Changeling (The Oddmire #1)
Magic is fading from the Wild Wood. To renew it, goblins must perform an ancient ritual involving the rarest of their kind—a newborn changeling. But when the fateful night arrives to trade a human baby for a goblin one, something goes terribly wrong. After laying the changeling in a human infant’s crib, the goblin Kull is briefly distracted from his task. By the time he turns back, the changeling has already perfectly mimicked the human child. Too perfectly: Kull cannot tell them apart. Not knowing which to bring back, he leaves both babies behind.Tinn and Cole are raised as human twins, neither knowing what secrets may be buried deep inside one of them. Then when they are twelve years old, a mysterious message arrives, calling the brothers to be heroes and protectors of magic. The boys must leave behind their sleepy town of Endsborough and risk their lives in the Wild Wood, crossing the perilous Oddmire swamp and journeying through the Deep Dark to reach the goblin horde and discover who they truly are.

Changeling (The Oddmire #1) Details

TitleChangeling (The Oddmire #1)
Author
ReleaseJul 16th, 2019
PublisherAlgonquin Young Readers
ISBN-139781616208394
Rating
GenreFantasy, Childrens, Middle Grade, Magic

Changeling (The Oddmire #1) Review

  • C.G. Drews
    January 1, 1970
    I have such a weakness for faerie books and dark forests and just look at this. It's here to give us both. And it's written FOR THE CHILDREN. I absolutely cannot wait till my nephew is old enough for this one because it was so good! It managed to curl a sinister darkness into the most heartfelt and wholesome story of unconditional family love. I didn't think it was *too* dark, but definitely had enough of a creepy vibe to snag those younger readers' attentions who say they loooove to be scared. I have such a weakness for faerie books and dark forests and just look at this. It's here to give us both. And it's written FOR THE CHILDREN. I absolutely cannot wait till my nephew is old enough for this one because it was so good! It managed to curl a sinister darkness into the most heartfelt and wholesome story of unconditional family love. I didn't think it was *too* dark, but definitely had enough of a creepy vibe to snag those younger readers' attentions who say they loooove to be scared. (So I wouldn't recommend for the very soft, smol children.)And the themes were just heartmeltingly lovely! My favourite thing was how Tinn and Cole's mother knew one of them was a goblin, but she 100% loved and fought for them both. It was such a loving hug to kids who might not have a traditional family, or be adopted, or not feel like they quite match their families -- that they deserve to be always always loved. Also the amount of FIERCE MAMA BEARS (quite literally in some cases) was incredible.Plus Cole and Tinn were ridiculously adorable little monsters, getting into mischief while being super sweet. The plot is a bit of a romp through a creepy wood, and the pacing was A+. I believe the book goes down in just a day and tbh I don't think the boys got enough snacks to get them through, but ya know. More marmelade pies all round.I so enjoyed this adventure of dark forests, goblins, ferociously loving mothers, and boys who will quite steadfastly tumble in and out of trouble on every page.
    more
  • Melanie (TBR and Beyond)
    January 1, 1970
    “That morning she had wanted nothing more than a cup of tea, and now there were real goblins and sinister swamps and strange women who turned into bears – and her boys were gone.” Changelings, goblins, creatures, fae? That pretty much checks off everything that will sell a book instantly to me, so I was thrilled to get my hands on a copy of this ARC.I was interested pretty early on in The Changeling because it was by Young Adult author William Ritter. You may recognize the name, he wrote the “That morning she had wanted nothing more than a cup of tea, and now there were real goblins and sinister swamps and strange women who turned into bears – and her boys were gone.” Changelings, goblins, creatures, fae? That pretty much checks off everything that will sell a book instantly to me, so I was thrilled to get my hands on a copy of this ARC.I was interested pretty early on in The Changeling because it was by Young Adult author William Ritter. You may recognize the name, he wrote the wonderful Jackaby series, so I had high hopes he could write a fantastical middle grade novel as well. Though, where Jackaby was Historical Fiction and Supernatural, here the author dives fully into the fantasy realm and I couldn’t be happier about it.We start off with a little sneaky goblin trying to save his kind by switching a changeling baby with a human baby (it’s a long story), but he completely bumbles it up and the the babies instantly look a like and he can’t tell them apart for the life of him, so he just bolts and leaves without the human child – much to the mother’s surprise. The mother keeps both babies, despite her husband seemingly leaving her over it and the towns people constantly whispering about her having a changeling baby. The two boys, Tinn and Cole are fairly different. One is more impulsive and adventurous and one is more cautious and anxious. Despite their differences they are fiercely loyal to one and other and always with the other. They are best friends and it’s so nice to see their relationship. They are aware of the stories about them, but they have no idea which one of them is the changeling.Eventually the goblin, Kull comes back for the Changeling and a hot mess of adventure ensues of course. The adventure is so much fun. There is a lot of banter and siblings working together. We also have a young girl that is in the Oddmire that joins them i nthe adventure and she is quite the oddball character and I loved her to pieces. We get quick sand, danger man eating vines, goblins and throw in a legendary witch, of course, for good measure and you’ve for the first in this series.My favorite part of this story is the author includes the mother (or mothers, I won’t go into that though). No, they aren’t dead and they aren’t horrible hags. They are amazing, fierce, single mothers that love their children and will fight to the ends of the earth to protect them. THANK YOU! I’m always wondering where the damn parents are, well this book show us. They are completely involved, searching – fighting – helping their children and it was so refreshing to see. I just loved it so much.I would highly recommend this book and especially to families with children. It’s such a healthy message showing the mothers as strong, independent and intelligent women. It makes my heart so happy and I wish more books would show single mothers in this light. Way to go William Ritter, you did good!
    more
  • rachel
    January 1, 1970
    i would sell what remains of my soul for this
  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    William Ritter doing more magical characters??? In middle grade??? Hello, 2019, you have been made. Now if only Jackaby and a Yeti hat would pop in and life would forever be complete.
