The Walking Dead, Vol. 31
Rick leads the Commonwealth's Governor, Pamela Milton, on a tour of the various communities Alexandria is aligned with. Naturally... terrible things begin to happen very quickly. Collects THE WALKING DEAD #181-186.

The Walking Dead, Vol. 31 Details

TitleThe Walking Dead, Vol. 31
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 12th, 2019
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534310520
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Horror, Zombies, Fiction

The Walking Dead, Vol. 31 Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    The shitshow that is The Walking Dead staggers on for yet another volume in the aptly named, Volume 31: The Rotten Core. Who knew that the Commonwealth, an authoritarian group obsessed with hierarchy enforced through an overbearing police presence, would turn out to be gasp kinda evil oh right everyone duurrr?! Rick is taking Commonwealth Governor Pamela Milton on a tour of their territories (Hilltop, The Kingdom, etc.) except it’s not interesting for the audience who’s already familiar with the The shitshow that is The Walking Dead staggers on for yet another volume in the aptly named, Volume 31: The Rotten Core. Who knew that the Commonwealth, an authoritarian group obsessed with hierarchy enforced through an overbearing police presence, would turn out to be gasp kinda evil oh right everyone duurrr?! Rick is taking Commonwealth Governor Pamela Milton on a tour of their territories (Hilltop, The Kingdom, etc.) except it’s not interesting for the audience who’s already familiar with them all - great storytelling, Robert Kirkman! Elsewhere, Sophia complains to Carl that there aren’t enough eligible boys around to date - cue a McLovin-type intro’d! Gee, wonder what gonna happen dere… Eugene decides to make trains a thing again, Princess continues to be annoying and Michonne becomes a lawyer again, fighting a stupid, dreary court case. Kirkman throws in a couple of zombie-killin’ scenes in a futile attempt to make all this dross less dross-tastic, though even he’s aware of how formulaic the series has become, having a couple of characters remark on the peace/war ebb and flow of things. Guess Rick and co. are gonna haveta fight the Commonwealth now… or are they? Sort of. Le sigh... So why doesn’t this get the lowest possible rating? Rick. Rick saves the day by being unintentionally hilarious and behaving like a moron! There’s one scene where he’s having coffee in the Commonwealth where I turned the page and saw this extra-large panel close-up of Rick’s face that looked like he’d been clobbered on the bonce by a football - he had this dazed expression and his eyes were streaming. Obviously he hadn’t and it was meant to be this moving moment where he got to experience his normal pre-zombie apocalypse life for the first time in years, but that we were meant to take it seriously only made it funnier to me. Fucking hell, Charlie Adlard, that was your best effort? Wow. Made me laugh though! Rick’s words that close out this book were also so corny - think similar lines to earlier in the series when he said “WE’RE the Walking Dead!”. And then there’s his actions in the final scene which were unpredictable and, despite being over the top, about the only interesting part of the book - hopefully that means Kirkman’s figuring out a new variation for the story? There’ve been worse volumes in The Walking Dead but Volume 31: The Rotten Core is still down there as among the series’ worst - the title’s quality drought unfortunately continues.
