The Printed Letter Bookshop
Love, friendship, and family find a home at the Printed Letter BookshopOne of Madeline Cullen’s happiest childhood memories is of working with her Aunt Maddie in the quaint and cozy Printed Letter Bookshop. But by the time Madeline inherits the shop nearly twenty years later, family troubles and her own bitter losses have hardened Madeline’s heart toward her once-treasured aunt—and the now struggling bookshop left in her care.While Madeline intends to sell the shop as quickly as possible, the Printed Letter’s two employees have other ideas. Reeling from a recent divorce, Janet finds sanctuary within the books and within the decadent window displays she creates. Claire, though quieter than the acerbic Janet, feels equally drawn to the daily rhythms of the shop and its loyal clientele, finding a renewed purpose within its walls. When Madeline’s professional life takes an unexpected turn, and when a handsome gardener upends all her preconceived notions, she questions her plans and her heart. She begins to envision a new path for herself and for her aunt’s beloved shop—provided the women’s best combined efforts are not too little, too late.The Printed Letter Bookshop is a captivating story of good books, a testament to the beauty of new beginnings, and a sweet reminder of the power of friendship.

The Printed Letter Bookshop Details

TitleThe Printed Letter Bookshop
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 14th, 2019
PublisherThomas Nelson
ISBN-139780785222002
Rating
GenreFiction, Writing, Books About Books, Contemporary, Christian Fiction, Womens Fiction

The Printed Letter Bookshop Review

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    My first book from Katherine Reay, and I was endeared to it immediately! Madeline grew up in a bookshop working with her Aunt Maddie. Twenty years later, the shop is hers. But Madeline is a different person who’s been through some significant losses. The Printed Letter Bookshop is a shadow of what it once was, and that just makes things worse. Madeline is considering selling the workshop. Her employees, Janet and Claire, don’t think that’s a good idea. They have too much to lose because the book My first book from Katherine Reay, and I was endeared to it immediately! Madeline grew up in a bookshop working with her Aunt Maddie. Twenty years later, the shop is hers. But Madeline is a different person who’s been through some significant losses. The Printed Letter Bookshop is a shadow of what it once was, and that just makes things worse. Madeline is considering selling the workshop. Her employees, Janet and Claire, don’t think that’s a good idea. They have too much to lose because the bookshop has meant stability and healing for each of them. Things start looking up for Madeline professionally and romantically, and she quickly reconsiders selling the store. The Printed Letter Bookshop is a charming and cozy read. The characters are complex and dynamic. I loved observing the antics between Madeline and her employees. Best of all? It’s a book about books! The bookshop setting had me fully-invested as did the strong storytelling. Overall, The Printed Letter Bookshop is about starting over and second chances. It’s filled with hope about the power of friendships and other relationships. I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own. My reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    An endearing story about friendship and forgiveness that will leave you with a lengthy list of books to read. Narrated by three different women- Madeline, Janet, and Claire, Katherine Reay creates a story and a setting that when I was finished, I found myself saddened to say goodbye to these characters. Each woman is hurting from past mistakes, but armed with book lists written by a dearly departed friend and the strength of each other, along with a failing bookshop, Madeline, Janet, and Claire An endearing story about friendship and forgiveness that will leave you with a lengthy list of books to read. Narrated by three different women- Madeline, Janet, and Claire, Katherine Reay creates a story and a setting that when I was finished, I found myself saddened to say goodbye to these characters. Each woman is hurting from past mistakes, but armed with book lists written by a dearly departed friend and the strength of each other, along with a failing bookshop, Madeline, Janet, and Claire are about to learn about themselves and each other. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through Netgalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. Goodreads Review published 14/05/19 Publication Date 14/05/19
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  • Melissa Tagg
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book so, so, so much...and on the one hand, that doesn't surprise me at all, because I've loved all of Katherine Reay's books. But on the other hand, I was surprised at how personally touching this story was...it could not possibly have landed in my life at a better time. I finished it weeks ago and I'm still thinking about it!It's Katherine Reay, so of course the writing is lovely. I adored the bookshop setting ... and I especially loved the relationships formed between the three m I loved this book so, so, so much...and on the one hand, that doesn't surprise me at all, because I've loved all of Katherine Reay's books. But on the other hand, I was surprised at how personally touching this story was...it could not possibly have landed in my life at a better time. I finished it weeks ago and I'm still thinking about it!It's Katherine Reay, so of course the writing is lovely. I adored the bookshop setting ... and I especially loved the relationships formed between the three main characters—three women with their own hurts and haunts and hopes. Janet was honestly the most surprising to me...she's prickly and hard, but she ended up tugging my heart so strongly. Claire's story is one, I think, that many, many women will relate to. And Madeline was so relatable and so believable. I feel like whatever I write in this review isn't going to do justice to how profoundly affected I was by this book. But suffice it to say, I will definitely be reading it again!
