We All Fall Down
Not since Pandemic have we seen a thriller like this from bestselling author Daniel Kalla: The plague has hit Italy. Can Dr. Alana Vaughn find the source in time to save the world?No person is left unscathed, no family untouched. Death grows insatiable.Alana Vaughn, an infectious diseases expert with NATO, is urgently summoned to Genoa by an ex-lover to examine a critically ill patient. She’s stunned to discover that the illness is a recurrence of the Black Death. Alana soon suspects bioterrorism, but her WHO counterpart, Byron Menke, disagrees. In their desperate hunt to track down Patient Zero, they stumble across an 800-year-old monastery and a medieval journal that might hold the secret to the present-day outbreak. With the lethal disease spreading fast and no end in sight, it’s a race against time to uncover the truth before millions die.

We All Fall Down Details

TitleWe All Fall Down
Author
ReleaseMar 26th, 2019
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN-139781501196935
Rating
GenreThriller, Fiction

We All Fall Down Review

  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. I wish to thank NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for this ARC in return for an honest review. I was not aware of any current medical mysteries, a category I used to enjoy. The author, Daniel Kalla , is an emergency room doctor, who puts his medical and scientific knowledge, as well as research into the epidemiology of the Black Death into a convincing narrative. The book was well written with believable and interesting characters. I sometimes felt a lack of connection with the prot 3.5 stars. I wish to thank NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for this ARC in return for an honest review. I was not aware of any current medical mysteries, a category I used to enjoy. The author, Daniel Kalla , is an emergency room doctor, who puts his medical and scientific knowledge, as well as research into the epidemiology of the Black Death into a convincing narrative. The book was well written with believable and interesting characters. I sometimes felt a lack of connection with the protagonists, and an emotional detachment from the well-described events when I should have been feeling suspense and dread. Dr. Alana Vaughn, an infectious disease expert working for NATO, has been summoned to Genoa by a former lover and co-worker in dangerous and disease-ridden trouble-spots overseas. She has been requested to observe and help diagnose a female patient at the hospital where he is presently working. They are horrified to discover that the woman has a deadly form of pneumatic plague, a disease not prevalent for centuries. The woman worked at the demolition site of an 800-year-old monastery. Soon other patients have been admitted with the lethal illness and are succumbing to it There is a scramble to produce a vaccine, but any prevention or cure will come too late for the earliest victims. If the source of the infection is not found soon and contained, the results will be catastrophic. Millions could die. Alana is joined in the investigation by another disease expert, Byron Menke, from WHO, the agency where Alana previously worked. Alana suspects that the disease had its origin in bioterrorism. Byron has his doubts and plans to search for Patient Zero before the plague spreads and causes Europe-wide death unseen since the Black Death. A patient in Rome has contacted the sickness, and soon people are been admitted to hospital in Naples. Some are presenting either symptoms of pneumatic or bubonic plague. The investigation is drawn back to the remains of the ancient monastery. There Alana uncovers a medieval manuscript which may provide clues to the new potential epidemic. A doctor in the 1300s kept a journal of his observations and experiences at the time the Black Death was raging across Europe and decimating the monastery and surrounding area. His writings had been preserved in the monastery library. The chapters alternate between the events and thoughts of the doctor in this centuries-old document and the frantic rush of the present day investigators to find the cause of the plagues’ reappearance, and the hurry by medical researchers to invent an effective preventive serum and cure. Terrified crowds during the Black Death scapegoated Jews, blaming them for poisoning water sources. In the present day, some people start reacting to rumours that Moslem terrorists have unleashed the disease in an act of terrorism. Alana and Byron are horrified to learn that the plague is being carried towards Asia, which would result in worldwide death of cataclysmic proportions. Is it possible to stop it in time? This was a fascinating and informative story of how epidemiologists and scientists in medical labs react to previously unknown new disease outbreaks, and to diseases which have been dormant for centuries. This should keep readers informed and riveted to the book. Recommended to anyone who enjoys a gripping medical mystery.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    A very entertaining and pleasingly sciencey thriller about the re-emergence of the Black Death in Genoa, mostly presented from the perspective of those fighting the disease. A parallel story takes us back to the horrors of the original outbreak in 1348. Review to follow very shortly on For Winter Nights.
