The Seamstress
A beautifully crafted story breathes life into the cameo character from the classic novel A Tale of Two Cities.France, 1788It is the best of times . . .On a tranquil farm nestled in the French countryside, two orphaned cousins―Renée and Laurette―have been raised under the caring guardianship of young Émile Gagnon, the last of a once-prosperous family. No longer starving girls, Laurette and Renée now spend days tending Gagnon's sheep, and nights in their cozy loft, whispering secrets and dreams in this time of waning innocence and peace.It is the worst of times . . .Paris groans with a restlessness that can no longer be contained within its city streets. Hunger and hatred fuel her people. Violence seeps into the ornate halls of Versailles. Even Gagnon’s table in the quiet village of Mouton Blanc bears witness to the rumbles of rebellion, where Marcel Moreau embodies its voice and heart.It is the story that has never been told.In one night, the best and worst of fate collide. A chance encounter with a fashionable woman will bring Renée’s sewing skills to light and secure a place in the court of Queen Marie Antoinette. An act of reckless passion will throw Laurette into the arms of the increasingly militant Marcel. And Gagnon, steadfast in his faith in God and country, can only watch as those he loves march straight into the heart of the revolution.

The Seamstress Details

TitleThe Seamstress
Author
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherTyndale House Publishers
ISBN-139781414390468
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Christian Fiction, Christian, Romance

The Seamstress Review

  • Joanne Bischof
    January 1, 1970
    Glory this novel is stunning! Set amid the tumultuous French Revolution, The Seamstress is unabashedly profound and yet crafted with such care, that I relished every heartrending word until the very last one. Through the lives of vibrant and genuine characters, notes of love, faith, and loyalty rise from its pages—all striking with one unanimous chord of courage. Allison Pittman has woven a novel that fortifies the spirit brick by brick so that as a nation is broken and transformed, so takes new Glory this novel is stunning! Set amid the tumultuous French Revolution, The Seamstress is unabashedly profound and yet crafted with such care, that I relished every heartrending word until the very last one. Through the lives of vibrant and genuine characters, notes of love, faith, and loyalty rise from its pages—all striking with one unanimous chord of courage. Allison Pittman has woven a novel that fortifies the spirit brick by brick so that as a nation is broken and transformed, so takes new shape yet another landscape: the reader’s heart. The Seamstress is an absolute masterpiece with all the makings of a classic, and is one of the finest novels I have ever read.
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  • Jocelyn Green
    January 1, 1970
    Destined to be a classic in its own right, The Seamstress is everything I love about historical fiction. The robust characters not only interact with real and pivotal events, but they embody the attitudes of the day in ways that are accessible for the modern reader. Pitman’s power of language drew me deep into revolutionary France, and her accurate and sensitive portrayal of the turmoil earned my undying respect. The Seamstress is an intricate tapestry hemmed in truth and grace. A masterpiece.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    This book! I am still thinking about it, its characters and the decisions they made. That, my friends, is the sign of a well written book (in my opinion). “The Seamstress” by Allison Pittman is truly a masterpiece and the story is epic! Ms. Pittman’s writing is phenomenal. It is set during the French Revolution, with nods to “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens and “Les Miserables” by Victor Hugo. I love the lessons Ms. Pittman includes on faith and life in general. She shows through her wr This book! I am still thinking about it, its characters and the decisions they made. That, my friends, is the sign of a well written book (in my opinion). “The Seamstress” by Allison Pittman is truly a masterpiece and the story is epic! Ms. Pittman’s writing is phenomenal. It is set during the French Revolution, with nods to “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens and “Les Miserables” by Victor Hugo. I love the lessons Ms. Pittman includes on faith and life in general. She shows through her writing that there are good and bad men—among both the rich and the poor—and all are equal in the eyes of God. There is a crucial decision that a character must make regarding whether one must be loyal first to God or to one’s country. I am still thinking about that decision and its implications. Bravo, Ms. Pittman for writing such an incredible read that will surely make my “top ten list” for the year!Content: This is definitely a more edgy Christian fiction book. I give it a PG-13 rating. Some examples of the content are: a man gets drunk a lot; talk of a woman’s figure; mention of alcohol; a woman is called a whore and accused of having too much sex; a man swears, but the word isn’t actually written; there’s a scene leading up to a couple having sex; the word “bastard” is used; a couple that is not married shares the same bed; a man tries to rape a woman; there is gore related to the violence of the Revolution.Rating: I give this book five stars!Genre: Christian fiction; Historical; RomanceI want to thank Tyndale House Publishers and Allison Pittman for the complimentary copy of this book for review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are my own. This is in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s CFR 16, Part 255.
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    "The Seamstress is a study in nostalgia: carefully evoking a classic while establishing itself as a classic in its own right. Deftly and intelligently nodding to its magnanimous source material, A Tale of Two Cities, it remains confident as its own entity. Appealing equally to Dickensian readers and the uninitiated, The Seamstress is a lush, moving and brilliantly sewn world. The thinking reader’s inspirational read, it is at once rich, beguiling and accessibly readable. Its aftertaste will spoi "The Seamstress is a study in nostalgia: carefully evoking a classic while establishing itself as a classic in its own right. Deftly and intelligently nodding to its magnanimous source material, A Tale of Two Cities, it remains confident as its own entity. Appealing equally to Dickensian readers and the uninitiated, The Seamstress is a lush, moving and brilliantly sewn world. The thinking reader’s inspirational read, it is at once rich, beguiling and accessibly readable. Its aftertaste will spoil you for any other story for a long, long while."
