Daisy Jones & The Six
Everyone knows Daisy Jones & The Six, but nobody knows the reason behind their split at the absolute height of their popularity . . . until now.Daisy is a girl coming of age in L.A. in the late sixties, sneaking into clubs on the Sunset Strip, sleeping with rock stars, and dreaming of singing at the Whisky a Go Go. The sex and drugs are thrilling, but it’s the rock and roll she loves most. By the time she’s twenty, her voice is getting noticed, and she has the kind of heedless beauty that makes people do crazy things.Also getting noticed is The Six, a band led by the brooding Billy Dunne. On the eve of their first tour, his girlfriend Camila finds out she’s pregnant, and with the pressure of impending fatherhood and fame, Billy goes a little wild on the road.Daisy and Billy cross paths when a producer realizes that the key to supercharged success is to put the two together. What happens next will become the stuff of legend.The making of that legend is chronicled in this riveting and unforgettable novel, written as an oral history of one of the biggest bands of the seventies. Taylor Jenkins Reid is a talented writer who takes her work to a new level with Daisy Jones & The Six, brilliantly capturing a place and time in an utterly distinctive voice.

Daisy Jones & The Six Details

TitleDaisy Jones & The Six
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 5th, 2019
PublisherBallantine Books
ISBN-139781524798628
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Audiobook

Daisy Jones & The Six Review

  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    I know many people loved this book, and it's not as if I don't see why, but this choice of narration just really didn't work for me. I found Reid's The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo absolutely riveting from the very first chapter, but I thought the decision to write this book entirely in interview transcripts made it really boring and emotionless.Daisy Jones & The Six is essentially a band documentary transcript. I'm sure most of you have seen a band documentary before. Former band members, I know many people loved this book, and it's not as if I don't see why, but this choice of narration just really didn't work for me. I found Reid's The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo absolutely riveting from the very first chapter, but I thought the decision to write this book entirely in interview transcripts made it really boring and emotionless.Daisy Jones & The Six is essentially a band documentary transcript. I'm sure most of you have seen a band documentary before. Former band members, their managers, and their friends are all interviewed, and the screen switches between them speaking and images/footage of the band in their prime. This is like that, but without the images to accompany it. Members of The Six, their acquaintances, and Daisy herself, recount the history of the band's rise and fall.I just… nothing interested me. I didn’t care when they were bickering about how song lyrics should go. Or when they were talking about the sex and drugs lifestyle. They just fly around, play gigs, do drugs, all while Daisy is being a brat and Billy is cheating on his wife. They are the only two characters of interest and they both irritated me.Perhaps it is because this is a perfect example of what they say a writer shouldn't do: all tell, no show. I mean, that's the nature of having it be an interview transcript. The characters just talk about their experiences, and it all felt very cold and detached. I wasn't immersed in the story; I wasn't experiencing it. I actually kept reading because the book seemed like maybe it was building to something good. It all feels like its leading up to a shocking climax at their last concert, but even the mystery surrounding that was unsatisfying for me. I was expecting something more juicy and exciting.Oh well. I do think it had a bit of a cool 1970s LA music scene vibe going on. The whirlwind of sex, drugs, rock'n'roll and all that. But it wasn't enough for me. I think the story would have been far more compelling written in the author's usual style. She seems quite good at writing about strong feisty women who get caught up in a vicious industry, but that didn't come across as well here. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • Emma Giordano
    January 1, 1970
    Daisy Jones & the Six is a masterpiece. Incredible. Intoxicating. Unforgettable. Truly one of the most remarkable stories I have ever had the pleasure of reading. The moment I finished, I had to immediately start from the beginning again. I refused to let go. And yes, I did read it twice in a row.CW: substance abuse/addiction, abortionSet in the mid sixties – late seventies, Daisy Jones & The Six transports readers to the most iconic age of rock n’ roll. The atmosphere and story composit Daisy Jones & the Six is a masterpiece. Incredible. Intoxicating. Unforgettable. Truly one of the most remarkable stories I have ever had the pleasure of reading. The moment I finished, I had to immediately start from the beginning again. I refused to let go. And yes, I did read it twice in a row.CW: substance abuse/addiction, abortionSet in the mid sixties – late seventies, Daisy Jones & The Six transports readers to the most iconic age of rock n’ roll. The atmosphere and story composition create and authentic tale that I almost refuse to believe isn’t real! Taylor Jenkins Reid is a master of fiction – her characters possess an uncanny ability to charm readers and settle into their hearts. Her novels are multi-faceted and unlike any other books I’ve read, especially due to the oral history storytelling of Daisy Jones. (Side note – the audiobook? SPECTACULAR. If you have access to the audio version, you will not want to miss this experience) Full of timeless quotes, glamourous scandals, and heart-breaking loss, Daisy Jones & The Six has absolutely climbed to the top as one of my favorite books of all time.FUCK! THIS BOOK IS SO FEMINIST! The women in this book are all so powerful and dynamic. There are so many strong messages about women empowerment, taking no one’s shit, supporting other women, and demanding credit where it’s due. Even the smaller side characters are them much more layered than most supporting characters, as we explore their own storylines. Plus the relationships between all of the women, (Karen & Daisy, Karen & Camila, Camila & Daisy – even Daisy and little Julia made my heart swell!) are wholesome, unique, and authentic. Especially for a story with a bit of a love triangle, I could not be happier with the superb study of the experience of women.I also was left so touched by the exploration of addiction. It’s a disease very close to my heart and I’m so, so pleased with how Taylor Jenkins Reid captured the dark, devastating nature of it. The story of both Billy and Daisy’s respective addictions bring light to the glamorization of drugs of this time, while not glamorizing it themselves. This book exposes the truth about substance abuse while simultaneously carrying an air of hope and recovery for those who may be in a similar situation. I’ll stand by this novel my grave as one of the greatest fictional stories of addiction ever told.And oh gosh, THE MUSIC! I just have to give a shout out to the author for writing so many superb original songs with their own distinct voice and sound. I cannot WAIT for the series to come out so I can finally hear these marvelous lyrics sung the way they should be. Again, I REFUSE to believe this isn’t a real band.I have so few complaints about this book, and honestly, they are so minuscule compared to the novel’s countless strengths. I felt the main plot twist wasn’t all that shocking and the ending could have been stronger compared to the rock-solid build up, but I’m so enchanted by this book that I’m totally unbothered.In sum, read Daisy Jones & The Six. Prepare to have your mind rocked by the story of a band that wanted to change the world, so they did.
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  • Hailey (Hailey in Bookland)
    January 1, 1970
    Video review - https://youtu.be/w9617uq7Kk0?t=752I AM SO EMOTIONAL
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    I will never stop cryingCheck out my book review!: https://youtu.be/pJvJi3HVzf0
  • Emily (Books with Emily Fox)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm afraid to read this book. What if it's not as good as The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo?What if I'm disappointed?!
  • Christine Riccio
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this! The audio book was fabulous.
