Murder in the City of Liberty (A Van Buren and DeLuca Mystery #2)
Hamish DeLuca and Regina "Reggie" Van Buren have a new case--and this one brings the war in Europe dangerously close to home.Determined to make a life for herself, Regina "Reggie" Van Buren bid goodbye to fine china and the man her parents expected her to marry and escaped to Boston. What she never expected to discover was that an unknown talent for sleuthing would develop into a business partnership with the handsome, yet shy, Hamish DeLuca.Their latest case arrives when Errol Parker, the leading base stealer in the Boston farm leagues, hires Hamish and Reggie to investigate what the Boston police shove off as a series of harmless pranks. Errol believes these are hate crimes linked to the outbreak of war in Europe, and he's afraid for his life. Hamish and Reggie quickly find themselves in the midst of an escalating series of crimes that seem to link Boston to Hamish's hometown of Toronto.When an act of violence hits too close to home, Hamish is driven to a decision that may sever him from Reggie forever . . . even more than her engagement to wealthy architect Vaughan Vanderlaan.

Murder in the City of Liberty (A Van Buren and DeLuca Mystery #2) Details

TitleMurder in the City of Liberty (A Van Buren and DeLuca Mystery #2)
Author
ReleaseMay 28th, 2019
PublisherThomas Nelson
ISBN-139780785216964
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Romance

Murder in the City of Liberty (A Van Buren and DeLuca Mystery #2) Review

  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    Hamish and Reggie are doing SUCH a good job of being *"just friends"We're back in Boston and it is all cobblestones and cannoli....And there's Nate, of course, and Luca too! ....and baseball.Spira, Spera!*actually they're doing a terrible job of it.
  • Ivonne Rovira
    January 1, 1970
    Onetime socialite Regina “Reggie” Van Buren and shy lawyer Hamish DeLuca met in a previous book I haven’t read. But not having read the first in the series isn’t what kept me from enjoying this sequel in which the pair, now partners in a detective agency, look into some nasty pranks aimed at a baseball rising star. Set in Boston in 1940, Murder in the City of Liberty features characters that made me think of the 1980s television show Moonlighting: DeLuca is the stolid Cybil Shepherd character, w Onetime socialite Regina “Reggie” Van Buren and shy lawyer Hamish DeLuca met in a previous book I haven’t read. But not having read the first in the series isn’t what kept me from enjoying this sequel in which the pair, now partners in a detective agency, look into some nasty pranks aimed at a baseball rising star. Set in Boston in 1940, Murder in the City of Liberty features characters that made me think of the 1980s television show Moonlighting: DeLuca is the stolid Cybil Shepherd character, while Reggie’s the devil-may-care Bruce Willis stand-in. As on the show, there’s a sexual tension between the two characters, with the female reluctant to reciprocate the male’s love. How could such a set-up go wrong?Ask author Rachel McMillan. Somehow I could never get into this cozy mystery. Reggie seemed so foolhardy and thoughtless (her quest for “adventure” always seems to create trouble for DeLuca), and Deluca seems like such a sad sack that I have to admit that I couldn’t force myself to finish this book. Say what you like about the original Moonlighting, the actors made you care about the characters they played, Maddie Hayes and David Addison, and neither made stupid mistakes. I simply couldn’t make myself feel the same way about DeLuca and Reggie.I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Maureen Timerman
    January 1, 1970
    I was having a bit of a time to get into this story, but soon realized that this was the second book, and I did feel lost.While this story takes place just prior to WWII we meet prejudice and antisemitism head on, and there is a mystery and sparks flying, I’ll admit I had to fight my way through this book. I have a fondness for the Red Socks, and this baseball team led me there, but maybe I needed the first book to really get this book.I received this book through Net Galley and the Publisher Th I was having a bit of a time to get into this story, but soon realized that this was the second book, and I did feel lost.While this story takes place just prior to WWII we meet prejudice and antisemitism head on, and there is a mystery and sparks flying, I’ll admit I had to fight my way through this book. I have a fondness for the Red Socks, and this baseball team led me there, but maybe I needed the first book to really get this book.I received this book through Net Galley and the Publisher Thomas Nelson, and was not required to give a positive review.
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  • Jes Drew
    January 1, 1970
    This novel was the epitome of historical romantic mysteries set in 30s Boston, with all the civil unrest, tension between the protagonists, and the underlying web binding crime and their pasts together. Reggie is her usual charming self- even as the loved ones of her former life jeopardize her independence. Hamich stands tall as a strong man despite his disability, and shines an honesty seldom seen in fiction. And Lucas stays in the shadows, a safe distance from his beloved cousin as he moves fu This novel was the epitome of historical romantic mysteries set in 30s Boston, with all the civil unrest, tension between the protagonists, and the underlying web binding crime and their pasts together. Reggie is her usual charming self- even as the loved ones of her former life jeopardize her independence. Hamich stands tall as a strong man despite his disability, and shines an honesty seldom seen in fiction. And Lucas stays in the shadows, a safe distance from his beloved cousin as he moves further into the world of crime- but still manages to charm himself into his status as a favorite character. And, of course, there is Nate, good old Nate- who doesn't deserve any of the antisemitism threatening Boston. The historical aspect itself is rife with tension revealing an evil that haunted that era, and tragically today as well. The author also does such a spectacular job at instilling the aura and lingo of the times, giving an atmospheric immersion of 1930s. The romance really rises in tension in this installment, with our characters having been partners for a couple years now (and Hamich being the only honest one in the relationship), but a side romance also rises. And the mystery takes a darker turn than I was expecting, knocking me off guard, but these deadly beliefs have deadly consequences. Anyway, if you enjoy historical novels, romantic novels, and/or mysteries, you will enjoy this expertly crafted story. I received a copy of this book from the publisher, and the views and opinions are my own.