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  • Fiction Aficionado
    January 1, 1970
    This book went on my TBR as soon as I finished reading the first line of the description. I knew exactly which cameo character the description was referring to, despite having no recollection that said character had mentioned she was a seamstress in Dickens’ tale, and I wanted to know her story. It meant that I also knew a major spoiler about the end of this novel before I even began, but in the hands of a skilled story-teller like Allison Pittman, that becomes irrelevant. It’s the journey that This book went on my TBR as soon as I finished reading the first line of the description. I knew exactly which cameo character the description was referring to, despite having no recollection that said character had mentioned she was a seamstress in Dickens’ tale, and I wanted to know her story. It meant that I also knew a major spoiler about the end of this novel before I even began, but in the hands of a skilled story-teller like Allison Pittman, that becomes irrelevant. It’s the journey that counts, and this one was every bit as engrossing as I hoped it would be.The story is told from the point of view of two orphaned cousins, Renée and Laurette, who watch the revolution unfold from two very different perspectives: Renée from the gilded halls of Versailles, and Laurette from the increasingly poverty-stricken countryside, where lack of food and employment are driving people to desperation and madness. Both worlds were vividly and authentically rendered in all their complexities, and I loved the way they contrasted each other, one having all the appearance of wealth but little happiness, and the other struggling with so little yet often showcasing the generosity and strength of the human spirit. In fact, all those contrasts mentioned in Dickens’ well-known opening permeate this story. We see the best and worst of human nature, wisdom and foolishness and their end, devout belief and incredulity at war with one another, Light piercing the Darkness, the consolation of hope in the face of despair, and, just as in A Tale of Two Cities, a bittersweet end. Quite simply, a masterly and deeply moving read.I received a copy of this novel from the publisher. This has not influenced the content of my review, which is my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my...this book is outstanding!!!Certain to remain one of my all-time favorites, this epic novel and its characters will haunt the reader long after the last page has been read. Ms.Pittman, as a new-to-me author, blew me away with her beautiful prose that masterfully told a story set amidst the turbulent times surrounding the French Revolution. Giving a nod to Charles Dicken's Tale of Two Cities, Ms. Pittman has crafted a story with memorable characters who face the harsh realities of the time Oh my...this book is outstanding!!!Certain to remain one of my all-time favorites, this epic novel and its characters will haunt the reader long after the last page has been read. Ms.Pittman, as a new-to-me author, blew me away with her beautiful prose that masterfully told a story set amidst the turbulent times surrounding the French Revolution. Giving a nod to Charles Dicken's Tale of Two Cities, Ms. Pittman has crafted a story with memorable characters who face the harsh realities of the time with courage. The eclectic cast of characters displayed both weakness and strength that is part of human nature as they fought for survival, loyalty and love during this difficult time. Faith threads of forgiveness and grace are woven throughout. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from Netgalley and the author/publisher through CelebrateLit. I was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Heidi Chiavaroli
    January 1, 1970
    In the midst of revolution and royalty, Pittman weaves a captivating tale of two cousins whose humble beginnings birth remarkable journeys. A beautiful, rich tale of love, loss, and amazing faith, The Seamstress is a book that haunts, satisfies, and inspires all at once. I loved this book!
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  • Jessica Baker (A Baker's Perspective)
    January 1, 1970
    It’s always exciting to find a book by an author you haven’t read before. My first thought after reading the first few chapters of this book – why have I not read any of Allison Pittman’s books before? It certainly isn’t because they do not exist, only because I had not yet come across them. To say this book caught me by complete surprise would probably be an understatement. As with any book you read from an author unknown to you, you aren’t sure if their writing style is going to be your cup of It’s always exciting to find a book by an author you haven’t read before. My first thought after reading the first few chapters of this book – why have I not read any of Allison Pittman’s books before? It certainly isn’t because they do not exist, only because I had not yet come across them. To say this book caught me by complete surprise would probably be an understatement. As with any book you read from an author unknown to you, you aren’t sure if their writing style is going to be your cup of tea. I knew right from the beginning that Pittman and I were going to be fast friends. I knew I was going to have to search for other books that she has written and add them to my ever growing wish list. Yes, she is that good.First, let me comment on her ability to capture two worlds in one book, a historic one at that. Quite often I read about rags to riches stories, or those who are middle of the road. The Seamstress captured both the glamorous and the struggling with ease. Pittman seamlessly transitioned between Renee and Laurette’s POV, and I found myself really connecting with both characters in different ways. I didn’t care for Laurette’s character in the beginning to be quite honest, but Pittman transitioned her and slowly put little things into place that made me change my opinion of her. In fact, I started to almost feel sorry for her.At the end of the day it was really Renee that stole the show for me. It was so interesting to see her go from a young girl who had amazing talent with so little to practice on, to being a young woman who could really stretch her talents and have the ability to wow the judges so to speak. You can’t help but cheer her on as she makes the move to service the Queen. For the record, I applaud Pittman’s research on this topic. Not only the surroundings and characters, but the fashion behind it as well. It was just amazing to see it come to life, at least in my mind!Historic fans will find they cannot tear their eyes away from this beautifully sewn story. Pittman easily brings historic France to life with her vivid descriptions and eloquent writing style. I cannot wait to get my hands on more of her novels! My only regret is that I had not come across them sooner. I received a complimentary copy of this book. I was not required to write a favorable review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Kelly Bridgewater
    January 1, 1970