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  • Carole
    January 1, 1970
    We All Fall Down is a suspenseful novel about a modern-day plague which closely resembles the Black Death which occurred 800 years ago. The author, Daniel Kalla MD, is an emergency room physician from Vancouver BC. Dr Alana Vaughn, a doctor with the NATO infectious diseases department arrives in Genoa, Italy to investigate the sudden critical illness of a woman who was working at a construction site where an ancient monastery had been demolished. The contagion soon claims several more victims, t We All Fall Down is a suspenseful novel about a modern-day plague which closely resembles the Black Death which occurred 800 years ago. The author, Daniel Kalla MD, is an emergency room physician from Vancouver BC. Dr Alana Vaughn, a doctor with the NATO infectious diseases department arrives in Genoa, Italy to investigate the sudden critical illness of a woman who was working at a construction site where an ancient monastery had been demolished. The contagion soon claims several more victims, thereby baffling the medical experts. The plague then mysteriously spreads to Naples and Rome, leaving the medics at a loss to determine what or who is the carrier of this contagious atrocity. Time being of the essence, the doctors from NATO and the World Health Organization rush to solve the mystery of where the plague started and how it is spread. If you enjoy tense medical drama, this novel is for you. Thank you to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for e-ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    In 1348 the Black Death came to Genova, Italy. A young barber surgeon, Rafael Pasqua, documents the effects of the terrible plague on his community. The epidemic ravaged most of Europe and left its population decimated. It's not been seen again for hundreds of years.Present day Genoa: A construction worker dies suddenly and had first exhibited the classic symptoms of bubonic plague. Is this Patient Zero in a new outbreak of this dreaded disease? Before long, the city is inundated with more cases In 1348 the Black Death came to Genova, Italy. A young barber surgeon, Rafael Pasqua, documents the effects of the terrible plague on his community. The epidemic ravaged most of Europe and left its population decimated. It's not been seen again for hundreds of years.Present day Genoa: A construction worker dies suddenly and had first exhibited the classic symptoms of bubonic plague. Is this Patient Zero in a new outbreak of this dreaded disease? Before long, the city is inundated with more cases including the more lethal form, pneumonic plague. A team from the World Health Organization descends on the city along with Alana Vaughn, an infectious diseases expert with NATO who is summed there by an old paramour. It is indeed Black Death. Is this somehow a reoccurrence of the plague related to an old monastery that was being torn down or is it bioterrorism? The doctors, scientists and epidemiologists are in a race against time as the horrible plague spreads across Italy. NO SPOILERS.If you know me, you know I absolutely love thrillers that involve some sort of medical condition and I'm totally obsessed with books written about the Black Death. This one did not disappoint and I devoured it in a few hours unable to set it down even for a second. I loved the scientific details and the descriptions in both past and present of how the disease affected the people and the communities in which it occurred. This is a story of disease, yes, but it's also a story about the individuals who travel to all parts of the world to contain and eradicate evolving bio threats. When a disease of this magnitude re-emerges, it can rapidly spread and develop into a pandemic and those infectious disease experts are there to prevent calamity and save lives. I liked the writing, the characters and the story and highly recommend it. Definitely a book I'm going to be pushing on all my friends this spring!Thank you to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for this e-book ARC to read and review. I enjoyed this so much that I intend to seek out the other books written by this author.
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  • Toni Osborne
    January 1, 1970
    “We All Fall Down” is a thought-provoking book which looks squarely at a cataclysm of unimaginable proportions. The Black Death has arrived in Italy and the story will tell us how people will react to the catastrophe. Will Dr. Alana Vaugh, an infectious diseases expert with NATO find the source in time to save the world?Daniel Kalla who practices emergency medicine in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada has once again written an absolutely riveting drama hard to put down. Very knowledgeable in t “We All Fall Down” is a thought-provoking book which looks squarely at a cataclysm of unimaginable proportions. The Black Death has arrived in Italy and the story will tell us how people will react to the catastrophe. Will Dr. Alana Vaugh, an infectious diseases expert with NATO find the source in time to save the world?Daniel Kalla who practices emergency medicine in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada has once again written an absolutely riveting drama hard to put down. Very knowledgeable in the subject, his words plunges his readers’ right in the middle of the crises where experts are on the hunt to track down Patient Zero. Their search brings them across an 800 year monastery and a medieval journal that may be key to understanding and solving the outbreak.This 10th novel that combines suspense with a historical mystery is told in alternating chapters drawing us back to the Middle Ages where the initial outbreak took place then we are smoothly taken forward to today’s crises where NATO, WHO and local representatives need to find a solution. Mr. Kalla demonstrates a masterful skill needed for genuine suspense by capitalizing and building on the danger of exposure and the panic ensuing. The writing shines with medical and scientific expertise. No person is left unscathed, no family untouched. Death grows insatiable……this is scary to think, could biological terrorism really happen, how fast can viruses spread and how safe are we?Mr. Kalla is one of my favourite authors and I wouldn’t miss any of his books. I read them all….This latest is a well-done nail biting thriller…. I received this ARC from the publisher Simon Schuster via NetGalleys for me thoughts.