  • kat
    January 1, 1970
    really don’t get the hype, but i finished. more thoughts later.(i listened to the audio and read a physical copy together)
  • Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the audiobook and I gotta say, Taylor Jenkins Reid has knocked it out of the park again. I LOVED THIS SO MUCH. This audiobook was one of the best audiobooks I've ever listened to and I am SO GLAD that I decided to take in the story that way. It was narrated by a full cast and I just about died when my girl Judy Greer started speaking in my ear as the voice of Karen Karen. Seriously y'all, so fucking good. I WILL SAY, the reason I'm giving this a 4 and not a 5 is because the book as I listened to the audiobook and I gotta say, Taylor Jenkins Reid has knocked it out of the park again. I LOVED THIS SO MUCH. This audiobook was one of the best audiobooks I've ever listened to and I am SO GLAD that I decided to take in the story that way. It was narrated by a full cast and I just about died when my girl Judy Greer started speaking in my ear as the voice of Karen Karen. Seriously y'all, so fucking good. I WILL SAY, the reason I'm giving this a 4 and not a 5 is because the book as a whole ends a little unspectacularly. There's so much build up and tension throughout the course of the book and the ending just did not live up to what came before it. I do still HIGHLY recommend you check it out though, and 100% recommend the audiobook. What a wild ride.TW: copious drug use, alcoholism, abortion
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  • Elyse Walters
    January 1, 1970
    NEW UPDATED REVIEW.....I already expressed LOVING this novel: REALLY REALLY REALLY LOVING IT.....about a fictional rock band in the 1970’s - their rise through the ranks of the LA music scene - eventually becoming one of the most legendary bands in the world. Taylor Jenkins Reid is not a novice author. Her other five books:“The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo”, “One True Loves”,“Maybe in Another Life”, “After I Do”, “Forever, Interrupted”, Are ‘all’ genuinely - emotionally - passionate books that NEW UPDATED REVIEW.....I already expressed LOVING this novel: REALLY REALLY REALLY LOVING IT.....about a fictional rock band in the 1970’s - their rise through the ranks of the LA music scene - eventually becoming one of the most legendary bands in the world. Taylor Jenkins Reid is not a novice author. Her other five books:“The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo”, “One True Loves”,“Maybe in Another Life”, “After I Do”, “Forever, Interrupted”, Are ‘all’ genuinely - emotionally - passionate books that make readers *FEEL*. I’ve been thinking about “Daisy Jones and The Six” for days: .....the story, the creative structure, the characters as individuals and in relationship to one another: written superbly!!!As for ‘emotions’.....and ‘reflecting’....I’m still engaged — as this soulful novel is more than drugs, sex, and rock-n-roll......its a novel that speaks to our own losses and loves. This book broke my heart and mended it. The authenticity of these mult-dimensional characters have us relating to how similar & universal our inner voices are. It becomes totally clear yet so complex to understand how we can love somebody but not be happy with the way things are. This novel’s achievement is deeply moving - irresistible- and the real beauty is that it FEELS TOTALLY ALIVE....made with REAL VIBRANT ENERGY!There are written songs - that I can’t wait to ‘hear’. The mini series can’t come fast enough for me—-I’m a fiction-rock-band-book-groupie!!! Guilty pleasure- out of the closet!!!While reading this novel - there were parts where I wished I had bought tickets to the live show — I would have given anything to hear Daisy and Billie sing together. A couple of times they were soooo vulnerable- you could cut the air tension with a knife. Bottom line..... extraordinary......brilliant....heartbreaking...depth....and beauty.LAST..... some thoughts as to ‘why’ I think Taylor Jenkins Reid is popular...with ‘strong-loyal-fans’......( I admit to being one of them - having read every book she has written).....MOST: TJR makes us *FEEL*.....we often get a lump in our throat in her novels.....Stories always move smoothly.....Her characters are complex - broken & beautiful- powerful & fragile - .....Simple moments - mundane moments are so real - we relate. .....Storytelling is wise, witty, smart, devastating, inspiring, often consumed by passion and love.....Her stories have us thinking “what might we do?”......Taylor Jenkins Reid skillful writing transfers into real experiential tales....she can crawl inside our heads and have us laughing one minute - worried the next - .....when it comes to creating powerful - glamorous- female characters - TJR is the ‘go-to’ author.....at the same time she knows how to capture the quiet behind the scenes powerful woman equally as well. .....None of her books are the same - yet we trust we will be taken on an entertaining unpredictable journey. FIRST REVIEW immediately after reading.....Review coming in a day or two .. or three ... Going to get some sleep!“I feel the earth move under my feetI feel the sky tumbling downI feel my heart start to trembling Whenever you’re around” Carol KingGREAT BOOK.... should make a terrific mini series!!!! At first...These characters felt SO REAL... I was SURE there must have been a real’ DAISY JONES.I went to look ‘Daisy Jones’ up on Google ... she didn’t exist! I was sad! But... Taylor Jenkins Reed created a novel that felt soooooooo darn real... It’s hard to believe it’s ‘not’ a biography.I LOVED IT!!! Loved it! Loved it! loved it!!!!!!
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  • chloe ✨
    January 1, 1970
    2nd read: 29-31 march (audiobook)5 starsUGH I WILL NEVER GET OVER THIS BOOK1st read: 14-15 march (audiobook)5 stars
  • Mackenzi
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone else furious that the songs in the book aren't actual songs you can stream right now CAUSE I AM.
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid is a 2019 Ballantine Books publication. Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll! I mean, that’s what the seventies were all about, man!! Right? Taylor Jenkins Reid has done an admirable job of creating the atmosphere and mindset of the seventies and the rock bands that were catapulted to success beyond their wildest dreams. From their humble incarnation to their mega-stardom, to their slide down into relative obscurity, the author takes us on a journey back to th Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid is a 2019 Ballantine Books publication. Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll! I mean, that’s what the seventies were all about, man!! Right? Taylor Jenkins Reid has done an admirable job of creating the atmosphere and mindset of the seventies and the rock bands that were catapulted to success beyond their wildest dreams. From their humble incarnation to their mega-stardom, to their slide down into relative obscurity, the author takes us on a journey back to the days when the music meant everything, the bands were serious about their art, and the rock and roll lifestyle either made you or it broke you. To tell the band’s storied history, the author employs a documentary style format, which is an interesting approach. It works in some ways, but it falls flat in others. As other reviewers have pointed out, the fictional band featured in this story is a thinly veiled Fleetwood Mac prototype. Again, this works to some extent because many people are familiar with the outrageous dramas within the band and it feels a bit familiar, and therefore plausible. But, at the same time, I did wish this fictional band had not borne such a close resemblance to an actual group. I thought it took something away from the story, as it was less imaginative than it could have been. However, this might be what made the book appealing to some readers. That said, as the story progresses, and the band follows an all too familiar and cliched path, riddled with pitfalls, drugs, relationship woes, and all manner of inner turmoil and temptation, the story makes an ever so subtle shift into something a little more substantial than the typical ‘Behind the Music’ ‘Rockumentary’ type of story.Although the characters’ personas are very recognizable, they are also very well constructed and unique in their own way. They do prompt emotions, but are still enigmas, in the same way the rock stars of the seventies often were, adding to, and maintaining their mystique. The downside to that gamble is that one may not feel a deep connection with them. While those thoughts were whirling around in my head, the realization that I'd finally become invested in the welfare of the band snuck up on me. I did, finally, find myself wrapped up in the drama, and was torn by the difficult choices that the characters made, questioning some, understanding others, but ultimately making peace with the way everything came together in the end. I will confess I was very much looking forward to this book and with all the rave reviews I was confident this one would blow me away. But, as much as I love this author and wanted to love this book, it didn't rock my world- so to speak. Don't get me wrong, I did like the book, but it didn’t come close to packing the emotional punch of Evelyn Hugo, and I thought it had the potential to do so. However, the big reveal in this case, which was centered around the group's final performance, was anticlimactic, in my opinion. Still, this is one many will find compulsively readable, and some will enjoy the feelings of nostalgia the story evokes. In some ways the story feels like an alternate reality for the real rock band the story is so obviously based on, which is also a thought provoking and interesting concept. Overall, although this one didn't have the impact on me, I'd hoped, I still enjoyed it for the most part. Due to the style and format, it is a very easy read, and many will be able to finish it off in one day or even in one sitting. A little Fleetwood Mac playing in the background will make some nice mood music to go along with the saga of Daisy Jones and the Six. 3.5 rounded up.