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  • Melki
    January 1, 1970
    Though there's not much zombie action in this volume, there's human drama galore. Maybe it's my current interest in income inequality, but this one really grabbed me. You see, the Commonwealth's Governor believes in a rigid class structure with everyone occupying a station . . . the same one they had before this whole walking dead thing started. As Michonne accidentally blurts out while dining in a restaurant (that's right - I said restaurant!) - "Can you imagine surviving the apocalypse and the Though there's not much zombie action in this volume, there's human drama galore. Maybe it's my current interest in income inequality, but this one really grabbed me. You see, the Commonwealth's Governor believes in a rigid class structure with everyone occupying a station . . . the same one they had before this whole walking dead thing started. As Michonne accidentally blurts out while dining in a restaurant (that's right - I said restaurant!) - "Can you imagine surviving the apocalypse and then ending up a waitress?"As you can probably guess, this isn't sitting too well with members of Rick's egalitarian commune where everyone is equal, and one particular fellow is managing to rile up some of the Commonwealth's denizens. Look out! The Yellow Vests are taking to the street. The Governor, of course, is all "let them eat cake" while she shoots one zombie just for show, then leaves her minions to tidy up the mess. On the softer side, there are also a lot of new romances that will undoubtedly be put to the test when the coming war finally comes - which at Kirkman Pace will probably be four or five volumes from now. BUT . . . for the time being I'm enjoying this soap, relishing the show while waiting for the other shoe to drop.I can't remember the last time I said this about The Walking Dead, but I'm actually looking forward to the next volume.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Kirkman still knows how to deliver a shock. He lulled me with this whole volume about how the Commonwealth is the absolute worst of our current consumer culture and how it's a police state, blah blah blah. Haven't we been here before? Then bam a sucker punch out of nowhere. Even when you start to think, "Eh, maybe it's time Kirkman ended this.", he can still manage to knock you to your knees.
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  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Seems like no matter what, when Rick Grimes gets involved, things fall apart!The post-apocalyptic adventures of The Walking Dead continue with the newest community, (view spoiler)[The Commonwealth (hide spoiler)], that Rick and crew have come across. While seemingly an ideal new society, there is something slightly rotten festering below the surface . . .One of my favorite parts of post-apocalyptic fiction is seeing how the people handle each other and the rebuilding process. But, is The Walking Seems like no matter what, when Rick Grimes gets involved, things fall apart!The post-apocalyptic adventures of The Walking Dead continue with the newest community, (view spoiler)[The Commonwealth (hide spoiler)], that Rick and crew have come across. While seemingly an ideal new society, there is something slightly rotten festering below the surface . . .One of my favorite parts of post-apocalyptic fiction is seeing how the people handle each other and the rebuilding process. But, is The Walking Dead starting to get a bit repetitive? I think it is . . . not distractingly so, but it doesn’t feel like we get a whole lot of movement forward, just a whole lot of movement sideways.The artwork in this series has been steady for many, many volumes. I enjoy it, so no complaints – but nothing new to say about it.You like zombies? Well, I think they may have almost finally killed them all because I think they only appeared an about 4 pages of this volume and there were only about 10 of them. So, if you are reading this series because you like zombie action, this current storyline had ventured far away from the actual Walking Dead!I continue to enjoy this series, but I feel like it is at a crossroads where it needs to have a mind-blowing climax leading to the final conclusion of the series or it may start to get stale.
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  • Paul E. Morph
    January 1, 1970
    Holy crap. Great volume. What an ending!
  • Ben Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Another volume, another great collection of”The Walking Dead” issues. Really, at this point, it’s starting to feel a little redundant, constantly singing this series’ praises…but then again, that’s something that shouldn’t be under appreciated: the fact that we’re 186 issues and 15 FREAKING YEARS into this series, and Robert Kirkman is still somehow finding ways to keep the story fresh and interesting…well, that’s just insanely impressive. Maybe they should hire Kirkman to write the scripts for Another volume, another great collection of”The Walking Dead” issues. Really, at this point, it’s starting to feel a little redundant, constantly singing this series’ praises…but then again, that’s something that shouldn’t be under appreciated: the fact that we’re 186 issues and 15 FREAKING YEARS into this series, and Robert Kirkman is still somehow finding ways to keep the story fresh and interesting…well, that’s just insanely impressive. Maybe they should hire Kirkman to write the scripts for his own TV show? ☺
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  • Karl Marberger
    January 1, 1970
    Daaaaaamn, son.
  • Lisa Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    A good installment in the series, but to be honest, trying to keep track of who's alive on TV and not in the comics -- and vice versa -- makes my head spin.
  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Touring the commonwealth. Showing the Commonwealth Alexandria and its allies. Like the Governor's town, the Commonwealth is too peaceful. There's something sinister behind the smiles. But, there's Mr.T and the A-Team so it can't be all bad. Unlike the tv series though, Heath is still alive. A transitional story moving the story arc forward.