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  • Kelly Bridgewater
    January 1, 1970
    Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan is a story filled with accurate details and a nod to classic literature. The story does have a dead body in it and does move the story along, but, I believe, the plot is more a cultural nod to the social and racial tensions of the 1940's. America is on the brink of World War II, even though majority of the citizens want to ignore the rising terror. McMillan jumps into the plot and brings 1940's Boston to life. I really enjoy her attention to hist Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan is a story filled with accurate details and a nod to classic literature. The story does have a dead body in it and does move the story along, but, I believe, the plot is more a cultural nod to the social and racial tensions of the 1940's. America is on the brink of World War II, even though majority of the citizens want to ignore the rising terror. McMillan jumps into the plot and brings 1940's Boston to life. I really enjoy her attention to historical detail with her settings and bringing the conflicts to light. The romantic heat between Hamish and Reggie spark even hotter in this addition of their story. McMillan does wonderfully at creating a story that grips my attention and kept me glued to the page. I finished the whole novel in under one day. Wonderful story. I can't wait to see what troubles and romance come to Hamish and Reggie next.I received a complimentary copy of Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan from Thomas Nelson publishing, but the opinions stated are all my own.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    On a scale of cotton candy and Brussels sprouts, Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan is unlimited kettle corn. Lightly sweet with a touch of saltiness, kettle corn is an addictive crunch that you can't feel bad consuming. What's another handful?Regina, known as Reggie by her friends, and Hamish are decently good amateur sleuths. Hired to figure out what's going on in the life of a famous baseball player, they find more questions than answers. Then, in the midst of it all, Reggie fac On a scale of cotton candy and Brussels sprouts, Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan is unlimited kettle corn. Lightly sweet with a touch of saltiness, kettle corn is an addictive crunch that you can't feel bad consuming. What's another handful?Regina, known as Reggie by her friends, and Hamish are decently good amateur sleuths. Hired to figure out what's going on in the life of a famous baseball player, they find more questions than answers. Then, in the midst of it all, Reggie faces family responsibility that clashes with her heart while a familiar but dangerous face from Hamish's past reappears.Once again, I've managed to start a series right smack in the middle. I do this. All the time! But, I had heard about Rachel McMillan's author prowess for a long time, and I jumped at the chance to read this book of hers. Now, I don't read mystery often, but I did enjoy Reggie and Hamish so much along with the details of Boston. Without being a mystery connoisseur, I'd like to say that story offered a little something for everyone--strong female heroine, quirky male lead, murder, romance, history, and so much more.If you enjoy history, mystery, and strong characters, Murder in the City of Liberty is for you.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    I love a mystery that uses the political and sociocultural influences of the times to enhance the story. Boston is the setting, in the 1940’s, where racism and corruption exist in the background. Reggie and Hamish are hired to find out who is harassing a Black baseball player, when they become enmeshed in a deeper mystery. I love these two characters, but did find the various Mob like characters and the subplot a bit difficult to follow. If you enjoyed Murder at the Flamingo, this 2nd in the ser I love a mystery that uses the political and sociocultural influences of the times to enhance the story. Boston is the setting, in the 1940’s, where racism and corruption exist in the background. Reggie and Hamish are hired to find out who is harassing a Black baseball player, when they become enmeshed in a deeper mystery. I love these two characters, but did find the various Mob like characters and the subplot a bit difficult to follow. If you enjoyed Murder at the Flamingo, this 2nd in the series is a must.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Historical fiction with a touch of crime is always appealing to me--and, this book' set in Boston, 1940 held a lot of promise for me. The two protagonists are compelling characters but the mystery takes a very distant second place to the romance. And, for me that was both boring and tedious.I wanted the modest, but dashing, hero to win the girl. And, I was prepared for him to have to earn his place before she came to her senses----but, all of the tension in the book seemed to be romantic, not pl Historical fiction with a touch of crime is always appealing to me--and, this book' set in Boston, 1940 held a lot of promise for me. The two protagonists are compelling characters but the mystery takes a very distant second place to the romance. And, for me that was both boring and tedious.I wanted the modest, but dashing, hero to win the girl. And, I was prepared for him to have to earn his place before she came to her senses----but, all of the tension in the book seemed to be romantic, not plot inspired. The criminal aspects of the book were convoluted enough (although secondary) that I was frequently confused---and, this book did not merit the reader getting confused about "who's on first."This is a series I wanted to enjoy. With characters crafted to earn our affection and interest. But, the author just didn't deliver enough story or depth of character to really engage me.Netgalley provided me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Janka H.