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  • Elena
    January 1, 1970
    So this is a girl that desperately wants to connect. But there’s no one in her life who is truly interested in who she is, especially not her parents. And it really breaks her. But it is also how she grows up to become an icon. And that is what this is, a story about a girl who wanted to connect with the world and have anyone out there willing to spare some time out to listen to her, listen to every word she had to let out. It's a story about a girl who grew up to be an icon, an inspiration, So this is a girl that desperately wants to connect. But there’s no one in her life who is truly interested in who she is, especially not her parents. And it really breaks her. But it is also how she grows up to become an icon. And that is what this is, a story about a girl who wanted to connect with the world and have anyone out there willing to spare some time out to listen to her, listen to every word she had to let out. It's a story about a girl who grew up to be an icon, an inspiration, a rockstar, a woman who independently grew up willing to do something in order to make her life better and live the life she had always dreamed to live. But that's not the only thing this story is about.This story is about a band who rose to fame and called the top of the charts theirs, their name sitting on the throne like they owned everyone and everything. It's about a band who struggled with communication, love, jealousy, anger, drug abuse, addiction, and, most importantly, friendship. This is a story about these band members telling their parts of the story and how everyone settled in, letting out their secrets out so everyone can know what happened, why, when, and how. It's about people who dealt with love and loss and how giving up will not get you anywhere.Content/trigger warnings: (view spoiler)[Drug addiction/abuse, abortion, underage drinking. (hide spoiler)]Daisy Jones & The Six follows Daisy and the band she joined, The Six, which started off with the Dunne brothers, Billy and Graham Dunne, and then became The Six with the rest of the band members: Karen, Warren, Pete, and Eddie. It is filled with interviews, song lyrics, and it told as an oral history. We have Daisy, our coming of age girl who grew up in LA wanting to rise in the late 60s. She becomes independent as she is getting no moral support from her family and parents, so her only chances are moving out and living on her own, taking care of herself like she always has. She grows up going to bars, sleeping with older guys, and starts drinking and doing drugs at a young age, but she also wants people to see her for who she is: a girl who finds drugs and sex thrilling but also want to perform at the Whisky a Go Go as she also has a love for rock and roll. When she makes her debut, not only are her vocals getting noticed but so are her looks and her beauty.The Six, a band started off by two brothers, are also hoping to make it to the music industry and rock out with the world. As they are making some progress and begin to hit the road together, Billy finds out his girlfriend, Camila, is pregnant. Unsure how to react and take the news, Billy turns to the drugs and drinks in order to hide his frustration and pour everything out. While on the road, the band and Billy are unable to settle in together as Billy is having trouble sorting everything out.When The Six and Daisy are set to collaborate and make a duet together, arranged by their producer, the pathway and journey they all take together is still legendary. The rise to their fame happened this way, but so did many other things. Told by the members themselves in interviews and transcripts, the making of the band who was taking over the 70s is told chronologically by the members themselves, revealing their past and present, future plans, and why, after their last performance at the Chicago Stadium, the band decided to never again play together. If the rest of the world was silver, Daisy was gold. I want to say that I know a lot about the 60s through the 80s, but that would be the first thing I would be lying about. I hate to disappoint my history teachers this way, but the era and time of the 70s have never been an interest of mine. Not only that, but classic rock and roll and the rise of artists know as legendary today have never been my style. Growing up, I never found this type of history interesting. From the politics to the astonishing shift between the American system, to the movements and the rise of the artists, the years between the 1960s to the end of the 1980s has always been something I would consider boring. Not only that, but this was never something I learned about until I started eighth grade. Growing up with parents from a whole different country than America and hearing them say Oh yeah these songs have been out since I was very young but I never learned the name of the artists or the actual words was a constant struggle as legendary artists remain on top charts and sit on their thrones while, in the meantime, I'm trying to figure out the rest of the history that happened before and after everything else.The tiniest bit of history—because we all love it—surrounds the book, but not so much as expected. We have this world in LA that is full of peace, love, drugs, sex, and so much rock and roll. The members take us to their past life as they embark on their journey to different cities and states. The rising artists that began their fame the from the 60s to the 80s still remain to be known, but the time and era of the 70s have even been quoted as "impossible to sum up" because so much happened during that decade. From band splits to new albums, future icons born, solo debuts to be out, serial killers being sentenced, the most magical place in the US built, and political statements and overviews released, the 70s hold a true and tremendous amount of cheerful yet dark sides, just like every era does.If you're a fan of the 70s, this book won't give you anything you're asking for. It will not talk to you about the debut solo diva Dianna Ross made, The Beatles split and last album, the protests against the Vietnam War and the shootings made, the deaths of artists that remain iconic, inspiration, and as role models for rock fans. It will not give you the background of Nixon making political decisions, the first feminism wave, the goodbye's to fashion icons and hello's to the new fashion figures, the deaths made by serial killers, Walt Disney World being created, The Ramone's first album, the controversy about the Vietnam War, the smash hit tv shows, the legendary sport events and its history marks, the rise of artists varying from the genres rock, R&b and pop, including Pink Floyd, Queen, Aerosmith, David Bowie, Elvis Presley, Lef Zeppelin, Cher, Elton John, and so many more icons. It will not give any stories of history made by people of color, women succeding, and protests made against everything America did not agree on. It was America. It was tits. It was sex. It was drugs. It was summer. It was angst. It was rock ’n’ roll. Truthfully, I will admit, I wish there was more history. But then, this book was never about U.S. and world history anyway. I mean, I don't even though what this is classified as, historical fiction or contemporary. It's hard to classify it as a historical fiction though, because the book in this book is not something that would just be forgotten and be out of print, the setting is set after WWII, and the descriptions of everything in this are still in modern society, even worse in some cases. But, I didn't read this to talk about history, I read this to learn about the history of Daisy & The Six.Daisy Jones & The Six was never calling my name, but Taylor Jenkins Reid was. It was as if she finally slammed the book to my face and telling me to read her latest novel because I'm the type of reader to join in the hype of every book years and years later, so Taylor probably knew I was never going to read The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo until the hype of Daisy Jones was...kind of gone. Marking this book on hold was a bold decision, but now I have to understand the hype that keeps surrounding Evelyn Hugo's story, as it blew last year and keeps blowing up, determined to take her own high charts and sit on the throne she deserves.Gosh. There is so much drama surrounding Daisy and The Six. For starters, every member tells different sides of the stories at times, and since they are being interviewed after many years have passed by, it can be difficult for them to remember every single detail about every band member, or, overall, everyone and not an individual in particular. The drama surrounding them makes everything more angsty, I will say, and it's what kept my hopes up for this book. To begin, the writing of this is not the best for me. I didn't even know this was told as an oral history, written in interviews, set like transcripts, and told by the members themselves. I really just knew this was about a legendary band that broke up and that was it. Starting this book, though, reminded me that we should just never not just judge a book by its cover but also by its written format, and in this case, in a format of interviews. The author of the book in this book interviews the members and ask them to chronologically tell their side of their story from start to finish, and we don't only get to learn their story but also everyone else's. We get to understand every different perspective and understand the reasoning behind everything.The biggest takeaway I got from this, in the beginning, was that it was solely about a rock band and their split, but Reid delivered so much more. I anticipatedly waited for this and starting it had my hopes