Star Wars
Continuing the imperious rise of the Dark Lord! A Jedi makes a desperate deal. The Inquisitors' mission evolves. And Darth Vader discovers a theft... And when the thief faces the consequences of their crime, Emperor Palpatine rewards Darth Vader with three gifts: A thing, a choice...and a voice. Seeking the path to his destiny, Vader returns to the place of his birth. There, echoes from the past reach out to him - both his own past, and the dark history of the Sith! Be here for a story that could only be called "Fortress Vader"! COLLECTING: DARTH VADER 19-25

Star Wars Details

TitleStar Wars
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 12th, 2019
PublisherMarvel Comics
ISBN-139781302910570
Rating
GenreMedia Tie In, Star Wars, Sequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Science Fiction

Star Wars Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    Charles Soule’s first Darth Vader book gave us the vitally important origin story of... his lightsaber. Great… his fourth book is the equally unnecessary origin story of Vader’s Fortress. The one that we briefly glimpsed in Rogue One? The very same. I know, FINALLY, right? What’s that sound? Oh, just the bottom of the barrel being scraped! It’s pretty bad, and not just because it’s pointless, but because it’s not very entertaining either. The dull storyline of Vader polishing off the remaining J Charles Soule’s first Darth Vader book gave us the vitally important origin story of... his lightsaber. Great… his fourth book is the equally unnecessary origin story of Vader’s Fortress. The one that we briefly glimpsed in Rogue One? The very same. I know, FINALLY, right? What’s that sound? Oh, just the bottom of the barrel being scraped! It’s pretty bad, and not just because it’s pointless, but because it’s not very entertaining either. The dull storyline of Vader polishing off the remaining Jedi-in-hiding wasn’t interesting, nor was how he turned on his Inquisitors – bad guy did bad thing? Didn’t see that coming! Then we’re on Mustafar as Vader and his Sith artist/architect (of course) figures out what he wants in order for Vader to “bleed” his lightsaber’s “kyber crystal at the Dark Side Locus” or some such gibberish. The locals try to get rid of their new, unwanted neighbour – think they succeed? Exactomundo. Ho hum. Charles Soule, the wheel-spinning master! If you’re a fan of the prequels, you’ll love this one as Soule takes us back to Sprawling City Planet, reintroduces Padme’s shiny silver spaceship, and the quasi-nightmare sequence at the end acts as a kind of “greatest hits” collection of scenes from those movies. That sequence unintentionally made me laugh when the quote “Now this is podracing!” cropped up. Wow, what a steaming pile of movie The Phantom Menace was, eh? Giuseppe Camuncoli’s art is superb though. The nightmare sequence was beautifully executed and the panel showing young Anakin with the Vader mask moulded into his face was quite shocking! Momin, the Sith artist/architect, was an imaginative idea too – a possessed helmet! That’s, uh, different at least? Fortress Vader is another flashy but superficial Darth Vader book – which accurately describes the character himself as well! Soule’s ironically soul-less writing is perhaps the most appropriate match for this series. Next up: the origin of the coloured buttons on Vader’s uniform!
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  • Calista
    January 1, 1970
    We start out this volume with Vader once again killing another Jedi. He is wiping this out. He returns to the Emperor and the Emperor agrees to give him a planet as home base. Of course, Vader chooses Mustafar as his home base, the planet he became what he is today. He has also gathered up secrets with a helmet of Momin, an ancient Jedi from the beginning. I don't know exactly how it works. Momin has plans to build a building that will open a gateway into the dark side of the force. It takes a f We start out this volume with Vader once again killing another Jedi. He is wiping this out. He returns to the Emperor and the Emperor agrees to give him a planet as home base. Of course, Vader chooses Mustafar as his home base, the planet he became what he is today. He has also gathered up secrets with a helmet of Momin, an ancient Jedi from the beginning. I don't know exactly how it works. Momin has plans to build a building that will open a gateway into the dark side of the force. It takes a few tries before they get it. This is a fascinating story and I know I keep saying this, but this whole series about Vader after Star Wars 3 is amazing. It really would be great on screen.I saw another reviewer named Peace call Vader a drama queen and I could not agree more. Total truth. Made me laugh. I am interested if this story will continue. If there are more, than I am excited to read them. This is so much fun and a little sad too.