  • Toya
    January 1, 1970
    There’s something about Changelings that always piques my interest. The idea of goblins swapping human infants for these creepy little terrors than can wreak havoc upon the parents, and sometimes leave them for dead, is utterly chilling.When I first read the synopsis of Changeling: The Oddmire #1, I was immediately drawn to the idea of changelings in a middle grade setting (I just want to clarify, don’t understand middle grade horror because it is still equaling as chilling). However, this is no There’s something about Changelings that always piques my interest. The idea of goblins swapping human infants for these creepy little terrors than can wreak havoc upon the parents, and sometimes leave them for dead, is utterly chilling.When I first read the synopsis of Changeling: The Oddmire #1, I was immediately drawn to the idea of changelings in a middle grade setting (I just want to clarify, don’t understand middle grade horror because it is still equaling as chilling). However, this is not your ordinary changeling story. When Kull attempts is in the process of swapping infants, he is interrupted when Annie (the mother) hears his racket and immediately goes to the nursery when her newborn son is fastly asleep. To her surprise, Annie is no longer a mother of one healthy boy. She is now a mother to identical twin boys.As Tinn and Cole grow older, the townsfolk tend to keep their distance since they know that one of the boys is in fact a changeling. The problem is that even the boys are unaware as to which one of them isn’t entirely human. One day, they receive a mysterious letter that claims that the changeling is to return to Wild Wood or face a most certain death, but the changeling is to go into the woods alone since it is a guaranteed death sentence for a human. Since the boys don’t know which one is the changeling and refuse to leave each other behind, they venture off into the dangerous Wild Wood where they encounter unlikely friends and plenty of foes.One of my favorite things about this book was how strong the sibling bond between Tinn and Cole was. Even though both boys were aware that one was entirely human, that never affected how much they loved each other. Each of the brothers secretly wished that he was the goblin instead of the other to save his brother from despair. Additionally, I also enjoyed the bond between the boys and their mother Annie, whom they loved unconditionally and vice versa. Even though Annie only gave birth to one son, she made it clear when she ran off in to Wild Wood to find her boys that both sons were in fact hers.Overall, this is a great story packed with adventure, magical beings, mystery, and most of all, love.Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers, Edelweiss, and NetGalley for the eARC. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Evangeline
    January 1, 1970
    On a scale from one to pomegranate? This book is definitely pomegranate. The Jackaby series holds such a special place in my heart that when I heard Ritter was writing a new series set in the same world, I was ecstatic. I really need to reread The Map now so I can catch all the references to the goblins, but the little things connecting it to the world of Jackaby were one of my favorite parts of the book. That being said though, this book stands on its own. Ritter paints a vividly magical pictur On a scale from one to pomegranate? This book is definitely pomegranate. The Jackaby series holds such a special place in my heart that when I heard Ritter was writing a new series set in the same world, I was ecstatic. I really need to reread The Map now so I can catch all the references to the goblins, but the little things connecting it to the world of Jackaby were one of my favorite parts of the book. That being said though, this book stands on its own. Ritter paints a vividly magical picture as we follow Tinn and Cole on their adventures through the Wild Wood and the Oddmire.The characters were all very well developed, I immediately fell in love with them. Tinn and Cole's brotherly relationship was so heartwarming and pure, I wanted to hug them both. Ritter is also so good at writing strong female characters, and in this case there were not one but two amazing mothers prominently in the story and that's just not something you see a lot of nowadays. The humor was great, witty, sarcastic, it's always one of my favorite things in Ritter's books.Overall my only complaint is that the beginning was a bit slow, but that's to be expected with a first book in a series. The set up for the other books in this series is fascinating and I'm already coming up with theories. Basically, read William Ritter's books. You won't regret it.
    more
  • Stormi (BMReviewsohmy)
    January 1, 1970
    Changeling is a fantasy story about twins who have been growing up knowing that one of them might be a goblin. It's about family and the things you would do for your family.Cole and Tinn are twins but not just ordinary twins, one is a changeling, but since they look so much alike nobody knows which one. Annie remembers quite well that she only gave birth to one boy, but now she has two. It happened when the little goblin who was trying to steal her baby gets interrupted and by then the changelin Changeling is a fantasy story about twins who have been growing up knowing that one of them might be a goblin. It's about family and the things you would do for your family.Cole and Tinn are twins but not just ordinary twins, one is a changeling, but since they look so much alike nobody knows which one. Annie remembers quite well that she only gave birth to one boy, but now she has two. It happened when the little goblin who was trying to steal her baby gets interrupted and by then the changeling has already changed and he can't remember which one is which and has to leave them there.Now the boys are almost thirteen and Kull needs his changeling as the magic is disappearing in the wild woods. There is also something in the deep dark that is waiting for them as well. Kull leaves them a message to come to the woods so he can get his changeling or all the goblins will die including the changeling. Cole and Tinn decide to go because they are curious and want to know but at the same time they don't. While they are on their way following the map they hear a cry and find a bear cub in the Oddmire (a very nasty lake) and decide to help it out, then they are almost attacked by the mama bear and so they run. This vears them off the trail and of course they lose the map. They meet up with a young girl in the woods who says she knows the way over the Oddmire and shenanigans ensue as they try to figure out how to find Kull. Meanwhile, Annie wakes up to find her boys gone and finds out they have gone to the Wild Woods and starts after them because she finds the note with a map. She ends up finding Kull but not her kids and has to work with him to find them. I really liked the characters in this story. Cole and Tinn are brothers who knows one is different but that has never stopped them from being best friends. They do everything together and the reason it was so hard to tell which is which is because they both get up to no good and when one is hurt the other one gets hurt in the same spot. So poor Kull could never figure it out was he watched them grow. Annie is fiercely protective of both her boys and doesn't care that one might be a goblin, she raised them so they are hers. Even the mama bear and her cub which I won't say any more about show a great family dynamic. Speaking of families I think that is one of the reasons I enjoyed this so much as it shows that you don't have to be blood to be family. Annie knows one of those boys is not really hers in the sense that it's a goblin, but she raised them and to her both are her boys. She couldn't unlove one because he ends up being something else. The protectiveness she has towards her family was great and the same goes for the mama bear ( who not only is protecting her family but the forest) and cub.It was a little slow at the beginning but it has some backstory to build up to the fun adventure side of it but overall I thought it was a fun Middle Grade book that I am sure any young reader would love to read.