    I have read a number of Allison Pittman's historical romances, and they were okay. The Seamstress sounded like a wonderful read, but sadly I was disappointed. The characters appeared flat and had no personality. They appeared to be cardboard characters flitting around on the pages of the story. I had a hard time empathizing with any of them. As for the plot, it started out with a wonderful synopsis, but Pittman drags the story along for a LONG time, getting to the good part of the uprising. I h I have read a number of Allison Pittman's historical romances, and they were okay. The Seamstress sounded like a wonderful read, but sadly I was disappointed. The characters appeared flat and had no personality. They appeared to be cardboard characters flitting around on the pages of the story. I had a hard time empathizing with any of them. As for the plot, it started out with a wonderful synopsis, but Pittman drags the story along for a LONG time, getting to the good part of the uprising. I had a hard time focusing, and I kept finding other things to do beside read the book. The ending might be historically accurate, but I had a hard time believing I spent all this time with the character to have her end up the way she did. I really didn't enjoy this novel and was glad when I reached the end. Fans of Sandra Byrd's Henry VIII series might enjoy this novel. I receive a complimentary copy of The Seamstress by Allison Pittman through Tyndale Publishing, but the opinions stated are all my own.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my goodness this book. I really had no idea what to expect with this novel. I have been reading Pittman's books for years so I know how talented she is as an author. This book is her best work in my opinion. The story flips between two cousins and this was so well done. The history is fascinating and the setting, Versailles and the countryside, are perfection. Having been there it made this book all the better! There are so many layers to this story but I will tell you that it is so well done Oh my goodness this book. I really had no idea what to expect with this novel. I have been reading Pittman's books for years so I know how talented she is as an author. This book is her best work in my opinion. The story flips between two cousins and this was so well done. The history is fascinating and the setting, Versailles and the countryside, are perfection. Having been there it made this book all the better! There are so many layers to this story but I will tell you that it is so well done you won't be able to stop reading. I loved all of the characters but I warn you, there will be some times when you will be frustrated with them! This book made me feel all the feels and has everything you want in a story line. Pittman did a fantastic job portraying forgiveness, compassion, and Christ's love. There are some difficult issues that some might deem inappropriate for a Christian novel. Nothing is too graphic (in my opinion), but I applaud Allison for acknowledging real life issues instead of skimming over them. I know she got the idea for this story from A Tale of Two Cities, but I also saw a lot of similarities to the themes in Francine Rivers Redeeming Love. I loved this book because I love history and I love reading about broken characters. This is one of the best books I have read in a while! I highly recommend!Five stars!"I received this book from the publisher for free. I was not required to write a positive review and all opinions are my own"
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  • Carole Jarvis
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed at The Power of Words: https://bit.ly/2tfdkpdSometimes a novel inspired by a famous classic achieves classic status in and of itself, and that is what I believe The Seamstress by Allison Pittman is destined to become. Intrigued by the cameo appearance of a seamstress in the closing pages of A Tale of Two Cities, Pittman fleshes out an epic and haunting tale of two young orphan cousins, their kind guardian, and the life-changing choices they made during a bloody and turbulent time. Perso Reviewed at The Power of Words: https://bit.ly/2tfdkpdSometimes a novel inspired by a famous classic achieves classic status in and of itself, and that is what I believe The Seamstress by Allison Pittman is destined to become. Intrigued by the cameo appearance of a seamstress in the closing pages of A Tale of Two Cities, Pittman fleshes out an epic and haunting tale of two young orphan cousins, their kind guardian, and the life-changing choices they made during a bloody and turbulent time. Personally, I have never read, nor wanted to read, this Dickens novel, and only chose to read The Seamstress because I’ve enjoyed Pittman’s writing so much in the past. The result was to become totally immersed in this moving and compelling story.Pittman’s prose and storytelling are exquisite, vividly drawing readers into the heart of the French Revolution. The four main characters – Renee, Laurette, Gagnon and Marcel – are richly drawn and reflective of the times. With the exception of Gagnon, the guardian, faith seemed to be either ritualistic or nonexistent. It was an era of hunger, heavy taxes, hatred for the ruling class, and a court blind to the plight of its people. The setting is not one that bodes happiness, yet inspiration and hope are found in this story of honor, grace, and forgiveness.Renee’s chance encounter leads her to the court of Marie Antoinette and brings this historic figure to life. But while The Seamstress came to be written because of Renee, it was the storyline revolving around her country cousin, Laurette, that I loved most. The young Laurette had a wildness about her, a desire to seek love in the wrong ways, and Gagnon’s strong faith, patience and influence were exactly what she needed. The Seamstress is a captivating story, relevant for today, and contains much to reflect upon. I look forward to much more from the pen of Allison Pittman.Very highly recommended.I received a copy of this book through Celebrate Lit. The opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.
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  • MJSH
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing, epic, and powerfully moving historical fiction set during the earlier years of the French Revolution. This is the first book I’ve read by Allison Pittman and she has garnered another devoted reader! The author’s writing style is hauntingly melodic and nostalgic; the combination of first person and third person narrative works well to bring a cohesive and well-constructed plot that spans quite a few years and takes place in several places. The characters are wonderfully layered, What an amazing, epic, and powerfully moving historical fiction set during the earlier years of the French Revolution. This is the first book I’ve read by Allison Pittman and she has garnered another devoted reader! The author’s writing style is hauntingly melodic and nostalgic; the combination of first person and third person narrative works well to bring a cohesive and well-constructed plot that spans quite a few years and takes place in several places. The characters are wonderfully layered, real, flawed, yet relatable and unforgettable. Faith and prayer play major roles in the characters’ lives even as the religious landscape of France changes drastically. Laurette and Renee are cousins and worlds apart in looks, personality, faith, and outlook on life. Laurette’s story is told in third person and Renee’s in first person. Though Renee is easier to like from the beginning, Laurette grew on me as the story progressed and she herself matured. My favorite character, though not truly a main character, has to be Gagnon. His faithfulness, gentleness, loving kindness, and steadfastness even in the midst of famine and heartbreak make him a godly man, though he does have plenty of faults. This book will make you examine what it is that we live and die for and what forgiveness and mercy truly look like. If you enjoy well-written and well-researched historical fiction, you will absolutely adore this book. It’s a must read. I was given a copy of the book by Tyndale House Publishers via Celebrate Lit Tours and was under no obligation to post a favorable review. All comments and opinions are solely my own.
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  • Maureen Timerman
    January 1, 1970
    We follow two cousins back at the time prior and during the French Revolution, living on a farm, having been given sanctuary by their guardian.One is a talented seamstress and we follow her to the royal court and watch her win favor there. What a hard time in history for the French people, and we put faces on what leads to the over thrown of their government. Surprises are found here, and all the way to the end I was hoping for different answers, but once you start on this story you will have to We follow two cousins back at the time prior and during the French Revolution, living on a farm, having been given sanctuary by their guardian.One is a talented seamstress and we follow her to the royal court and watch her win favor there. What a hard time in history for the French people, and we put faces on what leads to the over thrown of their government. Surprises are found here, and all the way to the end I was hoping for different answers, but once you start on this story you will have to keep on reading, sheep and all, starvation and violence, you will need to know who is going to survive.I received this book through Celebrate Lit, and was not required to give a positive review.