up way to the top of the room that everyone in my neighboorhood was able to see it. Reading about every member individually tell their story and the rest was so relaxing. It felt like I was actually watching a documentary and learning about this band that is so fictional yet feels so real. Unlike Reid herself and everyone else who has read this book, I do admit, I couldn't imagine the songs in my head and not understand how the album and band was never real, but I could imagine the characters playing, being up on the stage and letting the audience know their feelings and their emotions, taking out their anger, sadness, and happiness.Reading this felt like I was actually sitting in front of my television screen and watching "Behind the Music". Even though I've never actually watched every single episode, I've seen minor clips of some episodes, specifically about artists I particularly like. Now as I have finished this, I wish this was an actual documentary or any sort of adaption film, series or anything that can help me see for all the action for myself. Although I'm aware a 13-episode series is set to be adapted, I still wish this was actually a film instead of a series, but I can see why a series would be better, as the life of these ex-band members have been through the worst and best times and putting it all together in a 2 to 3 hour film wouldn't be the best. I'd also like to add that I read this and I didn't listen to the audiobook (as I am not a fan of them) but I do know there is a particular and whole cast that narrates the book, each given a specific member to voiceover, and I've also heard its highly recommended because not only are you reading but it's as if you're actually listening to the real members tell their story.You know, I'm not a big crier with books. The only time I actually cry are the times when an animal dies, a male character is crying, or a female is so relatable that her crying reasons just hit me hard. We know what happens to the band. We know they split, but we don't know why, and when I started this, I was rooting for everybody, but, most importantly, I was rooting for the women. I know for a fact that Taylor creates unforgettable female characters in her books. After reading this, I've been wanting to binge-read every other book she has published and I was considering buying them on Amazon, but then I realized I'm on a book buying ban unless I really want the book. Gosh, reading every perspective of the three women—Daisy, Karen, and Camila—made me see how much progress has been made on women's rights and its empowerment. Although there is still so much controversy against feminism, Daisy Jones and the Six slapped me in the face and woke me up to realize women have always been strong, capable, independent, and can have so much capability to do so much in the world without men having to get up in their business. Although there is so much feminism in this, there is also ache and love for men the women have here, all three of them. Daisy and Camila are both in love with Billy, and we know that. We know from the synopsis that Billy has a family and we know that there is chemistry between Billy and Daisy, and although I wished I hated it, I didn't...not the fullest. L.A. is full of men just waiting for some naive girl to believe their bullshit. Daisy is seen as unlikeable by many, but I was rooting for her. She had everything settled and planned out, and every time she did, it went according to her way. She didn't take shit from anyone, men mostly, and she always had to have it her way, and it was fucking powerful. What I will admit is that Daisy was a character who did need someone in her life to love her back and care for her. She had her best friend, but I felt like Daisy needed someone in her life who could share everything with her, tell her their secrets, do things with her, fill her life with more happiness and send sparks of light along the way. This story also focuses on Daisy and her struggle with addiction, staying sober, and not bothering to listen to what anyone says. Sure, she didn't take shit from anyone, and it's so cool seeing a woman stand up for her beliefs during those years, but I truly believe from the bottom of my heart that Daisy needed someone to be able to understand what she's going through and be able to try and piece her back together, because Daisy could not handle doing it alone.Daisy, to me, was a character who was lonely and needed to connect with someone. When she thought she found her true love, her person, her lover, her partner, her soul mate, the person she could feel the most connection with, she was right but she knew she couldn't have him, and it hurt man. Seeing Daisy breaking down even more over the fact that she's in love with the man who she has seen become a better person and see raise his family is so heartbreaking. But then, seeing Daisy not allow herself to be let down and just shut down from it is so strong of her too, and I truly think that if the year today was in the 70s and even early 80s, Daisy would have been such a role model for many people, and not just women. She was angry, jealous, loved, alone, and scared. She was a character with so much sympathy even at the times that you wanted to yell at her, shake her, and tell her to get a grip because all she was thinking about was herself and nobody and nothing else. But then, with the minor complaints I have about her, Daisy was such a radical woman. I run hot and I always have. I am not going to sit around sweating my ass off just so men can feel more comfortable. It’s not my responsibility to not turn them on. It’s their responsibility to not be an asshole. I never enjoy reading about love triangles, but Taylor can either rip you apart or anger you wish these three. She puzzles three different characters that begin to heal one another in different ways than the others do, and it either angers you or just breaks your heart. I said I'm not the crier, and instead of crying, I got mad. Frustrated. I got angry with Taylor for creating these broken characters that just didn't know what to do at times. She decided to make decisions difficult for all of them, but she also put barriers and signs in front of them that they were able to see and think of them as not only warning signs but signs that are meant for their future to keep growing and moving its way forward. I really felt like I understood him. And I think he understood me. You know, things like that, that kind of connection with a person, it is sort of like playing with fire. Because it feels good, to be understood. You feel in sync with a person, you feel like you’re on a level that no one else is. I know that this book also primarily focuses on the other band members, but every band member in this got in my nerves, other than Karen (at times). There was so much lack in communication that it made it very hard for the band to agree or disagree on everything, especially with Billy. I could understand where he was coming from, but Billy also needed to understand that there was really no leader in the band. What bothered me the most from his character was that he felt like he was a sort of leader and he referred to the band as his but never thought about everyone else. Sometimes he got on my nerves but then as we got to the ending, it all made sense as to why he was being so honest, so open, and unafraid to say the truth. Another thing I'd like to point out is how Billy was making his best effort to stay sober, healthy, and ready for his family. Seeing as how he did everything because of his family and because of the chances Camila gave him was so beautiful. It was a true meaning of what family can do and how it can really change a person.Although this book is called Daisy Jones and The Six, reading this felt like I was reading about Daisy and Billy struggling to understand they were not able to be together and the feeling they had for each other had to be forgotten. The angst they gave me because of the chemistry they had was attaching all the strings together. But Billy and Daisy were a puddle of their own: they knew they couldn’t be connected and there was going to be somebody to break them apart. It’s an album about the push and full of stability and instability. It’s about the struggle that I live almost every day to not do something stupid. Is it about love? Yeah, of course it is. But that’s because it’s easy to disguise almost anything as a love song. Honestly, I was unsure of my feelings when I finished this. Going into it, I was scared, especially because I didn't want to be on any minority. Seeing as how I'm feeling about this, this deserves much more than it's given. Daisy Jones & The Six delivers messages and portrayals about friendships that were never meant to last, families that were broken and love that was never meant to happen. It's all fun and games while it's lasting, but nothing ever lasts forever and knowing that this band was not going to make it until the end since the beginning brought actual anger to me because I hated that I was rooting for people I knew wouldn't root for each other. Not everyone will like this, but I believe it had to be read by me. I'd like to end this by saying that I believe my feelings for this had to do with how I was feeling while I was reading it. If I'm being honest, while reading this from the 22nd to the 25th of March, I was not emotionally and mentally healthy in any way. I think one of the biggest reasons why I truly enjoyed this, even with the small quibbles I can point out, is because I lessened the pain I was feeling as I was reading about the pain these characters were feeling, and I just think that is so strong of the book to be able to do, have me experience compassion for fictional characters while healing myself.
