A Match Made in Mehendi
Fifteen-year-old Simran "Simi" Sangha comes from a long line of Indian vichole-matchmakers-with a rich history for helping parents find good matches for their grown children. When Simi accidentally sets up her cousin and a soon-to-be lawyer, her family is thrilled that she has the "gift."But Simi is an artist, and she doesn't want to have anything to do with relationships, helicopter parents, and family drama. That is, until she realizes this might be just the thing to improve her and her best friend Noah's social status. Armed with her family's ancient guide to finding love, Simi starts a matchmaking service-via an app, of course.But when she helps connect a wallflower of a girl with the star of the boys' soccer team, she turns the high school hierarchy topsy-turvy, soon making herself public enemy number one.

A Match Made in Mehendi Details

TitleA Match Made in Mehendi
Author
ReleaseSep 10th, 2019
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780316522588
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction, Romance

A Match Made in Mehendi Review

  • Fanna
    January 1, 1970
    || Indian MC|| YA Contemporary|| High-school hierarchy turns upside down LIST & POSTS I'VE MENTIONED THIS BOOK IN:January 2019 - Ten Books To Look Out For This MonthBlog/Website | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Pinterest
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) A Match  Made in Mehendi is a story about family, friendship, and standing up against bullies. At the same time, A Match in Mehendi is about balancing technology and tradition, fear and desire, dreams and expectations. Simi's family are professional matchmakers, as a way to facilitate matches and join communities. But Simi would rather be an artist, drawn to a world full of exploratio (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) A Match  Made in Mehendi is a story about family, friendship, and standing up against bullies. At the same time, A Match in Mehendi is about balancing technology and tradition, fear and desire, dreams and expectations. Simi's family are professional matchmakers, as a way to facilitate matches and join communities. But Simi would rather be an artist, drawn to a world full of exploration and color, not the sparks between people. Is there a way to balance her seemingly natural talent for matchmaking, with her own dreams?
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  • Aparna
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5 stars!My incredible friend Maura lent me her ARC, and I'm so glad she did, because this one was such a lighthearted and fun read!! At times I felt like the plot moved too fast or I lost track of some characters, but overall it was such a delight to get into Simran's head and hear some of her fears between choosing art and straying from traditional values. I especially loved how her art was based in mehendi (I remember going to school with mehendi on my hands and being SO excited and then b 4.5/5 stars!My incredible friend Maura lent me her ARC, and I'm so glad she did, because this one was such a lighthearted and fun read!! At times I felt like the plot moved too fast or I lost track of some characters, but overall it was such a delight to get into Simran's head and hear some of her fears between choosing art and straying from traditional values. I especially loved how her art was based in mehendi (I remember going to school with mehendi on my hands and being SO excited and then being told by white kids that it was "just henna," so seeing her taking full ownership of the art form was really something to read). Some characters also really popped off the page, like Noah, Navdeep, Suraj, Teá, and Simi's mom in the principal's office. I always enjoyed the sections where Simi and Noah and Navdeep (or some combination) would be plotting out their next moves together. I thought that Noah's anxieties, even when talking with close friends, were written super well, and I could really identify with them (view spoiler)[(I might have even cried a little out of anger and sadness and sympathy when Amanda just outed him in front of the whole school) (hide spoiler)]. Amanda's character was given a little motivation/depth at the end, but it was mostly through someone else's explanation, and I wanted to really see it in action in the story. The Aiden arc really threw me for a loop, but I was really happy with who all ended up with who by the end.Overall, such a fresh and fun read that I would highly recommend picking up once it hits shelves in September!!