    more
  • Alyson Stone
    January 1, 1970
    Book: The Oddmire: Changeling Author: William RitterRating: 3 Out of 5 StarsI would like to thank the publisher, Algonquin Young Readers, for providing me with this ARC. So, William Ritter is a new one for me. This is a middle grade fantasy book. I love how traditional it is in terms of magic: fae, goblins, a mistake, and witches. I also love how most of this takes place in the woods, which always adds an excellent touch to fantasy in my book. I loved the lore and the wonder that William packed Book: The Oddmire: Changeling Author: William RitterRating: 3 Out of 5 StarsI would like to thank the publisher, Algonquin Young Readers, for providing me with this ARC. So, William Ritter is a new one for me. This is a middle grade fantasy book. I love how traditional it is in terms of magic: fae, goblins, a mistake, and witches. I also love how most of this takes place in the woods, which always adds an excellent touch to fantasy in my book. I loved the lore and the wonder that William packed into this. I kind of reminded me a lot of the Spiderwick Chronicles and Fablehaven, which are excellent middle grade series that I highly recommend. If you have read those two series, then you know what I’m talking about. It has that in this world touch with a bit of escape into another there. These are the kind of books that will allow kids to leave wondering if there are other worlds out and will get them to pick up another fantasy book. The characters were well down. The Thing is the prefect middle grade villain. He’s not too scary, but for middle school, you will find yourself hanging on to find out what he is going to do next. I loved the relationship between the two bothers and how each of them thought that they were the changeling. Tinn and Cole have been through a lot together and will probably have a lot more adventures to come. I also loved how the devotion was there from their mother and how she would do anything for her sons. So, why only three stars? I have read a lot of other middle grade-I teach it. This book did not have the punch that other middle grade books had have for me. Like with young adult, middle grade is getting to be more and more complex. Younger middle grade would really enjoy this, but I can honestly see my seventh and eighth graders kind of bored with it. I guess what I’m getting out whenever I compare this to other middle grade books, this one doesn’t have the same quality. This reads more like a children’s book than middle grade. Another thing I struggled with was the fact that it jumped around from the different point of views too quickly. Again, as an older reader, this would be fine, but my struggling readers would have a very hard time with this. I just wish that the translations from point of view to point of view were more clearly marked. Did I enjoy this book? Yes! Will I read the rest of the series? Probably, after all, this is the first book and we all know that series get better as they go on. So, I guess, if you have child interested in Fablehaven and Spiderwick Chronicles, then pick this up for them. This book comes out July 16, 2019.
    more
  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful start to a new fantasy series. The characters are well-developed, and hence quirky and easy to like and root for them - or dislike them. I liked the writing style. Loved the banter between the characters. Strong young characters, both Tinn and Cole are wonderful boys and their inner struggle, who the changeling might be, is described very well. Then there are the strong mothers, Goblin's with foul mouths and a sense of humour, lots of other fairy creatures,... I truly liked this very m Wonderful start to a new fantasy series. The characters are well-developed, and hence quirky and easy to like and root for them - or dislike them. I liked the writing style. Loved the banter between the characters. Strong young characters, both Tinn and Cole are wonderful boys and their inner struggle, who the changeling might be, is described very well. Then there are the strong mothers, Goblin's with foul mouths and a sense of humour, lots of other fairy creatures,... I truly liked this very much and am not only looking forward to a sequel (which will probably take longer than I like), but am also looking forward to the German translation, so that I can give the book to friends and family members.
    more
  • Amanda (MetalPhantasmReads)
    January 1, 1970
    **I downloaded an arc on Edelweiss for free but will also be on the blog tour for this book in July. All thoughts are my own and the proper review will be out in July**This was really cute and sweet with great themes of family and identity with a nice, tiny Jackaby reference! My review is now up on the blog :)https://metalphantasmreads.wordpress....
    more
  • Amber Brown
    January 1, 1970
    First one-day read in a long time. Who knew how much I needed kickass moms in my books? Because these women are champions. #moremomsinmiddlegrade
  • Lottie Oliver
    January 1, 1970
    Welcome to the Blog Tour for William Ritter!When I hear that William Ritter was writing a middle grade book I didn't quite understand how it would work. As silly as it sounds, I'm still not quite sure how it works... But it does.I don't know where this is going to go in the long run but I am there. I am going to be reading this series where ever it takes me.Let's start with the synopsis: Magic is fading from the Wild Wood. To renew it, goblins must perform an ancient ritual involving the rarest 
Welcome to the Blog Tour for William Ritter!
When I hear that William Ritter was writing a middle grade book I didn't quite understand how it would work. As silly as it sounds, I'm still not quite sure how it works... But it does.
I don't know where this is going to go in the long run but I am there. I am going to be reading this series where ever it takes me.
Let's start with the synopsis: 
Magic is fading from the Wild Wood. To renew it, goblins must perform an ancient ritual involving the rarest of their kind—a newborn changeling. But when the fateful night arrives to trade a human baby for a goblin one, something goes terribly wrong. After laying the changeling in a human infant’s crib, the goblin Kull is briefly distracted from his task. By the time he turns back, the changeling has already perfectly mimicked the human child. Too perfectly: Kull cannot tell them apart. Not knowing which to bring back, he leaves both babies behind.