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    The Printed Letter Bookshop is the type of independent bookshop we all wish we had in our neighborhood. Located in a little town outside Chicago on Lake Michigan, it’s not just full of wonderful books of all genres, but holds lots of author events and has friendly staff who can help you find that perfect book for yourself or someone else. A bookshop that really celebrates the art of reading.When the owner of the bookshop, Maddie Cullen dies, the whole town grieves her passing. None more so than The Printed Letter Bookshop is the type of independent bookshop we all wish we had in our neighborhood. Located in a little town outside Chicago on Lake Michigan, it’s not just full of wonderful books of all genres, but holds lots of author events and has friendly staff who can help you find that perfect book for yourself or someone else. A bookshop that really celebrates the art of reading.When the owner of the bookshop, Maddie Cullen dies, the whole town grieves her passing. None more so than her two friends and employees Janet and Claire who are worried about what will become of them and the bookshop if the new owner, Maddie's estranged niece, Madeline, decides to sell it. Madeline is a corporate lawyer working for a big Chicago law company who certainly doesn’t have time to run a bookshop, but the shop has been running at a loss while Maddie was sick and will need to get back in the black before it goes on the market so Maddie is forced to become involved in the running of the bookshop. Through working with Janet and Claire she comes to know more about Maddie and wonders if she really understands the family rift that had made her keep her distance. This is a delightfully written novel about the three women (Janet, Claire and Madeline) and how their relationship with each other and Maddie forces them to re-evaluate their lives and find what is missing.With thanks to Netgalley and the publisher Thomas Nelson for a digital ARC to read.
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4 bookish stars“The Printed Letter Bookshop” was an endearing bit of Chick-Lit, (or Women’s Fiction) that for some reason I just couldn't put down. I read most of it in a single day. I got pulled into the story and couldn’t drag myself away. I loved the bookshop setting and all the book references. At the end of the book, the author provided a list of the books from which quotes were used throughout her story. I appreciate that the list was provided. I was delighted to see how many of th Rating: 4 bookish stars“The Printed Letter Bookshop” was an endearing bit of Chick-Lit, (or Women’s Fiction) that for some reason I just couldn't put down. I read most of it in a single day. I got pulled into the story and couldn’t drag myself away. I loved the bookshop setting and all the book references. At the end of the book, the author provided a list of the books from which quotes were used throughout her story. I appreciate that the list was provided. I was delighted to see how many of the quotes I recognized. That kind of book trivia just makes me happy.Katherine Reay has written a well-balanced book about family; be it birth family, or ‘family of choice’. The story’s main stage is the Printed Letter Bookshop. It’s a cozy small town bookshop that widowed Aunt Maddie cherished, and lovingly struggled kept open with help from two of her ‘family of choice’ family members, Janet and Claire. Janet is divorced, unhappy, snippy and brilliantly artistic with the window book displays. Claire is fairly new to town, quiet, and behind the scenes is valiantly trying to keep the bookshop afloat while caring for her teenaged kids and oft absent husband. When Aunt Maddie passes away and leaves the bookshop to her niece, Madeline, everyone is surprised and a bit dismayed, no-one more so than Madeline herself. Madeline was estranged from Aunt Maddie for many years due to a family fallout. Madeline is working hard to make partner at a prestigious law firm in Chicago, and fully intends to sell the bookshop as quickly as possible.Then life happens, and it starts throwing curveballs at everyone. What if Madeline decided to drop her law career and make a home in Aunt Maddie’s house and try to keep the bookstore afloat? Can Janet and Claire with together, and work with Madeline to overcome the obstacles? What if there is a touch of romance? The dramatic tension of all these elements keeps the book moving along. These are the reasons that I found myself unable to put the book down. Aunt Maddie left a list of reading lists for all three ladies, and the lists of course fit their needs expertly. There are references in the later stages of the book to these books. I loved how the author elegantly and appropriately weaved the books and their quotes into the circumstances of Madeline, Janet and Claire’s lives.Reading this book was such a nice way to spend an afternoon and evening. By the end of the story I was cheering for all the characters, and pleased with the ultimate ending. I thought that reading the book was time well spent. ‘Thank-You’ to NetGalley; the publisher, Thomas Nelson--FICTION; and the author, Katherine Reay; for providing a free e-ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Emilee
    January 1, 1970
    My first book of 2019 was a winner! I throughly enjoyed Janet, Claire and Madeline’s stories. I was deeply touched by these characters and their relationships. I hated for this book to end. Katherine Reay did a beautiful job with this novel. I won an Advance Reader’s Copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    Charming.Katherine Reay continues a literary theme in The Printed Letter Bookshop although in a slightly different way from her prior novels. There is a cozy feel about reading the pages despite the very difficult realities covered.Three women struggling with different aspects of life find solidarity, fulfillment and guidance in a small town bookshop. I adored all three women and loved the chemistry between them.Simply delightful and highly recommended.My gratitude to the author for a compliment Charming.Katherine Reay continues a literary theme in The Printed Letter Bookshop although in a slightly different way from her prior novels. There is a cozy feel about reading the pages despite the very difficult realities covered.Three women struggling with different aspects of life find solidarity, fulfillment and guidance in a small town bookshop. I adored all three women and loved the chemistry between them.Simply delightful and highly recommended.My gratitude to the author for a complimentary ARC of the novel. I was not required to write a review and all opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, so this is about three women and a bookshop...how much better does it get? Oh, did I say troubled bookshop and troubled ladies? Yep. This is a slow unfolding of everything that’s going on, and plenty of small-town intrigue going on as well. Broken relationships, troubled kids, and so on. Can working together around the books, trying to save the bookstore, do anything to turn these women’s lives around?This one’s more of a literary fiction than her previous ones have been, and the faith mes Okay, so this is about three women and a bookshop...how much better does it get? Oh, did I say troubled bookshop and troubled ladies? Yep. This is a slow unfolding of everything that’s going on, and plenty of small-town intrigue going on as well. Broken relationships, troubled kids, and so on. Can working together around the books, trying to save the bookstore, do anything to turn these women’s lives around?This one’s more of a literary fiction than her previous ones have been, and the faith message is very subtle, but present: true peace is only found in God, not in an affair or in a bottle of wine. General market readers would probably hardly even notice it.I will say a word of caution about the books quoted. Unlike Dear Mr. Knightley, which was the reason I discovered a few more clean authors (notably Anne Perry’s mysteries), this book is about a bookstore and there are many, many books mentioned and/or discussed. Some are clean and some aren’t (Lolita, etc). So for the younger readers out there, I’d advise checking any reading list with an adult or a more mature friend before making out a want-to-read list.Content: drinking, books mentioned in passing that have content in them Thanks to the publisher and netgalley for a free ebook. A positive review was not required.
