The Wicked + the Divine, Vol. 8
Modernist poets trapped in an Agatha Christie Murder Mystery. The Romantics gathering in Lake Geneva to resurrect the dead. What really happened during the fall of Rome. The Lucifer who was a nun, hearing Ananke's Black Death confession. As we approach the end, we start to see the full picture. Also includes the delights of the WicDiv Christmas Annual and the Comedy special.Collects all six of THE WICKED + THE DIVINE's essential Specials.GENRE Superheroes, Urban Fantasy, Crime & MysteryModernist poets trapped in an Agatha Christie Murder Mystery. The Romantics gathering in Lake Geneva to resurrect the dead. What really happened during the fall of Rome. The Lucifer who was a nun, hearing Ananke's Black Death confession. As we approach the end, we start to see the full picture. Also includes the delights of the WicDiv Christmas Annual and the Comedy special.Collects all six of THE WICKED + THE DIVINE's essential Specials.

The Wicked + the Divine, Vol. 8 Details

TitleThe Wicked + the Divine, Vol. 8
Author
ReleaseMar 12th, 2019
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534308800
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics

The Wicked + the Divine, Vol. 8 Review

  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Wicked+Divine is one of the better comics out there right now, and I feel it's criminally underrepresented next to say, Saga. The premise of the series is about a recurring pantheon of 12 gods who return to the earth every 90 years to live fast lives of revelry. (You live fast and die young within two years).The series is slowly starting to give some answers, but this volume is a chance to explore the different dealings throughout the ages and experiment with times outside of smartphones.1831 45 Wicked+Divine is one of the better comics out there right now, and I feel it's criminally underrepresented next to say, Saga. The premise of the series is about a recurring pantheon of 12 gods who return to the earth every 90 years to live fast lives of revelry. (You live fast and die young within two years).The series is slowly starting to give some answers, but this volume is a chance to explore the different dealings throughout the ages and experiment with times outside of smartphones.1831 455ADChristmas Annual19231373 The Funnies This is a chance to see the Knights of the Round Table, the moves and shakes throughout history, etc.
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  • Carey
    January 1, 1970
    This blew my damn mind. I need to go back and read from the beginning but stupid school is making me read educational material.
  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    This volume collects the six specials that go with the series [455 AD, 1373 AD, 1831 AD, 1923 AD, Christmas Special, and Funnies]. Most of them are pretty good but it's still a bit disappointing because I feel like every time we gain some plot momentum with this series the authors just decide to take a huge detour before moving on. I guess most of these were published years ago, but still. I like that the four specials focused on certain years give us actual insight into the game that Minerva an This volume collects the six specials that go with the series [455 AD, 1373 AD, 1831 AD, 1923 AD, Christmas Special, and Funnies]. Most of them are pretty good but it's still a bit disappointing because I feel like every time we gain some plot momentum with this series the authors just decide to take a huge detour before moving on. I guess most of these were published years ago, but still. I like that the four specials focused on certain years give us actual insight into the game that Minerva and Anake are playing, and also that they all heavily feature Lucifer, who seems to be a major player each time even though it doesn't usually end well for them. The Christmas Special showed snapshots of what the gods were doing 6 months before the start of the series and definitely had some cute moments [also if you just really want to see Baal and Innana's dicks then you are in luck lol]. The Funnies issue I thought was a complete waste of time and featured such 'classics' as 'the whole cast but if they were dogs'. They even say at the beginning 'we're contracted for one more special but don't have any more story to tell so here's some random stuff'. Like ...maybe just either don't do another special or try to find something else relevant to do? Also I didn't actually read most of the 1923 issue because it was largely prose and I refuse to read comic issues that are just prose books in disguise. I'm sure it was very good but I just can't do it. Some highlights:Luci, I miss you! Also yeah you're all awful lmao, especially at the beginning.Baphomet plsAncient Roman Lucifer is uh ...having some issues O_oBut middle ages Lucifer is gettin' shit done!obvious Frankenstein issue is obvious [but still good]Womp Womp
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  • Agnė
    January 1, 1970