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  • Nadine
    January 1, 1970
    We All Fall Down reads like a high-octane two part episode of an interchangeable average network television show.We All Fall Down is told through multiple perspectives, the main character, Dr. Alana Vaughn, an 800-year-old diary, and the perpetrator of the release of the plague.Dr. Vaughn is your standard capable female main character. She’s intelligent, physically capable, and sensual with a romantic past connection to another character. She isn’t fleshed out given much depth. Mind you, all the We All Fall Down reads like a high-octane two part episode of an interchangeable average network television show.We All Fall Down is told through multiple perspectives, the main character, Dr. Alana Vaughn, an 800-year-old diary, and the perpetrator of the release of the plague.Dr. Vaughn is your standard capable female main character. She’s intelligent, physically capable, and sensual with a romantic past connection to another character. She isn’t fleshed out given much depth. Mind you, all the characters are not given much depth since the plague, it’s release, and containment are the main focus of the story.I disliked the diary chapters. I found them tedious and annoying as they often cut in the middle of the action to give readers information that isn’t relevant until later in the story. Though, Kalla does a fine job of portraying the setting and showing readers the atmosphere and chaos the Black Death created.The reason I rated the novel three stars instead of two is because the science is on point. The portrayal of the scientists and epidemiologists are credible and informative without being overly obtuse. The science of the disease itself and its containment was fascinating to read. Kalla is a doctor himself and it shows in this regard.Overall, We All Fall Down is an okay read that passes the time if you’re looking for a high stakes story rooted in science.***I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    ...**THIS IS A GOVERNMENT ALERT**IF YOU EXHIBIT SYMPTOMS, STAY IN YOUR HOMES**PLEASE REMAIN CALM AND DO NOT ATTEMPT THE RESCUE OF OTHERS**THIS IS A GOVERNMENT ALERT**IF YOU EXHIBIT SYMPTOMS, STAY IN YOUR HOMES**PLEASE REMAIN CALM AND DO NOT ATTEMPT THE RESCUE OF OTHERS**THIS IS A GOVERNMENT ALERT**...IT STARTS WITH ONE PATIENTA woman is dying in an Italian hospital, coughing up blood, convulsing and barely conscious.BEFORE IT SPREADS TO THE TOWNDr Alana Vaughn, an expert from NATO, confirms ever ...**THIS IS A GOVERNMENT ALERT**IF YOU EXHIBIT SYMPTOMS, STAY IN YOUR HOMES**PLEASE REMAIN CALM AND DO NOT ATTEMPT THE RESCUE OF OTHERS**THIS IS A GOVERNMENT ALERT**IF YOU EXHIBIT SYMPTOMS, STAY IN YOUR HOMES**PLEASE REMAIN CALM AND DO NOT ATTEMPT THE RESCUE OF OTHERS**THIS IS A GOVERNMENT ALERT**...IT STARTS WITH ONE PATIENTA woman is dying in an Italian hospital, coughing up blood, convulsing and barely conscious.BEFORE IT SPREADS TO THE TOWNDr Alana Vaughn, an expert from NATO, confirms everyone’s worst fears: the woman has the highly infectious disease that swept through Europe eight hundred years ago. The Black Death.AND TAKES THE CITYThe sickness is spreading so quickly that soon the outbreak becomes a global pandemic. Markets crash and governments fall as quickly as the citizens they govern. THEN THE COUNTRYAs panic takes hold and the death toll climbs, the consequences become horrifically clear – Alana must discover a way to stop the disease or it will be the end of us all.THEN THE WORLD - AND WE ALL FALL DOWN.The book is fast paced and had me on the edge of my seat wondering if Alana, Nico, Byron and company were going to be able to get to the bottom of who unleashed the plague and when or if they could get it under control.The book was well written with believable and interesting characters.I really liked the medical aspect of the book and how the scientists and doctors react to a dormant disease suddenly becoming active all over again and with them struggling to cope with the lack of vaccines available and also the consideration of the disease used as a bio-weapon was really interesting. This is scary to think, could biological terrorism really happen, how fast can viruses spread and how safe are we?I thoroughly enjoyed this book and look forward to reading more from this author. Highly Recommend reading!Thank you to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for this e-book ARC to read and review. I enjoyed this so much that I intend to seek out the other books written by this author.
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  • Randi Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Dr Alana Vaughn, working with NATO, is summoned to Genoa, Italy by her former lover and WHO partner Nico to help him with what appears to be a case of bubonic plague. This is the disease that decimated Europe in the mid 1300s but now only produces a handful of cases each year primarily in Africa. This new outbreak of the disease quickly spreads and is unusual in the speed that symptoms develop and rapidly lead to death. Alana and Nico race to find the cause. Did the first patient bring it back f Dr Alana Vaughn, working with NATO, is summoned to Genoa, Italy by her former lover and WHO partner Nico to help him with what appears to be a case of bubonic plague. This is the disease that decimated Europe in the mid 1300s but now only produces a handful of cases each year primarily in Africa. This new outbreak of the disease quickly spreads and is unusual in the speed that symptoms develop and rapidly lead to death. Alana and Nico race to find the cause. Did the first patient bring it back from Africa? Could terrorism be involved? What does the new development on the site of an ancient monastery have to do with it? Does the old priest know something? How is the Muslim man involved? I love medical mysteries and this one did not disappoint. As the cases spread beyond Genoa, WHO and NATO work together with Italian authorities to discover what, or who, caused this outbreak and try to get it rapidly under control. The book demonstrates the techniques they use to solve this mystery much as any detective solves his crimes. Of course there is a litte romance thrown to keep things human. The book moves rapidly and comes to a conclusion I found surprising but believable. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and look forward to reading more from this author. I wish to thank Netgalley and the publisher for allowing me to read an advance copy of this book. This review is my honest opinion and was not swayed by getting the book for free.