    January 1, 1970
    Reggie and Hamish sleuthing team is at work to solve the seemingly petty crimes in the baseball world. After two years, Reggie and Hamish are still friends. Oh wells, good luck with that. Luckily, there are gangsters of all sorts to provide the opening for the changes in their relationship status - or to make them suffer. Or both. Unfortunately, this second installments does not hold my excitement of the first volume. Maybe because I am not interested in baseball. Or maybe I am too much interest Reggie and Hamish sleuthing team is at work to solve the seemingly petty crimes in the baseball world. After two years, Reggie and Hamish are still friends. Oh wells, good luck with that. Luckily, there are gangsters of all sorts to provide the opening for the changes in their relationship status - or to make them suffer. Or both. Unfortunately, this second installments does not hold my excitement of the first volume. Maybe because I am not interested in baseball. Or maybe I am too much interested in the bad boy Luca. Or maybe because Reggie and Hamish's "friendship" can be dragged only for so long. What they have been doing during the two years from our last meeting? So while this series have awaken my need to visit Boston and to watch couple of movies from the Hollywood Golden Era, I would prefer more active sleuthing. And more Luca! Luca, truly, is soul of this series for me - a bit darkened, but the more interesting for it!I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Seema Rao
    January 1, 1970
    Fast-paced ~ Richly-detailed ~ Stressfultl;dr: Mystery in Boston touches on prejudice. This face-paced mystery novel set at the cusp of War War II tells about the American milieu. Boston was full of baseball, beautiful buildings, and antisemitism. This a great historic mystery, and I didn't quite know the perpetrator. Reggie, the main female character, makes this a great read. I will definitely add this Canadian author to my list of historic mystery favs. I received a complimentary copy of this Fast-paced ~ Richly-detailed ~ Stressfultl;dr: Mystery in Boston touches on prejudice. This face-paced mystery novel set at the cusp of War War II tells about the American milieu. Boston was full of baseball, beautiful buildings, and antisemitism. This a great historic mystery, and I didn't quite know the perpetrator. Reggie, the main female character, makes this a great read. I will definitely add this Canadian author to my list of historic mystery favs. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Dawn Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    5.22.2019Read 100 pagesDID NOT FINISHI should have trusted my gut and not requested this one when it became available; after not liking the first one, I should have known that this one was going to be not for me, but I am always hopeful and optimistic, so I went ahead and got this one. Ahhh, yeah. This one is not working for me either. I don't like the characters or the pacing or really, anything about this book. Sigh. Thank you to NetGalley and Thomas Nelson - Fiction for providing this ARC in 5.22.2019Read 100 pagesDID NOT FINISHI should have trusted my gut and not requested this one when it became available; after not liking the first one, I should have known that this one was going to be not for me, but I am always hopeful and optimistic, so I went ahead and got this one. Ahhh, yeah. This one is not working for me either. I don't like the characters or the pacing or really, anything about this book. Sigh. Thank you to NetGalley and Thomas Nelson - Fiction for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Melissa Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 3.5/5Murder in the City of Liberty is set two years after the first book Murder at the Flamingo. Europe and Hamish’s homeland Canada are at war, but the US has yet to join. Although they were not yet in the trenches; racism and anti-Semitism was growing fast. This second book in the Van Buren and DeLuca series was more exciting than Murder at the Flamingo. It did rely on the past events and characters, so I would definitely recommend reading the series in order. Even though I wasn’t exac Rating: 3.5/5Murder in the City of Liberty is set two years after the first book Murder at the Flamingo. Europe and Hamish’s homeland Canada are at war, but the US has yet to join. Although they were not yet in the trenches; racism and anti-Semitism was growing fast. This second book in the Van Buren and DeLuca series was more exciting than Murder at the Flamingo. It did rely on the past events and characters, so I would definitely recommend reading the series in order. Even though I wasn’t exactly captured by the mystery itself, there were several aspects that I did enjoy. Those include:The baseball storyline, which added to the patriotic theme, that painted a vivid picture of 1940’s America.The way McMillan was able to write a murder mystery centered around such atrocities without using a single racial slur, profanity or graphic descriptions of violence. And of course; my favourite character Hamish DeLuca, who is the epitome of a gentleman. Rachel McMillan is a talented writer who I would highly recommend. NOTE: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Karin Carlson
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second book in the series involving Hamish and Reggie. I was hoping they would have improved since the first outing but sadly they may have gotten worse. I had such a hard time finishing this. It, much like the first one, was not too mysterious. Or thrilling. The way the characters behave is somewhat incoherent.....As if they aren’t fully formed humans yet and they are both old enough to be exercising far better judgment then they do here. The problem with the first book continues to This is the second book in the series involving Hamish and Reggie. I was hoping they would have improved since the first outing but sadly they may have gotten worse. I had such a hard time finishing this. It, much like the first one, was not too mysterious. Or thrilling. The way the characters behave is somewhat incoherent.....As if they aren’t fully formed humans yet and they are both old enough to be exercising far better judgment then they do here. The problem with the first book continues to follow this author.....taking way too long to do anything with the plot to grab your reader. The whole first 1/3 of the book was almost boring. They say the third time is the charm so I will read the third book in this series if the author writes one but I really can’t recommend this one. Thank you NetGalley for providing me with an advanced copy for review.
