The Monkey Is the Messenger
Hope for all those who want to meditate but feel they can't because they think too much.“My mind is so busy, I really need to meditate.”“My mind is so busy, there’s no way I can meditate.”Familiar dilemma? These days just about all of us know we should be meditating, but that doesn’t make it any easier to sit down and face the repetitive thoughts careening around our brains—seemingly pointless, sometimes hurtful, nearly always hard to control. Rather than quitting meditation or trying to wall off the monkey mind, Ralph De La Rosa suggests asking yourself a question: If you were to stop demonizing your monkey mind, would it have anything to teach you? In a roundabout way, could repetitive thoughts be pointing us in the direction of personal—and even societal—transformation?Poignant and entertaining, The Monkey Is the Messenger offers a range of evidence-based, somatic, and trauma-informed insights and practices drawn from De La Rosa’s study of neuroscience and psychology and his long practice of meditation and yoga. Here at last—a remedy for all those who want to meditate but suppose they can’t because they think too much.

The Monkey Is the Messenger Details

TitleThe Monkey Is the Messenger
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 13th, 2018
PublisherShambhala
ISBN-139781611805840
Rating
GenreHealth

The Monkey Is the Messenger Review

  • Literary Soirée
    January 1, 1970
    “The Monkey Is the Messenger: Meditation and What Your Busy Mind Is Trying to Tell You” by Ralph De La Rosa reframes the concept of a mind that won’t quiet down during meditation. The author, a psychotherapist, life coach, rogue meditation teacher, storyteller, and musician whose works has been featured in CNN, SELF, GQ, Women's Health, and Elephant Journal, among others, suggests asking yourself a question: If you were to stop challenging your monkey mind, what would it teach you? Could our rep “The Monkey Is the Messenger: Meditation and What Your Busy Mind Is Trying to Tell You” by Ralph De La Rosa reframes the concept of a mind that won’t quiet down during meditation. The author, a psychotherapist, life coach, rogue meditation teacher, storyteller, and musician whose works has been featured in CNN, SELF, GQ, Women's Health, and Elephant Journal, among others, suggests asking yourself a question: If you were to stop challenging your monkey mind, what would it teach you? Could our repeating thoughts point us in the direction of personal and even societal transformation? Ever inspiring, “The Monkey Is the Messenger” offers evidence-based, somatic and trauma-informed insights and practices drawn from De La Rosa’s study of neuroscience and psychology and his long practice of meditation and yoga. At last, a remedy for all us who fear we can’t meditate ... because we suppose we think too much. Highly recommended! Pub Date 13 Nov 2018Thanks to Shambhala Publications, Inc. and NetGalley for the review copy. Opinions are fully mine.#MonkeyIsTheMessenger #NetGalley
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  • ConstantReader
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book, like all my meditation books, with a pencil in hand. I had to sharpen my pencil over and over again because I underlined so many great lines, explanations, definitions, and concepts. I am entirely impressed with how seemingly effortlessly RDLR explains complex encounters I've had in my meditation sits over the years. This book is a springboard - read it and take the jump. It seems more like a workbook, and I've been using it as such (there are recordings included with this book I read this book, like all my meditation books, with a pencil in hand. I had to sharpen my pencil over and over again because I underlined so many great lines, explanations, definitions, and concepts. I am entirely impressed with how seemingly effortlessly RDLR explains complex encounters I've had in my meditation sits over the years. This book is a springboard - read it and take the jump. It seems more like a workbook, and I've been using it as such (there are recordings included with this book, see "List of Practices" before the Foreword). Under this book's direction (chapter 13, pp. 223 - 226) I did a meditation to work with one my exiles, and she had information for me. Her info made total sense, and I take it to be true, and not a creative fabrication. I woke up the next day feeling lighter. I'm so grateful.This book is exceptionally well-written and well-paced. It does not read like a first book, which may be a sign that there are more to come. RDLR fearlessly shares his trauma with the reader, and that is nothing short of heroic. If he were to write a memoir, I would read it in a heartbeat. I feel the meditation community here in NYC needs his story -- it has helped encourage one of my parts to tell the truth about things she has done, and to start/continue healing. This book - more specifically, practicing this book's guidance - is now part of my self-healing process, and I recommend RDLR's teachings wholeheartedly.
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  • Ralph De
    January 1, 1970
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