Passengers….Jude, the person she met in a bar and believes he is the One.It taps into our fear of a loss of control, being in a car with no driver…..would my life be deemed worth saving over that of someone else in an accident….What follows is one of the most twisty thrillers I’ve read. There are so many secrets and lies to keep you guessing right to the breathtaking end. A definite must read for any lover of a dark thriller……a thought provoking nail biter….a brilliant 5 * read.I would like to thank the publishers, the author and netgalley and the author for the opportunity to read this book for free and this is my honest and unbiased review.
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