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  • Alison Eden
    January 1, 1970
    #WeAllFallDown #NetGalley Quite a different subject from the usual thrillers/crime dramas that I read and was a welcome change. The book is fast paced and had me on the edge of my seat wondering if Alana, Nico, Byron and company were going to be able to get to the bottom of who unleashed the plague and when or if they could get it under control. I am not usually a fan of two timelines, but this one really seemed to work with the plot and helped move the book along. I realise this is work of fict #WeAllFallDown #NetGalley Quite a different subject from the usual thrillers/crime dramas that I read and was a welcome change. The book is fast paced and had me on the edge of my seat wondering if Alana, Nico, Byron and company were going to be able to get to the bottom of who unleashed the plague and when or if they could get it under control. I am not usually a fan of two timelines, but this one really seemed to work with the plot and helped move the book along. I realise this is work of fiction, but it has me looking at people who cough in a whole new light!! An excellent read.
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  • Sid
    January 1, 1970
    The book was well written with believable and interesting characters even though I couldn't honestly connect with the main characters of the book. The disease and it's causes and effects were described well but I was not a fan of the constant timeline jumps as it ended up confusing me. But I really liked the medical aspect of the book and how the scientists and doctors react to a dormant disease suddenly becoming active all over again and with them struggling to cope with the lack of vaccines av The book was well written with believable and interesting characters even though I couldn't honestly connect with the main characters of the book. The disease and it's causes and effects were described well but I was not a fan of the constant timeline jumps as it ended up confusing me. But I really liked the medical aspect of the book and how the scientists and doctors react to a dormant disease suddenly becoming active all over again and with them struggling to cope with the lack of vaccines available and also the consideration of the disease used as a bio-weapon was really interesting. Overall an interesting book which I would recommend to anyone who likes a good medical thriller. A big thank you to NetGalley and Simon and Schuster UK Fiction for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange of my honest review.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and the publisher for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This was another absolutely brilliant story by Daniel Kalla. Dr. Alana Vaughn is brought to Genoa, Italy by a former flame to examine a critically ill patient of his. Alana is an infectious diseases expert with NATO. She is frightened by the discovery that the patient is suffering from the Black Death, in other words the plague. Alana wants to explore the possibility that this is an act of bio-terrori Thank you NetGalley and the publisher for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This was another absolutely brilliant story by Daniel Kalla. Dr. Alana Vaughn is brought to Genoa, Italy by a former flame to examine a critically ill patient of his. Alana is an infectious diseases expert with NATO. She is frightened by the discovery that the patient is suffering from the Black Death, in other words the plague. Alana wants to explore the possibility that this is an act of bio-terrorism, however her colleagues at her former employer WHO disagree with her. They start a massive search for Patient Zero. Along the way they realize that excavation at an 800 year old monastery ties into the epidemic. Alana is given access to a medieval journal that documents the plague spread across Europe. As the deadly disease spreads to other cities, they realize that the answers they seek are on a ship headed to Asia, where if the plague is released, the results would be catastrophic. A riveting read that was extremely hard to put down. Looking forward to Dr. Kalla's next book.
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  • Jackleen
    January 1, 1970
    We All Fall DownA fast paced dual time medical thriller set in Genoa Italy in both current time and during the Black Plague of the fourteen century. Heaps of action, accurate medical details and engaging characters all rolled into a rocket strapped plot make for the best medical thriller I have read in ages. While the present story line races off to stop the next pandemic, the historical section grounds the reader in the grim reality of the Black Plague in a sweet and sorrowful story of a barber We All Fall DownA fast paced dual time medical thriller set in Genoa Italy in both current time and during the Black Plague of the fourteen century. Heaps of action, accurate medical details and engaging characters all rolled into a rocket strapped plot make for the best medical thriller I have read in ages. While the present story line races off to stop the next pandemic, the historical section grounds the reader in the grim reality of the Black Plague in a sweet and sorrowful story of a barber surgeon battling his corner to if not save give comfort to his patients and community with compassion, the science of his age and a great deal of ingenuity.Either story line could well stand alone as a book. Together they sing. Looking forward to reading more by Daniel Kalla.