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  • Max
    January 1, 1970
    A great book for people who love books! Usually I don't read books in this genre but I venture outside my comfort zone once in a while when I see a book blurb that interests me, like this one. Really liked the story setting, Katherine Reay is a great writer. The story gripped me even though the characters weren't very interesting to me. Janet especially didn't interest me, I thought she was kind of rude and unlikeable. But it worked for the story and she too got her happy ending, sort of. I didn A great book for people who love books! Usually I don't read books in this genre but I venture outside my comfort zone once in a while when I see a book blurb that interests me, like this one. Really liked the story setting, Katherine Reay is a great writer. The story gripped me even though the characters weren't very interesting to me. Janet especially didn't interest me, I thought she was kind of rude and unlikeable. But it worked for the story and she too got her happy ending, sort of. I didn't really understand all the money problems that were pitched in the beginning of the book, those were hard to follow. Second half was easier to get into. So, in short, enjoyable book for the genre, just okay for me.Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the ARC. These are my opinions and are in no way influenced by the fact I got the ARC for free.
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  • Fareya
    January 1, 1970
    As a self proclaimed book lover, I am stating the obvious when I say I love books, but what I like even more is reading books about books and bookshops. The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay is delightful story about books and a bookshop also encompassing hope, friendship, forgiveness and second chances. It’s about finding joy in things we love, letting go of the past and embracing life’s uncertainty.At the heart of the story is a quaint small-town independent bookshop – The Printed Lett As a self proclaimed book lover, I am stating the obvious when I say I love books, but what I like even more is reading books about books and bookshops. The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay is delightful story about books and a bookshop also encompassing hope, friendship, forgiveness and second chances. It’s about finding joy in things we love, letting go of the past and embracing life’s uncertainty.At the heart of the story is a quaint small-town independent bookshop – The Printed Letter, that Madeline Cullen inherits from her aunt. A successful Chicago lawyer and about to be made partner at her current firm, Madeline does not have the time or inclination to continue running the barely thriving bookshop. In fact, the inheritance came as a shock to her. Almost two decades back, after an unfortunate turn of events strained her dad’s relationship with his sister, Madeline cut off ties too with her once-beloved aunt. But then why was her dad so full of regret at her aunt’s funeral? Did she make a mistake without knowing the whole story? How will she find out what actually happened all those years ago, when no one wants to talk about it?While Madeline is struggling with her thoughts about her aunt and the bookshop, several miles away across town, two women, Janet and Claire are also wondering about The Printed Letter Bookshop’s fate. Janet is a fifty something recent divorcee, and one of the two employees at the the bookshop. She lost her closest friend and confidante with Maddie’s death. Both her kids keep her at an arm’s length siding with their father since after the divorce. Maddie’s death has been hard on her and she desperately wants to save the shop and thereby her friend’s lifework and legacy.Claire, the other employee has recently moved to town and feels like she’s still settling in. The Printed Letter is the only place that makes her happy, she likes being in control and now with the uncertainty associated with the shop, she feels all control slipping out. After all, what is it that she can do?The The Printed Letter Bookshop is what brings these three women together, and as they get to know and help each other, a strong bond of friendship forms between them, Madeline’s aunt Maddie being the common thread. Days turn into weeks and the goal of getting the shop ready to be sold transforms into saving the shop. Alongside we also see the transformations occurring in the lives of the three women. This story isn’t plot elaborate but rather character oriented. Over its course we see, every character growing in their own way towards overcoming fears, accepting the whims of fate and letting go of what one can’t control.One thing that particularly delighted me about this book was the innumerable quotes and bookish references throughout. I had so much fun trying to figure out which books were being referenced. The author thoughtfully lists all of the books mentioned directly/indirectly in the story towards the end. After having finished reading this, I spent another hour browsing about the books I hadn’t heard of, and adding a bunch of books to my TBR. How often does that happen!A cozy, charming read, The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay is an ode to independent bookshops and book lovers and I’ll recommend this if you’re looking for an endearing, feel-good story to curl up with. I am definitely going to keep an eye out for the author’s future releases and meanwhile will be checking out her previous works.** An ARC was provided by Thomas Nelson and TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. **
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  • Nicole (Read Eat Sleep Repeat)
    January 1, 1970