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  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    I can only really remember the last issue, which did have a good ending. I think the rest of the arc was fine?
  • Cassie-la
    January 1, 1970
    How tired are you of the never-ending formula that is The Walking Dead (read: Rick and company encounter a new community, community is not what it seems, our heroes are forced to take down said community, everything returns to normal until they meet another new community, lather, rinse, repeat). On the one hand, I find it tedious and predictable. On the other, Kirkman keeps creating new and intriguing communities to explore, so I can only be slightly annoyed. This latest trade is no exception to How tired are you of the never-ending formula that is The Walking Dead (read: Rick and company encounter a new community, community is not what it seems, our heroes are forced to take down said community, everything returns to normal until they meet another new community, lather, rinse, repeat). On the one hand, I find it tedious and predictable. On the other, Kirkman keeps creating new and intriguing communities to explore, so I can only be slightly annoyed. This latest trade is no exception to that formula, but does set up what is sure to be an explosive new arc.ORIGINALLY POSTED: https://bibliomantics.com/2019/01/01/...
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    Is Kirkman going for modern political commentary? I sure hope not. The story doesn't move much - again. And the direction if not the details is predictable - again. And the only twists or surprises that come any more on the big splash pages seem to be Human or Human violence. But I'll keep reading.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like the Commonwealth are the worst villains of the series so far. They're not evil or murdering people, or zombie worshipers. They're just as close to the horrible human civilization that we live in now as you can get, and it makes my blood boil just reading about them.I cannot wait to see this entire place get burned to the ground.
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  • Peacegal
    January 1, 1970
    It's the comic that doesn't end...yes, it goes on and on my friend....;)The zombies are once again just a bit of an afterthought in this one, and the focus is much more on interpersonal conflicts within the survivors. I'm wondering if pushing the walkers to the backburner isn't an intentional thing, as zombies have definitely passed their trendiness expiration date?
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Another volume in the continuing saga.....Recovering from one crazy “other” group, just to meet a new one, crazy in a totally different way...🙄You would think I’d get tired of the us vs them in every permutation Kirkman can think up, but I still find myself reading these from cover to cover to find out what happens next.
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  • Alex E
    January 1, 1970
    This volume picks up exactly where the last left off, and to the most part it is very much following the same thread. That may sound like a bad thing, but actually I appreciate Kirkman taking his time to slowly build towards something, instead of the usually brutal sudden violence approach that he usually takes. And the conflict, it seems, will be coming from a much more ambiguous place. The moral grays are much more apparent now, as Rick enters a community that is essentially a military state, This volume picks up exactly where the last left off, and to the most part it is very much following the same thread. That may sound like a bad thing, but actually I appreciate Kirkman taking his time to slowly build towards something, instead of the usually brutal sudden violence approach that he usually takes. And the conflict, it seems, will be coming from a much more ambiguous place. The moral grays are much more apparent now, as Rick enters a community that is essentially a military state, if not a dictatorship. One thing that Rick and the other survivors didn't see coming is the political governing issues that arise when reestablishing civilization. There is a moment of high shock towards the end of this book, but what is surprising is not the act itself, but the fact that the character that does it, is unsure if this very definitive action, was for their version of "right" against wrong. I look forward to see where this book is going, as Kirkman seems to be ramping us up for some interesting new directions.
