Hedy Lamarr
From a childhood filled with curiosity and ambition despite the stereotypes imposed on her, to an abusive marriage that she ingeniously escaped from, to finding her way to stardom in the City of Angels in the face of rampant sexism and harassment, Hedy Lamarr would not only become a glamorous star of the Golden Age of Hollywood, alongside icons like Judy Garland and Clark Gable, but also an unparalleled inventor. She would fashion designs to revolutionize the planes built by Howard Hughes, and come up with a secret communication system that helped the Allies against the Nazis, a technology that would become the blueprint for what we know today as Wi-Fi. A visionary that never feared going after her goals and defied convention at every turn, Hedy Lamarr was a true woman of wonder.

Hedy Lamarr Details

TitleHedy Lamarr
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 6th, 2018
PublisherHumanoids
ISBN-139781594656194
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, Biography

Hedy Lamarr Review

  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    In diesem Herbst ist als biografische Graphic Novel neben ANDY: A FACTUAL FAIRYTALE (LEBEN UND WERK VON ANDY WARHOL) auch HEDY LAMARR – AN INDREDIBLE LIFE erschienen; die Lebensgeschichte von Hedwig Kiesler, österreichische Jüdin, die aus einer bedrückenden Ehe floh (was sie nicht hinderte, noch etliche Male zu heiraten) und im Hollywood der späten 30er und 40er Jahre eine kometenhafte Karriere als Schauspielerin erlebte. Sie galt als die schönste Frau Hollywoods, ein Etikett, das schmeichelhaft In diesem Herbst ist als biografische Graphic Novel neben ANDY: A FACTUAL FAIRYTALE (LEBEN UND WERK VON ANDY WARHOL) auch HEDY LAMARR – AN INDREDIBLE LIFE erschienen; die Lebensgeschichte von Hedwig Kiesler, österreichische Jüdin, die aus einer bedrückenden Ehe floh (was sie nicht hinderte, noch etliche Male zu heiraten) und im Hollywood der späten 30er und 40er Jahre eine kometenhafte Karriere als Schauspielerin erlebte. Sie galt als die schönste Frau Hollywoods, ein Etikett, das schmeichelhaft sein mag, es aber Hedy Lamarr, wie sie sich nun nannte, auch schwer gemacht hat, als Individuum und intelligente Frau wahrgenommen zu werden.Was diese Graphic Novel unter anderem sehr deutlich zeigt, ist, wie eng ihr Leben mit den Zeitläuften verbunden war: Nationalsozialismus und Weltkrieg wirken – wenn auch indirekt – bestimmend auf ihr Leben ein. Und obwohl Hedy Lamarr selbstbewusst und nicht auf den Mund gefallen ist, muss sie sich mit dem Rollenklischee, das Frauen von Männern oktroyiert wird, auseinandersetzen und sich ihm in vielen Punkten ergeben. Hier wird ihr blendendes Aussehen zum Bumerang, auch im Film wird sie auf einen Typus reduziert, der – hollywood-typisch - an ihre Jugend gebunden ist. Ebenso wenig nachhaltig ist für sie persönlich ihre Rolle als Erfinderin. Jahrzehnte werden vergehen, bis 1996 die Bedeutung ihrer Erfindung anerkannt wird, ohne die es kein WiFi gäbe. Doch zu diesem Zeitpunkt lebt Hedy Lamarr bereits lange Zeit zurückgezogen von der Welt, der sie ihr gealtertes Gesicht nicht mehr zeigen mag.Dass mir die Graphic Novel so gut gefallen hat, verdankt sich zum großen Teil natürlich der interessanten Biografie von Hedy Lamarr, die von William Roy und Sylvain Dorange allerdings auch sehr gut in Szene gesetzt worden ist – graphisch wie auch inhaltlich. Die Zeichnungen und die Kolorierung finde ich ausgesprochen sympathisch. Die Artwork könnte fast aus den fünfziger Jahren stammen, wirkt aber keinesfalls altbacken und ist der Geschichte angemessen. Und eben diese Lebensgeschichte hat mich sehr berührt, umso mehr, als in der Darstellung auf Effekthascherei und unnötiges Pathos verzichtet wird und geschickte Cuts Längen vermeiden. Hedy Lamarr wird hier nicht zur Ikone stilisiert, sondern es wird ihr mit Respekt, Interesse und Zuneigung begegnet. Das Buch ist der gelungene Fall, eine Biografie in Comic-Form zu präsentieren.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    "Films have a certain place in a certain time period. Technology is forever." - Hedy LamarrThis graphic novel explores the life of Hedy Lamar - the most beautiful woman in the world! Following her childhood in Austria, this book details certain events and relationships in her life up until her death, with a little epilogue to show her lasting legacy on society. Hedy was a Hollywood Star in 1938 until 1958; thus she was actress during the Golden Age of Hollywood. I really enjoyed the theme of thi "Films have a certain place in a certain time period. Technology is forever." - Hedy LamarrThis graphic novel explores the life of Hedy Lamar - the most beautiful woman in the world! Following her childhood in Austria, this book details certain events and relationships in her life up until her death, with a little epilogue to show her lasting legacy on society. Hedy was a Hollywood Star in 1938 until 1958; thus she was actress during the Golden Age of Hollywood. I really enjoyed the theme of this book; you routinely saw the struggle she had because of her looks - everyone thought she was just a dumb girl who couldn't do anything but be pretty. (It was that mentality of her studio that destroyed her career - because she kept being type casted into the same roles). But Hedy was brilliant - even getting a patent for a frequency hopping device; but when she explained to the US military how it could be applied to their machines, she was told it wasn't real science and to stick with using her pretty face to sell war bonds. But even doing what they told her to do wasn't enough and she eventually faded from the Hollywood lights and has been relatively forgotten by the majority of society. The artistry of this book evokes the 1930's - 1950's feel through its drawing and use of colors. The colors are almost muted, which allows the drawings and script to really shine. Despite how pretty it is, I think this book glossed over how difficult it was for an actor/actress in that time period, especially with Hollywood studios owning actors through contracts (i.e. the infamous star system). The book also really skipped through her career, only hinting at the movies, husbands, and the effect WWII had on her life. I feel like more could have been said/drawn about her life and career. However, with that said - if you never knew who Hedy Lamar was before this book, it is a great introduction and hopefully a gateway into to learning more about this woman who defied her "role" in life.