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  • Ben Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Charles Soule’s “Darth Vader” series goes out with a bang. Although perhaps not quite the strongest arc that Soule and Camuncoli, either in terms of story or art, these final 7 issues represent a fine sendoff not only to this chapter of Vader’s formidable legacy, but also for Soule and Camuncoli, who – over the curse of the last 25 issues – have managed a not-unimpresive feat: actually managing to find a way to make Vader legitimately menacing again. Whoulda thunk, after 40+ years of films and w Charles Soule’s “Darth Vader” series goes out with a bang. Although perhaps not quite the strongest arc that Soule and Camuncoli, either in terms of story or art, these final 7 issues represent a fine sendoff not only to this chapter of Vader’s formidable legacy, but also for Soule and Camuncoli, who – over the curse of the last 25 issues – have managed a not-unimpresive feat: actually managing to find a way to make Vader legitimately menacing again. Whoulda thunk, after 40+ years of films and who-knows-how-many canon and non-canon novel/comic/videogame appearances, that’d be possible?
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  • Peace
    January 1, 1970
    ANAKIN IS A DRAMA QUEEN
  • Jordan Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    The entirety of the new Disney/Marvel Star Wars comic catalogue hasn’t been exactly consistent. The titular series has had its ups and downs, Dr. Aphra has devolved into a mess that probably y wont ever be fixed, and, while mostly enjoyable and at least one of the better series, Poe Dameron kind of fizzled out and left the conclusion to be somewhat lacking. Thankfully Soule’s other work, Darth Vader has been one constant bright spot and always delivers a thrill ride. Fortress Vader is no excepti The entirety of the new Disney/Marvel Star Wars comic catalogue hasn’t been exactly consistent. The titular series has had its ups and downs, Dr. Aphra has devolved into a mess that probably y wont ever be fixed, and, while mostly enjoyable and at least one of the better series, Poe Dameron kind of fizzled out and left the conclusion to be somewhat lacking. Thankfully Soule’s other work, Darth Vader has been one constant bright spot and always delivers a thrill ride. Fortress Vader is no exception. Not since the first collection has Vader been such a Force to be reckoned with. In this last and final volume, Soule really cranks up the volume, so to speak, and takes Vader down one really dark and violent path. We’ve all seen Vader be a badass and slaughter his fair share of enemies, but I don’t think any other author has done such a succinct job of really nailing the character and doing his actions and motivations justice. Plus, Soule is master of weaving in other plot lines front other comic series and novels, probably being the most well read, and well rounded author out there.It’s too bad that this iteration of Vader has come to close. There was the announcement that Chuck Wendig (who I dont especially enjoy anyways) was attached to do his own version of dark Anakin, but his removal from the project has me wondering when we get to see Vader in his own spin off series again. And I doubt whatever Marvel chooses to do, and which direction they decide to take, will ever be as good as Soule’s vision. At least it was a fitting end to a great run. Can’t say I’m disappointed...which is a rarity when it comes to Star Wars these days.
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  • Benji Glaab
    January 1, 1970
    Overall this was good the final issue in this series was absolutely unreal. Charles Souls serves up a more than worthy conclusion to a great run. A series I consider in the upper echelon of SW comics.The first issue in this volume was kinda standalone-ish where Vader's inquisitors find and destroy the last of the known jedi, having concluded there mission for now Vader does what he does best at this troubling stage of his life, he finds someone else to kill. After a full day of shenanigans on Co Overall this was good the final issue in this series was absolutely unreal. Charles Souls serves up a more than worthy conclusion to a great run. A series I consider in the upper echelon of SW comics.The first issue in this volume was kinda standalone-ish where Vader's inquisitors find and destroy the last of the known jedi, having concluded there mission for now Vader does what he does best at this troubling stage of his life, he finds someone else to kill. After a full day of shenanigans on Corucant Emperor Palpatine decides to hook Vader up with a planet of his own to keep him out of his hair I suppose. This leads to the construction of Fortress Vader. Which I keep seeing around. The perfect design is required to open a door to the dark side. When perfection is finally obtained we are in for one doozy of a finale. What a great series, phenomenal art throughout, Soule was able to really flesh out Vader's character post episode 3. I'm really happy with the end product and would happily recommend this series
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  • Neil R. Coulter
    January 1, 1970
    The new Star Wars canon has not been very impressive, but this Darth Vader graphic novel series is really excellent. Charles Soule has consistently written Vader in such a way that you can really see Anakin struggling inside of him—but he's also captured the angry, Dark Lord of the Sith side of Vader, mercilessly destroying anything that stands in his way. Or anything that even mildly annoys him. Few writers have been able to accomplish all of that, or to sustain it through an entire series.The The new Star Wars canon has not been very impressive, but this Darth Vader graphic novel series is really excellent. Charles Soule has consistently written Vader in such a way that you can really see Anakin struggling inside of him—but he's also captured the angry, Dark Lord of the Sith side of Vader, mercilessly destroying anything that stands in his way. Or anything that even mildly annoys him. Few writers have been able to accomplish all of that, or to sustain it through an entire series.The art matches the writing perfectly. Giuseppe Camuncoli's illustrations are fresh and original, never looking like Photoshop tracing of frames from the films (a problem that has plagued Marvel's main Star Wars series). The visuals include fun references to other parts of the SW universe—a mask that brings us ever closer to the return of Durge in the new canon; the teaser poster for The Phantom Menace; and even (perhaps?) a bizarre homage to the Vader and Son cartoons.This final volume of the series brings Vader to another "face the mirror" test, one that connects all the parts of his previous life and leaves him devastated, knowing that there truly is no way to bring back all he has lost. At the end of this book, Vader believes that Anakin is gone forever—and this makes Luke's "there's still good in him" assertion even more powerful, thinking now about the many years Vader had lost all hope in himself. I love how Soule has expanded and deepened the mythology, not just adding new bits and pieces for the fun of it, but really understanding the deeper story and making it all more beautiful and complete.I'm very sorry that this is the last book of the series. This era, the time period between Episodes 3 and 4, is my favorite part of Star Wars so far, and Soule has made it even richer. I'd love to see this series made into an animated film, in the same way that DC has brought some of the classic Batman graphic novels to life on screen.
