An Agent of Utopia
“Andy Duncan is one of the very best short story writers in Science Fiction, Fantasy, or anywhere else. It’s a sure bet that you’re holding in your hand the best story collection of the year.” ―Jeffrey Ford, author of A Natural History of Hell“Duncan’s unique voice shines through in his third collection. You’ve not read him yet? Shame on you! Go out now and buy An Agent of Utopia. You’ll thank me.” ―Ellen Datlow, award- winning editor“Andy Duncan is one of the most hilarious and poignant writers of short stories that we have. He effortlessly forges dreamlike and nightmarish tales with wit and wisdom that rivals Mark Twain.” ―Christopher Barzak, author of Wonders of the Invisible WorldIn these tales you will meet a Utopian assassin, an aging UFO contactee, a haunted Mohawk steelworker, a time- traveling prizefighter, a yam- eating Zombie, and a child who loves a frizzled chicken―not to mention Harry Houdini, Zora Neale Hurston, Sir Thomas More, and all their fellow travelers riding the steamer- trunk imagination of a unique twenty-first- century fabulist.

An Agent of Utopia Details

TitleAn Agent of Utopia
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 6th, 2018
PublisherSmall Beer Press
ISBN-139781618731531
Rating
GenreFantasy, Short Stories, Science Fiction, Fiction, Anthologies

An Agent of Utopia Review

  • Galen Strickland
    January 1, 1970
    Full review at templetongate.net/agent-of-utopiaDuncan reads like the Southern version of Clifford Simak. Most of the stories are set in the South, with simple characters confronting weird situations. Even when not in first person, they read in the languorous lilt of the Southern drawl. A variation of style would have been nice once in a while, but that's the only negative. Well, that and the frequent use of the N-word. While appropriate for the time and place the stories were set, it's still ja Full review at templetongate.net/agent-of-utopiaDuncan reads like the Southern version of Clifford Simak. Most of the stories are set in the South, with simple characters confronting weird situations. Even when not in first person, they read in the languorous lilt of the Southern drawl. A variation of style would have been nice once in a while, but that's the only negative. Well, that and the frequent use of the N-word. While appropriate for the time and place the stories were set, it's still jarring for this Southerner who hates it.
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