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  • Paul Weiss
    January 1, 1970
    “… rats that are immune to plague but can still spread the goddamn Black Death.” With authors like Tess Gerritsen and Michael Palmer being a pretty sure bet, the literary arena can be a pretty crowded venue for new authors looking to worm their way into the affections of lovers of the medical thriller genre. But, with no small amount of native pride, I can recommend Canadian author Dan Kalla as being worthy of a place of honour on your shelves.Those who read medical thrillers regularly are only “… rats that are immune to plague but can still spread the goddamn Black Death.” With authors like Tess Gerritsen and Michael Palmer being a pretty sure bet, the literary arena can be a pretty crowded venue for new authors looking to worm their way into the affections of lovers of the medical thriller genre. But, with no small amount of native pride, I can recommend Canadian author Dan Kalla as being worthy of a place of honour on your shelves.Those who read medical thrillers regularly are only too aware that the field is chock-a-block full of weary derivative plot lines but in We All Fall Down, Kalla has crafted a barn-burner pandemic possibility tale that has a basis unlike anything you’ve ever seen or heard before. Suffice it to say, without treading into spoiler territory, that Kalla’s frightening scenario revolves around the bubonic and the pneumonic plague. And we’re not talking here about any old garden variety plague. Kalla has built a fascinating novel around the possibility of a DNA reprise of the actual “Black Death” virus that wiped out half of medieval Europe in the 14th century. Kalla has also filled the pages with plenty of other issues that keep the plot moving, compelling, believable and poignant in today’s embattled world – misogyny, xenophobia, anti-Semitism and Islamophobia, schizophrenia and mental illness, to name only a few.It’s also worth observing that Kalla is a skilled writer who has a marked ability to convey the science behind his plot in an informative, interesting fashion. No condescension or dumbing down for the masses here. It’s also clear that Kalla’s skills as a thriller writer have come a long, long way since his debut with Pandemic. I’m certainly going to head out to my local bookstore to find one or two of the other novels that formed part of his path between then and now.Highly recommended.Paul Weiss
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. Written by a doctor, I like its portrayal of the return of the plague to Genoa. There's also a parallel story of a Genoese doctor during the Black Death of the Middle Ages. We see the parallels of both ages. The sad fact that humans tend to find an "other" to blame in the face of disaster. During the Black Death, the Jewish community got the blame. In this modern tale, the Muslims were the scapegoat. We also see how our modern health system might be taxed in the event I really enjoyed this book. Written by a doctor, I like its portrayal of the return of the plague to Genoa. There's also a parallel story of a Genoese doctor during the Black Death of the Middle Ages. We see the parallels of both ages. The sad fact that humans tend to find an "other" to blame in the face of disaster. During the Black Death, the Jewish community got the blame. In this modern tale, the Muslims were the scapegoat. We also see how our modern health system might be taxed in the event of an epidemic. It's scary if one stops to think about it, how easy such an event might occur. Even with modern science, we are still vulnerable to bacteria and viruses. Also, since he's a local-to-me author, I am interested in getting his other books.
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  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    I love Daniel Kalla's style of writing, especially when dealing with medical issues/terms. He makes it clear and understandable without going on and on about boring things that will just clog up the story.This book is thrilling. I love a good pandemic type story and this one does not disappoint. While we "sort of" know what is happening before the main characters do, its still intriguing as Kalla leaves a lot of unsolved issues and keeps them to the very end.Although I had to read this slowly (t I love Daniel Kalla's style of writing, especially when dealing with medical issues/terms. He makes it clear and understandable without going on and on about boring things that will just clog up the story.This book is thrilling. I love a good pandemic type story and this one does not disappoint. While we "sort of" know what is happening before the main characters do, its still intriguing as Kalla leaves a lot of unsolved issues and keeps them to the very end.Although I had to read this slowly (time constraints) I was always annoyed that I had to put it down for "real life" and looked forward to picking it up again.The only reason I did not give this a 5 stars is that I HATED the forced romance in this book. This story could have easily survived without any of that and I wish it had. I am not sure why Kalla felt the need to insert that in an otherwise captivating read.
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  • Lisa Henderson-Farr
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.An eight hundred year old monastery in Genoa, Italy is being torn down to make way for more modern buildings. Vittoria Fornero is in charge of the construction site and isn't going to let anything slow down the project, including a monk that lived at the former monastery. Brother Silvio shows up at the site daily with a fold up chair and a black satchel and watches the progress of th Thank you to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.An eight hundred year old monastery in Genoa, Italy is being torn down to make way for more modern buildings. Vittoria Fornero is in charge of the construction site and isn't going to let anything slow down the project, including a monk that lived at the former monastery. Brother Silvio shows up at the site daily with a fold up chair and a black satchel and watches the progress of the excavation. The monk has been spooking some of the workers with tales of old concerning the monastery. All of this along with a sudden bout of illness is too much for Vittoria and she collapses at work. Dr.Alana Vaughn receives a text from a former colleague, Dr. Nico Oliva, whom she worked with at the World Health Organization. Two words had her packing for Genoa immediately. Those two words were "the plague". This is not the first time in history that the Monastery has been at the center of a deadly outbreak and Alana and Nico must discover how it is spreading now.This story is told from the perspective of two time periods, that of the medieval outbreak recounted by Rafael Pasqua, and from the present day investigations of Doctors Alana Vaughn and Nico Oliva. The modern day doctors race against time to find the source of the plague and try to contain it before it ravishes the population of Italy as it did once before centuries ago. The journals of Rafael tell about the horrors of the bubonic plague sweeping thru his time. Both timelines have one thing in common and that is the monastery.Fast paced story that has both timelines told in separate narratives that are seamlessly tied together. A compulsive read with well developed characters that will hold you on the edge of your seat till the final pages.