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  • Hallie Szott
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, so… A Tale of Two Cities is one of those books I should have read years ago in a high-school English class. But I didn’t. And I still haven’t. And yet, I wholeheartedly enjoyed Allison Pittman’s interpretation of its story in The Seamstress. The Dickens classic, set within the harsh realities of the French Revolution, comes to life in a fresh light in Pittman’s novel. Renée, the seamstress, and Laurette, her cousin in the country, highlight the contrasting experiences of the era—from count Okay, so… A Tale of Two Cities is one of those books I should have read years ago in a high-school English class. But I didn’t. And I still haven’t. And yet, I wholeheartedly enjoyed Allison Pittman’s interpretation of its story in The Seamstress. The Dickens classic, set within the harsh realities of the French Revolution, comes to life in a fresh light in Pittman’s novel. Renée, the seamstress, and Laurette, her cousin in the country, highlight the contrasting experiences of the era—from countryside desperation and starvation to palatial excess and ignorance. Their stories are exquisitely told, rich in historical detail, as well as faith, hope, and courage, until the bittersweet end.Readers of historical fiction, read The Seamstress. Even if you haven’t yet read A Tale of Two Cities, like me. It’s an experience worth having. I highly, highly recommend it.This review is also posted on Hallie Reads.Thanks to Celebrate Lit, I received a complimentary copy of The Seamstress and the opportunity to provide an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review, and all the opinions I have expressed are my own.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think I have read "A Tale Of Two Cities" but after reading "The Seamstress" by Allison Pittman, I definitely want to. I loved this story. It is a story filled with sorrow and love and neutral and forgiveness. The story is fast paced and this reader was swept into the story from the start. It was a story that makes you grateful for what you have. This is a story that really pulls at your heart strings because the scenes are written so well about the French Revolution and the hardships it I don't think I have read "A Tale Of Two Cities" but after reading "The Seamstress" by Allison Pittman, I definitely want to. I loved this story. It is a story filled with sorrow and love and neutral and forgiveness. The story is fast paced and this reader was swept into the story from the start. It was a story that makes you grateful for what you have. This is a story that really pulls at your heart strings because the scenes are written so well about the French Revolution and the hardships it cause. I could actually see it unfolding in my mind as I read. I loved how the clothing Renee sewed was part of the story. If you haven't read the story and you have no interest in sewing, you might these details would be boring, but these items are describing in a way that I would love to see them.I would love to watch this novel come alive in a movie or a television series.I was given a complimentary copy by the author and Celebrate Lit. These opinion are mine own.
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  • Bree
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, wow, wow, never in my wildest dreams did I think that I would enjoy this book as much as I did (worthy of 10 stars). I love that this author brought to life a little character from one of my favorite Dicken’s tales. Traveling back in time to the Paris of upheaval and revolution is a dream come true in this book for me. The level of detail that is woven into this book rivals that of a lace masterpiece, fine tidbits that seal readers love for the tale. All characters act out their humble role Wow, wow, wow, never in my wildest dreams did I think that I would enjoy this book as much as I did (worthy of 10 stars). I love that this author brought to life a little character from one of my favorite Dicken’s tales. Traveling back in time to the Paris of upheaval and revolution is a dream come true in this book for me. The level of detail that is woven into this book rivals that of a lace masterpiece, fine tidbits that seal readers love for the tale. All characters act out their humble roles perfectly, like a play on the stage they come to life on the pages. If there was a book to rival the bestseller list this year, it will be this beautiful tale.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    The Seamstress takes a reader back to 1788 in the countryside of France with cousins Renee and Laurette. They are orphans and live with their guardian, Emile Gagnon, where they help take care of his sheep. Renee is then offered a position as a seamstress in the royal court of Marie Antoinette. It is, also, time of turmoil in Paris. People are starving and wanting change, bringing on a violent rebellion. How will the lives for them all when these new events begin? The Seamstress is a good read. T The Seamstress takes a reader back to 1788 in the countryside of France with cousins Renee and Laurette. They are orphans and live with their guardian, Emile Gagnon, where they help take care of his sheep. Renee is then offered a position as a seamstress in the royal court of Marie Antoinette. It is, also, time of turmoil in Paris. People are starving and wanting change, bringing on a violent rebellion. How will the lives for them all when these new events begin? The Seamstress is a good read. This historical takes a reader back in time to one of the most important times in French history. I found the story to be an inspiring one that is rich in faith. The characters are ones that I admired. The author was so vivid with the details that I had to look up to see if certain scenes actually happened.I give The Seamstress four stars and recommend to those who enjoy novels involving French history. I received this book from the publisher. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book I've read by Allison Pittman. The story was interesting but somehow it felt heavy. It switched back and forth between two cousins and what they were going through. The time period is just before and during the French Revolution. It was an Advanced Reader's Copy so the editing wasn't perfect but still well done. What I liked about the book was that it was well written and the story was interesting. What I did not like was the use of the French words/terms. I speak English This is the first book I've read by Allison Pittman. The story was interesting but somehow it felt heavy. It switched back and forth between two cousins and what they were going through. The time period is just before and during the French Revolution. It was an Advanced Reader's Copy so the editing wasn't perfect but still well done. What I liked about the book was that it was well written and the story was interesting. What I did not like was the use of the French words/terms. I speak English and sometimes the words/phrases were re-stated in English but many times they were not. If you are writing in English and want to add foreign words and phrases make sure they are re-stated in English so your readers can follow along. I give this book three out of five stars mostly because of the French words/phrases. This is a Christian book and it is not overly preachy but does deliver the Gospel message in a nice way. I requested to read and review this book through Netgalley. The opinions are my own and freely given.