    The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 8 is a collection of six special issues, four of which feature the endings of the previous Pantheons:1) set in 455 AD, originally published after the issue 28;2) set in 1373 AD, originally published after the issue 39;3) set in 1831 AD, originally published after the issue 22;4) set in 1923 AD, originally published after the issue 33, written mostly in prose;5) Christmas Annual, originally published after the issue 33, features "deleted scenes" from the series;6) Th The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 8 is a collection of six special issues, four of which feature the endings of the previous Pantheons:1) set in 455 AD, originally published after the issue 28;2) set in 1373 AD, originally published after the issue 39;3) set in 1831 AD, originally published after the issue 22;4) set in 1923 AD, originally published after the issue 33, written mostly in prose;5) Christmas Annual, originally published after the issue 33, features "deleted scenes" from the series;6) The Funnies, originally published after the issue 39, consists of a bunch of random skits.The stories in this volume, especially the historical pieces, one of which has 20+ pages of TEXT, are not very engaging and they don't further the plot of the series in any way. They do, however, nod to/play with certain historical figures and events:- the Vandals' sacking of Rome (455 AD);- the Plague (1373 AD);- Claire Claremont, Lord Byron, Mary and Percy Shelley at Lake Geneva (1831 AD);- Modernist poets trapped in Agatha Christie's mystery novel (1923 AD).Cool, I guess, but... just give me the last story arc already!On the other hand, I did enjoy the Christmas Annual, which features the current Pantheon and covers some random events of little importance that were briefly mentioned (or not) throughout the series but were never shown or elaborated upon (i.e., how Nergal met Dionysus before they were gods).I also enjoyed most of the skits in the last issue, especially the one in which all the gods are dogs, and the one that highlights "5 Things Everyone Who's Lived With Sakhmet Will Understand."Finally, I'm a bit surprised but I didn't mind that different issues were drawn by different guest artists. Since the stories weren't directly related and most of them took place in different centuries, different art styles seemed very appropriate.455 AD:1373 AD:1831 AD:1923 AD:Christmas Annual:The Funnies:
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so excited for everyone to get their hands on this volume! These bonus issues answer questions that the arcs haven't, and the Christmas Annual and Funnies are just a great fucking time.After re-reading, here are my star ratings for each issue:1831AD - 4 Stars455AD - 4 Stars1923AD - 5 Stars1373AD - 5 Stars (personal fav of all)Christmas - 5 StarsFunnies - 3 Stars
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  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    Collecting the specials, in chronological order – meaning readers of the trades will have a very different experience to singles readers, who got them dotted between arcs in quite another order. My experience of the latter approach was...well, they certainly answered some of the questions the main arc was begging (given the death of the gods seems generally to come about through violence, could one of them just...not get killed? What happens then?). But at the same time they also reminded me of Collecting the specials, in chronological order – meaning readers of the trades will have a very different experience to singles readers, who got them dotted between arcs in quite another order. My experience of the latter approach was...well, they certainly answered some of the questions the main arc was begging (given the death of the gods seems generally to come about through violence, could one of them just...not get killed? What happens then?). But at the same time they also reminded me of some of my disconnects from the whole set-up of the series. Are the gods tribute acts to the famous artists they resemble, or do they replace them in the timeline? If the latter, why are things not more different in this world, and if the former, why doesn't it get mentioned more? Because either way, when you push eg that famous night at the Villa Diodati from 1816 to 1831...well, either you've deformed a crucial current in European literary history, or we're reading about a superpowered re-enactment society. And yet, as with the rest of the series, it's beautiful. I may not buy the situation, but dear heavens it looks gorgeous, and if you go along with that given, there's not a false note to the interactions which ensue, only an unflinching eye for the many ways in which fascinating people can do terrible, stupid things to each other once the pressure is on. And isn't it always? Because, like these gods staring down the barrel of imminent death, we're all on a clock. As well as the historicals, the collection also has the deleted scenes of the Christmas Special – some beautiful moments, for varying definitions of 'beauty', between the series' main pantheon – and the questionably canonical but emphatically hilarious comedy special. TBH, even if the whole rest of the series was just set-up for The Wicked + the Canine (the gods reborn as dogs), then the punchline was worth the whole thing.(I thought about adding a 'shaggy dog story' line there, but having only read The Funnies last night, I'm punned out)
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  • Lenny
    January 1, 1970