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  • Ahdom
    January 1, 1970
    This Darth Vader line from Soule deserves endless praise. Not only does this story add depth to the character, but it also digs deep into Star Wars lore and expands the universe in a way that others do not. Not only was the story brilliant, so was the artwork. I think most readers were hanging on to see where this went and it wrapped up beautifully in the end. This should serve as a model to what we are looking for in Star Wars comics when stories are character driven. Vader truly has to cut tie This Darth Vader line from Soule deserves endless praise. Not only does this story add depth to the character, but it also digs deep into Star Wars lore and expands the universe in a way that others do not. Not only was the story brilliant, so was the artwork. I think most readers were hanging on to see where this went and it wrapped up beautifully in the end. This should serve as a model to what we are looking for in Star Wars comics when stories are character driven. Vader truly has to cut ties with his former self in order to embrace his new identity and this series illustrates that process brilliantly.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    A very cool and consistent run. Vader Fraser returning to builid his fortress of solitude in a way. So far both Vader runs were highly reccomended.
  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    Less action but more character development than in prior volumes.
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    This volume contains Darth Vader Dark Lord of the Sith: Fortress Vader Part I-VII. This is by far probably the most interesting of the Vader graphic novels. It follows Vader as he remembers his past on Mustafar, his fall to the Dark Side and defeat by Obi-Wan Kenobi. As Vader fights with his own anger, as well as maintaining his loyalty to Palpatine, he finds that Mustafar houses an old Sith Temple. The relic of the Sith is powerful in the Force, and the Sith Lord of the past tries to manipulate This volume contains Darth Vader Dark Lord of the Sith: Fortress Vader Part I-VII. This is by far probably the most interesting of the Vader graphic novels. It follows Vader as he remembers his past on Mustafar, his fall to the Dark Side and defeat by Obi-Wan Kenobi. As Vader fights with his own anger, as well as maintaining his loyalty to Palpatine, he finds that Mustafar houses an old Sith Temple. The relic of the Sith is powerful in the Force, and the Sith Lord of the past tries to manipulate Vader to his will. Of course, Vader is not easily manipulated, and he's excellent at hiding his true intentions. In this volume, Vader constructs Fortress Vader, a stronghold of his own that reflects his own dark ways in the Force.I love the art and the story of Bader creating his fortress on Mustafar. It's an interesting historical aspect to Vader as a character that I greatly appreciate having as a reader. I also enjoy his interactions with other Sith/those who find themselves powerful, because Vader always seems up to the challenge in showing that no one can outmatch him.
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    It's a shame this is the end of Soule's run on Vader. For my money this is the best book to come out of Marvel regaining the publishing rights to Star Wars, it stayed excellent for the duration of the run.
  • Jim C
    January 1, 1970
    This collection concludes what I consider the best of the Disney Star Wars comics. In this one, Darth Vader picks Mustafar to be his planet of operations and we will learn why. This ties in with the show Rebels as it has a plot that was introduced in that show.The aspect that I have liked from this run of comics is that it shows the awesomeness of Vader and why he is feared throughout the galaxy. This is once again shown in the first issue as we see Darth Vader hunting a Jedi and I loved it. Rig This collection concludes what I consider the best of the Disney Star Wars comics. In this one, Darth Vader picks Mustafar to be his planet of operations and we will learn why. This ties in with the show Rebels as it has a plot that was introduced in that show.The aspect that I have liked from this run of comics is that it shows the awesomeness of Vader and why he is feared throughout the galaxy. This is once again shown in the first issue as we see Darth Vader hunting a Jedi and I loved it. Right away I knew this issue was going to be good. Even with this collection showing Vader being brutal it also shows him being ruthful which ties in nicely with the original trilogy. In fact, this collection ties in with all the movies including the current trilogy that is taking place. There is one panel where we get the epic poster shot of a young Anakin and the shadow of Darth Vader which makes this collection worth reading just to look at that one panel. This collection also answers a lingering question from the movies (I am not a fan of the reveal but whatever). In my opinion, this series has been so consistently good and I am sad to see it that it is ending. Everything works from the artwork, the story, and showing the character of Darth Vader and how the fans want to see him. We get to see that he is a badass with a lingering connection to human emotions.