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  • Jay Dwight
    January 1, 1970
    A captivating thriller, and a very thought provoking "what if?" scenario. Current day Italy and it seems the Black Plague has re-surfaced. The authorities are on a perplexing chase for the hows and whys, trying to contain the spread before it reaches cataclysmic proportions. Has it been transferred from Africa? Is it bio-terrorism. Does it have ties to the Plague that devastated Europe centuries ago in 1348?
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  • ashley lloyd spanton
    January 1, 1970
    Judging a Book by it's Cover - 2019-01-21I've never read what is considered a "medical thriller", but a Canadian author who moonlights as an ER Physician (okay, he is an ER Physician who moonlights as an author) is pretty darn cool. His first book Pandemic, inspired by the SARS outbreak, also sounds pretty darn cool, I might have to go back and read that if this works out for me.Review This was a well written and believable medical thriller. Kalla obviously draws on his own knowledge to build a Judging a Book by it's Cover - 2019-01-21I've never read what is considered a "medical thriller", but a Canadian author who moonlights as an ER Physician (okay, he is an ER Physician who moonlights as an author) is pretty darn cool. His first book Pandemic, inspired by the SARS outbreak, also sounds pretty darn cool, I might have to go back and read that if this works out for me.Review This was a well written and believable medical thriller. Kalla obviously draws on his own knowledge to build a story that makes sense logically, but is also interesting and suspenseful, without being too over saturated with medical jargon. I enjoyed following the WHO and NATO experts as they mapped and tracked this spreading disease to its source, trying to sort out whether this was a natural resurrection of the black plague, or bioterrorism. Both situations are frightening, but what it ends up being is even more frightening and I liked that little twist.However, I did find that my interested in the story waned about three quarters of the way through. I guess the repetition of more cases coming into light and the experts kind of running in circles as they tried to find the reason for the spread and develop a vaccine eventually became too repetitive for me and I was anxious for things to move ahead a bit quicker. That’s my own impatience at work, though.Overall, I enjoyed my first journey into this genre of thrillers, but I feel like this format could become familiar after a while without a lot of really unique approaches. That said, Kalla handled it quite well and strayed from presenting a predictable outcome, which I applaud.** I received an advance copy of We All Fall Down by Daniel Kalla for honest review from Simon and Schuster Canada and thank them for the opportunity to read this and share my thoughts.
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  • Peter Kralka
    January 1, 1970
    A very good read. A middle ages plague surfaces in Genoa when a monastery is sold by the church and it's torn down. A race for WHO to find the source of the plague, to isolate those infected, trying to cure the infected and to try to contain it to a geographic area. A parallel recounting of a middle ages physician trying to treat the same plague in the same city.
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  • Astrid
    January 1, 1970
    Easy to read, hard to put down.Switches from present to Middle Ages were very well done.Thought provoking, very well written and I am sure this will not be the last book I’ve read from a Daniel Kalla.
  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Weaving together history, science, and medicine Daniel Kalla’s novel “We All Fall Down” begins when one of the construction workers on a site where a monastery has been demolished to make way for a modern apartment tower becomes fatally ill. Summoned to Genoa to examine Dr. Nico Oliva’s patient who’s been diagnosed with the pneumonic plague Alana Vaughn an infectious diseases expert quickly suspects bioterrorism as the number of victims rises. Joining the WHO (World Health Organization) team und Weaving together history, science, and medicine Daniel Kalla’s novel “We All Fall Down” begins when one of the construction workers on a site where a monastery has been demolished to make way for a modern apartment tower becomes fatally ill. Summoned to Genoa to examine Dr. Nico Oliva’s patient who’s been diagnosed with the pneumonic plague Alana Vaughn an infectious diseases expert quickly suspects bioterrorism as the number of victims rises. Joining the WHO (World Health Organization) team under the leadership of Canadian epidemiologist Byron Menke they hunt for “Patient Zero” and the source of the plague, discovering a link to an 800-year-old monastery, an ancient journal and a conspiracy.Suspense mounts as past and present collide with barber-surgeon Rafael Pasqua’s journal entries about the impact of the Black Death in 1348 which are intermingled with Byron and Alana’s efforts to find “Patient Zero” and the truth behind the current outbreak. Captivating, with compelling plot twists the politics in both timeframes are fascinating with the Archbishop blaming the Jews for the outbreak in 1348 and the Muslims as the scapegoats in the present.Fast-paced tension escalates with a connection to the San Giovanni Monastery that’s been demolished and a building venture on the site that will be bankrupted with further delays. Lightening the severity of the unfolding drama is the closure of Alana’s relationship with Dr. Nico Oliva and her awakening attraction to Byron, a man she finds heavy-handed and tactless at first. Yet all too quickly the story flows smoothly to an ending with a life-threatening encounter.Breathing life into the plot are strong, complex, and realistic characters like Alana Vaughn the NATO infectious disease expert who’s perceptive, headstrong, and shrewd; Byron Menke the stubborn, single-minded and tireless WHO team leader; compassionate, dedicated and frustrated Dr. Nico Oliva; as well as the cheerful, talkative and alarmist Brother Silvio.I thoroughly enjoyed “We All Fall Down” an exciting page-turner and will look for other novels by Daniel Kalla in future.