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    Disclosure: I received an ARC of this book at Book Con. A Match Made in Mehendi is a cute, light read following Simi, who isn't quite sure that she wants to join the family matchmaking business because she dreams of becoming an artist. As a way to sort of test her interest and also gauge if she's any good at matchmaking, she works with her friends to design an app that uses all of her family's techniques to pair individuals. The dating app only works at her school and Simi personally has a hand Disclosure: I received an ARC of this book at Book Con. A Match Made in Mehendi is a cute, light read following Simi, who isn't quite sure that she wants to join the family matchmaking business because she dreams of becoming an artist. As a way to sort of test her interest and also gauge if she's any good at matchmaking, she works with her friends to design an app that uses all of her family's techniques to pair individuals. The dating app only works at her school and Simi personally has a hand in every match that occurs.I can truly say that I've never read anything like this! A Match Made in Mehendi has modern high school drama with the technology components, while also doing a callback to the past with Simi's more 'traditional' family business--old school, meeting prospective matches in person, and everything is written out on paper (Simi struggles with those filing cabinets and I sympathize). There's a blending of generational differences, a blending of cultures--and Simi is struggling to find her way through it all, so it's as relatable as any coming-of-age story.However, it takes a lot for me to fall in love with contemporary novels, and I don't think the characters were unique enough in this one for me to ever consider it for a reread. Simi is someone I think a lot of teens will see themselves in, but the cast around her falls flat as they really only exist to support her and don't stand well on their own. At times, things happen to other characters seemingly only so we can get Simi's reaction, and then we never see the follow-through or consequences. The plot threads are dropped, and while it was interesting that there were so many in a relatively short book, it would have been better to have them condensed so that nothing would end up getting left behind after a few chapters.The writing in this book was very simplistic, so I think it would appeal most to the younger spectrum of YA readers. There were never any really biting bits of dialogue, or paragraphs that jumped out as particularly meaningful. The text said what was happening, and who was saying what, but never explored Simi's emotions any more deeply than that. Disappointing, when we get the entire book from her perspective.However, unlike so many YA novels coming out right now, this was a fun book to read and pretty happy overall. Yes, there are deeper themes explored, such as bullying, but they're done nicely in a way that isn't quite as depressing or melodramatic as other current contemporary novels. Simi goes through a lot but never really lets it get her down, and it's refreshing to have such a positive main character.So, if you're looking for a light, fluffy read--overall, this might be the one for you.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you @kidlitexchange for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. A Match Made in Mehendi will release 9.10.19! This young adult contemporary was really sweet. It’s a story about relationships and young love, but more importantly it’s about family expectations vs. desire, tradition vs. technology and friendship vs. bullying. Simi comes from a long line of matchmakers. She seems to have the special gift of facilitating love connections, but art is her true passion. That is, unt Thank you @kidlitexchange for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. A Match Made in Mehendi will release 9.10.19! This young adult contemporary was really sweet. It’s a story about relationships and young love, but more importantly it’s about family expectations vs. desire, tradition vs. technology and friendship vs. bullying. Simi comes from a long line of matchmakers. She seems to have the special gift of facilitating love connections, but art is her true passion. That is, until she decides to combine both gifts to help her step outside of her shell. With the help of her best friend and tech savvy brother, they set out to prove that traditions could sometimes use a modern twist. Together they create a really cute matchmaking app and watch as its popularity takes over their school. They have to deal with perfect matches, total misses, skeptical clients, envious exes and a concerned school staff. I totally loved the idea of the Matched app. The icons and questionnaire was super brilliant and created various storylines to work through. There’s a big focus on kids feeling pressured to be a certain way or peruse a field their parents push them towards which will be a very relatable circumstance to many. I adored Noah, Simi’s best friend. He is gay and his story of how he used the app to carefully find love was an extra bonus. I was crushed when he was eventually outed in a very humiliating way, but adored the fact that his true friends rallied around him. A story rich in Indian culture was an extra treat. I loved the vichole guidelines. The numerous food descriptions left me with many cravings. I could taste those samosas and smell the chai tea (which is one of my very favs). I really enjoyed learning more about mehendi and watching Simi experiment with it as an unique art medium. This was a charming, lighthearted story that handled many topics in a fun, entertaining way.