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  • Alex Tiethoff
    January 1, 1970
    Brutal and heart-wrenching, Charles Soule's final installment in the emergent Vader's saga does not disappoint. It is at once the satisfying end of an arc and a piercing look at Anakin that integrates old canon and new.In this volume I continually cringed at the freakin' messed up relationship between Palpatine and Vader. Fortress Vader continues to establish Vader's loyalty to yet mistrust of his Master.As reflected in this volume's title, Vader requests of his Master the planet Mustafar for hi Brutal and heart-wrenching, Charles Soule's final installment in the emergent Vader's saga does not disappoint. It is at once the satisfying end of an arc and a piercing look at Anakin that integrates old canon and new.In this volume I continually cringed at the freakin' messed up relationship between Palpatine and Vader. Fortress Vader continues to establish Vader's loyalty to yet mistrust of his Master.As reflected in this volume's title, Vader requests of his Master the planet Mustafar for his very own. Yet his palace ends up designed not by Imperial architects but by the spirit of a long dead Sith.Vader journeys into the depths not only of the dark side of the Force, but of his own soul, as he wonders whether there might still be something else to live for, other than the will of Palpatine.
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  • Geoffrey Payne
    January 1, 1970
    This series really went out with a bang. I’m genuinely sad to see this series finish up since I think it was one of the strongest comic series of the Disney era. Soule took Vader to such an interesting and emotional place and that made this a fantastic volume. 5 out of 5!
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  • Emilee Hone (Emilee Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    5/5 - http://emileereads.com/blog/2019/4/13...My favorite story arc in this Vader series. I love the fortress so much.
  • Jonathan Roberts
    January 1, 1970
    Good finish to this volume! Liked the idea of the past meeting up with Vader in several ways!!!
  • Anime Mage
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this comic was certainly not what I expected. On one hand, I found it to be somewhat disappointing because I felt like it didn’t quite live up to its potential. But on the other hand, I thought it was really good and even an improvement overall to the previous three volumes. And while technically that would make this comic a mixed bag, I can safely say that I enjoyed this fourth and final installment of this comic book storyline.So what is this all about? Essentially, Darth Vader hunts dow Well, this comic was certainly not what I expected. On one hand, I found it to be somewhat disappointing because I felt like it didn’t quite live up to its potential. But on the other hand, I thought it was really good and even an improvement overall to the previous three volumes. And while technically that would make this comic a mixed bag, I can safely say that I enjoyed this fourth and final installment of this comic book storyline.So what is this all about? Essentially, Darth Vader hunts downs down a Jedi and kills two inquisitors that didn’t follow orders very well. Next, he decides to go to Mustafar to bring Padmé back to life with the aid of a sprite of a sith lord named Darth Momim. To do this, they build a giant castle that can serve as a portal to the Darkside (which explains why there is a fortress on Mustafar in Rogue One a Star Wars story). However, the spirit quickly betrays Vader get his body back and in the two fight each other. Vader wins, uses the portal that they created to try to bring back his wife. Instead, he gets this really cryptic vision that kind of re-play his entire life but also reveals that Darth Sidious is his father.So let's talk about the positives because there is a lot of them. In fact, there is so many that it certainly makes this recent installment in this comic easily the best of the bunch.The first thing that I liked about this comic was the Jedi that they chose to kill off at the start was Eeth Koth, Essentially, this Jedi was on the Jedi Council in the Phantom Menace and a Jedi general during the 2008 Clone Wars TV show (he was the one that was captured by General Grievous in season two). Honestly, one of my biggest critiques about this character is that originally in legends continuity this character died at the battle of Geonosis allegedly yet in the clone wars television series they brought him back to life (give him one really cool episode) and then proceeded to not explain where he ends up after Order 66. And finally, this comic gives us an answer that is pretty satisfying. We see that he essentially left The Order and became a father on some faraway world. He even became a priest. I like the way that they re-introduce the character. I think that his fight with Vader what is supposed to be a really big throwback to his fight with General Grievous in the Clone Wars TV show. I just like little nods like that. Honestly, their lightsaber duel was admittedly pretty cool. I also felt really sad for his wife when her child got taken away in such a cruel manner. It is kind of proves how evil The Inquisitors really are. I mean they gave his wife the false promise that her child would be safe only to take it away from her at the last second. I think it does a great