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    This is a novel about a black death outbreak in modern day Genoa. By absolute coincidence I recently read up on the plague, why it was that the in the middle ages it killed so many, and yet while the plague still exists (unlike say Smallpox which has been eradicated), while there are still outbreaks, they are never so deadly. It turns out that the plague is like the flu in that there have been different variants. Most flu doesn’t become a deadly pandemic, but in 1918, the Spanish flu was just th This is a novel about a black death outbreak in modern day Genoa. By absolute coincidence I recently read up on the plague, why it was that the in the middle ages it killed so many, and yet while the plague still exists (unlike say Smallpox which has been eradicated), while there are still outbreaks, they are never so deadly. It turns out that the plague is like the flu in that there have been different variants. Most flu doesn’t become a deadly pandemic, but in 1918, the Spanish flu was just that, killing millions. The same is true of the plague. The variants around today are not the same as those which ravaged Europe and much of the world in the middles ages, which has disappeared for reasons unknown. We All Fall Down imagines a scenario where this, far deadlier plague, returns. As the text on the cover reads: Centuries ago the plague killed millions. Today it might kill billions.”Dr Alana Vaughn, the novel’s protagonist, is an infectious disease specialist who in the past has worked for the World Health Organisation (WHO). She now works for NATO and her job is to watch out for signs of germ warfare, as well as natural outbreaks which might threaten order in the societies of member nations. When she hears about the plague outbreak she flies to Italy to check it out. She quickly discovers the outbreak to be of the deadlier variety and together with the WHO team on the ground, and local Italian doctors, they try to contain the rapidly spreading outbreak. As part of their efforts they try to discover the source of the outbreak and this entails detective work.Their efforts lead them to multiple potential suspects. Is it a bioweapon? Both the Soviet Union and the United States weaponised plague virus during the cold war. Whether or not it is, has it’s release to do with terrorism? Has it been released accidentally? Or has the plague come from a natural source? Just as in the middle ages, the virus itself, and the deaths it causes, is only part of the problem. People’s fear and their associated need to find a scapegoat leads to social tensions and it isn’t long before immigrants are being blamed for the outbreak.We All Fall Down is compared on the cover to Contagion meets The Da Vinci Code, and without giving away spoilers, while I can see why it has been compared to the latter, it is far more the former. At heart this is a novel about the reemergence of the plague, a medical thriller rather than a religious-conspiracy novel. The author, Daniel Kalla, is himself a doctor practicing emergency medicine and this shows. Nor is this his first novel about pandemics (in fact one of his previous novels, titled Pandemic, is about a deadly outbreak of flu). It is not too heavy on the medicine and science but he clearly knows his stuff and writes with authority.Dr Alana Vaughn and her supporting cast of characters are compelling and well drawn and the novel presses the right buttons, the narrative moving along at a fast pace that kept me turning the pages. The plot itself holds together and resolves itself satisfactorily. All in all this is an enjoyable novel and one that posits a frightening scenario, all the more nightmarish because a global pandemic is far from the realm of fantasy and could well occur some day.
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    We All Fall Down is as fast past and deadly as the plague that sweeps through Genoa and beyond. We begin on the construction site where an old monastery has been pulled down to make way for a new development. An old monk turns up on a daily vigil to the site with warnings of the consecrated ground they are working on. The workers pay no heed and carry on with their work until one collapses, coughing up blood. So begins a disease that spreads with unrelenting speed; children, adults, men, women a We All Fall Down is as fast past and deadly as the plague that sweeps through Genoa and beyond. We begin on the construction site where an old monastery has been pulled down to make way for a new development. An old monk turns up on a daily vigil to the site with warnings of the consecrated ground they are working on. The workers pay no heed and carry on with their work until one collapses, coughing up blood. So begins a disease that spreads with unrelenting speed; children, adults, men, women and even animals are struck down. The World Health Organisation begin to investigate alongside NATO. Dr Alana Vaughn comes to the conclusion that the victims are suffering from The Black Death. The question is not only how to stop it but if they even can? They need to find out where and how a disease centuries buried came to be. It’s a race against time as the disease spreads further and further, killing without discrimination.This is an absolute page turner that I couldn’t read fast enough. It filled my sleep with dark shadows and even when awake my mind kept returning to the story as I eagerly awaited my next opportunity to read on. Daniel also takes us back to the 14th-century as the Black Death tore the small town of Genoa apart. Can it survive a second time? Indeed, can the world? Thoroughly recommended and I will definitely be seeking out more by Mr Kalla.