    When I first came across The Printed Letter Bookshop, I immediately thought it would be right up my alley and was excited to get an advance copy through Netgalley. It didn’t take long once I opened it up and began reading to realize just how much I would love it!This story is wrapped around the lives of three different women, Madeline, Janet, and Claire, and the bookshop that pulls them together. It is told through each of their perspectives in turn, slowly but surely unraveling their tales. Alt When I first came across The Printed Letter Bookshop, I immediately thought it would be right up my alley and was excited to get an advance copy through Netgalley. It didn’t take long once I opened it up and began reading to realize just how much I would love it!This story is wrapped around the lives of three different women, Madeline, Janet, and Claire, and the bookshop that pulls them together. It is told through each of their perspectives in turn, slowly but surely unraveling their tales. Although each of these women have life experiences and personalities that are different from my own, there was a piece of each of them that I could identify with, making them all incredibly relatable. I found myself riding along the rollercoasters of their lives and relationships, cheering them on and tearing up for them.In addition to the wonderful characters, there was so much bookishness within these pages that warmed my heart. The bookshop setting, along with the many book references and even book lists mentioned, delighted this lover of books about books. The plot was a bit easy to predict, but I can’t say that I particularly cared as I so thoroughly enjoyed watching it unfold. And Reay’s writing style really worked for me, flowing well and making for quick and easy reading.In the end, I loved The Printed Letter Bookshop so much I simply couldn’t put it down! Recommended for fans of contemporary women’s fiction and books about books.*Thanks to the publisher for providing an arc of this edition via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    I would love to have this bookshop in my neighborhood and would spend as much time as possible there. Maddie Cullen, the owner of Printed Letter Bookshop, was an exceptional woman who loved books and people. When she died she left everything she owned to her niece, Madeline who is an attorney in Chicago and trying to make partner. Maddie loved Madeline dearly, but something had happened with Madeline's father and his sister Maddie that made Madeline distance herself from Maddie. When she inherit I would love to have this bookshop in my neighborhood and would spend as much time as possible there. Maddie Cullen, the owner of Printed Letter Bookshop, was an exceptional woman who loved books and people. When she died she left everything she owned to her niece, Madeline who is an attorney in Chicago and trying to make partner. Maddie loved Madeline dearly, but something had happened with Madeline's father and his sister Maddie that made Madeline distance herself from Maddie. When she inherits Maddie's home and bookshop Madeline hardly knows what to do and her first instinct is to get it in shape and sell it all. The two employees of the bookshop, Janet and Claire, are both very talented women in their own ways and when Madeline takes over the shop they don't know where their futures lie. I was charmed by the story of this bookshop and all the women who worked there. It was a lovely book that makes you remember that relationships and friends and family are the most important things in life and that you should cherish them.Thanks to Thomas Nelson--FICTION through Netgalley for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sarah Grace Grzy
    January 1, 1970
    This took me three weeks to finish (a ridiculously long time if you're me), but I'm blaming that on this busy season of life, not the book. Because I loved this book. I fell in love with Reay's writing style when I read A Portrait of Emily Price awhile ago, so I was excited when I first saw The Printed Letter Bookshop. Also, that cover is so whimsical, I was instantly intrigued! And I was not disappointed. The Printed Letter has a somewhat slow and even meandering at times plot, but I would not This took me three weeks to finish (a ridiculously long time if you're me), but I'm blaming that on this busy season of life, not the book. Because I loved this book. I fell in love with Reay's writing style when I read A Portrait of Emily Price awhile ago, so I was excited when I first saw The Printed Letter Bookshop. Also, that cover is so whimsical, I was instantly intrigued! And I was not disappointed. The Printed Letter has a somewhat slow and even meandering at times plot, but I would not say that is a bad thing in this case. (Although it certainly didn't help my reading slump) It was, in fact, a delightfully fresh breath of air after several dud reads and fast-paced suspense books. I fell in love with this fictional bookshop, its people, and its city. Reay creates a beautiful location to set her story.Our main characters are three women--all in different walks of life. Madeline, a young attorney; Claire, a forty-something mom and wife; and Janet, a divorced, middle-aged woman who is trying to find her place in this life. They all are, trying to find their place. And that alone makes each of these characters incredibly relatable, I believe. While the POV jumps were confusing at times for me, I think Reay does a fabulous job keeping each of these characters unique and individual, all the way down to switching up the points of view, having both third-person and first-person points of view--something you don't see a lot, and some may find unenjoyable, but I personally liked that decision. They each had their own beautiful and complete storyline, yet the three interwove so perfectly to form the novel as a whole.Reay tackles some difficult and serious issues in The Printed Letter, not the least of which being adultery, divorce, and teen issues. Yet she does so with incredible tact and realisticness, weaving lines of grace, forgiveness, and mercy throughout the pages of this lovely story. Overall, I highly recommend The Printed Letter Bookshop! Katherine Reay is an incredible author and I look forward to reading more.