job making me hate the empire. As for Eeth Koth's death, it was admittedly pretty decent. It was probably one of the more sad deaths stowed upon our beloved background prequel trilogy characters.The second thing I liked about the comic was Darth Momim. One of the things that I liked about the old Expanded Universe was its plethora of obscure but really cool ancient Sith Lord characters. Examples of this include Darth Bane, Darth Zahanna, Darth Cognus, Darth Plegeuis, Darth Revan, Darth Malak, Darth Malgus, and Exar Kun. Intuitively this is not a complete list because if that was the case...the entire review would just be a list of characters...so we are not gonna do that. But anyway, when Disney decided to do something similar in their continuity, I got really excited. Honestly, I thought this character was executed really well. To put it bluntly, he is essentially the artist side of the Sith. He’s an architect and an artist. He’s basically Pablo Picasso meets Hannibal Lecter with a lightsaber and force powers. I also like his lightsaber fighting style and some of the dialogue that he has. I love his philosophy that you only gain power if you serve the Darkside, and if one tries to control the Darkside they are ultimately destroyed. I also love the gimmick that he is imprisoned in his own mask and that he can possess people by forcing people to wear it. This character is really cool and is probably one of the greatest original characters that Disney has ever created for the Star Wars franchise. I like the character so much that I want to know more about him. Specifically, I want to know where he fits within the context of The Grand Plan (if you don’t know what that is…essentially it just refers the plan for how the Rule of Two Sith were going to destroy the Jedi.) I also want to know whether or not he came before or after Darth Bane. So call me intrigued.The third thing I liked about this comic was that they gave a really cool rationale for why Darth Vader builds his castle on Mustafar. And this is why I love this particular installment so much and by extension the whole comic book storyline in general. I love it because it is able to tie the various prequel material together and make everything within the Star Wars universe seem cohesive an alive. I love how it was able to tie Rogue One a Star Wars story with Revenge of the Sith so beautifully. Because now every time I rewatch the scene where Darth Vader’s castle appears, I will always be reminded of his attempts to get Padme back from the dead. And honestly, it’s stuff like that that just enhances the movies for me. It really enhances Vader’s character arc in such a way that it’s actually pretty cool. I mean the lore behind the castle itself was actually pretty believable and really interesting.The fourth thing I liked about this comic what is the story and pacing. Yes, it wasn’t all that amazing execution-wise, but it had tons of really well done emotional moments overall that it felt both dynamic and interesting. I think the build-up could’ve used a little bit more work, but the emotional moments within the narrative were executed well enough that the comic felt actually really entertaining. I guess the best thing I can say about the story and pacing was that things didn’t happen to slowly. Rarely was there ever really any dull moments found throughout the comic. So yeah I thought the story and pacing were doing well enough.And probably the fifth and probably the most important thing I liked about this comic was the vision that Vader got when he went through the portal. To put it bluntly this was probably the best moment in the entire comic book series for sure. For starters there is a lot to take in. For so many years, we’ve always wondered who Anakin Skywalker‘s father was. And now we actually know who it is. And the answer kind of put Star Wars on its head in a way that it changes the way one will see the whole Star Wars saga. So who is Anakin’s father? *drum roll* Darth Sidious! Who would’ve guessed?! I mean personally I always thought it was Darth Plageius but I guess I was wrong. It kind of screws up my mind a little bit. The fact that Darth Sidious created what was essentially the main characters of this entire franchise and while he also configured the downfall of the Republic leads to some pretty dark stuff. You mean to tell me that Anakin was made to suffer from the start?! I mean when you probably re-watch the movies again with this in mind it actually makes the whole thing kind of depressing. That the entire time some evil old man created this little boy and then manipulated him to destroy everything he loves and make it such that he was destined to lose everything. That’s really messed up. It also makes me love this comic even more. It actually builds upon the prequel lore in such a way that it enhances it!! But that’s not all, I love how that entire vision shows us the entirety of Anakin‘s life. I love how they had a scene where Anakin's shadow took the shape of Darth Vader and attacked him (which was essentially an Easter egg to the promotional poster of Episode I: The Phantom Menace. God I love that poster. And the movie for that matter). I also love how the comic showed Darth Vader more or less killing everybody that he has killed up to that point of in the series. I also love how when he tries to save Padme she ends up killing herself. Honestly, it just reminds me of a really well-written creepypasta....that