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  • Amanda G. Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    From my endorsement (which ended up on the front cover. Oh. My. Squee.): Rachel McMillan paints her portrait of 1940 Boston with brushes of poetry, humor, and care for historical detail. In this sequel she brings us home, not only to a city she clearly loves, but also to her winning cast of characters. Flavored with quipping nods to The Thin Man and imbued with insecurities and prejudices of the time and place, Murder in the City of Liberty is an irresistible read.Other thoughts: LUCA. And Ray. From my endorsement (which ended up on the front cover. Oh. My. Squee.): Rachel McMillan paints her portrait of 1940 Boston with brushes of poetry, humor, and care for historical detail. In this sequel she brings us home, not only to a city she clearly loves, but also to her winning cast of characters. Flavored with quipping nods to The Thin Man and imbued with insecurities and prejudices of the time and place, Murder in the City of Liberty is an irresistible read.Other thoughts: LUCA. And Ray. And a revelation at the end that promises great conflict between the cousins in Book 3. Looking forward to the fallout and, I trust, redemption.
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  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    Private investigators Reggie Van Buren and Hamish DeLuca are asked to look into a property development that is threatening to push out an old wharf in Boston. But when they show up, the person who called them suddenly doesn’t seem to want their help anymore. That doesn’t mean they are going to let things go, though. An African American minor league baseball player also has come to them for help in figuring out who has upped the pranks against him to a threatening level. The problem is, it is 194 Private investigators Reggie Van Buren and Hamish DeLuca are asked to look into a property development that is threatening to push out an old wharf in Boston. But when they show up, the person who called them suddenly doesn’t seem to want their help anymore. That doesn’t mean they are going to let things go, though. An African American minor league baseball player also has come to them for help in figuring out who has upped the pranks against him to a threatening level. The problem is, it is 1940 and the number of people who don’t like a man of his color is quite high. Is it someone on the baseball team who feels threatened by how good he is? Is it someone influenced by the “Christian Patriots” group spouting hateful philosophies outside the stadium every day? And as if two cases that seem to be going nowhere aren’t enough, Reggie is also trying to figure out if she should follow her heart or her family’s expectations regarding who she should marry, and Hamish is worried about his gangster cousin’s return to town and the uncharacteristic secretive tendencies of his roommate Nate of late.I have not read the first book in this series, and I usually don’t like to jump into a series in the middle. But they recapped events in the first book enough and characters were re-introduced sufficiently that I feel like I wasn’t missing anything. You can totally read this one without reading the first book. It seems fitting that Reggie frequently mentions The Thin Man movies and their characters, Nick and Nora Charles, in this book because she and Reggie’s mystery solving adventures do remind me of theirs. Like those movies (I can’t speak to the books as I haven’t read them), the book spends equal amounts of time on the character’s lives as on the mystery solving. And the time period is the same. Reggie is a debutante who came from old money and struck out to be an independent woman though she still has one foot in that old world and she can’t quite figure out if she wants to or even can completely leave the socialite world. She is bold and adventurous, sometimes to a fault. Hamish is a complicated character. He is kind and compassionate, but also sometimes lets his heart take over his head in moments of being overwhelmed with negative emotions. He struggles with anxiety and panic attacks, and I’ve never seen another private investigator dealing with those issues but also with a strong enough passion for justice he works to overcome them to solve cases even if it gets dangerous. It is a different thing for this genre, but a good thing. The author says in the back that she herself has lived with these issues and wanted to create a character that helps bring awareness and understanding of people who live with anxiety. Definitely pick up the book for that reason alone. The mystery elements of the story were complicated and sometimes a bit muddled (as would probably be true during an investigation). Towards the end of the book it felt like the characters’ stories and dealing with prejudice (against African Americans, Jews, lower classes, etc.) took over and the cases were secondary. It wasn’t bad, it's just a different kind of mystery novel. Sometimes the cases can take so much precedence that characters in a mystery novel can be super stereotypical and cardboard-like that this could be a refreshingly different read for many readers. My one qualm with the book was hopefully something that was fixed with the final edits (I read an advanced reader copy). I felt like there were frequent moments when there was little to no transition from one scene to another and we’re suddenly in a different time and place. It was jarring, but again, I’m guessing this was fixed with final edits. This book is published by a Christian publisher but there was little to no content that made this book Christian per se. Recommended to those who like pre-WWII mysteries, books set in Boston, books that explore issues of injustice or misunderstood people, and clean historical romance fans.Notes on content [based on ARC]: No language issues. No sexual content beyond some kissing and close dancing. There are two murders but very little gory details. Some perilous situations that result in mild to moderate injuries that aren’t gorily described. Racial hate is spouted by some characters that are not painted in a good light. Some consumption of alcohol by various characters, and true to the time period, some characters smoke (but this was very minimal… lower than would have been true of the time period).I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    If you asked me who my favorite mystery-solving couples of the 1930s and 1940s are, I would have to say Tommy and Tuppence (even though they started in the 1920s, Mr and Mrs North, Nick and Nora, and