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  • Kara
    January 1, 1970
    Seriously. How does Katherine Reay write such perfection every time?! Once again, this particular story and these particular characters gripped my heart from page one and refused to let me have it back until I came to the final pages. Every character, every interaction, every heartache, every uncertainty, every joy, I was right there with them for everything. And my poor heart lost pieces of itself while finding pieces of itself all at the same time! Like I said, Ms. Reay just has a gift of writ Seriously. How does Katherine Reay write such perfection every time?! Once again, this particular story and these particular characters gripped my heart from page one and refused to let me have it back until I came to the final pages. Every character, every interaction, every heartache, every uncertainty, every joy, I was right there with them for everything. And my poor heart lost pieces of itself while finding pieces of itself all at the same time! Like I said, Ms. Reay just has a gift of writing characters and their respective journeys that resonate with me.The three women at the center of this story are far from perfect. That's what makes them so unforgettable. They are real people with real heartache and pain. They are grieving, having just lost an amazing woman who was important to each of them for differing reasons. As Madeleine, Janet, and Clair slowly begin moving forward from that point of loss and grief, they stumble through figuring out how to do life on this side of things. It's hard, it's messy, and they all make a lot of mistakes. But it's not perfection I was looking for when I began this story, it was the journey they took. Watching these women, and the people in the lives, as they circle and spin in myriads of doubt and confusion, yet somehow, little by little, as they begin to see the light and the hope that's been waiting for them to discover it...it's beautiful. Yes, it is messy, but it's beautiful. And it completely connected with me!Like I said, Ms. Reay always seems to have a knack of understanding parts of my heart and then writing characters around that, but so much of the lostness inside each of these ladies felt just like mine! For all the chaos, there is a lot of quiet and piece by piece these women begin finding parts of themselves they'd forgotten all about.Being the lover of stories that I am (and a HUGE fan of Ms. Reay's! :), I knew I'd enjoy this story before I even began it. But I underestimated Ms. Reay's ability to speak such truths in such gentle and heart-tugging ways. From the bookshop that I wish actually existed so I could go visit and maybe stay forever, to the characters who became my friends, to the sweet bits of romance that entwines its way through the story, to the loveliness that filters through every word and sentence in every chapter, this little book is full of delight and charm. I fell in love and refuse to go back to life without this heart-satisfying story in it!I could, doubtless, gush on for paragraphs more, but I will leave you with this. Go read it. As soon as you are able you download it or drive to a bookshop of your own and buy it and bring it home. Or go to your local library and borrow it! Because you need this story in your life, friends. Trust me. You'll thank me later. :)**I received a copy from Netgalley and Thomas Nelson. All opinions are my own.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    The Printed Letter Bookshop is a story of friendship and family. I enjoyed seeing the friendship between the main characters grow throughout the story. I loved how the book wasn't just a light, easy read -- it had some difficult moments. The romance was interesting. I can't say that I was 100% a fan of it in the beginning, but as the story progressed I grew to like it and the ending was good...It was sweet, in fact. ;)All in all, The Printed Letter Bookshop was a great read. It was written very The Printed Letter Bookshop is a story of friendship and family. I enjoyed seeing the friendship between the main characters grow throughout the story. I loved how the book wasn't just a light, easy read -- it had some difficult moments. The romance was interesting. I can't say that I was 100% a fan of it in the beginning, but as the story progressed I grew to like it and the ending was good...It was sweet, in fact. ;)All in all, The Printed Letter Bookshop was a great read. It was written very well and held my interest throughout. I found myself wanting to pick it back up whenever I had to stop reading. I recommend it to fans of contemporary reads.*Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention/review it on my blog. I was not required to give a positive review, only my honest opinion - which I've done. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own and I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.*
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  • Penny
    January 1, 1970
    The Printed Letter Bookshop is a beautiful story of love, loss, misunderstanding, friendship, and joy. I'd love to have a bookshop like this one in my neighborhood. The store itself is an amazing character. The two ladies who work in the shop create the perfect tension to carry the story through to the end. I enjoyed watching Maddie grow into the person her aunt knew she could be. And I love the gardener. He's a sweetheart. Katherine Reay's books always captivate me, this one was no exception. S The Printed Letter Bookshop is a beautiful story of love, loss, misunderstanding, friendship, and joy. I'd love to have a bookshop like this one in my neighborhood. The store itself is an amazing character. The two ladies who work in the shop create the perfect tension to carry the story through to the end. I enjoyed watching Maddie grow into the person her aunt knew she could be. And I love the gardener. He's a sweetheart. Katherine Reay's books always captivate me, this one was no exception. She adds in so many wonderful literary references. This is definitely a story for book lovers. It would make a wonderful gift for the avid reader. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    From Endorsement: The Printed Letter Bookshop is a softly elegant and invitingly intricate ode to books and the power of their communal solace. With the charm and insight of Nina George and the sheer reckless book love of Jenny Colgan, The Printed Letter Bookshop enfolds the reader in a welcome literary embrace. Reay’s natural talent of putting the reader at ease in her fictional world is evident from the first page. But the story is also deceptively accessible, for the moment you fall into its From Endorsement: The Printed Letter Bookshop is a softly elegant and invitingly intricate ode to books and the power of their communal solace. With the charm and insight of Nina George and the sheer reckless book love of Jenny Colgan, The Printed Letter Bookshop enfolds the reader in a welcome literary embrace. Reay’s natural talent of putting the reader at ease in her fictional world is evident from the first page. But the story is also deceptively accessible, for the moment you fall into its continued spell, you are confronted by a mature narrative that allows three remarkably different women to become the unlikely heroines of their own stories.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Reay’s best book and I love her books. This one was fabulous and when I wasn’t reading it, I was thinking about it. I absolutely loved it! Go get it right now!(Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley. Although I’m buying a copy for my shelf too)
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  • Lilian
    January 1, 1970
    I think I’ll start off by saying that this wasn’t really *my* kind of book, and the main reason for that was the continual point of view (POV) switching. I’d originally heard much about the author’s lovely writing style before picking up this book, and it lived up to my expectations! The writing style was very smooth and a joy to read, and I’ll definitely pick up another one of Reay’s books!But back to the POV switching. xD The point of view jumped from Madeline to Janet to Claire and back again I think I’ll start off by saying that this wasn’t really *my* kind of book, and the main reason for that was the continual point of view (POV) switching. I’d originally heard much about the author’s lovely writing style before picking up this book, and it lived up to my expectations! The writing style was very smooth and a joy to read, and I’ll definitely pick up another one of Reay’s books!But back to the POV switching. xD The point of view jumped from Madeline to Janet to Claire and back again and over and over, and I found that it really disrupted my flow of thought while reading. I had to constantly adjust to each character, and that was a pain. The characters themselves were very… unique, I guess? I didn’t really love them all that much since it was difficult to connect to them with all the POV switching, but I appreciated how real and raw their lives were, and how none of them seemed to have their lives “together”.Overall it was a good book! Again, not for me, but I can certainly think of people who’s reading styles would fit this book better. 3.5 stars.FTC DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy from Celebrate Lit Bloggers. All thoughts are my own and a positive review was not required.