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  • Chris Jager
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautifully written book. Set in the French Revolution, The Seamstress is not always an easy book to read, but one that I enjoyed completely. Well written with a time in history that is sometimes written in a romantic way, but was bloody and harrowing. Allison does a good job of writing about tough stories in a sensitive manner. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to read another story about the French Revolution, but I was completely wrong, this book is about people caught up in the waves of a rev What a beautifully written book. Set in the French Revolution, The Seamstress is not always an easy book to read, but one that I enjoyed completely. Well written with a time in history that is sometimes written in a romantic way, but was bloody and harrowing. Allison does a good job of writing about tough stories in a sensitive manner. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to read another story about the French Revolution, but I was completely wrong, this book is about people caught up in the waves of a revolution and how they survived.A must read for historical fiction fans.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    The Seamstress by Allison Pittman is a phenomenal MUST-READ. This book is excellent!The Seamstress by Allison Pittman is a phenomenal story. From page one to the end, I was completely captivated. The characters are well-crafted and endearing. And the setting is amazing. I felt like I was in revolutionary France during the 1790s. The Seamstress is an overall stunning read.Laurette’s storyline is absolutely beautiful, and left me loving Jesus all the more. In her tale, Laurette eventually acknowle The Seamstress by Allison Pittman is a phenomenal MUST-READ. This book is excellent!The Seamstress by Allison Pittman is a phenomenal story. From page one to the end, I was completely captivated. The characters are well-crafted and endearing. And the setting is amazing. I felt like I was in revolutionary France during the 1790s. The Seamstress is an overall stunning read.Laurette’s storyline is absolutely beautiful, and left me loving Jesus all the more. In her tale, Laurette eventually acknowledges how ugly her sin is, asks for forgiveness, and recognizes just how blessed she is by God. But, as is typical with humans, Laurette’s guilt over her past sticks with her a little. You see, she’s a bit like Gomer from the book of Hosea … Laurette really does struggle with believing she deserves the blessings God gives her. She looks at it all in wonder and asks God, “Why am I so richly blessed?” I love the realism in Laurette’s character. I’ve been there — feeling like I am the worst sinner on earth, and unable to understand how God could love me so much and bless me beyond what I deserve. Laurette’s tale is a great reminder that the God we serve is bigger than any mistake we may make. His love can cover a multitude of filth. We just have to be willing to go to Him and ask for His help.Renee is a beautifully magnificent character. I knew going into this book that her story does not end well, but I didn’t care. I wanted to see how Pittman would develop this cameo character. Renee is a character full of depth, innocence, and beauty. She endeared herself to my heart right from the start. The best part of Renee’s character is her steadfastness to the Lord no matter the cost to herself. She is brave and courageous in her faith in a way that really made me take a long look at myself. How strong am I in my faith in God? Do I trust Him with my very life? Am I willing to stand for God no matter what the world is demanding from me? I’m not sure anyone can adequately answer these questions until they are tested, but I appreciate the mirror Renee’s character held up so I could contemplate the strength of my faith in God.The beginnings of the French Revolution are happening here in America. There is so much unsubstantiated hate and baseless anger flying free today it’s sickening. The worst part is that everything is emotions-based. Fact and Truth seem to be things of the past. Mainstream American society has kicked God out and made itself its own god. The pure evil and violence illustrated in The Seamstress is terrifying, but what’s more terrifying is that I can see the unrest and grumblings happening right now in my own home state. People are screaming and yelling. They are knee-jerk reacting. And it’s 100% based on feelings. Try telling someone an actual fact and that person treats you like you’re the most intolerant, evil human who ever walked the face of the earth. It’s scary. There is one part in this novel that I really LOVED. One of the characters, Marcel, is very anti-establishment. He is part of the jeering, pamphlet-reading, screaming crowd who calls for the death of the monarchy. He underestimates the mob he’s helping to create, and when he sees what the French Revolutionists are truly capable of he realizes the errors of his emotional ways. I tell my husband often that one day all of these emotional, violent, hate-filled people we see today in America are going to get exactly what they are screaming for. But it won’t truly be what they want. Once they realize this it will be too late and too many innocent people will have been slain on their altars of blind hatred and unadulterated anger. I wish those yelling the hardest in our country would wake up because they are being played.The Seamstress by Allison Pittman is a stellar novel — a true 2019 must-read! This book is a masterpiece in the same way A Tale of Two Cities is. The Seamstress has sown its way into my heart, and will not easily be forgotten. I highly, times infinity, recommend this amazing piece of exquisite literature.I received a review copy of this novel in eBook form from the author via Celebrate Lit through NetGalley. I also received a paperback copy of this novel via the publisher, Tyndale. In no way has this influenced my review. The opinions expressed in this review are my own.
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  • Deana Dick
    January 1, 1970
    This has been one of the most detailed historical books I have ever read. There are twol characters in the book that are equally important to the story. Renee and Laurette are cousins and have suffered greatly in poverty in their young years. The author does an exceptional job of drawing readers in with vivid descriptions that made me feel like I was there as the two cousins leaned on each other. The setting takes place during the French Revolution and the hardships it caused. I loved learning m This has been one of the most detailed historical books I have ever read. There are twol characters in the book that are equally important to the story. Renee and Laurette are cousins and have suffered greatly in poverty in their young years. The author does an exceptional job of drawing readers in with vivid descriptions that made me feel like I was there as the two cousins leaned on each other. The setting takes place during the French Revolution and the hardships it caused. I loved learning more about the Revolution and how it defined people during that time. The author takes two characters that are close and gives them different paths to take. Renee is a likeable character but to me was a bit naive at times. I think she was ready for something or someone to take her away to a better life. When her chance comes, she is a bit reluctant but seizes the opportunity. I loved reading how she could take a simple piece of fabric and make it into a work of beauty. With Renee suddenly finding herself living in a place with a queen must have been hard to adjust to. I loved when the queen said to Renee, " Never under estimate the value of loyalty." Our word is everything and it speaks volumes to people who come to trust us. Can Renee find happiness living in a grand place away from her cousin? Laurette is a little more reserved and follows rule to perfection. She is sad that Renee has left, but prays for her safety and happiness. Laurette seemed to be somewhat ready to change her life. She will find herself having to make difficult choices that could cause her to go down a path not suited to her. I think I related to her because she was always seeking approval from others. Her insecurity was evident and her desire to be needed and loved sometimes made her make poor choices.I loved the questions certain characters had about God and how one spoke up and said that in his house he would not allow anyone to speak against Him. What a great stance he took and showed how faithful he was to God. There is a strong presence of faith in the book and I liked how the author used it to show how characters needed God in times when they felt lost or alone.It is a historical adventure with Marie Antoinette making a big splash in the story during the French Revolution. It was hard to read about how people were starving and trying to find ways to survive. There is a sense of hope in the story and it showed as people still believed that God hadn't left them. The time period is during a difficult time in history and the author captures the emotional turmoil with grace.I wanted to give a warning to those who may be sensitive to bad language, hints of unkind things done to a woman and unthinkable violence. There are a few of those moments in the book but it is done tastefully and does hinder the story at all. It is a very well written story that I will not forget.I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher and Celebrate Lit. The review is my own opinion.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    The Seamstress was inspired by the ending of A Tale of Two Cities, where a seamstress meets up with That Guy (to avoid spoilers) and talks to him briefly before they are both beheaded. The Seamstress is basically the story of that seamstress, detailing her life and circumstances leading up to and during the French Revolution.Pittman says she spoils about 50% of A Tale of Two Cities, but I didn’t see it. Of course, I read Dickens’ novel in high school, so my memory of the book is not great. The S The Seamstress was inspired by the ending of A Tale of Two Cities, where a seamstress meets up with That Guy (to avoid spoilers) and talks to him briefly before they are both beheaded. The Seamstress is basically the story of that seamstress, detailing her life and circumstances leading up to and during the French Revolution.Pittman says she spoils about 50% of A Tale of Two Cities, but I didn’t see it. Of course, I read Dickens’ novel in high school, so my memory of the book is not great. The Seamstress is much more like a historical fiction set during the French Revolution than a spin-off of A Tale of Two Cities, and, in fact, the ending of the novel, where Pittman most clearly references TTC, is the weakest, as Pittman clearly borrowed dialogue from Dickens’ novel, where it stands out like a sore thumb because Pittman doesn’t write like Dickens.To be honest, I thought the story about the seamstress, Renee, was the weakest of the novel. The story involving Renee’s cousin, Laurette, was the best part. That was a story laden with forgiveness and grace, of a young woman’s desperate attempts to find love and the way she feels when those attempts give her nothing but emptiness and shame. I normally don’t like perfect men, but Gagnon is exactly the character he needed to be to temper Laurette’s wildness. Laurette’s story is the reason I gave this book such a high rating—and Renee’s story is the reason why it didn’t get higher.Pittman utilizes the dreaded “first-person, third-person” switch: Renee’s story is in 1st person, and Laurette’s in 3rd. I see no reason why it had to be that way, and it’s jarring and frustrating to keep switching back and forth. And compared to Laurette’s beautiful story, Renee’s is timid and historically thin (Pittman admits she painted an idealistic portrait of Marie Antoinette); Renee herself is given paper-thin motivations for her actions and most of the time is simply a passive observer to what’s happening around her. And the reason Pittman gives for her arrest leading up to her death sentence is laughably unrealistic—plot convenience shines throughout that particular portion.Yet, the power of the setting and Laurette’s story manage to offset and overshadow many of the flaws of Renee’s story, giving a lush, detailed look at the French countryside and the path leading to the French Revolution. The stark contrast between Renee’s life at court and Laurette’s life in the country helps paint the strong divide between rich and poor that was the catalyst in the Revolution’s start. And Renee’s arrest, imprisonment, and execution helps show the bloodthirsty rage that fueled the Revolution and kept the guillotine dropping.It’s definitely not perfect, but Laurette’s story alone makes The Seamstress worth a read.Disclaimer: I received a free copy from the publisher. No review, positive or otherwise, was required—all opinions are my own.