Tinn and Cole are raised as human twins, neither knowing what secrets may be buried deep inside one of them. Then when they are twelve years old, a mysterious message arrives, calling the brothers to be heroes and protectors of magic. The boys must leave behind their sleepy town of Endsborough and risk their lives in the Wild Wood, crossing the perilous Oddmire swamp and journeying through the Deep Dark to reach the goblin horde and discover who they truly are. 
Let's start with the cons as that's a small list, literally like one. It's dark... I know William Ritter writes dark YA, Young Adult, but I didn't think that this would be so dark as its a middle grade. When I was growing up the darkest children's book/series was the Goosebumps.
As a child these were chilling. The storylines were simple enough and sometimes that's all it needs. A simple idea to get stuck in the child's mind. Oddmire was not chilling. It was dark, as in the way that some things are described. There is the talk of the Twins crawling over the bones of the victims of The Thing. You also have the way that The Thing talks to one of the twins.
Other than this... That is it. That is my list of cons. I think that the book is aimed at the older of the middle grade group, even to the age of the younger Young Adult. It is almost as if William Ritter is getting children ready for the world of YA before they even know it.
What can I say. This is a breath of fresh air as well as the vines that cause you to hold your breath. The characters, though are young, are very relatable as we have all been children. We all know the games that we played where your imagination would go beyond the believable. This is what reading is about.
Reading is finding your childhood again. It's exploring that unknown part of the forest that no-one steps foot in or climbing to the tip of the mountain. And that is what is so easy about this book. There is the sense of unknown throughout the whole story as you don't know which twin is the changeling, they both think they are, but all the way through right to the end, the only one who knows which twin the changeling is, is William Ritter.
I love the innocents of the language, the feelings. It's simple. After all things are simple to a child. Don't get me wrong, this book is not simple once you peel back the thorns, theoretically speaking.
For older readers that may be reading this, for them self or even to or with their child. Things will feel rather familiar. Through most of the first few chapters I kept getting the feeling that at some point Gandalf was going to come riding through the village on his cart, ready to sweep the twins off onto an adventure with the hobbits.
The way that the village is described reminds me of the shire and the Hobbits that live there. The people that live in Endsborough almost follow the same mentality as the Hobbits, keeping to themselves and not worrying about the world around them.
I just think that this has given the Middle Grade the boost it needed. This is a book I would be more that thrilled to recommend, and may already have. If your child wants some old folk tales without the Grimm's view, this is a brilliant alternative to get them started in the fantasy genre. A series to keep an eye on.
I would like to thank Algonquin Young Readers for providing me with a digital copy of this book through NetGalley. This was a brilliant eye opener.
A book that is innocent as well as dark. As wise as it is thrilling. Middle Grade just got a whole lot more interesting. 
As far as star ratings go... no doubt. 5 stars.


    more
  • Melissa Chung
    January 1, 1970
    I want to thank NetGalley and Brittani at Algonquin for sending me this eARC for an honest review.When I was contacted about reading William Ritter's, (one of my fave YA authors), new book series, I got super excited. When I was asked if I would like to join the book tour, I jumped at the chance.Willam Ritter is the author of the Jackaby series, a paranormal detective with his assistant Abigail Rook. So think of Sherlock, but for the supernatural.This book, Changeling or The Oddmire series is a I want to thank NetGalley and Brittani at Algonquin for sending me this eARC for an honest review.When I was contacted about reading William Ritter's, (one of my fave YA authors), new book series, I got super excited. When I was asked if I would like to join the book tour, I jumped at the chance.Willam Ritter is the author of the Jackaby series, a paranormal detective with his assistant Abigail Rook. So think of Sherlock, but for the supernatural.This book, Changeling or The Oddmire series is a middle grade series, about a goblin named Kull who really just wants to save the Wild Wood and the Goblin Horde. The Wild Wood is losing it's magic and it's inhabitants are leaving. The Witch of the Wood can only do so much and a dark power called the Thing, is eating everything in it's path. Against Chief Nudd the king of the Goblins, Kull whisks the new changeling to the human side in order to steal a human baby. However thirty seconds in the house Kull goofs and has to abandon both babies. Now there are two boys in the crib when the mom Annie goes to check on her son.Thirteen years later the town is used to both boys. The mom loves them both equally and Cole and Tinn are both as mischievous as any boy or goblin could be. No one, not even Annie can tell which is which. The time has come however for Kull to make right what he started thirteen years ago while the veil of both worlds are at its thinnest. He leaves a note for the boys to find with a map showing where they should meet him. If they do not the changeling will die and so will the magic of the woods.I found the boys love for each other sooo sweet. I loved the creatures that the boys encountered on their journey: Candlebeard and Fable. I thought the Thing was nice and creepy and the fact that both moms in the story even though they were at odds, decided to join forces for the greater good.I read this story out loud to both my boys and they found it funny and entertaining. We played a game on who they thought would end up being the real goblin child. There were a few times I did get choked up with emotions when Annie was talking about her boys. That is true mother devotion right there. Risking it all to save her kids. So so good.Again I want to thank Algonquin for allowing me to join the book tour. I would have bought the book anyway because William Ritter is an auto-buy author for me, but it was so much cooler to have been able to read it early.