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  • Sabreena - Books and Prosecco
    January 1, 1970
    This was a super cute, feel good read! Full review to come, but definitely keep an eye out for this in September!Disclaimer: The amazing humans at Hachette Book Group Canada were kind enough to send me an arc of A Match Made in Mehendi in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    * Thank you to the publisher for sending an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review *ACTUAL: 4.5 starsIn this story, readers meet Simi, a sophomore in high school who is determined to stand out this school year. After teaming up with her best friend Noah and brother Navdeep, they create an online match making app for their high school. Despite Simi's desire to still pursue her artist dreams, she enjoys her newfound fame. But Simi soon must learn how to balance relationships, love, and fam * Thank you to the publisher for sending an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review *ACTUAL: 4.5 starsIn this story, readers meet Simi, a sophomore in high school who is determined to stand out this school year. After teaming up with her best friend Noah and brother Navdeep, they create an online match making app for their high school. Despite Simi's desire to still pursue her artist dreams, she enjoys her newfound fame. But Simi soon must learn how to balance relationships, love, and family, if she is going to survive this year. I thought this novel had many aspects of a great contemporary novel. I loved the family ties and unique cultural parts. The humour and romance was amusing and will draw in teenage readers. The challenges Simi faced were realistic, and situations such as handling bullies, dates, and family struggles were relatable and it was enjoyable to root for Simi. I liked the other characters as well, and found Noah, Navdeep, and Saraj to be well rounded characters. The plot line at times could be a bit predictable, but overall, I really enjoyed this one!
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  • Olivia & Lori (The Candid Cover)
    January 1, 1970
    This book sounds like so much fun! I love that there is a different spin on the matchmaking theme here with the main character playing matchmaker. I look forward to finding out how this story plays out.
  • Siri
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Avon Public Library for providing me with this ARC.Originally posted on:https://bookitybooksp.wordpress.com/2...Simi Sangha has a plan: with her freshman year of high school finally over, she’s ready to step out of the shadows, dig deep into her art, and (perhaps the most crucial goal) stand up to resident mean girl Amanda. But her plans go awry when she accidentally pairs up her cousin with a future lawyer, convincing her family that she has the Sangha match-making gene that her mo Thank you to Avon Public Library for providing me with this ARC.Originally posted on:https://bookitybooksp.wordpress.com/2...Simi Sangha has a plan: with her freshman year of high school finally over, she’s ready to step out of the shadows, dig deep into her art, and (perhaps the most crucial goal) stand up to resident mean girl Amanda. But her plans go awry when she accidentally pairs up her cousin with a future lawyer, convincing her family that she has the Sangha match-making gene that her mom, aunt, and grandmother all wield to create happy couples in their family business.Initially, Simi is reluctant to abandon her formula for the perfect year, but with a little convincing from her best friend Noah, she teams up with her techie brother to create a dating app based on her family’s match-making principles. But when the app’s popularity unexpectedly skyrockets, Simi finds herself in the aftermath of a high school where everyone’s love story (including hers) is resting in her hands.Verdict: Bajpai writes with a colloquial and relaxed tone that makes this book a quick, fun, and light-hearted novel. While the novel’s language was geared towards telling rather than showing, Bajpai’s rich story and expressive characters more than made up for this. The main character, Simi, was especially dynamic. I thoroughly enjoyed getting to see how she progressed in her journey regarding match-making. At first, she was apprehensive about getting sucked into the family business and having to neglect her artwork; however, by the end of the book, she realized that she could be more than one thing. I also loved that Simi’s art focused on mehendi — by incorporating mehendi into her daily routine and using it as a base for her art project, Simi harnessed her culture and hybridized it with her more Western life.Perhaps my favorite part of the book was the mouth-watering depictions of different Indian snacks, from bready, spicy samosas to crunchy, onion-filled pakoras. And while the meal descriptions were authentic, even more genuine were the relationships Bajpai portrayed. The casual affectionate terms like beta and puttar as well as how close Simi and her brother were to their grandparents would make any reader smile. As for the plot, it was easy to follow and incredibly detailed. Any reader could see Bajpai had put thought into subtleties like the app’s features and the story’s timeline. I recently read in an interview that Bajpai has a hard time writing “mean girl” characters, since she’s an avid enthusiast of girls supporting girls. But in this novel, Bajpai did a great job of creating a troubled and complex villain.Overall, this book was cute, short, and ingeniously fulfilled its purpose as a teen romance novel.Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • Allie