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  • KAS
    January 1, 1970
      We love broken, beautiful people. And it doesn’t get much more obviously broken and classically beautiful than Daisy Jones. I so connected to this book as it took me back to my teen years of the 1970’s in which music, specifically rock n roll, played a huge part. My now husband and I were always traveling to big concert events in our late teens. One of the most memorable was on July 30, 1978, where we stood in the sweltering heat just feet from the stage listening to the awesome band, Fleetwoo   We love broken, beautiful people. And it doesn’t get much more obviously broken and classically beautiful than Daisy Jones. I so connected to this book as it took me back to my teen years of the 1970’s in which music, specifically rock n roll, played a huge part. My now husband and I were always traveling to big concert events in our late teens. One of the most memorable was on July 30, 1978, where we stood in the sweltering heat just feet from the stage listening to the awesome band, Fleetwood Mac, and lead singer, Stevie Nicks. We even ‘slept’ outside on the stadium sidewalk the night before just so we could be the first in the doors the next morning. While this book is fictional, I can’t help but think it is loosely based on Fleetwood Mac and Stevie Nicks.I totally enjoyed the unique format in which this was written. We get short snippets of thoughts from a wide variety of characters. It reads as if there is a documentary interview going on without hearing the questions, only the answers pertinent to the storyline in a chronological order of events.It is a re-telling of the past in their own words. The re-telling of how “Daisy Jones and the Six” got started, the ups and downs, the pains and hurts, the rampant drug use, the clashing of personalities. And ultimately how the band came to an end during the tumultuous 70’s era.This is a compelling, fast paced page turner written by one of my favorite authors.*Thank you to Random House-Ballantine Books and Net Galley for an advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.*
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.DNF @ 22% “I love you as much as I’m willing to love anybody.” I can’t believe I’m DNFing a Taylor Jenkins Reid book. She wrote one of my favorites books of all time, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, that means more to me than I have words to even begin to express. But this? This was just boring, and crude, and told in such a bad format. It’s like mini interviews if you will, where multiple people are talking, but i ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.DNF @ 22% “I love you as much as I’m willing to love anybody.” I can’t believe I’m DNFing a Taylor Jenkins Reid book. She wrote one of my favorites books of all time, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, that means more to me than I have words to even begin to express. But this? This was just boring, and crude, and told in such a bad format. It’s like mini interviews if you will, where multiple people are talking, but it was impossible for me to ever be immersed. I suppose the main focus is on Daisy Jones, though, and her childhood and rise to stardom. She has a really rough childhood, and got into a lot of drugs, but eventually got really famous. We get to meet her other band mates, and other people in the music scene that changed her life, but all these voices feel disjointed and chaotic. This was really difficult to read, even with all the notes I was taking. I don’t care about Eddie, or Graham, or Warren, or Billy, or Rod, or Camila, or Karen Karen *eye roll forever*. Honestly? I don’t even care that much about Daisy; I just feel bad for her. Simone was my favorite, easily, but even their voice wasn’t enough for me to continue on. “I learned about sex and love the hard way. That men will take what they want and feel no debt, that some people only want one piece of you.” I will say that I’m not the biggest fan of the 60s and 70s in general, but I think if anyone could make me appreciate the decades, it would be TJR. Maybe I’ll try this one again closer to the release date, but right now this just doesn’t feel like the book for me. But take this review with a grain of salt because it is being adapted into a series for Amazon Prime, which Reese Witherspoon is producing. Also, as of now, this has a lot of five star reviews. I’m sorry, friends. I hope you enjoy this one more when you pick it up!Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | TwitchThe quotes above were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.Content and triggers warnings in the first 20%: drug use, alcoholism, addiction, underage drinking, sex, pedophilia, loss of a loved one, and abandonment. Buddy read with Julie from Pages and Pens! ❤
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  • lucie
    January 1, 1970
    I REFUSE TO BELIEVE THIS IS A FICTION AND THESE PEOPLE DON'T EXIST.
  • Cindy Pham
    January 1, 1970
    Taylor Jenkins Reid's strength lies in her ability to write realistic characters and relationships and take you through a whole life journey. This book has all the elements that we love about Evelyn Hugo: a unique storytelling format, a life story, a notorious historical setting, an iconic main character, a tumultuous and very human relationship, etc. It's the same formula, but switched with different variables, and therefore I think how much you resonate with those variables depends on personal Taylor Jenkins Reid's strength lies in her ability to write realistic characters and relationships and take you through a whole life journey. This book has all the elements that we love about Evelyn Hugo: a unique storytelling format, a life story, a notorious historical setting, an iconic main character, a tumultuous and very human relationship, etc. It's the same formula, but switched with different variables, and therefore I think how much you resonate with those variables depends on personal taste and subjectivity. Evelyn Hugo matched what I liked, but Daisy Jones did not. I personally did not connect to this story or care for the characters, but I don't fault the author for that. I think I felt lukewarm for this book due to having spent most of my life mentally blocking out family & friends who deal with addiction and tumultuous relationships as a survival tactic, and therefore I am unable to connect to the subject matter as deeply. I commend Taylor's skill at writing realistically imperfect relationships, even though it was a miss for me and my own preferences.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Is there anyone in their 60s or older that doesn’t see the cover for this book, read the summary and doesn’t immediately think of Stevie Nicks and Fleetwood Mac? Reid does a great job capturing that sense of stardom; the sex, drugs and rock n roll. I love how this book is written, as if it is a history of an actual band, as if it’s a compilation of interviews with everyone involved. It was wild to see how different things said or done were misinterpreted or remembered differently by others. I ha Is there anyone in their 60s or older that doesn’t see the cover for this book, read the summary and doesn’t immediately think of Stevie Nicks and Fleetwood Mac? Reid does a great job capturing that sense of stardom; the sex, drugs and rock n roll. I love how this book is written, as if it is a history of an actual band, as if it’s a compilation of interviews with everyone involved. It was wild to see how different things said or done were misinterpreted or remembered differently by others. I had to keep reminding myself it wasn’t based on a real group, the characters just seemed that real. It will be fascinating to see how the mini-series, being produced by Reese Witherspoon for Amazon plays out. This is a super fast read and an engrossing one. I enjoyed The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, but I really loved this. Billy’s comment “Drinking, drugging, sleeping around, it’s all the same thing, you have this line you won’t cross. But then you cross them. And suddenly you possess the very dangerous information that you can break the rule and the world won’t instantly come to an end.” Reid really made me feel the different addiction problems that first Billy and then Daisy faced, including the fight to stay sober. It also took me back to the sexual discrimination that was just accepted back in the day. We all felt we just had to deal with it. I loved that Daisy didn’t; how she was able to ignore the “rules”. “I am not a muse.I am a somebody.End of fucking story.”And yes, I realize I’m gushing, but… when Reid is writing about how Daisy and Billy wrote their songs together, it made me think of all the great songwriting duos, like McCartney and Lennon. And the dynamics of the band brought back to mind all the stories of band breakups from my youth. Reid really captured the egos and the tensions rubbing against the desire to be famous and rich. And kudos, TJR, for actually writing complete songs and including them in the back of the book. Trust me, this is one you want to read. It’s going to be one of the most talked about books of the spring. My thanks to netgalley and Random House for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    I'm realizing now that I'm one of those folks in the minority when it comes to TJR and her most recent books. I fell in love with her contemporary romance novels years ago, but have found that I struggle with her historical fiction, which is strange because it seems these are the stories that have catapulted her into mainstream fiction! Uber Fame Level-Achieved! Here's the thing, it must be more a case of my not being as interested in and compatible with the story content, because her writing qu I'm realizing now that I'm one of those folks in the minority when it comes to TJR and her most recent books. I fell in love with her contemporary romance novels years ago, but have found that I struggle with her historical fiction, which is strange because it seems these are the stories that have catapulted her into mainstream fiction! Uber Fame Level-Achieved! Here's the thing, it must be more a case of my not being as interested in and compatible with the story content, because her writing quality is just as excellent as it's ever been. I found this one was easy for me to put down and difficult to pick back up, with other books constantly calling my name. While I felt middle of the road regarding this story, please do check out some of the many 5 star reviews here covering this book. So many of my friends have adored this novel, and it seems, for the most part, that if you enjoyed Evelyn Hugo that you'll gobble this one up as well. *Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy.