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  • Nikki (Saturday Nite Reader)
    January 1, 1970
    Make your favorite beverage, pull up a chair, take a seat, and get comfy: this book will give you all the warm and fuzzy feel good feels.If this book was a dessert it would be Strawberry Shortcake – the one with the homemade biscuit and whipped cream – my favorite dessert that is underrated and needs to be served at more restaurants for me to enjoy. Hello restaurants! You taking note here?! XO, Saturday Nite Sweet ToothThis book is just as good as that smooth red velvet cake or decadent molten l Make your favorite beverage, pull up a chair, take a seat, and get comfy: this book will give you all the warm and fuzzy feel good feels.If this book was a dessert it would be Strawberry Shortcake – the one with the homemade biscuit and whipped cream – my favorite dessert that is underrated and needs to be served at more restaurants for me to enjoy. Hello restaurants! You taking note here?! XO, Saturday Nite Sweet ToothThis book is just as good as that smooth red velvet cake or decadent molten lava cake: it doesn’t need the fancy frills to keep you yearning for the next bite. Its simple ingredients are still packed with that addictive sugar…you see what I’m doing hereAbout the book: Young gun lawyer, Madeline is aiming for a partnership at her firm. Work pressure alone is stifling, but now let’s add in the fact that she is the sole inheritor of her recently deceased aunt’s estate; which includes a home and bookshop that are underwater. Madeline doesn’t want it, but becoming a bookshop owner will lead her on a path of self-discovery whether she is looking for herself or not. On top of the bookshop, she inherits its motley crew staff: Claire and Janet. Both Claire and Janet are lonely in their own ways so Madeline fits right in. And, right under her nose is a fella named Chris (who wouldn’t want their own Chris is all I am going to say).The story had a slow build but once I was deeply wrapped in these three women’s stories I could not stop turning the pages. I needed to know they would all be alright.My 2¢: it would certainly translate well into a Hallmark movie. You’re welcome Hallmark.It’s a lovely read for any book club, happy reading!P.S. I haven’t read Christian Fiction before and wasn’t sure what to expect. Had I not been told, I wouldn’t have thought to characterize it as such. There were a few references to lines of proverbs and God, but to me I didn’t think it was the overall theme of the book.I received an advanced readers copy of this book as part of my participation in a blog tour with TLC Book Tours. The gifting of this book did not affect my opinion of it.To read my reviews visit: www.saturdaynitereader.com
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  • Melindam
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the Publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Ana
    January 1, 1970
    When it comes to bookish things – characters who are readers, writers, or publishers; classics retellings; a real-life author’s fictionalized story – I pretty much read any genre. When it comes to contemporary romance novels, there has to be something more than family drama or the love story to draw me in: a cosy little bookshop is one of those things!However, the story just was not gripping! There were things that I anticipated from the opening chapters, which were soon confirmed: the will, the When it comes to bookish things – characters who are readers, writers, or publishers; classics retellings; a real-life author’s fictionalized story – I pretty much read any genre. When it comes to contemporary romance novels, there has to be something more than family drama or the love story to draw me in: a cosy little bookshop is one of those things!However, the story just was not gripping! There were things that I anticipated from the opening chapters, which were soon confirmed: the will, the love interest (a quasi-meet-cute at your aunt’s funeral does make for a creepy relationship start in my books), what is going to happen with the bookshop. At first, I didn’t like any of the three female characters, particularly Janet, and although Claire and Madeline warmed up to me, it wasn’t enough to keep me engaged. I also couldn’t buy into Maddie’s - Madeline’s aunt - blind love for her niece…Unfortunately, this meant that I couldn't continue with the novel. It was indeed unfortunate, as from the description it looked like a charming bookish read, but it simply wasn't for me.If you are looking for a novel that portrays female friendship in a Hallmark type of setting and has plenty of book-related treats, this is a handy pick.*Thanks to NetGalley & Thomas Nelson for the opportunity to read a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review. The Printed Letter Bookshop RELEASES MAY 14, 2019.*
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  • Sara Jo
    January 1, 1970
    As an avid book lover, any story about a bookshop always catches my eye and this one did not disappoint. It's a lovely tale of 3 women in different stages of life, all coming to terms with changes that occur after the death of a loved one. Madeline seemed very cold and distant, but I quickly warmed up to her. Claire seemed a bit of a mousy doormat, but soon found her place. Janet was the odd one to me as she was very angry and rude in the beginning and her development seemed more sudden than the As an avid book lover, any story about a bookshop always catches my eye and this one did not disappoint. It's a lovely tale of 3 women in different stages of life, all coming to terms with changes that occur after the death of a loved one. Madeline seemed very cold and distant, but I quickly warmed up to her. Claire seemed a bit of a mousy doormat, but soon found her place. Janet was the odd one to me as she was very angry and rude in the beginning and her development seemed more sudden than the others. The three become friends over the course of the book in a way that felt more like siblings in a way and I loved the teasing and frank speech along with the encouragement. There were a few side plots involving each woman and I felt that Claire and Janet received more of the lion's share of detail here, but Madeline's story was fairly important to the entire plot of the book. I also enjoyed that this was a modern day story with heartbreak and romance that involved God without preaching scripture. All in all, I started reading this at bedtime just to relax and ended up finishing it in one sitting. I love that the author is obviously an avid reader and graciously provides us a list of all the novels mentioned at the end! A must read for anyone who loves books and reading.I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Suzie Waltner
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 StarsOne of the magical things about books is how they speak something to us wherever we are in our lives. And in her newest release, one of Katherine Reay’s three main characters is sure to touch you in some way.Madeline, Claire, and Janet are different in many, many ways. A thirty-something lawyer, Madeline wants only to sell her aunt’s bookshop and get back to her law firm. In her forties, Claire feels lost and unappreciated in her family. And living the consequences of a divorce that was 4.5 StarsOne of the magical things about books is how they speak something to us wherever we are in our lives. And in her newest release, one of Katherine Reay’s three main characters is sure to touch you in some way.Madeline, Claire, and Janet are different in many, many ways. A thirty-something lawyer, Madeline wants only to sell her aunt’s bookshop and get back to her law firm. In her forties, Claire feels lost and unappreciated in her family. And living the consequences of a divorce that was her own fault, Janet looks at her life through a cynical lens. But when these three women are brought together, they begin to form a friendship that is both unexpected and blessed. It’s one of those friendships that despite their hiccups and cracked fault lines, is going to become stronger for the challenges.While Reay gives each of these women their own challenges, it is refreshing that some of them are a little more run-of-the mill. Because, let’s face it, most of us are probably not set to inherit a struggling bookstore or make a huge change professional, but many of us can relate to feeling lost within relationships. Some of us can even empathize with the difficulty of forgiveness and apologizing for our wrong doings.So, what are you waiting for? Pick up a copy of The Printed Letter Bookshop and visit Winsome and this little independent bookstore that struggles to survive along with the women who are employed there. But be warned, your reading list is most likely to grow by the end of this delightful read.Disclosure statement:I receive complimentary books from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including NetGalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.