this entire time Darth Vader is trapped in this purgatory where no matter how strong he gets, he will never be able to find love or be loved. Padme will forever be out of reach, and it is his fault and thus he’ll burn forever. It just kind of makes the ending of Episode III scene even sadder than it already is! It just makes me wish the Anakin Skywalker had simply went away with Padme when she asked him to. Why didn’t he just do that?! I mean I guess that’s why Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is my favorite Star Wars movie. It’s done in such a way where you know how it’s going to end, but you wish that it would end differently.The other thing I liked about the comic was the Tarkan versus Darth Vader side story. Yes I am aware that this is technically a story that was featured in the last volume but I never got to talk about it so I’m just gonna do it here. I thought it was pretty cool. It showed a how intelligent Tarkan really was but also how deadly Vader was. I think personally the reason Vader configured the situation in this way was because he wanted to avenge Ashoka after what Tarkin did to her in The Clone Wars. Obviously it’s not stated outright, but given that Darth Vader/Anakin Skywalker is a very vengeful character I wouldn’t put it past him to do that. But anyway, I thought the story was cool because it showed that the dynamic between them was interesting in that both characters are incredibly intelligent despite the fact they’re so different.Perhaps on a more funny note, the other thing that I liked about the comic was the running gag of Anakin’s hatred towards the sand. I just found that to be really funny but not done in a way that distracts from the overall narrative. Personally I just find the line of "I don’t like sand" be really funny but at the same time to be really true to Anakin’s character. Maybe that’s what this franchise was going with that particular gag. And on that front it succeeded. It really sends my belly into a fit of giggles. And I think that this comic was able to utilize that in a way that was funny as well. Admittedly, the Star Wars films and the extended universe are supposed to be pretty campy despite having a serious nature. And I think the "I don’t like sand" line is a testament to that. I guess what I’m trying to say is that that particular line was funny in an endearing way, and that this comic utilizes that accordingly.And then we get to the negatives. And this makes me sad because I feel like that while this comic has some of the best strengths in the entire series, and also some of the worst flaws.First and probably the biggest thing I dislike about the comic was the artwork. I don’t know if this is because the last comic I read (Killen’s Vader) had amazing artwork or the fact that this particular comic has sub-par artwork, but suffice it to say the artwork in this comic is not particularly strong. I mean it just looks kind of sub par. I mean fortunately it’s not terrible, but I think it definitely holds back what otherwise could’ve been a far better comic.The second thing I dislike about the comic was that the potential love story between the two inquisitors was under developed and kind of stupid. And by extension, these two inquisitors weren’t even that interesting. I could’ve deleted these characters from the comic and their entire fight with Vader....and nothing else would have changed. I mean the fight sequence itself was admittedly decent, but the emotional stakes behind it were completely and utterly nonexistent.The third thing I dislike about the comic was that I thought the two architects that Vader brings with him were completely worthless. I mean they add nothing to the plot, they are annoying, and and prove to be just a nuisance for the entire affair. Honestly I feel happy when Darth Momim killed them if only because I don’t have to deal with them anymore.And the fourth in the final thing I dislike about the comic what is that I thought that the little alien natives that they had on Mustafar could’ve been developed more. Because the comic kind of screws up with them. At first, they end up feeling like filler because they’re not all that interesting and just serve as a distraction from all the cooler stuff that’s going on. But just when they’re about to get interesting, they die off way too quickly. So yeah that was the problem. Now to be fair the action sequences involving them were so cool but I can kind a look past that. But the fact that these characters were more or less a hindrance to the overall story does detract from my enjoyment of the comic.Final Verdict:Despite its flaws, I would say that this installment was easily the strongest one in the series. For one thing, I like the Jedi character that was killed, I like the new Dark Lord of the Sith character they added, I like the backstory for the castle, and I like the big vision at the end. However, I thought that the artwork could’ve been better, I thought that there were a lot of characters that could’ve been developed more, and there were a lot of side supporting characters that were annoying.But still, I really liked the comic. And yes it was an improvement over the previous one, but it was not as much of an improvement as past issues. With this in mind, I give a Star Wars: Dark Lord of the Sith Volume IV: Fortress Vader 3.83/5.00 stars - An above average Star Wars story that more than makes up for its admittedly lackluster flaws.