    more
  • Reading Bifrost
    January 1, 1970
    Yes! It’s another fantastic series by the ever talented William Ritter! This time he takes us through a journey into the Wild Wood; crossing paths with goblins, witches, and the mysterious Thing. This series is meant for middle grade kids, but I don’t see why it can’t be enjoyed by all ages. There’s elements that will keep you interested throughout, if just to solve the bit of mystery surrounding the characters.I don’t think there’s a person in my generation that wasn’t intrigued my baby snatchi Yes! It’s another fantastic series by the ever talented William Ritter! This time he takes us through a journey into the Wild Wood; crossing paths with goblins, witches, and the mysterious Thing. This series is meant for middle grade kids, but I don’t see why it can’t be enjoyed by all ages. There’s elements that will keep you interested throughout, if just to solve the bit of mystery surrounding the characters.I don’t think there’s a person in my generation that wasn’t intrigued my baby snatching goblins, thanks to Jim Henson and “Labyrinth”. In ‘Changeling’, Kull the goblin forgot to keep up with which was the changeling and which was the human when he tried to switch the babies. That left him in a conundrum, and he decided to leave BOTH until he could figure out which was which, so the poor parents woke up to TWIN sons; Tinn and Cole.Both boys have their own, strong, personalities. Cole is the more adventurous of the two. He’s usually the one to come up with schemes that get both him and his brother into trouble, but he’s also very protective. Tinn is more timid, but it doesn’t take much nudging from Cole to get him to tail along on adventures and pranks. He’s the more thoughtful of the two. Also, the relationship the ‘brothers’ share is more than adorable; taking up for each other, comforting each other and fighting for each other. I’m a sucker for good sibling relationships in books and these two just take the cake! And part of the fun is journeying along with the two and trying for yourself to figure out which is the human boy and which is the goblin!To me, the best parts of the book is when Cole and Tinn individually talk about why they think they are the goblin child. Each boy has their own insecurities. Cole mentions that he does bad things, without wanting to, and doesn’t understand why he does them. This is a GREAT topic for kids reading this book! Heck, it’s a great topic for teens and adults, too!Bears, witches, goblins, a strange creature named Candlebeard, and a monster trying to satisfy its hunger; Ritter filled the Wild Woods full of creative creatures and Deep Dark dangers. This series is sure to be his next best seller!
    more
  • Deanna (Deanna Reads Books)
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on my review blog Deanna Reads Books Changeling is the first book in William Ritter's new middle grade series. Although, having finished the first book, I felt like the story is pretty complete so I'm curious how the sequel will continue the story. The book is a fantasy story steeped in folklore of the dark wood, goblins and fairies. It's the classic changeling switcheroo story, but the Goblin making the switch messes up and the real boy and the changeling end u This review was originally posted on my review blog Deanna Reads Books Changeling is the first book in William Ritter's new middle grade series. Although, having finished the first book, I felt like the story is pretty complete so I'm curious how the sequel will continue the story. The book is a fantasy story steeped in folklore of the dark wood, goblins and fairies. It's the classic changeling switcheroo story, but the Goblin making the switch messes up and the real boy and the changeling end up being raised together. Let's give it up for Annie, because that mother was a fierce protector. I loved that no matter what both boys were "her boys." This book deals a lot with a mother's love and the importance of family no matter what that might be. I do feel like we don't get closure about her husband disappearing, but maybe we will get that in later books. I couldn't guess which boy was the changeling, but you do find out which one it is in this book, so don't fear! Once this happens it really gets to the interesting parts of the novel because we learn about what is happening to the forest and the two worlds colliding.The fantasy elements in this book were pretty cool. I liked that the Goblins in this book felt really true to folklore about them. The witch in the woods was a really cool element to it and I don't know want a Hinkypunk is but I thought they were neat too! If you like fantasy woodland creatures this one has a lot of them and also a huge evil thing that is just called "The thing."I don't read a lot of Middle Grade, but I felt like this one read well enough for a kid. But at the same time it has good elements of what it means to be a family that resonates with adults as well.*I received an eARC copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.Many thanks to Algonquin Young Readers for sending me an eARC via Netgalley for my honest review! Quotes are taken from an unfinished ARC and may not match final publication.
    more
  • Laura Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 for this fabulous fantasy series starter by William Ritter; thanks to @algonquinyr for the free book.Out 7/16, this spooky fantasy belongs in every elementary and middle school library!.〰〰My son loves to read but is somewhat picky, so when he came to me 30 pages into this book, eyes shining and said “oh mama, I have so many theories!”...that’s when I knew this was a special book. We both ended up loving it!.〰〰Tinn and Cole are mischievous twins who live with their mother on the edge of t ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this fabulous fantasy series starter by William Ritter; thanks to @algonquinyr for the free book.Out 7/16, this spooky fantasy belongs in every elementary and middle school library!.〰️〰️My son loves to read but is somewhat picky, so when he came to me 30 pages into this book, eyes shining and said “oh mama, I have so many theories!”...that’s when I knew this was a special book. We both ended up loving it!.〰️〰️Tinn and Cole are mischievous twins who live with their mother on the edge of the Deep Dark Wood...but their mother only originally gave birth to one child. The other child is a changeling placed there by a goblin and left after the changeling mimics the other child so well that the goblin can’t tell them apart. The twins are both well-loved by their mother, who doesn’t care that she now has two. Then the boys get a note telling them that the changeling one of them must return to the goblins or else all magic in the woods will end. They set off on an adventure that involves a witch, shape shifters, a monster and more. Their mother, Annie Burton, follows, determined to save both her boys..〰️Things aren’t what they seem.〰️“It’s never too late to do something right.”〰️Sometimes you have to leave your lukewarm tea and take up battle against monsters to save your children. 〰️First rate fantasy adventure and highly readable (even funny at times!). Perfect for grades 3+. My rising 3rd grader and I read it on our family camping trip this week and couldn’t stop talking about all the twists and turns this story takes. .〰️〰️Warning: things get a little scary! My guy LOVES scary, but not all kids do of course. Book 21 for #30booksummer !!.〰️〰️#williamritter #theoddmire #librariansofinstagram #librariesofinstagram #bookreview #mglit #mgbooks #bookstagram