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  • Larry H
    January 1, 1970
    "I am not a muse. I am the somebody. End of fucking story."I am a gigantic music fan. I was in a band in high school and college, and sing almost everywhere. As much as I love music and lyrics, I'm equally as fascinated by those who make the music and what inspires them to write the songs they do, not to mention the stories of connection and tension and dissension among band members."This obsession was one of the myriad reasons I couldn't wait to get my hands on Taylor Jenkins Reid's newest book "I am not a muse. I am the somebody. End of fucking story."I am a gigantic music fan. I was in a band in high school and college, and sing almost everywhere. As much as I love music and lyrics, I'm equally as fascinated by those who make the music and what inspires them to write the songs they do, not to mention the stories of connection and tension and dissension among band members."This obsession was one of the myriad reasons I couldn't wait to get my hands on Taylor Jenkins Reid's newest book, Daisy Jones & The Six . Reid is the author of one of the best books I read last year, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo , and given the way she depicted the often-tumultuous personal life of a famed actress from Hollywood's heyday, I had a feeling she'd knock it out of the park with this look at the music business.She knocked it way out of the park. This book, written as an oral history of the band, reads as if you were watching an episode of VH1's "Behind the Music" crossed with the amazing movie Almost Famous .Daisy Jones & The Six was one of the legendary bands of the 1970s, turning out hit after hit, filling stadiums and arenas across the country, and captivating the world with what appeared to be the electric relationship between singer/songwriters Daisy Jones and Billy Dunne, the musician who headed The Six. But what made the band end everything in the middle of their world tour, when they had everything in the palm of their hands?Growing up in Los Angeles in the late 1960s, Daisy Jones was a free-spirited teenager who wanted to be a singer more than anything. Essentially left to raise herself, she spent her formative years in some of LA's most famous clubs and bars, sleeping with rock stars, and experimenting with every kind of drug. As she moves into her early 20s, her beauty opens doors but her voice gets her noticed. She's more than ready to be the next big thing.Brothers Billy and Graham Dunne put together a band, hoping to make a living making music. But Billy's magnetic appeal and his talent as a singer and songwriter take the group to the next level, and The Six, as they come to be called, are on their way to becoming stars. But fame and the tantalizing distractions that materialize for rock musicians, particularly in the 70s, test Billy's mettle and put the band at risk, as well as Billy's marriage to his longtime girlfriend, Camila, and their young family. If Billy is going to succeed at both music and marriage, he must battle his demons.Billy and Daisy cross paths when their mutual producer brings Daisy in to sing a duet for The Six's record. Their connection is immediate, powerful, and electrifying, and it will change everything for everyone. It is the stuff of legend."Some people will never stop being themselves. And you think it drives you crazy but it is the very thing you will think about when they are gone. When you don't have them in your life anymore."The story of Daisy Jones & The Six may not be anything new if you're a fan of the stories behind famous bands, but Taylor Jenkins Reid succeeds in making this utterly compelling from the very first sentence, and she makes you wish these musicians actually existed, so you could hear their music and watch videos of their performances, to catch a piece of the fictional legend she has made you believe in. Daisy Jones & The Six is powerful because it's a story about ambition, need, fear, longing, love, jealousy, connection, talent, and music. But at the same time, it's a story about how exhausting it is to fight your demons on a daily basis, and it is equally as exhausting to give in to your demons as well. There is raw emotion in this book, and it is so potent that at times I felt like I was right there in the middle of the stories everyone was telling.Reid is one heck of a storyteller. I had been dying to read this since I finished Evelyn Hugo at the end of last year, but no matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get access to an advance copy of this book. I worried that seeing so many people rave about this book would build it up too much for me. But I truly believe this is worthy of the hype it's getting. They're now making it into a television series for Amazon and I honestly cannot wait.You need to read Taylor Jenkins Reid's books. If you're not a music fan, pick up The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo first, and you'll see how masterfully she tells a story. But Daisy Jones & The Six is like a song you won't be able to get out of your head.See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com.Check out my list of the best books I read in 2018 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2019/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2018.html. You can follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/yrralh/.
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  • Kayla Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    Apparently I read a different book than everyone else. Or maybe my brain just thinks it's funny to make me hate hyped books idk. This didn't touch me whatsoever. I was bored and the story and some actions of the characters felt repetitive to the point that I skipped some paragraphs. Everything was so predictable and dialogues even felt pretentious sometimes. Trying to be meaningful while actually being pseudo deep (like 80% of tumblr u know?).Sure, this had some great quotes and some funny bits Apparently I read a different book than everyone else. Or maybe my brain just thinks it's funny to make me hate hyped books idk. This didn't touch me whatsoever. I was bored and the story and some actions of the characters felt repetitive to the point that I skipped some paragraphs. Everything was so predictable and dialogues even felt pretentious sometimes. Trying to be meaningful while actually being pseudo deep (like 80% of tumblr u know?).Sure, this had some great quotes and some funny bits in it.. but that's all. I'm disappointed..
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    4 stars! Taylor Jenkins Reid always writes the most unique and brilliant stories. Daisy Jones & The Six is a book unlike any I’ve read before. This story follows many characters, but is primarily about Daisy Jones and Billy Dunne, the two lead singers and songwriters of the band. The band came together in the 70’s and that is the decade the story takes place. You get the perspectives of many characters, but thankfully, it was easy to follow. This story felt like it was real, in fact, I quest 4 stars! Taylor Jenkins Reid always writes the most unique and brilliant stories. Daisy Jones & The Six is a book unlike any I’ve read before. This story follows many characters, but is primarily about Daisy Jones and Billy Dunne, the two lead singers and songwriters of the band. The band came together in the 70’s and that is the decade the story takes place. You get the perspectives of many characters, but thankfully, it was easy to follow. This story felt like it was real, in fact, I questioned several times if this was a real band/story. This one captured me from the start and held my attention all the way through. I felt conflicted about a lot of things, but the ending… the last few lines… they gave me goosebumps. I listened to the audio book of Daisy Jones & The Six and I can’t recommend the audio format enough. There was an array of narrators voicing the characters and they did a magnificent job. The book was written in an interview style, and I honestly don’t think I would have enjoyed reading the ebook/paperback near as much. I’m so glad I did the audio. If you love rock star books, stories that are real, raw, and a bit angsty, be sure to grab this. And do yourself a favor and do the audio if you can. It’s wonderful! “We love broken, beautiful people. And it doesn’t get much more obviously broken and more classically beautiful than Daisy Jones.”