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  • Lisa Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 26%. Such a slow start. Nothing is happening. And two of the main characters so far seem interchangeable. I can't find a reason to keep going.
  • Nora St Laurent
    January 1, 1970
    All bookish people will love this story. It’s fun, intriguing, has a mystery and a splash of romance. It takes place in The Printed Letter Book Shop a place I’d love to hang out in and work at. The author does a brilliant job of placing readers inside the shop as the customer and then as an employee/owner of the store. Maddie is the founder and creator of the shop, Janet was an artist and put up inviting window and end cap displays. Claire was great at running the business end of things. Madelin All bookish people will love this story. It’s fun, intriguing, has a mystery and a splash of romance. It takes place in The Printed Letter Book Shop a place I’d love to hang out in and work at. The author does a brilliant job of placing readers inside the shop as the customer and then as an employee/owner of the store. Maddie is the founder and creator of the shop, Janet was an artist and put up inviting window and end cap displays. Claire was great at running the business end of things. Madeline (Maddie’s name sake) just inherited this special book store that the community embraced and adored. They didn’t want to see it close.Here's a peek at the store, Claire asks her customer, “Have you read The Secret Garden?”“Too long ago to remember it.”…Claire opened the book and said, “Mary Lennox begins her journey in a new and unfamiliar land, but makes her mark on it. She transforms it and reviews the people around her as well as herself. She blossoms…And when you’re finished come back, we’ll talk some more.”I love that the author invites the reader into this special place and the reader is also on the receiving end of book recommendations, where they describe books, give quotes from books and talk about books Maddie has recommended to the three people who run the book store, Janet, Claire and Madeline. Each list was personally handpicked by Maddie herself and given to each of them after her death by her attorney Greg Frankel. The author states, “Maddie’s list to each woman was a love letter – so I’ll let Janet, Claire, and Madeline keep them private. On the other hand, I can’t help giving a peek behind the curtain….” .Quote from book, Madeline says, …”I remember Aunt Maddie saying you could lose yourself in a book and, paradoxically, find yourself as well.”Madeline was a lawyer in a prestigious firm and worked hard to hopefully make partner. She didn’t want anything to do with this book business. It was her Aunt’s thing. But Madeline’s life takes a sharp turn into an unexpected zone and she finds herself getting to know her Aunt Maddie and her family in ways she never thought possible. It changes the way she looked at her Aunt, parents and herself. She begins to question what’s important in life. All three women realize that The Printed Letter Bookshop is more than a book store it’s a place where they can bloom and grow in friendship and in healing for themselves and the community. Things change for these three women as their friendship develops and they start to trust each other.I had a hard time getting into this book at first because it seemed slow and it started off at a funeral. The author shows the funeral from all three women’s perspective Janet, Claire and then Madeline. It was a little confusing until I got my bearings as to who was who and how it related to the scheme of things. The author clearly labels the chapters, so you know who is talking.At the surface I thought maybe this story was just going to be pure fluff and fun being in the book store sharing favorite books and book quotes but once I got my bearings the author takes readers deeper. I was amazed at what each character had to deal with and how natural the spiritual thread was intertwined throughout the story and the trials, healing and forgiveness. It choked me up in parts. The author naturally lets the light shine in the dark places. Showing that sometimes it’s harder to forgive yourself and at other times it’s harder to forgive what’s been done to you. These ladies give each other the grace to take one step at a time as they recapture their lives, their hopes, dreams, worth and loves.I highly recommend this book as a book club pick. It’s a rich story with characters you care about and all the things we love about books. This was the first novel I’ve read by this author it won’t be the last. This books a keeper.Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the Publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising”Nora St. LaurentTBCN Where Book Fun Begins! www.bookfun.orgThe Book Club Network blog www.psalm516.blogspot.com Book Fun Magazine https://www.bookfun.org/page/past-iss...