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  • Adam Fisher
    January 1, 1970
    This title has been consistently amazing. This Volume is no exception and it makes me wonder if age is in fact what slows Vader down and calms his rage a bit...Vader and the Inquisitors are still searching for rogue Jedi in the time after Order 66. Finding Eeth Koth, the battle breaks out, proving again not only that no one stops Vader, but also that he contributes to the future when Koth's child is brought as an infant recruit for the Empire. After quelling two traitors within the Inquisitors, This title has been consistently amazing. This Volume is no exception and it makes me wonder if age is in fact what slows Vader down and calms his rage a bit...Vader and the Inquisitors are still searching for rogue Jedi in the time after Order 66. Finding Eeth Koth, the battle breaks out, proving again not only that no one stops Vader, but also that he contributes to the future when Koth's child is brought as an infant recruit for the Empire. After quelling two traitors within the Inquisitors, Palpatine grants Vader two gifts: 1) Padme's J-327 Nubian ship (made popular in Episode I) and 2) the chance for him to have a planet of his own choosing to shape and mold as a base. Vader chooses Mustafar, the site of his downfall and creation.On Mustafar, after a nail-biting epic no shields entry landing on the planet, Vader uses the Mask of Lord Momin, a powerful Dark Side artifact, to use Momin's expertise to create a Fortress that will be able to channel a Dark Side nexus located on the world. Embarking on a cycle of: build the fortress, defeat the uprising locals, destroy the fortress, kill the host for Momin, put the Mask on someone new, and repeat.... it is on the ninth attempt that the Fortress/Nexus is complete and correct.The largest band of invaders chooses to attack then, and while Vader is distracted, Momin opens the gate in the Nexus and reclaims his body from the Abyss. The battle between Vader and Momin breaks out and we already know who the winner is, though with some of his last energy, Vader passes through the gate into the Nexus.(This issue is probably one of the best issues of the whole series...)Vader, as a Dark Side entity, walks through his past. We see (now made canon) that Shmi was manipulated by Palpatine's Sith powers to birth Anakin, Anakin has nightmares about Vader, spirit Vader is forced to battle and destroy a ton of Jedi who have lived before (including: Yaddle, Mace Windu, Plo Koon, Adi Gallia, Shaak Ti, Jocasta Nu, Depa Bilaba, Quinlan Vos... and some others though I am impressed with how many of those I can name on sight without looking...), as well as "killing" both Obi-Wan and Palpatine as a prophesy of sorts for the future. Coming upon Padme, he is again forced to relive her death. But.... another faceless stands in his way. Wielding a blue lightsaber, he obliterates Vader and pushes him out of the Nexus. (This is obviously Luke, though we only see an outline of him.) Vader rejoins Palpatine and the story continues.Again, this Volume and the whole run of "Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith" is totally worth your time. Young Vader is amazingly powerful!High recommend!
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  • Nate
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. What an ending. That last issue gave me chills. Soule’s Darth Vader series started a bit shaky for me, but quickly became great. He writes a fantastic Vader. Like Kieron Gillen before him, Soule wisely eschews internal monologue, opting instead for a cold, intimidating force who speaks very little. It's impressive how menacing Soule and Camuncoli make Vader. In that regard, this series has done an excellent job of showing, not telling.I’m sad this is the end, because I would happily read 25 Wow. What an ending. That last issue gave me chills. Soule’s Darth Vader series started a bit shaky for me, but quickly became great. He writes a fantastic Vader. Like Kieron Gillen before him, Soule wisely eschews internal monologue, opting instead for a cold, intimidating force who speaks very little. It's impressive how menacing Soule and Camuncoli make Vader. In that regard, this series has done an excellent job of showing, not telling.I’m sad this is the end, because I would happily read 25 more issues of what is essentially Darth Vader: Year One. But I’m incredibly satisfied with what we got.
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  • Paul Decker
    January 1, 1970
    I have enjoyed this ongoing Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith series so much more than the original Marvel Darth Vader series. I think the reason is that this is such a more interesting time in Darth Vader's life. Anakin is still there behind the mask, figuring out his path. This is the finale of the series and everything comes to an excellent end. There are so many references that blend all the different time frames together: the prequels, Rebels, Clone Wars, Rogue One, and the original trilog I have enjoyed this ongoing Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith series so much more than the original Marvel Darth Vader series. I think the reason is that this is such a more interesting time in Darth Vader's life. Anakin is still there behind the mask, figuring out his path. This is the finale of the series and everything comes to an excellent end. There are so many references that blend all the different time frames together: the prequels, Rebels, Clone Wars, Rogue One, and the original trilogy. And the connections aren't just passing allusion, but they make up this story. We get to see a former Jedi Council member at the start of this volume. Then a classic prequel ship. The Inquisitors are very present. There's a chase scene on Coruscant very reminiscent of Episode II. And then of course there's Mustafar!!!The final chapter in this volume is done so well. I want more comic stories that connect the trilogies so well. There's even a reference to one of my favorite Episode I movie posters. This was a great volume. A great end to a great series. I obviously give this book a 5/5. I highly recommend this ongoing Marvel series if you're looking for a Star wars series to read.