    Volume seven of WicDiv was nothing short of phenomenal. Years worth of questions were answered in epic payoffs; fantastic art with meticulously researched details literally spanning all of time, and of course, a massive cliffhanger.But don’t get too excited opening up volume 8 – you’re not going to get any resolution just yet. This volume collects the WicDiv specials, all of which were released at different times during WicDiv’s run. That means anyone reading the issues has already seen these – Volume seven of WicDiv was nothing short of phenomenal. Years worth of questions were answered in epic payoffs; fantastic art with meticulously researched details literally spanning all of time, and of course, a massive cliffhanger.But don’t get too excited opening up volume 8 – you’re not going to get any resolution just yet. This volume collects the WicDiv specials, all of which were released at different times during WicDiv’s run. That means anyone reading the issues has already seen these – but for a trade reader like me, it was my first time. McKelvie and Gillen acknowledge this in their forward and include original release dates for each special, if you’d prefer to read in chronological release order.Each special – aside from the funnies – focuses on a particular pantheon and therefore period of history. They cover. lot of ground including ancient Rome, the black plague, the Romantic writers, and the 1920’s, along with lots of different guest artists, particularly the last two specials. Each period was chosen with intention, relating to WicDiv’s ongoing themes of power and betrayal, hero worship and art – which comes out in each issue with varying degrees of subtlety. (All good though.)The specials focus a lot on Ananke and Lucifer, and while nothing big was given away, there were some nice things teased or even revealed (such as Lucifer and Amaterasu’s past relationship before godhood). It was neat to see which gods remained more consistent, who changed genders (conclusion: most of the queer characters, is that a bad thing?), and how their personalities both fit the time and also remained consistent.But I personally didn’t find most of the stories particularly affecting or interesting. There was some extreme gore and disturbing stuff in the first issue that set me off for the rest of the book. I didn’t find my investment in characters I already love, or don’t care for, changing all that much. I was surprised that Persephone took a backseat. And it was a disappointment that the most visually interesting special, set in the 1920’s (and a lovely homage to Agatha Christie), was largely written in prose.Disclaimer, though: I have been reading this series off and on for years. It’s entirely possible that, not unlike volume 7 (which had me pulling practically every volume off the shelves to reference and cross-check like some goddamn graduate school essay), I missed a lot, and some small details or reveals went completely over my head. This could also be because I’m technically reading them out of order too. Someday, I’ll go back and reread everything, and maybe I’ll update with a more glowing or understanding review.The Christmas Annual was basically fluff where everyone gets it on. I mean just, just lots. Like, definitely don’t read in a public place, lots. Guest artist (and one of my faves) Kris Anka just has no censor to worry about, and just…well, there it is, and wow. In my opinion he should have done the whole damn issue. That guy knows how to draw a sexy time. That’s all I’ll say.And the funnies were actually a pretty cute and amusing collection of vignettes not meant to be taken literally or really exist in the WicDiv universe. The creators make fun of themselves and their work in a way that only people who have been working on the same story for many years could. The humor – even when it misses – is still refreshing from the metaphor-laden and often gory material.Finally, shout out to letterer Clayton Cowles. Aside from Gillen, he is I believe the one member of the creative team consistent across all the issues, and the way he letters the different eras is just brilliant. Everything was super easy to read, including script fonts (this is a problem in comics so often, I can’t even), and some of the typefaces he chose really gave the characters, especially Lucifer, a real texture to their dialogue. Cowles – in this series – is the reason why I became aware of the crucial (and unsung) role letterers play in comics, and it really shines in this volume.Wic Div’s eighth and penultimate volume might be an interlude but it’s still worth reading for invested fans. While not my favorite of the series it’s still a worthwhile installment as lots of small pieces come together. This creative team is nothing short of brilliant – nothing can change my mind about that – and I sincerely hope this isn’t the last story we see from them.
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  • César
    January 1, 1970
    The specials will be collected in cronological order (455AD, 1373, 1831, 1923, christmas, funnies), which is ok as a volume 8, but I still think they work better when read in publication order intersped with the rest of the series (Vols 1-4, 1831, Vol 5, 455AD, Vol 6, 1923, christmas, Vol 7, 1373, funnies).1831 - 5 stars455AD - 4 stars1923 - 5 starsChristmas special - 2 stars1373 - 4.5 starsFunnies special - 2 stars
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    Volume 8 is the only inessential volume in The Wicked + The Divine's run, due to its status as a collection of standalone stories shedding more light on past eras of Gods. While the individual stories are quite interesting and have stellar guest artwork, as a whole the collection feels a little haphazard and not very cohesive. But it is still worth a read by anyone invested in the series.