    more
  • Tonja Drecker
    January 1, 1970
    A perfect mixture of creepy, mysterious and wholesome family love, makes this a read to take under the blankets with extra snacks and batteries for those flashlights.In hopes of renewing the goblin magic, a goblin uses the very rare chance to exchange a human boy with a changeling. But he gets distracted and can't seem to figure out which one is which. The mother, despite knowing something isn't right, simply keeps both, raises them and loves them with her whole heart. Until one day, the boys wa A perfect mixture of creepy, mysterious and wholesome family love, makes this a read to take under the blankets with extra snacks and batteries for those flashlights.In hopes of renewing the goblin magic, a goblin uses the very rare chance to exchange a human boy with a changeling. But he gets distracted and can't seem to figure out which one is which. The mother, despite knowing something isn't right, simply keeps both, raises them and loves them with her whole heart. Until one day, the boys wander off into the woods to discover the secret of who they really are.Changelings are a mystical folklore which carries a sense of dark dread and intrigue at the same time. While I wondered if the author could really pull these creatures down to a middle grade level, my suspicions weren't not only unwarranted, but completely blown away. The author weaves a fantastic tale with the heart-warming bond of brotherly (and motherly) love. And yet, there is so much dark creepiness and chills to insure young readers won't put this one down.The characters are easy to connect to and react as any boy that age would. While adventure and shadows remain high on every page, there's a nice amount of humor built in to keep it light at just the right times. While more sensitive readers might find the spooky side to be a bit heavy, others will love the dive into this story about the creatures of folklore. It's magical, mystical, dark and inspiring.I received an ARC copy and loved diving into this chilling and fascinating world. So, I'm leaving my honest thoughts (and asking for an extra set of batteries.)
    more
  • Tamra
    January 1, 1970
    The title and cover were what first drew me to the Changeling (Oddmire Book 1). From the description, I felt like this was going to be an odd mashup of Labyrinth and Fantastic Beasts. Tinn and Cole appear to be two brothers. Except one of them is a changeling, a special kind of goblin child. When trying to swap a human child and the changeling a goblin, Kull, is distracted for a second...the changeling transforms to look like its human crib companion. Now no one knows which is which, but the cha The title and cover were what first drew me to the Changeling (Oddmire Book 1). From the description, I felt like this was going to be an odd mashup of Labyrinth and Fantastic Beasts. Tinn and Cole appear to be two brothers. Except one of them is a changeling, a special kind of goblin child. When trying to swap a human child and the changeling a goblin, Kull, is distracted for a second...the changeling transforms to look like its human crib companion. Now no one knows which is which, but the changeling must return to the wild wood to save the magic of the there. So the two brothers embark on a quest through the wood filled with all sorts of fantastic creatures. Changeling, Goblins, Bearskins...Newt Scamander would love this wood. I love this wood.The story though isn't about the fantastic beasts...This is a story about what it means to be family, and what family will do to protect each other. Having a sibling of my own I am always critical of how those relationships are portrayed in stories. The brothership between Tinn and Cole is powerful and reminds me of Edward and Alphonse Elric and Fred and George Weasley. They care about each other so much, that they embark on this adventure. I can wait to share this adventure with my library patrons. I'd say this is a middle-grade read, but I can see older readers enjoy the story as well. The only other thing I will add is that I love the portrayal of the mothers in this book. Thank you, NetGalley, for the advanced read.
    more
  • Beth Mendelsohn
    January 1, 1970
    I received this e-ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.Goblins are known for switching out human babies with changelings -- goblin babies who then take on the appearance of the humans they are replacing. The goblins then sell the human babies to the fairies and the magic in the Wood is kept in balance. Changelings are rare and by the type Kull tries to switch babies, the magic in the Wild Wood is almost gone. This is due to the Thing that is devouring ever I received this e-ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.Goblins are known for switching out human babies with changelings -- goblin babies who then take on the appearance of the humans they are replacing. The goblins then sell the human babies to the fairies and the magic in the Wood is kept in balance. Changelings are rare and by the type Kull tries to switch babies, the magic in the Wild Wood is almost gone. This is due to the Thing that is devouring everything it can find. Unfortunately for Kull, his plans for the switch go awry and he must leave the two identical babies in their crib. The twins, Cole and Tinn, grow up and have all sorts of adventures together. Just before their 13th birthday, they receive a mysterious note promising more adventure. The boys sneak away to the dangerous Wild Wood, through the Oddmire swamp, to find out who they really are.I really enjoyed reading this middle grade fantasy and that was before I realized that the author also wrote the wonderful Jackaby series. The story did start out a bit slow but the pace soon quickened! I am looking forward to the next in the series. I would recommend this book form readers in grade 3 and up.#Changeling #Edelweiss
    more
  • Shakera
    January 1, 1970
    They say “parents know their child”, but is that really true? If your child was switched at birth with a child that looks exactly like the child you gave birth to, would you know? That is something that has been troubling Annie for 13 years. Kull, a goblin, did a botched job of switching the children. He was distracted and the changeling adapted to the baby before Kull had a chance to make the switch. Everyone has heard the stories, but what they haven’t heard… Tinn and Cole, the children have o They say “parents know their child”, but is that really true? If your child was switched at birth with a child that looks exactly like the child you gave birth to, would you know? That is something that has been troubling Annie for 13 years. Kull, a goblin, did a botched job of switching the children. He was distracted and the changeling adapted to the baby before Kull had a chance to make the switch. Everyone has heard the stories, but what they haven’t heard… Tinn and Cole, the children have one day to figure out who is the real child. Magic is at stake… let the adventure begin!Let me start by saying, I know I am way past the age for the targeted demographic, but I loved this book. It was funny, witty, intriguing, and full of mystery! Reading Jackaby first, I wasn’t sure what to expect of this series. When I was offered the opportunity to read and review this story, I jumped at the chance because of the author. I’m so glad I accepted the offer because I read this in one sitting and I’m eagerly awaiting the next book in the series. The characters and the world created was fascinating. I can’t wait for the next book!