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    The art is stunning, but I wish it were longer and a little more in-depth. This would be a good introduction, though, for anyone who is unfamiliar with Ms. Lamarr and her life and work.
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Art was great, story is great. She seemed like an amazing woman.
  • Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    graphic biography (1940s/50s actress and underappreciated inventor)I like the idea of graphic biographies about lesser known people, but was wanting more from the story--was Hedy being offered lame roles because that's truly what the MGM guy felt fit her best (due to societal stereotypes or whatever), or was there something else going on? It also felt disappointing to learn that Hedy gave up on inventing so quickly after being turned down by the military when she clearly felt strongly about it a graphic biography (1940s/50s actress and underappreciated inventor)I like the idea of graphic biographies about lesser known people, but was wanting more from the story--was Hedy being offered lame roles because that's truly what the MGM guy felt fit her best (due to societal stereotypes or whatever), or was there something else going on? It also felt disappointing to learn that Hedy gave up on inventing so quickly after being turned down by the military when she clearly felt strongly about it and had worked hard on it--if this were fiction, she would have found a way (a pen name, or a male scientist to present her ideas for her, etc.). There was more to this story too, if only in the form of internal anguish/frustration.Most of this story (with the exception of Hedy's first marriage to and escape from the tyrannous Nazi sympathizer) I picked up just from listening to NPR's story on Hedy, so I was really hoping for some more insight or detail or something.
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  • Frank Garland
    January 1, 1970
    A life like Hedy's is a lot to cram into 176 pages. It must be tricky trying to get both depth and natural flow, but the plotting is good and the artwork is lively with a nice colour palette. It would have been interesting to see more of her relationships played out in richer detail, particularly with her first husband, who is entertainingly monstrous, or her chafing against the rascally portrayed Louis B Mayer, more moments of her father's unconventional encouragement - and who doesn't want to A life like Hedy's is a lot to cram into 176 pages. It must be tricky trying to get both depth and natural flow, but the plotting is good and the artwork is lively with a nice colour palette. It would have been interesting to see more of her relationships played out in richer detail, particularly with her first husband, who is entertainingly monstrous, or her chafing against the rascally portrayed Louis B Mayer, more moments of her father's unconventional encouragement - and who doesn't want to spend more time in the moonlight with Howard Hughes, talking about inventions? We meet many characters along the way that could be happily lingered with, but this book is a stone skimming lightly across a very deep lake. It's a very pretty thing which will make you want for more, and so I picked up the documentary Bombshell and watched that the same weekend. I found myself watching real life personalities on the screen, but seeing them as Sylvain Dorange's cartoons.
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  • Kate Atherton
    January 1, 1970
    I really took my time reading, and re-reading this graphic novel. It's incredible, clever, succinct and effortless. I find, often, that graphic novel biographies tend to be plodding, the meetings between historical figures feel forced and fake and you end up disinterested in the person at the end. This book left me wanting more, but also completely satisfied. I feel like I know the key points of Hedy Lamarr's life, that I see her beauty through these illustrations and portraits and I feel what i I really took my time reading, and re-reading this graphic novel. It's incredible, clever, succinct and effortless. I find, often, that graphic novel biographies tend to be plodding, the meetings between historical figures feel forced and fake and you end up disinterested in the person at the end. This book left me wanting more, but also completely satisfied. I feel like I know the key points of Hedy Lamarr's life, that I see her beauty through these illustrations and portraits and I feel what it was like in the world in the time that she lived. Every detail of this including it's color ways for different time periods of her life is completely thought out. The way the illustrator captured her movies, particularly Ecstasy, is stunning. I highly recommend this book, not just as a fan of Hedy Lamarr but as a, general non-fan of Graphic biographies. This one is brilliant.
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  • brian annan
    January 1, 1970
    gives an excellent overview of Hedy’s life and a brief view into her loves. it shows especially well the intelligence and brilliance of her mind that was often overlooked. the animated style was functional, moving the narrative well and the caricatures did well to express emotions and thoughts but i would have enjoyed a more realistic style. a very enjoyable and informative book, clearly made by two talents who have a deep appreciation for Ms Lamarr. strongly recommended.
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  • V
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely worthy subject matter! Execution was good enough, but not fantastic imo.
  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    I got more info from the You Must Remember This Podcast so it didn't bother me that they skipped a lot... the art was great.
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