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  • Beckie Burnham
    January 1, 1970
    Inspired by a minor character in Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, The Seamstress by Allison Pittman could be described as a tale of two cousins — orphans raised by a guardian in the tumultuous times leading up to and including the French Revolution. Pittman takes on the daunting task of creating an entire story for not only the seamstress that Sydney Carton encounters, but also for the cousin left behind in the country and produces a story that will captivate your heart and mind. Renee and Laurett Inspired by a minor character in Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, The Seamstress by Allison Pittman could be described as a tale of two cousins — orphans raised by a guardian in the tumultuous times leading up to and including the French Revolution. Pittman takes on the daunting task of creating an entire story for not only the seamstress that Sydney Carton encounters, but also for the cousin left behind in the country and produces a story that will captivate your heart and mind. Renee and Laurette, who have shared so much in their young lives, embark on very different journeys in search of purpose in the dark times in which they live. Famine for the poor and excess in the aristocrats are on a collision course that leads to violence. Such is the time period the book explores; a time of starvation, desperation, anger, and vengeance. The two cousins come to know first hand the two sides of the conflict — revolutionaries and royalty. And though both are swept into the larger drama around them, they are separate from the forces at work.The Seamstress is a beautifully written book as complex as the time period in which it is set. Renee’s story is written in first person, while Laurette’s is a third person narrative. Secondary characters greatly influence them and their decisions. Marie Antoinette plays a large part in Renee’s life, and I appreciate the care Pittman took in fleshing out her character. There are also three important men in the novel who play pivotal roles in Renee and Laurette’s lives. My absolute favorite is Gagnon, the man who takes the two in when they are orphaned. His tender care for them and the freedom he gives the two to choose their paths, is reminiscent of the father of the Prodigal. His unconditional love and forgiveness reflect the father and the Father. Interestingly, the town from which the girls venture forth is called Mouton Blanc (White Sheep) with a church styled the Church of The Lost Sheep. Loss is great during this turbulent time (children, spouses, innocence), but also much is gained. I am still pondering the truths expressed.The Seamstress is not a quick or easy read. It is a book to take your time with. There are spiritual threads that are subtly woven that a reader will want to take time to think about. I also think this novel would make an excellent choice for a book club. It is definitely one to talk about.Highly Recommended.Audience: adults.(Thanks to Tyndale and Celebrate Lit for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)
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  • Margaret Kazmierczak
    January 1, 1970
    The Seamstress“In one night the best and worst of fate collide” in the life of a penniless seamstress. Just as the sewing skills of the main character Renee bring beauty to the most mundane of colours and fabrics so does the writing of Allison Pittman bring richness and power to the pages of her novel.Take an old classic and weave a new taleI have not read a Tale of Two Cities, but having read The Seamstress, I am eager to delve into the original story that inspired Allison Pittman to scoop out The Seamstress“In one night the best and worst of fate collide” in the life of a penniless seamstress. Just as the sewing skills of the main character Renee bring beauty to the most mundane of colours and fabrics so does the writing of Allison Pittman bring richness and power to the pages of her novel.Take an old classic and weave a new taleI have not read a Tale of Two Cities, but having read The Seamstress, I am eager to delve into the original story that inspired Allison Pittman to scoop out a minor character and bring flesh to the bones of this talented young lady. “I do not know the idleness of a moment. (Who) when not engulfed in silk, is running through the endless passages of Versailles on one errand or another.”A must readI just loved this book. From the moment I started reading the first line, I became hooked. The descriptions hurled me into another century where I hungered alongside the destitute and swished my flowing gown in the Royal Court where opulence ruled.Wisdom abounds through the pages, and bad choices fuel a rebel heart.“You must never, Laurette, find your esteem in the eyes of anyone other than our heavenly Father who loves you. The way men determine the value of others means nothing.” But does Laurette heed her mentor’s words?Desperate timesAnd the book is about the desperate, “Desperate men take desperate action.” I could feel that desperation. “The women carry weapons in their hands, but they carry hunger in their bellies, dead children in their hearts, broken men in their arms.”And contradictionsThe Seamstress is a powerful book with many contradictions. And Allison Pittman seamlessly sews each chapter together to create a story that had me crying. I do not usually shed tears when reading books, but this tale got to me. Not just The Seamstress but the whole tragic situation of a country divided, by poverty and wealth. Not unlike our world today. But the author does her best to show both sides of the story, and I felt torn like a shirt ripped in half from the back of an innocent child.Would I recommend The Seamstress?This story is just brilliant. There are no surplus characters as all carry the tale along, all are important and engaging. Even the scoundrel has a place in my heart. And I didn’t want it to end, but it had to because I needed to dry my eyes.Therefore if you get a chance grab yourself a copy and emerge yourself in this classic.It definitely deserves 5* if not more.Thank you, Allison Pittman, for writing such a clever extension to the original Tale of Two Cities.