    January 1, 1970
    This book was an incredible read to get out of a slump. This book has officially gotten me out of my reading slump so I would highly recommend it to all of you to check out and read. The main character of this story was Simi Sangha. She comes from a whole line of women who are Indian Vichole- Matchmakers. However, her main passion is art in serval forms, mehendi is the most known form of art that she uses on art projects, for family and friends and for herself due to the meaning that is behind i This book was an incredible read to get out of a slump. This book has officially gotten me out of my reading slump so I would highly recommend it to all of you to check out and read. The main character of this story was Simi Sangha. She comes from a whole line of women who are Indian Vichole- Matchmakers. However, her main passion is art in serval forms, mehendi is the most known form of art that she uses on art projects, for family and friends and for herself due to the meaning that is behind it for her. Yet, when she sets up her cousin her family  comes to realize that she has the "gift" so therefore she is more presumed to go into this path. Yet, when her and her best friends since childhood, Noah, come together with her older brother they from an Matchmaking app named "Matched!" which is only for use within the school that she goes to. Simi goes from a wallflower with her best friend to the most known people at school and with the attention drawn to them it creates issues for people who were already popular. There is romance within the book that takes place when Simi and Noah along with her brother form the matches but also with their own lives. As they are trying to get into relationships with their crushes they are confronted with drama that they have to take care of both in, around the app, and in their own lives. The romance within this book is crafted well allowing for the reader to immerse themselves into the lives of the characters while also trying to figure out who they end up with. There is gay representation within the book between Simi's best friend, Noah. However, there is a trigger warning of a character outing another within the book. With the addition of new characters in the start of the book towards the school it easily sets up the ability for other characters to widen their sea of fish that they could choose compared to before. The pacing of the book was set perfectly with it not being too fast when it should have been slow and not too slow when it should have been fast. The way that the book was written was also wonderful allowing for people who aren't apart of the culture that the book is written about to learn more and to develop a stronger passion for learning and appreciating other cultures. They additions of text message format were also wonderful due to it being different compared to other books. A Match Made in Mehendi is a creative and immersive read that will leave you wondering how you could read a book so fast. It is definitely worth pre-ording and reading! 5/5 stars
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this book for free from BookCon 2019 and Little, Brown Books for Young Readers in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.A Match Made in Mehendi is such a delightful little contemporary romance, and I am here to SHOUT about it.First of all, as this is an #OwnVoices book, it’s important to mention that the cultural experiences Nandini Bajpai relays in this novel may not necessarily mirror the experience of an # Disclaimer: I received this book for free from BookCon 2019 and Little, Brown Books for Young Readers in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.A Match Made in Mehendi is such a delightful little contemporary romance, and I am here to SHOUT about it.First of all, as this is an #OwnVoices book, it’s important to mention that the cultural experiences Nandini Bajpai relays in this novel may not necessarily mirror the experience of an #OwnVoices reader. As I am a white girl, I’m really not equipped to talk about the rep with any real authority, but for myself I was so excited to see terms like “Desi” and “auntie” used regularly. Honestly? We need to normalize the inclusion of other cultures and books like A Match Made in Mehendi and Not the Girls You’re Looking For make me so excited for what YA is going to come up with next!So first