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  • Bryan
    January 1, 1970
    -- read as single issues #181 - #186 --I feel critical of this comic these days. And I honestly still don't know if it's because it actually deserves criticism or if I'm just getting a little burnt out on it. Part of me feels like my enjoyment of The Walking Dead as a whole would increase if I were to just trade wait; but I know I won't. I'm weak like that. In any case, there are moments in this comic now where characters perform acts of such unthinking stupidity that for a moment I almost think -- read as single issues #181 - #186 --I feel critical of this comic these days. And I honestly still don't know if it's because it actually deserves criticism or if I'm just getting a little burnt out on it. Part of me feels like my enjoyment of The Walking Dead as a whole would increase if I were to just trade wait; but I know I won't. I'm weak like that. In any case, there are moments in this comic now where characters perform acts of such unthinking stupidity that for a moment I almost think I'm watching the show. That, and things do tend to feel a bit rushed in certain issues. Scenes are short, and there's a general feel of 'packing it in'. I'm ready to forgive Kirkman almost entirely for this however considering just how many different characters and settlements he has to juggle now. Everyone misses that one character they haven't seen in a while and Kirkman tries to give everyone their fair share of the limelight. These are characters we've known for a long time, it only makes sense that we wonder about them. Oh, and there's a really cringe-worthy sex scene in 184.Okay. Criticism aside, believe it or not I do actually like this book. I'm still happy to read it each month. Things at the Commonwealth are interesting. Zombies may no longer be the number one problem in everyone's minds anymore, but the problems of adjusting to a new 'normal' can be just as interesting. Not everyone can make the adjustment with ease.. And, as usual, 186 wraps up this volume with a bang (no pun intended). I'll still be reading come 187; bring it on.
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  • Kinksrock
    January 1, 1970
    Once again our protagonists are learning about another society that has come about, and once again there's a looming fear that they could go to war. This time it's a society where everything looks perfect at first (we saw it in the last issue). In this issue, we see that they even have restaurants! But gradually they see that it's a class-based society where control is maintained by armed police, and the people are ripe for a revolution. The comics have the same issues as the tv series. So many Once again our protagonists are learning about another society that has come about, and once again there's a looming fear that they could go to war. This time it's a society where everything looks perfect at first (we saw it in the last issue). In this issue, we see that they even have restaurants! But gradually they see that it's a class-based society where control is maintained by armed police, and the people are ripe for a revolution. The comics have the same issues as the tv series. So many characters I cared about have been killed off, although, thankfully, there are still a few left, like Rick, Carl, Maggie, Michonne, and Eugene. (In the tv series right now, of those four, only Michonne and Eugene are still there, although Rick and Maggie are still alive somewhere.) Both struggle to introduce new characters and to have them around long enough so that the reader cares about them as well. Unfortunately, so much time passes between these volumes that, by the time a new one comes out, I have forgotten who the new characters even are. There is a new character named Princess who is promising, if they let her live long enough!
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  • Jakub Kvíz
    January 1, 1970
    Kirkman just know how to finish a mediocre arc with a BANG! (pun intended) and make you want more.Well, another one bites the dust and I will definately miss this charatcer but I guess that’s what TWD is about...
  • Václav
    January 1, 1970
    Well as I said, with TWD there is a black cloud on every silver lining. And with Commonwealth Kirkman didn't let us wait long. The drama is boiling, there are first unknown and well-known casualties. To the quality - I feared a bit because of one guy here on GR wouldn't stop ranting since issue 18x, but I do not see the issue. Yes, TWD is starting to lose its breath, but it was huge run since AN (after Negan) started, so that was expected. I was wondering the shortening of breath didn't start ea Well as I said, with TWD there is a black cloud on every silver lining. And with Commonwealth Kirkman didn't let us wait long. The drama is boiling, there are first unknown and well-known casualties. To the quality - I feared a bit because of one guy here on GR wouldn't stop ranting since issue 18x, but I do not see the issue. Yes, TWD is starting to lose its breath, but it was huge run since AN (after Negan) started, so that was expected. I was wondering the shortening of breath didn't start earlier because it was a long run. Well, here we are. At first, it was a man having issues, then people having zombies issue, later peoplůe having people issues and now societies having societies issues. For me, this is the natural development. And Rober Kirkman is hauling TWD's ass for so long, so this couldn't be avoided. And I'm fine with that, and I'm enjoying that. I have only one major problem - I just caught up on TWD. The waiting, the long, bloody waiting...