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  • Alex Jacobson
    January 1, 1970
    It is rare that I am captivated from the very first page, but I was. It is also rare that I am this invested in a story, but I was. With a fast paced life filled with lots of little boys, so many commitments, and a list of things I want or should do that stretches well beyond what is humanly possible I tend to select books that are quick to read or a dare I say short. I asked around with those on the review team before agreeing to read this story. I am so grateful they had rave reviews about All It is rare that I am captivated from the very first page, but I was. It is also rare that I am this invested in a story, but I was. With a fast paced life filled with lots of little boys, so many commitments, and a list of things I want or should do that stretches well beyond what is humanly possible I tend to select books that are quick to read or a dare I say short. I asked around with those on the review team before agreeing to read this story. I am so grateful they had rave reviews about Allison Pittman and will always be grateful they encouraged me to pick up this book.Pittman beautifully developed not one but two main characters in this novel. Cousins in the late 1700’s in France who are more like sisters that bicker, fight, love and hurt. Their crushes on the same men that grow in wildly different ways were masterfully developed and so enthralling to read about. I loved the way Pittman dipped in and out of each girl’s story. These tandem story lines kept me riveted. I also loved the different perspective on Marie Antoinette. Usually portrayed as a heinous queen she is humanized and motherly which is a different and unique perspective. The Women’s March on Versailles (an actual historic event) was brutal to read about, but that is a part of historical fiction that I appreciate most. Renee’s utmost devotion to the queen, was both bizarre and riveting. I am so grateful for a fiction story that leaves me wanting to learn more about a real historical event. And that leads me to read classics like A Tale of Two Cities. I have no desire to ruin the story for you, but every hope my pure enthusiasm for the author and this story in particular will lead you to grab a copy.Don’t miss the guest post from Pittman herself on my blog, but I will tell you this she has accomplished what she set out to do by ” ‘finishing’ other author’s works, fleshing out the stories of neglected characters.”  The stories she chose to extend and explore took neglected characters and gave them the attention they deserve, creating beautiful tales of their lives and stories.The good news for me is that she has  a “Sister Wife” duo and so many more that I can now add to my “to read” list! Again so many thanks to Celebrate Lit Bloggers for exposing me to yet another author who I now will follow with baited breath, and for a copy of the book. All these thoughts are honest and my own, and I hope they leave you wanting to READ, more info and a giveaway of the book is on the blog.
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  • Jennifer Sienes
    January 1, 1970
    I love this story. And I despise this story. How can it be that I am filled with both of these emotions as I come to the end of Allison Pittman’s The Seamstress? I was touched by the beauty of the writing and the emotions evoked while falling in love with the main characters. But when so strongly drawn to characters, I find that I despise the last two words—The End.The story takes place before and during the French Revolution from the perspective of two orphans, Renée and her cousin, Laurette. L I love this story. And I despise this story. How can it be that I am filled with both of these emotions as I come to the end of Allison Pittman’s The Seamstress? I was touched by the beauty of the writing and the emotions evoked while falling in love with the main characters. But when so strongly drawn to characters, I find that I despise the last two words—The End.The story takes place before and during the French Revolution from the perspective of two orphans, Renée and her cousin, Laurette. Left alone in the world, they are adopted into the family of Emilé Gagnon, a sad man of strong faith and convictions, who is grieving after the death of his beloved wife and newborn babe. Renée is a young girl and gifted seamstress who has no desire in the world other than to live by faith. When a member of the queen’s court lands on her doorstep, Renée is offered a prized position as Marie Antoinette’s Couturiére. For a destitute girl, starving in the wake of decisions made by the monarchy, this is a chance of a lifetime.Laurette, Renée’s older cousin, has only one gift of which she is aware—her looks. She trades on them in an effort to find the sense of belongingness that has always eluded her. She doesn’t put stock in faith, and thereby finds that a life served for self is not often blessed by God.The story starts out a little slow—but I promise you, if you push through the first few chapters, you will not be disappointed. Allison Pittman’s writing is so powerful, and I found myself so steeply drawn into the story—into the characters—I was actually praying for them. I had to remind myself that this is only a story, and no amount of praying would change the outcome, as it was already written.It is rare that I cry at the end of a book—a movie, yes, but a book, no. However, as I finished up the last few pages, tears burned my eyes and a definite lump filled my throat. This is a phenomenal story and so well written, you will understand more about the French Revolution than you ever did in your high school history class.This is a definite five out of five stars. I look forward to reading more from this author, as she is now one of my favorites.I was given a complimentary copy of this book for the purpose of this review, however, the opinions are my own.
