Verses for the Dead (Pendergast, #18)
FBI special agent Pendergast must confront a strange, otherworldly circumstance - a new partnership. After an overhaul of leadership at the FBI's New York office, Special Agent A. X. L. Pendergast is forced to accept an unthinkable condition of continued employment--he must work with a partner.Pendergast and his new teammate, junior FBI agent Coldmoon, are assigned the case of a devious new killer whose killing spree spans the countryside, and whose crimes are distinguished by a mysterious M.O. Letters left at seemingly unrelated gravesites in the city of Miami.That the connection between these old deaths defies easy explanation is the least of Pendergast's worries. As Aloysius digs deeper, he soon realizes there may be more to the killer--and Pendergast's new partner--than meets the eye.

Verses for the Dead (Pendergast, #18) Details

TitleVerses for the Dead (Pendergast, #18)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 31st, 2018
PublisherGrand Central Publishing
ISBN-139781538715482
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller, Fiction, Mystery Thriller, Contemporary, Horror

Verses for the Dead (Pendergast, #18) Review

  • Bob Milne
    January 1, 1970
    With Verses for the Dead, the 18th novel in the Agent Pendergast series, Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child continue the soft reset they began in City of Endless Night. Once again it's a standalone story, one that only touches on the wider mythology, completely devoid of any monstrous themes or supernatural elements . . . and which introduces the twist of a new Director, uncomfortable with Pendergast's methods, and a new partner.The introduction of a new character can often be uncomfortable, up With Verses for the Dead, the 18th novel in the Agent Pendergast series, Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child continue the soft reset they began in City of Endless Night. Once again it's a standalone story, one that only touches on the wider mythology, completely devoid of any monstrous themes or supernatural elements . . . and which introduces the twist of a new Director, uncomfortable with Pendergast's methods, and a new partner.The introduction of a new character can often be uncomfortable, upsetting the chemistry with which readers have become familiar, but Agent Coldmoon is a welcome addition. In watching him work side-by-side with Pendergast, not just observing but questioning his methods, we get an immediately interesting new point-of-view. His wonder, his bewilderment, and even his frustration is something we share, but Coldmoon is more than that. He has a not-so-secret agenda that casts a pall over the story, but he ultimately proves himself to be a capable agent and a loyal partner.There is also a young forensic coroner introduced who adds an interesting new dynamic to the story. Her conflict with her boss allows Pendergast to demonstrate that, after all his suffering, he has once again found the calm, polite, respectful temperament of a Southern gentleman, but it also allows him the opportunity to prove he is not a man to be trifled with. The way Fauchet admires him, somewhere between romantic attraction and platonic hero worship, is a nice touch, and even her enthusiasm in the later chapters isn't enough to cast a shadow over her role.As for the story, it's a relatively simple one compared to other outings, but still fascinating. What we have a serial killer who murders women in busy areas, where the risk of discovery is greatest, who takes the time to remove their hearts - and then deposits them on the graves of suicides, along with a literary-themed note. Why he does it, and what the connection is between victims, both past and present, is the mystery that drives the book. I had a light-bulb moment about two-thirds of the way through, figuring I had it solved, but the ultimate solution was darker and more complicated than I had anticipated. There are some great set pieces along the way, making great use of not just the state of Florida but a few other locations, and the swampy climax is one of their strongest to date.Even if you were to take Pendergast out of the story, Verses for the Dead would be a better-than-average crime thriller. With him driving it, however, better-than-average becomes a must-read.https://beauty-in-ruins.blogspot.com/...
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    Another one I'm torn on. I'm glad I got my hands on it slightly early, it was a great I don't feel good curl up and read with tea book. On the one hand I'm thrilled, this is one of the first of theirs in awhile that I really plowed through, the plot is tight and hinged on the murders instead of dawdling on longer term issues we don't see resolutions to, it ties together beautifully. On the other I desperately miss Margo and Nora, or really any women who get fair time, and would really like to se Another one I'm torn on. I'm glad I got my hands on it slightly early, it was a great I don't feel good curl up and read with tea book. On the one hand I'm thrilled, this is one of the first of theirs in awhile that I really plowed through, the plot is tight and hinged on the murders instead of dawdling on longer term issues we don't see resolutions to, it ties together beautifully. On the other I desperately miss Margo and Nora, or really any women who get fair time, and would really like to see things from a woman's point of view when it's not about men or about their eminent death. The descriptions of the murders made me think of https://www.tor.com/2017/06/14/eyes-i... and all the dead women who are still pretty. Also entirely unqualified as to the accuracy of Agent Coldmoon's portrayal.
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  • Nate Mayes
    January 1, 1970
    Originally, I encountered Pendergast after reading Relic, the first in the series. I read it after seeing movie that, unfortunately, was missing the rather singular FBI investigator. One part anachronism, one part Sherlock Holmes (though he finds him a bit overly dramatic), Pendergast is a very interesting character. However, a gap of about 16 books leaves many holes in what feels like a long and colorful history. I will say that in reading this book, I do have a desire to hunt down the books th Originally, I encountered Pendergast after reading Relic, the first in the series. I read it after seeing movie that, unfortunately, was missing the rather singular FBI investigator. One part anachronism, one part Sherlock Holmes (though he finds him a bit overly dramatic), Pendergast is a very interesting character. However, a gap of about 16 books leaves many holes in what feels like a long and colorful history. I will say that in reading this book, I do have a desire to hunt down the books that came before, and will give me many many hours of enjoyable reading. As a stand alone book, it was enjoyable, if a bit shallow in places. However, for a fun pulp read, It was a fun read. Enjoyable enough to send me back several years to explore the other adventures of A. Pendergast.
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  • Kurt Weber
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful quick read with a twist I certainly didn't see coming. I am very frustrated that the authors are publishing an exclusive edition for Barnes & Noble with an extra chapter. I suppose I shall have to visit one next week to read it.
  • Fred
    January 1, 1970
    Very enjoyable thriller/mystery. As always with Pendergast a big twist at the end. I could not put it down.
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent.
  • Lauren Watts
    January 1, 1970
    Could this be the best Pendergast book yet?!
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