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    With a touch of the tribulations of Fleetwood Mac, Reid offers a very different novel from The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo. It is equally as enjoyable. From the onset we know that the band breaks up. The reasons for the break-up are told by the band mates via a series of question-less interviews. This is smart choice rather a question/answer structure which would, I think, become tedious. From 1965 through 2012, the characters tell the story of the formation of the band, their struggle to achi With a touch of the tribulations of Fleetwood Mac, Reid offers a very different novel from The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo. It is equally as enjoyable. From the onset we know that the band breaks up. The reasons for the break-up are told by the band mates via a series of question-less interviews. This is smart choice rather a question/answer structure which would, I think, become tedious. From 1965 through 2012, the characters tell the story of the formation of the band, their struggle to achieve rock star status, the band’s eventual demise and its aftermath. Resonating with authenticity and conflicting memories (it is sex, drugs and rock-n-roll), we witness talented, addicted artists create and destroy; clash and, perhaps, tenuously reconcile. Once again, I was struck by Reid’s ability to capture the complexities of human interactions set against a backdrop of fame. This is, most assuredly, a best seller for 2019.
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  • Lucy Langford
    January 1, 1970
    4**** He sad, "I'm going to use that in something one day." And he wrote it down on a napkin and put it in his back pocket. I thought to myself, "What the hell makes you think I'm not going to use it in something once day?" But, of course, there it was in his next movie. That's how it was back then. I was just supposed to be the inspiration for some man's great idea.So as 2018 closes, Daisy Jones and The Six was my last book of the year. Daisy Jones and The Six details the rise and sudden fall o 4**** He sad, "I'm going to use that in something one day." And he wrote it down on a napkin and put it in his back pocket. I thought to myself, "What the hell makes you think I'm not going to use it in something once day?" But, of course, there it was in his next movie. That's how it was back then. I was just supposed to be the inspiration for some man's great idea.So as 2018 closes, Daisy Jones and The Six was my last book of the year. Daisy Jones and The Six details the rise and sudden fall of the rock band in the 70's, with a brief cut through to the present decade. This whole book is written as an interview transcript of the band (and those associated with it) in the present day, detailing the past of the flawed but iconic Daisy Jones and the prominent members of The Six (mainly the heart throb, Billy Dunne, lead singer), to how the two came together, the rather rough conflicts within the band hidden from public eye, to the sudden fall and disbandment of the band. The story particularly focused on the selfishness, self-absorbent and love/hate relationship of the two lead singers: Daisy and Billy, and what this was like to witness from other band members, who were also all complex and had their own issues to overcome.This a story including the rise of fame under the Californian heat; sex, drugs, bad decisions and rock and roll. Taylor Jenkins Reid (TJR) does an absolutely brilliant job at creating an utterly believable and engaging transcript of the rise of fame as a 70's rock band. Several times I believed Daisy Jones and The Six were a real band and needed to remind myself that this was fictional. The writing was utterly compelling, persuasive and inventive and I found myself lost and entranced in the life of those of The Six. Daisy was an utterly compelling and alluring character; beautiful, talented and creative, despite having her many flaws and annoyance of the character. Here is a girl who is given the lavish lifestyle, but desperately wants to make her own name, fame and earn rewards for herself, without always considering the perspectives or the effects these decisions have on other people. She is also a very no-nonsense woman and has had enough of living in a mans world, so takes the decisions in her life in her own stride.... She is also very reliant on drugs. Even though Daisy was the main focal point and female character in this book, in general the female characters in this book were utterly captivating for me and were all unique in their own individual way. TJR does an excellent job at writing and displaying the different decisions and paths in life that all the women in this book undertake... and she rightly shows how it is OK for women to follow different paths and decisions in life from other women, and how at times during their lives, mistakes will happen. Despite maybe not appearing straight on the surface, TJR writes subtly how this "sisterhood" of support is available despite some decisions being bad or different, despite not aligning to ones own decisions in life, it shows how women should support other women’s decisions. This can be demonstrated through Simone's love and devotion of Daisy as a best friend, or Karen's (Keyboardist, The Six) decision to depart from "traditionalist" female roles.The band echoed that of Fleetwood Mac and I imagine Daisy’s voice similar to Stevie Nicks or Patti Smith (two female lead singer's I absolutely LOVE), a voice that is so compelling you can't help but listen to and be awed by. TJR shows a real cleverness by writing this as an oral biography as the band was truly believable and their story sucks you in. As a side note: the songs that the band sing mentioned in this book are written at the end of the book. All the lyrics are available for the reader to devour. It is my belief that TJR could be a song-writer or poet after reading these lyrics for a fictional band!!An additional side note: there is a Daisy Jones and The Six playlist on Spotify which TJR created as they helped her for her ideas of Daisy Jones and The Six.I did not receive this book from a publisher, I actually found this copy at a charity book shop without realising until after I bought the book that this was a proof copy.
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  • Christina - Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    4.5, Reid you've done it again, welcome to my auto-purchase shelf stars!!!Full review featured on my blog Recipe & a Read!Taylor Jenkins Reid has found her niche and let me just say, GAH DAYUM girl can you get it freakin’ done. Having read and absolutely adored The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo last year I couldn’t get my hands on Reid’s next historical fiction novel soon enough. I tried to get an ARC of it, but alas the book gods did not bless me. However, that’s not to say I’m too disappoi 4.5, Reid you've done it again, welcome to my auto-purchase shelf stars!!!Full review featured on my blog Recipe & a Read!Taylor Jenkins Reid has found her niche and let me just say, GAH DAYUM girl can you get it freakin’ done. Having read and absolutely adored The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo last year I couldn’t get my hands on Reid’s next historical fiction novel soon enough. I tried to get an ARC of it, but alas the book gods did not bless me. However, that’s not to say I’m too disappointed about it though because now this beauty gets a front row seat on my book shelf. While I’m not quite as enthusiastic with Daisy Jones as I was with Evelyn Hugo, I absolutely adored this book.I remember seeing Daisy on the dance floor one night at the Whiskey. Everybody saw her. Your eye went right to her. If the rest of the world was silver, Daisy was gold.Daisy Jones isn’t just beautiful, she’s stunning. She’s not just stunning either, she’s also broken and lost. If Daisy Jones is in the room, the whole room knows it, their eyes travel to her and they can’t move away. There’s something about her that doesn’t just light up a room, it sucks all the air out of it so your forced to notice her. Growing up with distant parents who hardly notice whether or not she’s home, or doing drugs out on the strip, she might be born to privilege but she’s raised by rock ‘n roll.Billy Dunne and his brother Graham have musical talent, great lyrics and the right stage presence to make people take notice. They form a band called The Six, and with a dictatorship like control Billy’s hard work and talented band members shoot to mediocre, middle of the charts fame. This affords them money and some notoriety. As Billy gets lost in the “sex, drugs and rock ‘n roll” lifestyle of the last 60s and early 70s he loses not just himself but he misses out on some of his life’s most important moments. Choosing instead drugs over family.I had absolutely no interest in being somebody else’s muse. I am not a muse. I am the somebody. End of fucking story. As Daisy and Billy’s stories collapse upon one another, rock ‘n roll history is made when Daisy Jones joins The Six. What follows is the story of their sky rocket to fame and their ultimate demise. A story about love and loss, the struggles of fame and fortune and about finding out not only who you are, but who you truly want to be. What ever happened to Daisy Jones & The Six? Why did they cancel the second leg of their tour right after they released their number one record that had screaming fans selling out every stop?I used to think soul mates were two of the same… I don’t believe in soul mates anymore and I’m not looking for anything. But if I did believe in them, I’d believe your soul mate was somebody who had all the things you didn’t, that needed all the things you had. Not somebody who’s suffering from the same stuff you are.This was a little slower for me to get into. At first, I thought it was my book slump that had me not really connecting with the characters but after finishing it, I don’t think that’s the case. Because everything is told in an interview format, first hand from each of the characters the development isn’t quite as strong as I wanted it to be. There was a depth lacking to each of the characters because it was a retelling of events, instead of truly understanding the characters various mindsets we’re given their memories. It was a really interesting take and I think make the story very realistic, it very much felt like Daisy Jones & The Six were a real band.What I absolutely adore about Reid’s writing and story telling, is that every time I’m reading one of her books and I get to the end, I realize I’ve learned some lessons I didn’t even know I needed. I’ve been given advice I didn’t know I was asking for and I’ve learned a new perspective that I didn’t even realize was being given to me as I was reading. Reid’s stories are obviously female forward, there’s a lot of female empowerment in both Evelyn Hugo and Daisy Jones but it isn’t heavy handed and it isn’t just the ladies who are dealing out life lessons in spades. Each character is learning about themselves, learning how to be authentic to who they are and we, as the reader learn along with them.Daisy Jones & The Six doesn’t hand out thrills or twists – it’s giving you the story of a band, their members histories, their rise to fame and their downfall. Reid shows in this book that you don’t have to have cheap thrills, jump scares or twists to really deliver a poignant and compelling story. I wasn’t sure what I was going to think at the halfway mark, I felt unsure of how I was going to feel. I know I’m always saying “compare and despair” but it was nearly impossible for me not to draw lines between Evelyn Hugo and Daisy Jones. However, when I got to the end and I’m sitting alone in tears wondering how Reid has gone and done it again I realized that while these are both stories about strong women overcoming adversity, being unapologetic for being themselves that these stories are both beautiful and unique in their own ways.Music can dig, you know? It can take a shovel to your chest and just start digging until it hits something. While I didn’t feel quite as connected to these characters as I have in other reads and I wish they’d been a tad bit more developed I absolutely adored this book. It was incredibly crafted and Reid consistently blows me out of the water with her writing. There’s an endless number of quotable lines that make me feel strong and inspired. I felt invested in Daisy Jones & The Six, in their story, their triumphs and their failures and I’m incredibly happy to have read this book. Reid is an auto-purchase for me now and I can’t wait to see what she does next.