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  • Imogene
    January 1, 1970
    I just got excited when I realised that I had actually read all of these :-) I'll have to go back, reread and review each title separately.I did find it a little less compelling due to the, shall we say, narritus interuptus? But individually, some of these were insanely brilliant
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  • k
    January 1, 1970
    collections like this are always hit or miss but a) i love my hot mess children and b) i really appreciate that they just did a bunch of 'fuck it, here are all your favs canonically getting it on' stories for the christmas annual. truly, the spirit of the season.
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  • rosalind
    January 1, 1970
    this series is sort of like a car crash that you can’t bring yourself to look away from
  • KL Baudelaire
    January 1, 1970
    Things were never okay.
  • Eszter
    January 1, 1970
    1831 - 3 starsChristmas Annual - 3 stars1923 - 2 stars455AD - 4 stars1373 - 5 starsThe Funnies - 1 star
  • Ali
    January 1, 1970
    After finishing the last volume, I thought how much room there is for more spin-offs like the 1831 Romantic poet inspired issue. So boy was I pleased to realize the penultimate volume was all one-offs! The opening special about the fall of Rome was not enjoyable. I didn't get it at all, which is frustrating because while the specials aren't required for the story, they do offer insight into what's really happening with Ananke's plans. However, the rest of the specials were so damn good. The Medi After finishing the last volume, I thought how much room there is for more spin-offs like the 1831 Romantic poet inspired issue. So boy was I pleased to realize the penultimate volume was all one-offs! The opening special about the fall of Rome was not enjoyable. I didn't get it at all, which is frustrating because while the specials aren't required for the story, they do offer insight into what's really happening with Ananke's plans. However, the rest of the specials were so damn good. The Medieval Lucifer? Absolutely incredible and a great spin on how some people would handle being turned into a god. I already loved the 1831 issue (it's the only issue I actually own because I adore the Romantics) so I was thrilled to reread it. The 1923 issue inspired by And Then There Were None. There was a lot of mystery I didn't totally get it BUT the atmosphere was perfect. Also Woden as a German nationalist? Checks out.Finally, the last two issues were the Christmas special and the Funnies. The Christmas specials consisted of deleted scenes which were nice! There wasn't much substance to them but it was really great to get glimpses of the Pantheon before all of this shit went down And the Funnies... oh man they were perfect. I laughed so hard at each one. What a beautiful tribute to the whole series! The Pantheon as dogs... YES. I LOVE IT. The Buzzfeed parody of 5 things about living with Sakmet (I don't remember the specific title in case this is off) was brilliant. Plus I loved the open mocking of Gillen & McKelvie.I can't believe there's only one volume left!
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    some fun additions to the 'historical' canon of the pantheon but mileage varies on the tales, and the one taking up the majority of the volume (1927?) was largely in text - I'm reading a graphic novel, I want GRAPHIX. This volume also included a host of different artists which means the style deviated significantly from previous volumes - that's not a terrible thing but it didn't work for me for both the flappers and the Victorians (which looked like a bad gothic vampire romance). My favorite st some fun additions to the 'historical' canon of the pantheon but mileage varies on the tales, and the one taking up the majority of the volume (1927?) was largely in text - I'm reading a graphic novel, I want GRAPHIX. This volume also included a host of different artists which means the style deviated significantly from previous volumes - that's not a terrible thing but it didn't work for me for both the flappers and the Victorians (which looked like a bad gothic vampire romance). My favorite story showed Ananke & Lucifer in the midst of the Black Plague (which (view spoiler)[Ananke single-handedly spread across the continents, of course (hide spoiler)]) and Lucifer's incarnation is awesome, and Ananke feels the urge to spill the beans this iteration which provides some insight to her motivations (never terribly clear in Vol 7 w/exception of 'be immortal and WIN') and her general fatigue with life/people/so-much-winning. It's worth the pickup of the volume on its own.There are also more tidbits on the 'baby breaks the cycle' & 'the crone & maiden' split-self playing out. In general, Ananke seems to have set up the board much better than her sister millenia ago. Comics in the end are silly but fun. and what would nerds be without punning!?