of all, this is a very light read. It’s been perfect in as far as the characters are layered and the story is good, but I really just needed to step back from all the mental health and feminist messages for a hot second and refresh my cynical heart. There’s meet cute all over the place and it’s adorable. And there’s a straight out mean girl who is projecting, yeah, but she’s just a really good, properly dislikable villain. There were characters that I kept waiting for more from, like Aiden? I SO expected he was going to play more into the events in the second half of the book. But everything going on kept me wrapped up and I really liked it.Most of all, I liked how everything was so important to Simi. Her art, her family, her future, her friends. Nothing she did was halfway. She had so much passion and love for people and there was a lot of genuine-feeling emotion in this book. I really loved that. Simi Sangha is a nice girl who tries to do what’s best for the people she cares about, who believes in herself, and is flawed enough to be selfish and petty sometimes. She’s such a beautifully crafted character for a contemporary, and a reminder that characters (and people) don’t need to have a battle cry to be wonderful.A Match Made in Mehendi is a story about matchmaking and believing in your self and sticking to your truth, no matter how difficult it seems. There was so much loyalty in these pages: loyalty to ones self, loyalty to ones art, ones friends, ones family… the faith and struggle may seem like a simple storyline when so many contemporaries are tackling racism and sexism and homophobia and gender identity. But what about all those lovely books about friendship? This is one of them. And all those other things? They’re important too. The main character is a minority, several characters in the book are gay, and there’s even brief discussion about an interracial couple. There’s also conversation about minority couples from different religions coming together. Everything appears told very respectfully and beautifully.Honestly I just… I really liked this book? I went in with zero expectations and I found myself picking it up at odd moments to read a chapter because I really liked Simi and I wanted to her to find happiness. A Match Made in Mehendi may not be a literary masterpiece, but it’s a book that will make you warm and fuzzy inside.
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  • Kate Waggoner
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partnerA huge thank you to @littlebrownyoungreaders, @thenovl, and #nandinibajpai for sharing an advance review copy of A Match Made in Mehendi with the #kidlitexchange network. All opinions are my own. This book is set to hit shelves in September 2019 and I highly recommend you pre-order it!Fifteen-year-old Simi comes from a long line of matchmakers. She, however, isn't interested in following in the family tradition and would prefer to pursue a career in art. After she inadver @kidlitexchange #partnerA huge thank you to @littlebrownyoungreaders, @thenovl, and #nandinibajpai for sharing an advance review copy of A Match Made in Mehendi with the #kidlitexchange network. All opinions are my own. This book is set to hit shelves in September 2019 and I highly recommend you pre-order it!Fifteen-year-old Simi comes from a long line of matchmakers. She, however, isn't interested in following in the family tradition and would prefer to pursue a career in art. After she inadvertantly sets up her cousin Prett with the very handsome and successful Jolly, her family is thrilled to discover that she has the gift. As she starts her sophomore year, she and her friend, Noah, decide that they're going to make changes this year and be different. The two, with the help of Simi's brother, develop a an app called Match! to help her classmates find their perfect match and maybe step outside of their cliques. Things, of course, do not go as planned and hysterics ensue. I love books that make me feel like I'm watching a movie. The narrative was so easy to slip into and the characters were vibrant. I was so enthralled that I had a hard time putting the book down in order to get my errands done today. The book deals with peer pressuring, bullying, pursuing your passions, not know how others feel, and stepping outside of your comfort zone. I like that the characters each have their own passions that they want to pursue, but many have to deal with pressure from family and friends to do other things. For example, Simi's brother wants to be an engineer and/or go into the tech world, but his parents (specifically his father) want him to be a doctor. Then there is Simi who wants to do art, but her mother and aunt want her to become a matchmaker. There is also Amanda who is dealing with the pressure of having to live up to the expectations of her parents and her seemingly perfect older sisters. The book seamlessly weaves together the stories of dealing with pressure and every day high school drama into a super cute YA love story.