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  • Nick Scott
    January 1, 1970
    This was a solid conclusion to this series.This was one of those "Star Wars gets weird" stories that can often have elements I dislike in it, but I thought most everything worked here. Momin's character and backstory were cool, and I would love to see more about him, but I wasn't crazy about him coming back to life through the helmet stuff. What made this volume great was the artistic interpretations of Anakin/Vader's inner psyche as he continues his transformation and ultimately realizes that P This was a solid conclusion to this series.This was one of those "Star Wars gets weird" stories that can often have elements I dislike in it, but I thought most everything worked here. Momin's character and backstory were cool, and I would love to see more about him, but I wasn't crazy about him coming back to life through the helmet stuff. What made this volume great was the artistic interpretations of Anakin/Vader's inner psyche as he continues his transformation and ultimately realizes that Padme is gone for good...and so is Anakin. The final issue, where we see the fiery-lava-force-specter-representation of Anakin/Vader wander through his past, hearing the voices of those that used to be close to him, that was powerful stuff. Kudos to Soule and the art team for making me feel emotions tied to the "Now this is podracing!" and "Are you an angel?" lines. And ending with Kylo Ren's "Let the past die" quote? *chef's kiss*
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  • Benjamin Barham
    January 1, 1970
    In summation: An ancient dark side artist who looks like a elf fails at making art, everyone's facial proportions continue to defy natural order, Vader has a (view spoiler)[shit (hide spoiler)] "best-of" vision, and NOTHING HAPPENED. Still. Again. If this sounds like something you might be interested in, don't hesitate - pick up Star Wars: Darth Vader: Lord of the Sith: Subtitles Evermore, Vol. 4: The Black Fortress: An Exercise in Zero Stakes Storytelling With Beloved Characters: The Comic Adap In summation: An ancient dark side artist who looks like a elf fails at making art, everyone's facial proportions continue to defy natural order, Vader has a (view spoiler)[shit (hide spoiler)] "best-of" vision, and NOTHING HAPPENED. Still. Again. If this sounds like something you might be interested in, don't hesitate - pick up Star Wars: Darth Vader: Lord of the Sith: Subtitles Evermore, Vol. 4: The Black Fortress: An Exercise in Zero Stakes Storytelling With Beloved Characters: The Comic Adaptation of the Bad Idea today!Good riddance to another bad Star Wars comic.
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  • Rocky Sunico
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This book was total wow. While some aspects that were prominently highlighted by the media may not fully sit well with everyone, on the whole this volume is really strong and quite the insight into Darth Vader's early journey as a new Lord of the Sith. The unusual task of crafting his fortress on Mustafar was given so much more depth that it made for quite the epic tale on its own. I really enjoyed this.
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  • Helena R-D
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know what to expect when I was reading this, but it totally kept me captivated and reading as Vader himself became the Vader we know, but not quite. There is still sympathy to be had for him and even throughout all of the things he does, he still has this one thread of not evil in him. The end was interesting, since it plants the hints that he knew, no matter what, that Luke was his end. And he seemed to be sort of ready for it. Haunting, but thought provoking stuff.
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    Subtitled Fortress Vader.Remember that scene in Rogue One where Director Krennic visits Vader in his castle on a (I think) un-named planet? That planet was Mustafar: the planet where Obi-Wan defeated Vader, and where he was first encased in his suit of armour. This collection of stories deals with the creation of his fortress on that planet, a fortress that comes under attack from the locals who are not keen to see the Empire there.
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. What an ending!The volume lagged a bit in the middle. The large battle felt like an unnecessary diversion.But that ending... masterfully done. Intensely character-driven. Soule gets what makes Vader work as a tortured protagonist. He really knows how to use Anakin/Vader's tragic past.On a side note, of all the issue covers they could've chosen for this TPB, I'm a bit confused as to why they chose that one. It may, in fact, have been the weakest of all of them.
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  • CB
    January 1, 1970
    A fabulous conclusion to a fabulious series. I read it twice in a week to try and digest all that Soule builds into the character of Vader. By far, this is the best exploration of the light/dark conflict within the character. The last issue in particular is jam packed with meaning (although I wasn't too bothered by the Palpatine panel that got everyone excited).
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  • Ian Darko
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing end to fantastic run! I loved how much this series overall not only let us delve deep into the mind of arguably the most iconic character in the franchise, but also explored the rich lore in new ways we haven’t seen. This is on par with The Last Jedi as one of the greatest Star Wars stories told in the modern era.
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  • Kavinay
    January 1, 1970
    What's cool isn't just that Soule is able to give an expansive EU feel to the conclusion of his series, but that's he's also able to definitively end it. When we leave Vader by the end of this book, his descent into both despair and rebirth in the dark side is so dramatic that you understand how completely Anakin Skywalker has been broken and lost.
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