    more
  • Emily (Infinite Lives, Infinite Stories)
    January 1, 1970
    Netgalley ReviewI absolutely loved Ritter’s Jackaby series and I can already tell that his Changeling series will be no different. Love magical creatures? Then this is the book for you! Changeling follows twin brothers, Tinn and Cole as they set out on a magical journey. There is never a dull second with these two around. Likewise, Ritter’s creatively crafted story will leave you wanting more. Aside from the adventure and humor, there are plenty of lessons and themes for younger audiences to pic Netgalley ReviewI absolutely loved Ritter’s Jackaby series and I can already tell that his Changeling series will be no different. Love magical creatures? Then this is the book for you! Changeling follows twin brothers, Tinn and Cole as they set out on a magical journey. There is never a dull second with these two around. Likewise, Ritter’s creatively crafted story will leave you wanting more. Aside from the adventure and humor, there are plenty of lessons and themes for younger audiences to pick up on. I specifically enjoyed and related to the strong bond between the two brothers. It was evident that their bond was stronger than blood. The same goes for their mother. You can be a family without being related at all.I highly recommend this book to all fantasy lovers. No matter how old you are, this book will be an enjoyable ride. Ritter’s writing will transport you into a magical world filled with goblins, witches, and unique characters. You won’t want to put it down. I will most defiantly be re-reading this for years. Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers and NetGalley for the eARC. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Matthew Galloway
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I have to say that I love there are Jackaby references! You don't need to read that series and, I think, whether you read that or this one first, once you make the crossover you'll be delighted to spot the ties.This is a sweet, quirky tale with themes for both children and adults. There's great humor, clever use of folklore, excellent twists. There's a blend of familiar tropes and surprising turns. All in all, a very enjoyable read.As a side note: there was a climactic scene which, fo First off, I have to say that I love there are Jackaby references! You don't need to read that series and, I think, whether you read that or this one first, once you make the crossover you'll be delighted to spot the ties.This is a sweet, quirky tale with themes for both children and adults. There's great humor, clever use of folklore, excellent twists. There's a blend of familiar tropes and surprising turns. All in all, a very enjoyable read.As a side note: there was a climactic scene which, for some reason, reminded me of the owl scene in The Secret of NIMH movie. Probably no one else will make that particular connection -- just the way my brain works -- but wow did that add some extra creep factor to it for me. hahaI guess this is where I should put in that I got a review copy disclaimer, but really, either you trust me to be a good, objective librarian or not. I'm just glad my librarian powers allowed me to obtain an early review copy! It wouldn't be false to say there was only one book I absolutely wanted to snag at that conference... and I did. ;)
    more
  • Jaime
    January 1, 1970
    Changeling is a fun, magical adventure perfect for fans of middle grade. I enjoyed the concept of two boys growing up side-by-side, one human and one a changeling, and the journey to discover who they are.The cast of characters is a blast. I love the magical creatures, the spooky witch, and the Thing hiding in the woods. But the real MVP of the book is Annie Burton, the two boys' mom. She kicks butt and is a fantastic role model of a good, parent figure in a book. Another character, Fable, defin Changeling is a fun, magical adventure perfect for fans of middle grade. I enjoyed the concept of two boys growing up side-by-side, one human and one a changeling, and the journey to discover who they are.The cast of characters is a blast. I love the magical creatures, the spooky witch, and the Thing hiding in the woods. But the real MVP of the book is Annie Burton, the two boys' mom. She kicks butt and is a fantastic role model of a good, parent figure in a book. Another character, Fable, definitely steals the show. She's adorable and fun, and she does something extraordinarily awesome near the end of the story.Changeling is a fantstic fantasy story that kids of all ages will enjoy. I'm excited to see what's next for the magical Wild Wood.Slightly longer review can be found here: https://booksandwafflesblog.wordpress...Thank you to the publisher for providing an early digital copy of the book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Kelly Erickson
    January 1, 1970
    In Changeling, magic is disappearing from the Wood and in order to save it a goblin takes a changeling baby and plans to switch it with a human baby. Unfortunately things don't go as planned and he ends up leaving both babies there to be raised by their human mother. The main plot takes up when the boys are almost 13, and the goblin invites them into the Wood, which they've grown up hearing scary stories about, as his last chance to try and save it and the rest of the goblins. This book was real In Changeling, magic is disappearing from the Wood and in order to save it a goblin takes a changeling baby and plans to switch it with a human baby. Unfortunately things don't go as planned and he ends up leaving both babies there to be raised by their human mother. The main plot takes up when the boys are almost 13, and the goblin invites them into the Wood, which they've grown up hearing scary stories about, as his last chance to try and save it and the rest of the goblins. This book was really fun, with a sense of humor that will draw in older readers as well. I loved Fable, the little girl they meet in the woods, who has no sense of human manners. I also liked the twins, and it was great reading them as they developed and grew up in such a short amount of time.There's also a great hook at the end for a sequel that I am definitely going to readRecommended for fans of the Serafina series, Mez's Magic, and the Darkdeep
    more
  • Rebecca M
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate to receive an ARC of this title from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.A fast-paced fantasy adventure about a family, a goblin, and a world whose magic is slowly dying...Identical twins Cole and Tinn do everything together: climb trees, steal their mother's marmalade tarts, and attend their first school dance. But a shared secret has been hanging over them their whole lives: one of them is a flesh and blood boy, and the other is a goblin changling. No one kno I was fortunate to receive an ARC of this title from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.A fast-paced fantasy adventure about a family, a goblin, and a world whose magic is slowly dying...Identical twins Cole and Tinn do everything together: climb trees, steal their mother's marmalade tarts, and attend their first school dance. But a shared secret has been hanging over them their whole lives: one of them is a flesh and blood boy, and the other is a goblin changling. No one knows which is which--not the goblins, not their mother, and not the twins themselves.Now, though, the goblins are demanding the changling present himself on the day of his 13th birthday--if they don't, the magic of the goblins will be lost forever. Uncertain the boys set out together, following a crudely drawn map that shows the way into the strange and mysterious Oddmire, a boggy forest where dwells a most fearsome witch--and who knows what else!This first book in William Ritter's Oddmire series contains entertaining and light-hearted adventure along with all the familiar fantasy elements, and illustrates the surprising power of love and family. Kids 10-13 will love this book, as will anyone who simply loves a good story.