Hamish and Reggie.Okay, so Hamish and Reggie are only SET in the 1930s and 1940s, but they have so much of the same feel. Rachel McMillan has written their story (starting with Murder at the Flamingo) is such a way that it's hard to remember sometimes that it has a 2019 publication date and not one If you asked me who my favorite mystery-solving couples of the 1930s and 1940s are, I would have to say Tommy and Tuppence (even though they started in the 1920s, Mr and Mrs North, Nick and Nora, and Hamish and Reggie.Okay, so Hamish and Reggie are only SET in the 1930s and 1940s, but they have so much of the same feel. Rachel McMillan has written their story (starting with Murder at the Flamingo) is such a way that it's hard to remember sometimes that it has a 2019 publication date and not one 70-80 years prior. It's hard to explain since it isn't as though the English language has really changed all that much since then ... but the feel and flow have. You know? Maybe? A little?Murder in the City of Liberty takes place two years after Murder at the Flamingo and is, once again, perfectly set in Boston. The States aren't quite in the War yet, but tensions are running high amongst the classes and the immigrants. Through it all, though, there's baseball. There will likely always be baseball in Boston. Being a Braves girl I would have preferred them to be the team in question rather than the Red Sox .... but I get it. Even though I'm a Braves girl, Fenway is far more exciting than The Wigwam probably would have been for your average reader. Wow. Ramble much?(The baseball tangent is more than just a tangent for the book -- it's at the heart of one of Reggie and Hamish's cases as they're hired by a minor-league player to investigate "pranks" the police can't be bothered with.) I didn't enjoy this as much as I did the first, but it's still a good read and I would recommend McMillan's books to anyone who likes a good historical mystery. I definitely recommend reading Murder at the Flamingo first, though. Not only is it a great book, but the backstory between the characters there and I'll never complain about more Nate and Luca. (I do need Maisie, though. A lot of Maisie. Up close and personal Maisie. You're killing me here, Rachel!)
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    I had difficulty reading this novel. I was confused by the beginning, starting with Luca. I remember wondering who Luca was when this novel was about deLuca. That chapter would have better been placed later, after identifying the relationship between those cousins.Then there was an immediate introduction of a number of characters from the previous novel. The back story of their involvement in that novel was reviewed but I was at a loss until about a third of the way into the book as to how they I had difficulty reading this novel. I was confused by the beginning, starting with Luca. I remember wondering who Luca was when this novel was about deLuca. That chapter would have better been placed later, after identifying the relationship between those cousins.Then there was an immediate introduction of a number of characters from the previous novel. The back story of their involvement in that novel was reviewed but I was at a loss until about a third of the way into the book as to how they figured in this one.I did not find the main characters engaging. Someone mentions to Hamish about traveling from Boston to Cincinnati, for example. “Hamish knew nothing about American geography. 'Is that far?'” (1319/3875) I don't mind a bumbling hero but I don't like a stupid one. I just never found anything engaging about Hamish. Reggie seemed like a foolhardy woman to me. I did not find her decisions to pursue a vague sense of adventure endearing. The relationship between the two of them seemed to be the focus of the novel. I would have rather had the focus be the cases Hamish was working on with the romance/friendship tension a side issue.I did appreciate learning a bit about minor league baseball in the 1930s as well as the housing situation in Boston.This is not a stand alone novel. One must have read the first in the series and I would suggest having read it very recently. Potential readers would need to be satisfied with a plot heavy on relationship issues rather than sleuthing.I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review. I read an ARC and the quote I noted in my review may have changed in the final edition of the book.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    “Murder is a by-the-way when there are so many bigger things at play.” -Hamish DeLucaWelcome back to Boston! Hamish DeLuca, a handsome upright young man who works as an investigator and part-time attorney, and his perky well-bred partner, Regina “Reggie” Van Buren, are now running their own firm in the historical part of town. Although the office is a bit slow, the two are always on the lookout for any type of investigative business that looks the least bit interesting and mysterious. When Reggi “Murder is a by-the-way when there are so many bigger things at play.” -Hamish DeLucaWelcome back to Boston! Hamish DeLuca, a handsome upright young man who works as an investigator and part-time attorney, and his perky well-bred partner, Regina “Reggie” Van Buren, are now running their own firm in the historical part of town. Although the office is a bit slow, the two are always on the lookout for any type of investigative business that looks the least bit interesting and mysterious. When Reggie takes a call from someone who won’t give his name, their lives become extremely interesting. The shadowy figure of Luca Valari, Hamish’s flamboyant, troublesome cousin, seems to lurk in the background of their current problems along with Dirk, one of Reggie’s old friends who works at the architecture firm of her good friend and sometimes boyfriend, Vaughn Vanderlaan. As Hamish and Reggie increasingly find themselves drawn in to multiple situations that seem to be tied together, their investigative work takes them to the baseball field, Fiske’s Wharf, and other shadowy places.The characters in this novel continue to develop and add even more personality to the series. Once again the suspense pulls the reader in and draws them through the story. Love, loyalty, prejudice, and honor all play into the heart of this tale. A captivating, suspenseful read that will take the reader right into the heart and soul of Boston with an entertaining mix of historical fiction, mystery, and romance! Bring the next one on!! This ARC copy was received from Thomas Nelson Publishers. The above thoughts and opinions are wholly my own.