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  • Maura
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this lighthearted romance novel! I got it from TheNovl's Lollipop Game at BookCon, and I even got it signed by the author because she was hanging out in their booth. I'm so glad I did, because this book is a fun and original take on navigating high school dramas and familial expectations.Simi is your average sophomore who loves art and wants nothing to do with the family business: matchmaking. Her mother and aunt take great pride in coming from a long line of Indian vichole who use their I loved this lighthearted romance novel! I got it from TheNovl's Lollipop Game at BookCon, and I even got it signed by the author because she was hanging out in their booth. I'm so glad I did, because this book is a fun and original take on navigating high school dramas and familial expectations.Simi is your average sophomore who loves art and wants nothing to do with the family business: matchmaking. Her mother and aunt take great pride in coming from a long line of Indian vichole who use their family's matchmaking guide to connect eligible Desis in the area. When Simi accidentally sets up her cousin with one of their community's most eligible bachelors, her family realizes that she, too, has the "gift!" While Simi isn't thrilled about this at first, her friend Noah convinces her that creating an app to do some matchmaking at school could help make them more popular and improve her family's business.Of course, chaos ensues and the app upends the school's social hierarchy, which is when the real fun begins! Simi and Noah had a lot of fun adventures in matchmaking to prove that the app was successful, and they sincerely wanted what was best for their matches. I also loved how Indian culture was incorporated throughout the novel as Simi helped out her family's business, watched her cousin's relationship blossom, and worked on her art project. This book did feature a cliche mean girl, which I really dislike as a trope. But it's a small issue for me when Simi and Noah had such adorable relationships of their own to navigate. Plus, Noah is gay, so I got to start off June with some LGBT+ representation! So clearly, there is no reason why you shouldn't pick this one up when it comes out in September! I hope you love it as much as I did.
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  • Toka Box
    January 1, 1970
    This awesome new South Asian YA novel is engrossing from start to finish, and should be on your reading list!Nandini Bajpai's A Match Made in Mehendi hooked me right from the start. The writing is perfect and simply draws you in from the very first page. The book is charming, witty and strikes the perfect register when it comes to capturing the South Asian teen experience. The book practically starts with a bang. Fifteen-year-old Simran (or Simi, as they call her) accidentally breaks a vase when This awesome new South Asian YA novel is engrossing from start to finish, and should be on your reading list!Nandini Bajpai's A Match Made in Mehendi hooked me right from the start. The writing is perfect and simply draws you in from the very first page. The book is charming, witty and strikes the perfect register when it comes to capturing the South Asian teen experience. The book practically starts with a bang. Fifteen-year-old Simran (or Simi, as they call her) accidentally breaks a vase when shopping with her mother and aunt in an Indian furniture store in New Jersey. She is aghast but finds herself inadvertently matchmaking her beautiful and picky cousin Preet with the furniture shop owner's son, surprising even herself in the process. Her family thinks that Simi has got the gift of matchmaking. After all, she comes from a long line of Indian 'vichole' or matchmakers. These are middlemen who help find good matches for girls and boys. At first, Simi brushes off these proclamations. Her first love is art, but after a lot of thought, she and her best friend Noah decide that they want to do something really cool that year. They come up with the idea to start a unique matchmaking app, Matched! This is an app that pairs people according to how they answer quiz questions designed by Simi. She takes a lot of inspiration from 'The Shagun Matchmaking Guide,' a book that is a family heirloom of sorts, which has guided generations of matchmakers in pairing people successfully.Things take quite the turn when Simi pairs an ordinary girl with a soccer star. This turns the status quo on its head, and Simi finds herself targeted by Amanda, who is livid that Simi's app matched her ex-boyfriend with the school wallflower. Amanda and her friends are out to get Simi and Noah, and what happens is a cathartic showdown worthy of any awesome rom-com. The book does full justice to its South Asian characters, finding humour in situations that are so familiar to Indians all over the world -- the bargain-loving mum and mausi, or the furniture shop owner's son