    more
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    This tale is strong in pacing with quick, engrossing chapters. The human characters are allowed to grow a bit before the magical elements start to be infused into the story. When the twins cross over into the woods, the story changes to one of real evil and poisoning villains. I loved the little girl who appears and helps the pair through some challenges. Also a character of note is the twins’ strong mother who stops at nothing to help her sons, not caring if one might be a goblin in disguise.A This tale is strong in pacing with quick, engrossing chapters. The human characters are allowed to grow a bit before the magical elements start to be infused into the story. When the twins cross over into the woods, the story changes to one of real evil and poisoning villains. I loved the little girl who appears and helps the pair through some challenges. Also a character of note is the twins’ strong mother who stops at nothing to help her sons, not caring if one might be a goblin in disguise.A middle-grade piece to be read when the sun goes down… The Oddmire promises to be a series that should bring about more stories of the gap between the Earth and the other side of the wall… the protected realm of faeries and other shades.For my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2019/06/27/th...For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog
    more
  • Samantha Kish
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't put this book down, and found it very entertaining and enjoyable. I'm excited to know that it is going to be a series as I'd love to see more from this author and this specific world. The book tells the stories of two young boys (raised as twins), but one is a changeling that was mistakenly left instead of replaced when they were both babes. No one knows (including the twins themselves) which is the real boy and which is the changeling, but they both undertake the task of unraveling t I couldn't put this book down, and found it very entertaining and enjoyable. I'm excited to know that it is going to be a series as I'd love to see more from this author and this specific world. The book tells the stories of two young boys (raised as twins), but one is a changeling that was mistakenly left instead of replaced when they were both babes. No one knows (including the twins themselves) which is the real boy and which is the changeling, but they both undertake the task of unraveling their true selves in order to survive. The story is ripe with fairy tale characters, and is beautifully written. There are allusions to other stories that could be told, and I'm hoping that the next in the series jumps into more details and information about some of the other magical creatures introduced in this first story.
    more
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    I actually finished this a day ago, but had to give myself enough time to write a review. So I finished this in two sittings, about 2.5 hours. That is mostly due to the fact that it is a middle-grade book, but also it is definitely a "can't put down; want to know what happens next" type of a book. This was wonderful. I found it thrilling, cute, exciting, and loved all of the characters and the way they were written. This technically hasn't even been published yet and I am so excited for book 2! I actually finished this a day ago, but had to give myself enough time to write a review. So I finished this in two sittings, about 2.5 hours. That is mostly due to the fact that it is a middle-grade book, but also it is definitely a "can't put down; want to know what happens next" type of a book. This was wonderful. I found it thrilling, cute, exciting, and loved all of the characters and the way they were written. This technically hasn't even been published yet and I am so excited for book 2! I loved Ritter's Jackaby series and was originally super disappointed when I heard he was writing another book, but it was middle-grade and about twin boys. That disappointment was totally unwarranted, this was just as good as his Jackaby novels.
    more
  • Carolynn (All the Books and Chocolate)
    January 1, 1970
    When I heard this was written by William Ritter, the man behind my beloved Jackaby series, I knew I had to read it, and I was not disappointed.  This is a middle-grade book, so it is meant for a younger audience, the main characters 13, that being said I really enjoyed this book.  I loved all the characters and loved that these two brothers were so close while they both struggled with the idea that one of them was a Goblin.  And most importantly that they didn’t care! The story was great and ext When I heard this was written by William Ritter, the man behind my beloved Jackaby series, I knew I had to read it, and I was not disappointed.  This is a middle-grade book, so it is meant for a younger audience, the main characters 13, that being said I really enjoyed this book.  I loved all the characters and loved that these two brothers were so close while they both struggled with the idea that one of them was a Goblin.  And most importantly that they didn’t care! The story was great and extremely entertaining and well paced.  It's a typical hero's journey with minor quests and new friends along the way.  I’m so glad this is just the first of other books in this series because I can’t wait to revisit Oddmire!
    more
  • Marta Ilieva
    January 1, 1970
    The Oddmire, Book 1: Changeling is a must-read. It is filled with magic and adventure and follows twin brothers who set out on an adventure for self-discovery (yes, one of the twins is actually a goblin, but neither truly knows who is the real goblin!). This was a beautiful read and filled with fantasy and folklore. I loved the twin’s relationship with one another, and pretty much every character in the book. I do think this story is best aimed for the younger middle-aged students as it’s a rela The Oddmire, Book 1: Changeling is a must-read. It is filled with magic and adventure and follows twin brothers who set out on an adventure for self-discovery (yes, one of the twins is actually a goblin, but neither truly knows who is the real goblin!). This was a beautiful read and filled with fantasy and folklore. I loved the twin’s relationship with one another, and pretty much every character in the book. I do think this story is best aimed for the younger middle-aged students as it’s a relatively easy read with simpler concepts of brotherhood, family, and self-discovery. Thank you NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers for this eARC. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
    more
Write a review