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  • Best In Suspense - Kelly Underwood
    January 1, 1970
    Hamish DeLuca and Reggie Van Buren are back in action with their own private investigation firm. Just be warned that it helps to read Murder at the Flamingo to know what’s happened in the past. This isn’t meant as a stand-alone novel. While there is a murder (as the title implies) much of the story involves Hamish and Reggie sorting out their feelings for one another. I love the settings and characters. The author paints a fabulous backdrop with Boston in the late 1930’s/early 1940’s. Just befor Hamish DeLuca and Reggie Van Buren are back in action with their own private investigation firm. Just be warned that it helps to read Murder at the Flamingo to know what’s happened in the past. This isn’t meant as a stand-alone novel. While there is a murder (as the title implies) much of the story involves Hamish and Reggie sorting out their feelings for one another. I love the settings and characters. The author paints a fabulous backdrop with Boston in the late 1930’s/early 1940’s. Just before the US joins WWII, racial and political tensions create an interesting and historical window into this time period. Hamish will steal the reader’s heart as he struggles to overcome anxiety to forge his own way in life, similar to what Reggie is doing by making hard choices to leave the past behind while she finds her own identity. The mystery part wasn’t as intriguing as the setting and characters and played a secondary role for me, so the element of suspense wasn’t there. It wasn’t a fast-paced novel, yet I became completely immersed in Murder in the City of Liberty. It definitely transports readers to a different time period where the characters come to life on every page. The characters have real flaws and struggles, making them vulnerable in a way that tugs on your heart strings.I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Rachel Mcmillan's unique voice never fails to draw me into her stories. Her love of Boston and attention to historical detail is evident in this 1940 mystery. America is hovering on the brink of war and the tensions felt by people from all walks of life are the unifying thread between different cases amateur sleuths Hamish and Reggie are solving. Filled with wit and romance, there is plenty of danger to please readers of historical mysteries. While Hamish needs to face shadows from his past, Reg Rachel Mcmillan's unique voice never fails to draw me into her stories. Her love of Boston and attention to historical detail is evident in this 1940 mystery. America is hovering on the brink of war and the tensions felt by people from all walks of life are the unifying thread between different cases amateur sleuths Hamish and Reggie are solving. Filled with wit and romance, there is plenty of danger to please readers of historical mysteries. While Hamish needs to face shadows from his past, Reggie needs to reconcile her past with her dreams for her future. While the story is filled with lighthearted witty banter, the author addresses several serious issues such as anxiety disorders and racial tensions that are relevant regardless of historical setting. With one of the storylines following the baseball farm teams and another the underworld of the mob, the reader is easily drawn into Hamish and Reggie's world of 1940 Boston. I loved the bookish nod Ms. McMillan gives to the beloved characters from the classic, The Hunchback of Notre Dame. While I adore Hamish as the hero of the story, I quickly became a fan of his friend Nate. I eagerly await the next adventure of our sleuthing couple and their friends. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book from the author/publisher. I was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • E
    January 1, 1970
    I love old movies. In fact, if you give me a choice between a clean modern movie and an old movie, I will almost always choose the old movie. I don't know what it is about old movies but the actresses are classier, the actors are more handsome and debonair and the acting is so much better. Even though it is a new book,  Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan is written in the style of an old black and white movie. I even read it in black and white! And I don't mean just black words on I love old movies. In fact, if you give me a choice between a clean modern movie and an old movie, I will almost always choose the old movie. I don't know what it is about old movies but the actresses are classier, the actors are more handsome and debonair and the acting is so much better. Even though it is a new book,  Murder in the City of Liberty by Rachel McMillan is written in the style of an old black and white movie. I even read it in black and white! And I don't mean just black words on a white page, but I actually pictured what was happening in black and white. If you've read and enjoyed the first book in the series, Murder at the Flamingo, then  you will definitely want to read this book. It picks up a couple years later and puts you right in the middle of Boston just before the United States joins World War II.  It has exciting moments, romantic moments, and moments that had me wondering if the book was going to end in the way I wanted it to. It was fantastic. So, if you are wanting to read a book that is like an old classic movie, try Murder in the City of Liberty. I recommend this book to anyone who loves old movies, the 1940s, baseball, mystery, romance and historical fiction.I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Cass
    January 1, 1970
    “A little mystery, lots of injustice.”Murder in the City of Liberty centres on a crime-solving duo - former heiress Regina “Reggie” Van Buren and shy lawyer Hamish DeLuca - who receive their latest case in the form of a series of hate crimes potentially linked to the outbreak of war in Europe.I put off reading this book for ages, even knowing that I’d probably love it. But the first chapter really put me off. I felt like I’d missed a chapter or a book before this one - and I had, because it’s th “A little mystery, lots of injustice.”Murder in the City of Liberty centres on a crime-solving duo - former heiress Regina “Reggie” Van Buren and shy lawyer Hamish DeLuca - who receive their latest case in the form of a series of hate crimes potentially linked to the outbreak of war in Europe.I put off reading this book for ages, even knowing that I’d probably love it. But the first chapter really put me off. I felt like I’d missed a chapter or a book before this one - and I had, because it’s the second book in a series. However, there are ways to make subsequent books in a series accessible to a reader without ruining a book, and, indeed, the book’s second chapter goes on to do that perfectly. It would honestly have been a much much better way to start the book.It’s hard to tell the actual tone - it alternates between philosophical gangster-noir and… lyrical historical romance? without much effort to mesh the two. Despite that, it’s well-written and flows nicely. The story is interesting, but I wouldn’t call it engaging.Overall, a nice read with an excellent concept but not exceptional by any means.I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Dorothy