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  • Sara (sarawithoutanH)
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this so much I read it twice.
  • Riley
    January 1, 1970
    This had a really rough start and I almost dnfed it but oh man am I glad I stuck it out. Before I knew it Daisy and Billy were imprinted on my heart and I was so invested in this story.
  • Ashley Nuckles
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely LOVED this book & I have to admit I was one of those people who immediately went to Spotify to listen to the music only to remember THIS ISNT A REAL BAND. My heart was crushed but I still loved it anyway ;)
  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This is one for music fans everywhere from Taylor Jenkins Reid, a multilayered fictional documentary of a fictional legendary rock band set in the music scene of California and LA in the 1960s and 1970s. This is to be turned into a TV series on Amazon by Reece Witherspoon, and I must add that though the accounts given in the narrative are pure fiction, it nevertheless feels atmospherically real in its echoes of actual bands from this era, say perhaps the likes of Fleetwood Mac. Billy Dunne is th This is one for music fans everywhere from Taylor Jenkins Reid, a multilayered fictional documentary of a fictional legendary rock band set in the music scene of California and LA in the 1960s and 1970s. This is to be turned into a TV series on Amazon by Reece Witherspoon, and I must add that though the accounts given in the narrative are pure fiction, it nevertheless feels atmospherically real in its echoes of actual bands from this era, say perhaps the likes of Fleetwood Mac. Billy Dunne is the leading light of an up and coming band The Six, going off the rails with his wild behaviour when he learns that his girlfriend is pregnant. The young, beautiful, captivating and unapologetic Daisy Jones has oodles of musical talent and a distinctive voice which gains an army of admirers. Daisy Jones and The Six join forces that results in an explosive emotional roller coaster of a ride that consolidates their near mythical musical status in musical history. The rise and fall of the band is voiced through the differing perspectives of the band and those close to and around them.Much of the narrative is delivered through the form of interviews and it becomes clear that not everyone has the same memories of events with their different perspectives. I came to appreciate the superb complicated characterisation and the relationships, with the flawed, destructive and damaged characters, so very vulnerable, feeling spine tingling real in their authenticity. Reid provides insights and observations of love, loss, cheating, drug addiction, heartbreak, passion and fraught times intermingle with the creative musical inspiration and spellbinding performances. This is an intelligent evocation of this specific period in time and place, the music and an unforgettable rock group of its time. It is an absolute treat to read, I loved the songs and lyrics within it and I have no doubt that this book will prove to be highly successful. Looking forward to the TV series of this. Many thanks to Random House Cornerstone for an ARC.
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  • Gabby
    January 1, 1970
    I just reread this book. I read the physical version of this book the first time and I really didn't enjoy it, but I just finished the audiobook and I enjoyed the audiobook so much more than the physical verison. When I first read this book, I didn't know what I was getting myself into, I just thought it was going to be an epic badass story about Daisy Jones, very similar to Evelyn Hugo. It is kind of that, but it's also not and I think I just went in with false expectations the first time. I ha I just reread this book. I read the physical version of this book the first time and I really didn't enjoy it, but I just finished the audiobook and I enjoyed the audiobook so much more than the physical verison. When I first read this book, I didn't know what I was getting myself into, I just thought it was going to be an epic badass story about Daisy Jones, very similar to Evelyn Hugo. It is kind of that, but it's also not and I think I just went in with false expectations the first time. I hated the interview style format when I read the physical book, but with the audiobook it was actually kind of neat. There were so many voice actors on the audiobook it truly felt like watching a movie, which was really cool. I connected a lot more to the characters this time around and I found myself in tears at the end. Daisy Jones is such a fierce, independent amazing female character, but she definitely has her flaws. And this book isn't really about Daisy Jones as much as it is about the band and their history. I really loved reading about Billy and Camilla. Listening to the audiobook made me feel more emotionally attached to the characters. I loved Daisy and Billy and the way they both hace such big egos that their music tastes clash. I loved the story of them writing the only album together that the band ever put out. I am fascinated by 70's bands and this story definitely felt very reminiscent of the 70's and that era.The only reason I still gave this book 4/5 instead of 5 is because I don't think I absolutely loved it the way a lot of other people do, and it took me a long time to get invested again, but once I got used to the style of writing, I was hooked. I felt so sad when the story ended. I don't think this is Taylor Jenkins Reid's best novel, but now I can understand why people love it so much and I definitely think if the physical version of this book bored you to death (as it did for me) I highly recommend the audiobook instead.ORIGINAL REVIEW:It absolutely kills me that I didn't enjoy this. Taylor Jenkins Reid is one of my all time favorite authors and this was my most anticipated book of the year, but unfortunately it just wasn't for me. I wasn't aware going into this book that the writing is told entirely through interviews.... I absolutely hated this writing style/format. I feel like this book would be so much better if it was told from Daisy's POV.. I hate that every single page of this story is told in interview clips talking about the past. It made me feel so disconnected from the characters and the story. And I felt like Daisy Jones wasn't even the main character, it read more like Billy and Camilla were the main characters and I couldn't care less about any of them...?I am just so sad because I thought I would love this. This book had some good moments, and I loved all the really feminist quotes like: "Men think they deserve a sticker for treating a woman like a person." but I was not interested in the actual story at all and it was extremely boring. I know this is being made into a limited series on Amazon and I do think this story will make for a good tv show, but the writing style is what made this so boring and disappointing to me. Huge thanks to kristinnsbooks for sending me an ARC!
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