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  • Nyla Wilkerson
    January 1, 1970
    Author Allison Pittman has taken a minor character from Charles Dickens’ book, “A Tale of Two Cities” and given her a tale all her own. The character now has a name, Renee, a stronger voice, and emotions that will leap off of the pages of this book and straight into your heart. The three other main characters, Laurette, Gagnon, and Marcel all come to life with the skilled stroke of the author’s pen.For years I have been a fan of the gifted wordsmith Pittman. Her writing style is engaging and alw Author Allison Pittman has taken a minor character from Charles Dickens’ book, “A Tale of Two Cities” and given her a tale all her own. The character now has a name, Renee, a stronger voice, and emotions that will leap off of the pages of this book and straight into your heart. The three other main characters, Laurette, Gagnon, and Marcel all come to life with the skilled stroke of the author’s pen.For years I have been a fan of the gifted wordsmith Pittman. Her writing style is engaging and always draws me in. It was the same with this book. This book was well researched, organized, and well planned. At first I found it a little difficult but after a couple of chapters, it flowed flawlessly. The characters complimented each other with their positive and negative attitudes. They were well defined and described. My heart ached for them and I secretly hoped the author had changed Dickens’ ending, too.Life issues of despair, hope, faith, love, redemption, treachery, war, kindness, lies, and morality are intricately woven throughout this exemplary novel. At times it was hard to read, and yet at other times it was even harder to but down. I was totally captivated. My mind had no problem imagining the scenes that played out on the pages.Even though I have read other fiction about this time period, this book taught me more than other books about the people, turmoil, surroundings, and era. It is essential that I learn something from a novel for me to really enjoy it. The second thing I need is a Christian message if it is classified as a Christian fiction book. Bravo on both points for “The Seamstress.”This is no light, fluffy read. It portrays real life during the French Revolution and that can be brutal. This book has stuck with me long after finishing it. It was thought provoking and beautifully written. I find it hard to describe such a masterpiece.Definitely I recommend this gem of a novel. If you are a fan of Dickens, the classics, French Revolution, or history you will swoon over this novel. It earned a five out of five stars from me.A copy was provided buy I was under no obligation to write a review. These are my own, personal thoughts.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    What can I say about this book? It is really a mesmerizing tale. Even though it is a longer book (over 400 pages) I could not put it down and read it quickly. I was a little bit leery at first that dealing with the time around the French Revolution that the story would be too dark or heavy. It was not. There are hard scenes to read, but I never felt that there was never any hope shining through. This was a story about two cousins, Laurette and Renee who both have to do deal with childhood trauma What can I say about this book? It is really a mesmerizing tale. Even though it is a longer book (over 400 pages) I could not put it down and read it quickly. I was a little bit leery at first that dealing with the time around the French Revolution that the story would be too dark or heavy. It was not. There are hard scenes to read, but I never felt that there was never any hope shining through. This was a story about two cousins, Laurette and Renee who both have to do deal with childhood trauma and now live with the shepherd Gagnon. Gagnon was probably my favorite character. I did not always like him, didn’t always understand him, but he was always the voice of reason in a time of darkness and hunger. He was man of deep passions that he did not always show. He was a good guardian and his character showed a man who tried to be the light to all he came across.On the other hand, Marcel is a character that wanted the aristocracy gone. He believed he and others should be able to take what they wanted when they wanted regardless of the circumstances. He was violent and callus and a truly selfish person that you wished would change due to his relationships with Laurette, Renee, and Gagnon.This story is a tale of loyalty, love, convictions, and bravery. We are given the story through Laurette and Renee’s eyes, back and forth which helped the book move quickly. I have not read The Tale of Two Cities which one of these characters has a cameo in. I will need to rectify that soon as it is my daughter’s favorite book and this story has only made me want to dive into it.Laurette and Renee were the innocents of this story. Trying to live life the best they knew how. The author did a great job of showing the contrast between the ignorance of the aristocracy; they just didn’t seem to have a clue and were just too out of touch with the rest of the country- and the poor; those who were innocent and only hungry and then the wolves who were hungry for blood.This is a great read, one I will probably be pondering for a while. I received a copy of this novel from the publisher. I was not required to post a positive review and all views and opinions are my own. https://pausefortales.blogspot.com/20...
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  • Christina Scotton
    January 1, 1970
    I haven’t read Charles Dicken’s A Tale of Two Cities since high school, and so I did not remember the character of the seamstress. However, I love reading stories about the French Revolution, as it is an often overlooked time period in my reading experience, and Allison Pittman has written an excellent novel in The Seamstress.This is the first book I’ve read by Ms. Pittman, and I was immediately drawn in. She has created a setting and characters so vivid I could immediately see the setting and t I haven’t read Charles Dicken’s A Tale of Two Cities since high school, and so I did not remember the character of the seamstress. However, I love reading stories about the French Revolution, as it is an often overlooked time period in my reading experience, and Allison Pittman has written an excellent novel in The Seamstress.This is the first book I’ve read by Ms. Pittman, and I was immediately drawn in. She has created a setting and characters so vivid I could immediately see the setting and the characters in my head. The story begins when the main character, Renee, and her cousin, Laurette, are taken in by a neighbor, Gagnon, who lets them sleep in his barn and work on his farm. Renee is a great character. She loves the farm and raising sheep, though a little too idealistic. It seems weird to say that someone who grew up in poverty and endured the struggles of that upbringing could be idealistic, but once she moved to Paris to work in the royal household, I found her often naïve and hopeful when she should have been more aware of the consequences of the unrest growing in pre-Revolutionary France.Laurette is the other main character, and I related to her immensely. She was desperate for a place to belong and kept trying to fill it with people and things instead of God. The themes of redemption are strongest in her storyline and I found myself rooting for her as she navigated her way through a life of uncertainties and unwise choices. The Seamstress is a book that will stick with you. I was rooting for all the characters and the portrayal of the King of France and Marie Antoinette is an interesting one, and one not often seen as they are considered the “villains” of the French Revolution. I give this book 4/5 stars and recommend it to those wanting to read more about the French Revolution and those who enjoy nuanced takes on polarizing historical figures (in this case, Marie Antoinette). The book is well-written and the themes of redemption, what makes a family a family, and equality in the eyes of the government are given appropriate amounts of page space and conclude the story in a way that is satisfying. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through CelebrateLit. All opinions are my own.**
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  • Robin Willson
    January 1, 1970
    Wow what a powerful story. A step into history. It's set in France 1788 just before, then during the French revolution. There is a place not far from where I live that was constructed with the hope that Marie Antoinette would find asylum there, but sadly she never made it. Going there, seeing how it was made ready for her, I wished I could have made or helped to make some of the things for her. In particular I remember a quilt made from velvet pieces with beautiful embroidery around each piece. Wow what a powerful story. A step into history. It's set in France 1788 just before, then during the French revolution. There is a place not far from where I live that was constructed with the hope that Marie Antoinette would find asylum there, but sadly she never made it. Going there, seeing how it was made ready for her, I wished I could have made or helped to make some of the things for her. In particular I remember a quilt made from velvet pieces with beautiful embroidery around each piece. My grandmother made one similar and the women in our family all stitched on it. It enhances my feeling about Marie, the war and a seamstress she might have had.Renee is a poor girl taken in as an orphan with her cousin by a man, not that much older than them, who runs a farm that's been in his family for generations. They don't have much but she delights in small things and loves her new family, growing in a Christian way. They have a friend who believes in eliminating the royalty from France. Near their house a carriage overturns and Renee mends the gown of a woman who was within. The mending is quite clever and fashionable. The woman is close to the queen, and decides to take Renee with her. Renee, though quite young, finds a new life at the palace, and her skills make her a favorite. I delight in reading about the fabrics and thread as the story describes how she uses them. And in the beauty of the palace. The author skillfully tells several sides of the struggle at this time and I found it very difficult to put down. It's hard not to feel strongly for the characters, and its not a very happy time overall for any of them. I like the depiction of Marie Antoinette as a good person who tried to help the poor. A get-lost-in-it book for me. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher and NetGalley book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”#TheSeamstress #AllisonPittman #NetGalley #ChristianHistoricalFiction
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