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  • Shalini
    January 1, 1970
    I love a fast paced thriller and if it is a medical thriller then it is the perfect icing on the cake. I know, wrong metaphor for a book which pneumonic plague as it's backdrop.The story started with the first patient Vittoria who fell ill and died in a few hours. Thus has Dr Alana rushing to the patient zero. She along with her old crush Nico were soon running to get to the people whom Vittoria came in contact with. Then came the horrific story of Vittoria involved in the demolition of an old m I love a fast paced thriller and if it is a medical thriller then it is the perfect icing on the cake. I know, wrong metaphor for a book which pneumonic plague as it's backdrop.The story started with the first patient Vittoria who fell ill and died in a few hours. Thus has Dr Alana rushing to the patient zero. She along with her old crush Nico were soon running to get to the people whom Vittoria came in contact with. Then came the horrific story of Vittoria involved in the demolition of an old monastery where the monks were killed by Black Death, another dreadful virus.This was an exciting story which had me running along with Alana to get to the source of virus and prevent epidemic. She was strong and gutsy, brilliant in her work. There was romance but the book concentrated on the medical aspect. Daniel Kalla has done a fabulous job, writing was smooth, fast paced. A lot of medical terms, but being in the sane profession, I had no problems following the story. It was an unputdownable but scary page turner for me.
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  • J.L. Slipak
    January 1, 1970
    MY THOUGHTS:I received this book in exchange for my honest review.If you like books that depict a race against time, usage of science and medical investigations, suspenseful situations and a search for answers following clues, then this book is for you.The enemy: Black Death, a plague from the past that wiped out millions in the past and now threatens to wipe out billions. The MC must race against time to find out if terrorism is responsible, or something else.There were a few slow spots that ma MY THOUGHTS:I received this book in exchange for my honest review.If you like books that depict a race against time, usage of science and medical investigations, suspenseful situations and a search for answers following clues, then this book is for you.The enemy: Black Death, a plague from the past that wiped out millions in the past and now threatens to wipe out billions. The MC must race against time to find out if terrorism is responsible, or something else.There were a few slow spots that made the story disconnect, but other than that I enjoyed it.Well-researched and set against a historical backdrop with modern touches. The main character was interesting, intelligent and a strong female lead. If you like Dan Brown’s writings (Da Vinci Code) and the movie based on his writings starring Tom Hanks, then you’ll love this book.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Pneumonic plague. Bad, very very bad. And now it's back in modern Italy. Dr. Alana Vaughn finds herself trying to figure out what's happening- what set off this epidemic. Is it terrorism? Working with Byron, she must determine not only the cause but also how to stop it. Told from a variety of viewpoints- most notably through the diary entries of Rafael Pasqua, a barber surgeon who watched the Black Death spread in 1348- this is a very well constructed medical thriller. Kalla's background no doub Pneumonic plague. Bad, very very bad. And now it's back in modern Italy. Dr. Alana Vaughn finds herself trying to figure out what's happening- what set off this epidemic. Is it terrorism? Working with Byron, she must determine not only the cause but also how to stop it. Told from a variety of viewpoints- most notably through the diary entries of Rafael Pasqua, a barber surgeon who watched the Black Death spread in 1348- this is a very well constructed medical thriller. Kalla's background no doubt is responsible for the impressive explanations of epidemiology and the science of plague. His writing is crisp, his characters well drawn, and all in all, it's a good read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. A page turner.
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  • Dawn O. | Left Coast Reader
    January 1, 1970
    Free copy provided by the publisher.WE ALL FALL DOWN is a medical thriller crossed with historical fiction - it is fast paced and full of thrill and action and the alternating chapters between a fourteenth century barber surgeon’s diary and a present day NATO doctor are brilliant!A modern day story of the plague set in Genoa, Italy, medical staff from NATO and WHO are sent in to investigate the source of the plague. It’s unusually fast spread across Italy raises the question of bioterrorism...Th Free copy provided by the publisher.WE ALL FALL DOWN is a medical thriller crossed with historical fiction - it is fast paced and full of thrill and action and the alternating chapters between a fourteenth century barber surgeon’s diary and a present day NATO doctor are brilliant!A modern day story of the plague set in Genoa, Italy, medical staff from NATO and WHO are sent in to investigate the source of the plague. It’s unusually fast spread across Italy raises the question of bioterrorism...The author’s medical background and scientific research bring authenticity to this plausible story. Well done!
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    I will now have to add Daniel Kalla to my favourite authors list. I could barely force myself to put this book down. The storyline is ingenious and the plot races along. A mystery, a thriller, and historical fiction all in one book!
  • Gabby
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. Pretty shocked at the rating this book has. It's extremely corny and overdramatic, and not in a tasteful or entertaining way. I didn't quite buy the "fate of the world all depends on this sexy doctor" thing the author seemed deadset on conveying.
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  • Kathleen Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    A quick fast paced engaging story, where there was lots to learn. Glad I read it.
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