who is studying to be a lawyer. What is wonderful is that there isn't a single false note when representing these characters. They are funny, human, relatable, progressive and rise above tropes. Simi is fun, hilarious, likeable and charmingly disinterested in the reality that the adults in her life want to cook up for her. Teens will instantly connect with her humour and ingenuity. The adults will too! The last time I read a book that took me back to my own adolescent years was when I read the Ruby Redfort series by Lauren Child. Now more than ever, South Asian teens need wonderful books that represent their myriad cultures and sensibilities, books that centralize the South Asian teen experience by making it the lens to society in general. What's really cool about A Match Made in Mehendi is that it does all these things and still is a fun and interesting book about all the things that teenagers like -- falling in love, finding purpose, doing something cool, beating bullies, finding out that the cute guy actually likes you, and of course, realizing how cool your culture is when your art teacher asks you to explore mehendi as an art medium! For more reviews on South Asian books for children, young adults and adults, do visit:www.tokabox.com/blog
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  • Marisa
    January 1, 1970
    More like 4.5Cute fun Desi realistic romance of a sophomore in high school who tries a modern day approach to her family’s matchmaking business.Great for grades 7+. There’s some bullying and villain character but the author does a great job at trying to flesh out main and secondary characters. Happy with the ending and the journey to get there. A copy of the book was provided by the publishers for an honest review.
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  • Whitney
    January 1, 1970
    Very sweet
  • Hasina (PagesEnchanted)
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 3.5 starsThanks to Hachette Book Group Canada for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.A Match Made in Mehendi was a cute contemporary about family tradition and high school drama. It follows Simran as she and her best friend Noah launch a matchmaking app, with the technical help from her brother Navdeep. Drama and chaos ensue after someone doesn’t get the match they want.I quite liked Simi as a character. She was easy to relate to and her goals seemed quite realisti Actual rating: 3.5 starsThanks to Hachette Book Group Canada for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.A Match Made in Mehendi was a cute contemporary about family tradition and high school drama. It follows Simran as she and her best friend Noah launch a matchmaking app, with the technical help from her brother Navdeep. Drama and chaos ensue after someone doesn’t get the match they want.I quite liked Simi as a character. She was easy to relate to and her goals seemed quite realistic. Noah, Suraj, and Navdeep were all relatable high school students too.The plot is quite typical for a contemporary. A big project is introduced, then boy meets girl. The aspect that made it differ from other contemporaries was that there was a failed love interest, which caused the protagonist to stand up for herself.Another fun part of this book was the blend of Indian and Sikh cultures. It was clear to see religion, tradition, and culture in this book. It made the book more interesting to me! One part of the tradition is the Shagun Matchmaking. The vichole of Simi’s family are matchmakers and it’s passed through the generations along with the guide with their matchmaking tips. Simi has this matchmaking talent and she decides to stray from some of the tradition by creating the app.Of course, there were some clichés, but I liked the book overall.A Match Made in Mehendi is a fun, lighthearted read about teenage love and drama and the power tradition can have. It’s full of relatable characters, culture, and a nice contemporary plot.
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  • Sierra
    January 1, 1970
    So cute!!! 💖💘
  • Cherie
    January 1, 1970
    A very cute YA romance book. Matchmaking is in Simi's genes - her mom does it, and she ends up creating a matchmaking app at her school that goes viral. What happens when people aren't happy w their matches? And is Mr. Right via the app really Mr. Right? A very cute romance book with lots of great elements of Indian-American culture.
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    This was a cute book. It had a pretty classic rom-com plot and was fun and quick to read with cultural elements that were very interesting. It wrapped up a little too nicely at the end but overall I would recommend this to someone looking for a fun read. 3.5/5 stars.
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  • Kira Brighton
    January 1, 1970
    (Showcased in Summer 2019 Top To-Reads)
  • Alison Glass
    January 1, 1970
    SOOOO GOOD.
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