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  • Maureen Timerman
    January 1, 1970
    What a great and enjoyable read, one that keeps you wondering to the end. A judgement as a child, and then carrying those choices into adulthood, and then affecting your relationships with family. The death of a beloved member of this small Illinois town, and those that loved and cherished her, are the heart of this story. While the book does revolve around a book store, Maddie even though she is no longer here, is there for those she loved, and the chosen books for them to read, she is leading. What a great and enjoyable read, one that keeps you wondering to the end. A judgement as a child, and then carrying those choices into adulthood, and then affecting your relationships with family. The death of a beloved member of this small Illinois town, and those that loved and cherished her, are the heart of this story. While the book does revolve around a book store, Maddie even though she is no longer here, is there for those she loved, and the chosen books for them to read, she is leading.All the while I was wondering what was going to happen to these women when the store closed, amazing things go on and most you won’t see coming. A story that will make you laugh and cry and search for answers, a book of life and love.I received this book through Celebrate Lit, and was not required to give a positive review.
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  • Windi
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely LOVED this book! I just discovered Katherine Reay this year and have read through all of her books sequentially and waiting on pins and needles for this last one. I wasn’t disappointed. Each of her books are new and fresh and she weaves such a beautiful tapestry of story. As i have said in other reviews of her books....her characters are real, flaws and all. Her story lines deal with the flaws, keeping the characters authentic. I believe i could walk into any small town bookshop and t Absolutely LOVED this book! I just discovered Katherine Reay this year and have read through all of her books sequentially and waiting on pins and needles for this last one. I wasn’t disappointed. Each of her books are new and fresh and she weaves such a beautiful tapestry of story. As i have said in other reviews of her books....her characters are real, flaws and all. Her story lines deal with the flaws, keeping the characters authentic. I believe i could walk into any small town bookshop and there i would find Claire, Janet, and Madeline ... and through them, discover Maddie. I have definitely found a new favorite author!!Thank you to NetGalley and Thomas Nelson Publishers for the advance copy. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Martha
    January 1, 1970
    If you are a book lover, a book that features other book lovers warms your heart. This book is totally that way. The author takes a story of friendship surrounding books that will make you wish the bookstore truly exists somewhere. One thing that is unique about this story is that none of the characters have it "all together". They have messed up, some more than others. They were not really destined to be friends, until life throws them together. Love, forgiveness and finding what is truly impor If you are a book lover, a book that features other book lovers warms your heart. This book is totally that way. The author takes a story of friendship surrounding books that will make you wish the bookstore truly exists somewhere. One thing that is unique about this story is that none of the characters have it "all together". They have messed up, some more than others. They were not really destined to be friends, until life throws them together. Love, forgiveness and finding what is truly important in life are the themes of this novel. It is published as Christian fiction, but it is more for the thread of hope, love and forgiveness throughout the novel than for sermons, bible verses and quotes. I found myself wanting to highlight portions of the novel and remember what was said. I would highly recommend it. I obtained this book through the publisher and NetGalley. The opinions contained herein are my own.
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  • Chautona Havig
    January 1, 1970
    When A Lifelong Dream Gets Fulfilled in a Great BookI fell in love with Katherine Reay’s writing when I read Dear, Mr. Knightley. That Emma/Daddy-Long-Legs mashup was one of my favorite books of 2017. So, when I had the opportunity to request a review copy of another of her books, it was a no-brainer. Seeing it was about a bookshop, I filled out the form and waited for the day I could crack it open and read.Reay did something I would never have imagined would work. She wrote the book in tenses t When A Lifelong Dream Gets Fulfilled in a Great BookI fell in love with Katherine Reay’s writing when I read Dear, Mr. Knightley. That Emma/Daddy-Long-Legs mashup was one of my favorite books of 2017. So, when I had the opportunity to request a review copy of another of her books, it was a no-brainer. Seeing it was about a bookshop, I filled out the form and waited for the day I could crack it open and read.Reay did something I would never have imagined would work. She wrote the book in tenses that fit the POV character of the page. So, when we’re reading from Madeline’s perspective, we are treated to a simple first-person/past voice that feels authentic and engaged. After it changes to Claire’s perspective, we read in third-person past tense—very much who Claire is. When Janet splashes on the page, we shift to first-person present tense. And get this. I didn’t even mind! (although, if it had been the whole book, I might have—just being honest).To help us keep track, the heading of each section shows the name of the character who narrates that scene.The book is seemingly about a friendship forged between three women.That’s not quite accurate. One woman who is no longer on the scene so permeates the bookstore and the lives of the women who now run it, that she appears as a full-fledged character, nearly on every page. The writing is brilliant in that regard.Maddie never feels as though she’s intruding on the story. Instead, she’s a bit omnipresent—almost like an allusion to how the Lord is with us always. And yet, I don’t know that the author meant to do that. The subtle imagery just appears naturally.Which, of course, takes phenomenal writing skills. I’m just sayin’. Okay, so she does not hold a proper appreciation for the Oxford comma in her online writing, but that might be forgivable in light of an amazing book.This book has everything I love most (and I’m not even including the bookshop). You have deep yet floundering friendships, rich, raw, and flawed characters, subtle but strong spiritual themes, and just a beautiful hint of real romance.Aaah… romance.That romance appears, introduces all the feels, and tiptoes away so the characters can enjoy their own love stories without feeling like they’re on display for the world.I guess you could say the author respected the characters enough not to put their hearts on display and respected us enough to ensure we knew those hearts were entangled at just the right moments.Seriously, this book has everything!I don’t know who I wouldn’t recommend this book for. Even lovers of historical fiction might enjoy it simply because of the beautiful setting, the natural description, and the feel that we’ve stepped back into time… all with cellphones, internet, and snow plows. And let me tell you, I’ve never needed one of those suckers here in the desert, but after reading The Printed Letter Bookshop, I consider snow plows to be romantic little suckers and essential to my happiness.
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