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  • Caro
    January 1, 1970
    This is not actually a new volume, but rather a compendium of the prequels as well as some funny (and not so funny extras). The quality is all over the place, as McKelvie isn't illustrating this and Gillen thought that writing one of the issues down rather than to plot it as a graphic novel was a good idea (it wasn't and he can't write, and that was STILL the best part of this book. Huh.)Should you read this? I don't think it's strictly necessary, but I do recommend reading at least 1923 (you ca This is not actually a new volume, but rather a compendium of the prequels as well as some funny (and not so funny extras). The quality is all over the place, as McKelvie isn't illustrating this and Gillen thought that writing one of the issues down rather than to plot it as a graphic novel was a good idea (it wasn't and he can't write, and that was STILL the best part of this book. Huh.)Should you read this? I don't think it's strictly necessary, but I do recommend reading at least 1923 (you can get the ebook version, it's mostly text, anyway). That one is plot-relevant and relates to the flashbacks in Volume 1 and 7. However, the rest is mostly optional. I didn't love most of it, and the quality is far below Mothering Invention. It's much closer to book 1, Fandemonium, which I still think sucked hard.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Awesome! This is like a collection of short stories, drawn in different styles by different artists, each about a different reincarnation of the pantheon through the ages. Not only does it give a little more understanding to what is going on in the main Wicked + Divine plot, it is really cool to think about how the scenario would have played out in different time periods with the cultural markers of that time. For example, a steampunk version with characters referencing Mary Shelley and the Roma Awesome! This is like a collection of short stories, drawn in different styles by different artists, each about a different reincarnation of the pantheon through the ages. Not only does it give a little more understanding to what is going on in the main Wicked + Divine plot, it is really cool to think about how the scenario would have played out in different time periods with the cultural markers of that time. For example, a steampunk version with characters referencing Mary Shelley and the Romantics; or the 30's, Golden-Age mystery homage with a "Hemingway" character, a German Expressionist, etc.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Individual issue reviews: The Wicked + The Divine: 1831The Wicked + The Divine: 455 ADThe Wicked + The Divine: Christmas Annual #1The Wicked + The Divine: 1923The Wicked + The Divine: 1373The Wicked + The Divine: The Funnies #1Current review score: 2.4
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  • Sesana
    January 1, 1970
    A detour from the main story, to collect the special issues. Most of them are set in different historical eras, and they're uniformly great. My favorite was the 1831 issue, with obviously Byron and obviously Shelley and, most importantly, obviously Mary Shelley and obviously Claire Clairmont, Mary's step-sister. Perfect choices for the pantheon, and a great use of Frankenstein. The Christmas issue is not at all Christmas but still great fun. It's basically a collection of relatively unimportant A detour from the main story, to collect the special issues. Most of them are set in different historical eras, and they're uniformly great. My favorite was the 1831 issue, with obviously Byron and obviously Shelley and, most importantly, obviously Mary Shelley and obviously Claire Clairmont, Mary's step-sister. Perfect choices for the pantheon, and a great use of Frankenstein. The Christmas issue is not at all Christmas but still great fun. It's basically a collection of relatively unimportant but illuminating moments in the modern pantheon, with puns. And then there's the "comedy" special, which isn't very comedic. It's the one low spot in the book.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like the series does not know what it wants to be, to do, or where it wants to go. In this volume, the authors are more obsessed with the minutiae of the historical relationships between characters, and filling in "apparently" engrossing plot points that I didn't even pick up on. For example, in this volume, it is about the history of Lucifer and Ananke, and some underlying plot being explained over ~100 pages.I did like the variations in graphical styling over the different centuries, bu I feel like the series does not know what it wants to be, to do, or where it wants to go. In this volume, the authors are more obsessed with the minutiae of the historical relationships between characters, and filling in "apparently" engrossing plot points that I didn't even pick up on. For example, in this volume, it is about the history of Lucifer and Ananke, and some underlying plot being explained over ~100 pages.I did like the variations in graphical styling over the different centuries, but the language did not fit. And the Art Deco period was not inspiring, instead it was just badly written text (text only, like a written work) for about 20 pages.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Minor spoilers for the final "Okay" arc which is, as of this writing, halfway published in single-issue format.It's interesting to go back and read some of these one-shots, now that certain info from them is becoming Very Much a Big Deal in volume 7 and (view spoiler)[in the final arc (which just dropped a Big Reveal specifically relating to the 1831 story in Issue 42) (hide spoiler)]WicDiv is one of the best things in comics today, and Gillen manages to keep the shocks and twists and turns comi Minor spoilers for the final "Okay" arc which is, as of this writing, halfway published in single-issue format.It's interesting to go back and read some of these one-shots, now that certain info from them is becoming Very Much a Big Deal in volume 7 and (view spoiler)[in the final arc (which just dropped a Big Reveal specifically relating to the 1831 story in Issue 42) (hide spoiler)]WicDiv is one of the best things in comics today, and Gillen manages to keep the shocks and twists and turns coming in every single issue. As much as I dread the final issues, I am also looking forward to reading them, and being able to enjoy the story from start to finish in one massive reread.