    January 1, 1970
    I chose to read this book based on the time period and the description of the story and the heroine, Reggie, and her quest for independence. I was not aware that this was the second book with these characters; I felt left out through some of the story, even as much as the author tried to fill in the details of what happened in the first novel as they affect this one. I feel like this is not so much a detective novel as it is a romance and a commentary on the place and time (Boston during the tim I chose to read this book based on the time period and the description of the story and the heroine, Reggie, and her quest for independence. I was not aware that this was the second book with these characters; I felt left out through some of the story, even as much as the author tried to fill in the details of what happened in the first novel as they affect this one. I feel like this is not so much a detective novel as it is a romance and a commentary on the place and time (Boston during the time of WWII before the USA entered). Reggie frequently compares herself and her business partner, Hamish, to Nick and Nora Charles (but no Asta) of The Thin Man movie series, and, though they lack their sophistication, like them they stumble through or upon the clues, and find themselves among many characters and misleading information.I like this novel for its view of Boston and the underlying themes of friendship and loyalty. The characters are interesting and complex enough be able to support the story. There are some parts that drag, especially the political discussions. I also appreciate the clean language and lack of overt violence and sexuality.I received a free copy of this book from Amazon Vine in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Spira, Spera! (I want this necklace, does it exist?)I'll start by saying that you really do need to read the first book in this series to get the entire picture. I believe I would have been pretty lost, especially with so much reference to what went on and the continuing storylines from that book (and actually, if you want to get the *real* whole picture you should read the Herringford and Watts series before this one, you're welcome)I just love the banter and interplay between Reggie and Hamish Spira, Spera! (I want this necklace, does it exist?)I'll start by saying that you really do need to read the first book in this series to get the entire picture. I believe I would have been pretty lost, especially with so much reference to what went on and the continuing storylines from that book (and actually, if you want to get the *real* whole picture you should read the Herringford and Watts series before this one, you're welcome)I just love the banter and interplay between Reggie and Hamish. Hamish is such a fabulous character, but I truly care about both of them as if they were real people. This isn't an easy-read mystery, there are many characters and a good deal of action, you need to pay close attention to what's going on. Even in the end, I'm not totally sure what I think about one of the characters...This book and this series is a treat to read. I stayed up WAY too late reading and now I'll be thinking about it for days. Can't wait for the next one.I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.
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  • Celia
    January 1, 1970
    This is a second book in a mystery series. I did not have the benefit of reading the first book. Like some other modern mystery series, the latter books must recount much of the action of the earlier books. Like some of the recent mystery series I recently have read, the focus of the story is about the main characters and the mystery plays a secondary role.The strength of the book is that it gives what feels like an authentic picture of Boston at a certain period. The weakness of the book is tha This is a second book in a mystery series. I did not have the benefit of reading the first book. Like some other modern mystery series, the latter books must recount much of the action of the earlier books. Like some of the recent mystery series I recently have read, the focus of the story is about the main characters and the mystery plays a secondary role.The strength of the book is that it gives what feels like an authentic picture of Boston at a certain period. The weakness of the book is that I did not find Regina van Buren, the main female character, very convincing. I did not understand what makes her rebel against her society upbringing. Hamish Luca the main male protagonist of the novel is somewhat more believable. Still I found it hard to believe that a lawyer trained in Canada could easily practice law in the United States.I received a free copy of this book from Negalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Patti Whitson Stephenson