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  • Benjamin Barham
    January 1, 1970
    This was a total bore. There were no new ideas. There was no forward movement for the story. At this point, it's just one more ring in the ever-expanding trunk of uninspired scenarios involving bad, different people in increasingly nicer environments. (view spoiler)[Dwight dies (hide spoiler)]. Who cares? (view spoiler)[Rick's conflicted (hide spoiler)]. Who cares? Who cares about any of these characters anymore? This is a soap opera now, splashed with predictable carnage.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    In the last volume we are introduced to the Commonwealth, a large settlement in Ohio that has rigid class structures but has managed to thrive. I thought it established a promising arc that could turn the series in a new direction, for now years out from the outbreak, how does civilization rebuild? Last issue and this issue had less zombie attacks, for I would think that now that people know how to prevent more zombies from reanimating, there would be less and less zombies to dispatch as the yea In the last volume we are introduced to the Commonwealth, a large settlement in Ohio that has rigid class structures but has managed to thrive. I thought it established a promising arc that could turn the series in a new direction, for now years out from the outbreak, how does civilization rebuild? Last issue and this issue had less zombie attacks, for I would think that now that people know how to prevent more zombies from reanimating, there would be less and less zombies to dispatch as the years went by. That gives people more time to refashion their world, and there would be many different ways in which this could happen. With this being TWD, we are force fed that Rick's way is best (it actually usually is) and other settlements should adapt to the way Alexandria is governed. So we get a heartbreaking showdown between Rick and another certain someone who wants change fast and isn't willing to take no for an answer. We also get a lot of character development between others with new romances developing, but the shifting scenes between different settlements and characters was abrupt with no visual cues that the scene had changed- you were just supposed to know who lived in what settlement to know where you were now. BTW- Carl is an asshole and he and Sophia had better not eventually get together.
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  • Tomas Serrien
    January 1, 1970
    Mmm... I am getting bored. One major surprise in this volume. But it feels like every volume is going to the same direction: another dispute, another way of living, another rule of power,... maybe it is time to kill off Rick and start a focus on Eugene curing zombies? Or Negans search for killing all the zombies by making a super Lucille atomic bomb?
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    I’m not sure how I feel about this volume. It covers a fairly lengthy period of time without making that entirely clear. Chess pieces are being moved again, but it feels different than other times. Different can be good or bad, and I think I just haven’t made up my mind on what I like or dislike about where this means the story is going.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    The Rotten Core
  • Koen
    January 1, 1970
    -- read as single issues #181 - #186 --There are things brewing at the (un)Commonwealth.. I like it!And oh my gods.. what an ending!!Ok, enough talking ;)
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I thought the new storyline introduced in volume 30 was kind of lame, but it turned out to be really good this issue. Lots of nice spreads, and the story moved along at a good pace. The ending really took me by surprise. Here’s hoping they keep up the momentum!
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    The first time a volume really let me down. Politics are boring. Michonne is lame. A lot of open threads the will force me to read the next volume.
  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    With The Rotten Core and the preceding volume or two, we enter a state of the Walking Dead world where there aren't really enemies left in the world, just communities that have different philosophies. We aren't even looking at Negan-level differences, either; the new community isn't arbitrarily killing people (so far, at least), they just approach society differently than Rick, et al. are.The thing is, with society restored in the world of The Walking Dead, this is pretty much what passes for co With The Rotten Core and the preceding volume or two, we enter a state of the Walking Dead world where there aren't really enemies left in the world, just communities that have different philosophies. We aren't even looking at Negan-level differences, either; the new community isn't arbitrarily killing people (so far, at least), they just approach society differently than Rick, et al. are.The thing is, with society restored in the world of The Walking Dead, this is pretty much what passes for conflict. It's what we do in our pre-apocalyptic world, where we invade countries with different philosophies and instill our own government to bring better lives to people who live there. When survival is a given, what's left to create conflict? The same thing that creates conflict in the real world.On the one hand, I like that the series is approaching conflict this way; on the other hand, I read fiction to escape reality, not necessarily to see it mirrored in a skewed reflection. I'm still uncertain how I feel about the ending of this volume, but I'm willing to wait it out and see where Kirkman goes with it.
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  • XO
    January 1, 1970
    Rick has to die. It’s time. It’s over due actually. What are we waiting for? The series has to end too. Everyone ends up a walker. That’s it. The end.
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