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  • Emma (howlsmovinglibrary)
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly every star I gave this was earned by the 1923 short story, otherwise I would've been very disappointed by this volume. While I was excited to see one shots of previous Pantheons (the Romantics as a bunch of hedonist gods in particular!) I found many of these short stories poorly plotted and not very interesting.That being said, the 1923 story (a mix of artwork and prose) was amazing and I loved every moment, particularly the shade thrown at the modernist elite.TW: extreme gore in the Ro Honestly every star I gave this was earned by the 1923 short story, otherwise I would've been very disappointed by this volume. While I was excited to see one shots of previous Pantheons (the Romantics as a bunch of hedonist gods in particular!) I found many of these short stories poorly plotted and not very interesting.That being said, the 1923 story (a mix of artwork and prose) was amazing and I loved every moment, particularly the shade thrown at the modernist elite.TW: extreme gore in the Rome short story
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  • Magali
    January 1, 1970
    Like with any stand alone collection, there were hits and misses. I particularly loved the one that happened in 1831, which should not be a surprise knowing what I like. The one that happens in France was probably the one with the most beautiful art, and the story was very different, but I did not really feel like I understood it, or at least not Lucifer's way of acting. I like the ones for the christmas special, they were cute, and the funnies were... well more weird than funny but I like them Like with any stand alone collection, there were hits and misses. I particularly loved the one that happened in 1831, which should not be a surprise knowing what I like. The one that happens in France was probably the one with the most beautiful art, and the story was very different, but I did not really feel like I understood it, or at least not Lucifer's way of acting. I like the ones for the christmas special, they were cute, and the funnies were... well more weird than funny but I like them too.Can't wait to read the last arc.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    An all round good collection of shorts and other issues of the comics that add to some of the backstory of the overarching plot of the series. My only problem now is that I found myself enjoying the “funny” zenes at the end of this volume rather than the mini arcs set in different time periods of when the gods had previously return such as near the end of the Roman Empire and after the Black Plague. I find myself enjoying the concept more of the series than actually understanding what is really An all round good collection of shorts and other issues of the comics that add to some of the backstory of the overarching plot of the series. My only problem now is that I found myself enjoying the “funny” zenes at the end of this volume rather than the mini arcs set in different time periods of when the gods had previously return such as near the end of the Roman Empire and after the Black Plague. I find myself enjoying the concept more of the series than actually understanding what is really going on in the arcs themselves.
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  • Shane Perry
    January 1, 1970
    A decent enough volume. This one is filled with standalone issues which were originally released between story arcs, so don’t go into this expecting the next chapter of the story. Some of these are better than other. I preferred the ones giving backstory to the history of the Pantheon than the Christmas or Funnies issues. The prose issue was a bit much, but I did like the story. I enjoyed this overall, but I’m definitely ready to see how this story ends.
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  • Alyssa Markmann
    January 1, 1970
    Wasn't all that impressed to find out that this volume was just a collection of side stories, and was really not a fan of the short story because, really, I'm reading a graphic novel! And this does seem to be a common occurrence, but I'm really not a fan of guest artists, because half the reason I buy a comic is due to the art being to my taste.That being said I'm always happy to visit the gods and really enjoyed the Lucifer stories. Very keen for the wrap up to come later this year!
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  • Amélie
    January 1, 1970
    As eager as I am to read the last arc, I still thoroughly enjoyed this extra material. The art was absolutely gorgeous, especially with the issues dealing with other pantheons. It's hard to say which story was my favourite.I also really liked the in-between scenes. I wasn't suuper fond of the humorous ones, although some (especially the last one) were really well done.Can't believe I have to wait until September for the next volume... nor that it will be the last!!
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  • Jennifer Ranger
    January 1, 1970
    This volume was a little different than the others, since it was a compilation of the specials. Overall, it was great. The character development was wonderful, and the plot of each special kept things moving along. I especially liked "And Then There Was One," although I would have liked to see more comics and less straight text in this one. I look forward to reading volume 9.
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  • Doug Peters
    January 1, 1970
    This middle chunk of this hodgepodge collection is a whodunit during the 1920s. It is mostly text (instead of art), which is probably why this Volume has a lower rating than the rest. Overall, I liked it for what it was. I can't criticize the authors for combining a bunch of stories that appear separately in the individual issues, after all.
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