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this book makes me feel as if I’d just watched an old pre-war 1940’s movie. I was glad to read more of Reggie and Hamish’s story. The author makes references to this in the book, but they could be modeled after Nick and Nora Charles in “The Thin Man” movies filmed during that era. The description fits this time period perfectly with the music, parties, and glamour. The historical details enhance the story. The dialogue between Reggie and Hamish is sparkling and helps define their charact Reading this book makes me feel as if I’d just watched an old pre-war 1940’s movie. I was glad to read more of Reggie and Hamish’s story. The author makes references to this in the book, but they could be modeled after Nick and Nora Charles in “The Thin Man” movies filmed during that era. The description fits this time period perfectly with the music, parties, and glamour. The historical details enhance the story. The dialogue between Reggie and Hamish is sparkling and helps define their characters. There’s quite a mystery to be solved. It was interesting and held my attention. I’ve never been quite sure if Reggie would end up marrying Hamish or Vaughn, but this book helped answer that question. Hamish is a great fictional character. I’m still warming up to Reggie, and hope to read more about them in another book in this series.I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    The setting and time period of this book were very fun to me...1940 in Boston. I loved the descriptions of the sights and sounds of the city. I haven't read many books that take place in this time period so it was interesting to read about. I struggled a bit with the author's writing style. It was a bit hard for me to follow at times and she made a lot of references to "Old Hollywood" films and the book "Hunchback of Notre Dame". I'm not well versed or interested in these things so those parts w The setting and time period of this book were very fun to me...1940 in Boston. I loved the descriptions of the sights and sounds of the city. I haven't read many books that take place in this time period so it was interesting to read about. I struggled a bit with the author's writing style. It was a bit hard for me to follow at times and she made a lot of references to "Old Hollywood" films and the book "Hunchback of Notre Dame". I'm not well versed or interested in these things so those parts were difficult for me to get through (I'm sure that those that enjoy these things would love those segments).The characters were all interesting...they each had many facets and their personalities were very well described and fleshed out. I appreciated that Hamish struggled with anxiety as that is still a rare thing to find in fiction these days. I received this book to review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Claudia
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed Murder I the City of Liberty, but I was constantly aware of the fact that I would have understood the characters and the plot better had I read Murder at the Flamingo first. So of course that is what I recommend doing. Even without that advantage, I was quickly pulled into the lives of Regina (Reggie) Van Buren and Hamish DeLuca, private investigators in 1940s Boston. Regina brings a connection to high society, Hamish to the underworld through his cousin Luca, and both to the m I really enjoyed Murder I the City of Liberty, but I was constantly aware of the fact that I would have understood the characters and the plot better had I read Murder at the Flamingo first. So of course that is what I recommend doing. Even without that advantage, I was quickly pulled into the lives of Regina (Reggie) Van Buren and Hamish DeLuca, private investigators in 1940s Boston. Regina brings a connection to high society, Hamish to the underworld through his cousin Luca, and both to the minority community of the North End. Sometimes these connections create complications more than they help as Reggie and Hamish pursue their current case involving Minor League Baseball, the building of tenements and the smuggling of munitions as the world waits to see if the United States will join the second great war. I was grateful to have received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Even better than the first one! I felt like we got a lot more character development with Reggie and Hamish, individually (and together...). I will say I enjoyed the character plot on their development even more than their latest mystery, but it was such a good read. I enjoy the setting, I feel like I have a good picture of the city, of their neighborhood. I also enjoy Hamish's overlay of the city with his favorite novel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame. This story is supposed to take place two years Even better than the first one! I felt like we got a lot more character development with Reggie and Hamish, individually (and together...). I will say I enjoyed the character plot on their development even more than their latest mystery, but it was such a good read. I enjoy the setting, I feel like I have a good picture of the city, of their neighborhood. I also enjoy Hamish's overlay of the city with his favorite novel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame. This story is supposed to take place two years after the last book - this was my only qualm with the story. The characters do not seem to have moved two years ahead, there doesn't seem to be enough history mentioned to make up for it. The story picks up like there hasn't been any time lapse at all. If I hadn't been told two years had passed, I wouldn't have known, and so I just kind of ignored that fact. I feel like the only reason that was even included was to put us at the proper time on the eve of the War for certain aspects of the story. BUT! Nevertheless, a great read. Evil isn't always what it seems on the surface, and everything you thought you knew about the villains will be challenged. Read on!
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  • Marguerite Gray
    January 1, 1970
    If you like mysteries and detective stories, Murder in the City of Liberty brings all the elements of the genre together in a 1940 Boston crime venue. Reggie Van Buren and Hamish DeLuca join in an unlikely venture to save their city from the corrupt vices of organized crime. McMillan does an excellent job of leaving the reader in suspense until all the pieces line up. McMillan is a new author to me. I love her use of The Hunchback of Notre Dame (one of my favorite novels) as lessons on solving p If you like mysteries and detective stories, Murder in the City of Liberty brings all the elements of the genre together in a 1940 Boston crime venue. Reggie Van Buren and Hamish DeLuca join in an unlikely venture to save their city from the corrupt vices of organized crime. McMillan does an excellent job of leaving the reader in suspense until all the pieces line up. McMillan is a new author to me. I love her use of The Hunchback of Notre Dame (one of my favorite novels) as lessons on solving problems and focusing on solutions. Her characters come to life exposing their flaws alongside their charm, wit, and enthusiasm for life in the city.I plan on reading more of McMillan’s novels in order to fulfill my desire for captivating mystery.
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