Suffering Is Never for Nothing
Elisabeth Elliot (1926-2015) was a Christian author and speaker. She, having lived through great loss, taught on God’s grace in the midst of hardship, as well as teaching wives and mothers to fulfill the high calling of Titus 2. In her final book, Elisabeth Elliot describes how it is often through the deepest suffering that God teaches us the deepest lessons. As we trust Him through our trials, we come to a greater assurance of His love and sovereignty—even as He works all things together for the good of those who love Him.

Suffering Is Never for Nothing Details

TitleSuffering Is Never for Nothing
Author
ReleaseFeb 1st, 2019
PublisherB & H Books
ISBN-139781535914154
Rating
GenreChristian, Christian Non Fiction, Christian Living, Nonfiction

Suffering Is Never for Nothing Review

  • Kari
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 out of 5 stars.This is a new release of a series of talks Elisabeth Elliot once gave. Because of that, it reads a little differently than a regular book on the topic of suffering, but the nuggets of truth are wonderful. It is a gorgeous book that would make a thoughtful and helpful gift to someone who is walking through a trial, grieving a death, or tired of the struggle.Some great quotes:"If I can thank God for this very thing which is killing me, I can begin dimly and faintly to see it as 3.5 out of 5 stars.This is a new release of a series of talks Elisabeth Elliot once gave. Because of that, it reads a little differently than a regular book on the topic of suffering, but the nuggets of truth are wonderful. It is a gorgeous book that would make a thoughtful and helpful gift to someone who is walking through a trial, grieving a death, or tired of the struggle.Some great quotes:"If I can thank God for this very thing which is killing me, I can begin dimly and faintly to see it as a gift. I can realize that it is through that very thing which is so far from being the thing I would have chosen, that God wants to teach me His way of salvation.""Whatever is in the cup that God is offering to me, whether it be pain and sorrow and suffering and grief along with the many more joys, I'm willing to take it because I trust Him.""Faith is not a feeling. Faith is a willed obedience action.""Christ leads me through no darker rooms that He went through before. -Richard Baxter"
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  • Kaitlyn Bouchillon
    January 1, 1970
    As a fan of Elisabeth Elliot’s writing, I was thrilled to hear that a never-before-published manuscript was going to be released. This is actually a series of messages strung together, and although impactful, I actually wish that they had been published with no edits and kept in their original form — as if Elliot is talking to a gathered group of people.The minor edits throughout, although surely intended to be helpful for the reader, actually felt confusing… somewhere in between a book and a se As a fan of Elisabeth Elliot’s writing, I was thrilled to hear that a never-before-published manuscript was going to be released. This is actually a series of messages strung together, and although impactful, I actually wish that they had been published with no edits and kept in their original form — as if Elliot is talking to a gathered group of people.The minor edits throughout, although surely intended to be helpful for the reader, actually felt confusing… somewhere in between a book and a sermon.The 6 chapters are presumably 6 different messages given, covering topics like God’s sovereignty, gratitude for suffering, and God’s love being linked to suffering.This is a short book, just over 120 pages, but as always Elliot writes (speaks) with wisdom and honesty. She knows what it is to suffer much, and we would do well to listen to what she has to say.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    If there’s one person who is an authority on the topic of suffering, it’s Elisabeth Elliot. In case you need a refresher on her story, she lost the life of her newlywed husband who was also the father of her young daughter. Her husband’s sole desire was to share with the Auca Indians the Gospel; they mistook him for a cannibal, so they speared him to death.Fast-forward some years later, and Elisabeth works through her grief and remarries. Only, she becomes widowed yet again after losing her seco If there’s one person who is an authority on the topic of suffering, it’s Elisabeth Elliot. In case you need a refresher on her story, she lost the life of her newlywed husband who was also the father of her young daughter. Her husband’s sole desire was to share with the Auca Indians the Gospel; they mistook him for a cannibal, so they speared him to death.Fast-forward some years later, and Elisabeth works through her grief and remarries. Only, she becomes widowed yet again after losing her second husband to cancer.The book Suffering Is Never for Nothing is actually not a book written by Elsiabeth Elliot, but rather messages compiled together from her speaking engagements that an editor wove together to create a book. Because of this, the book reads a little differently. I think some parts came off differently because it was originally intended as words for the ears and not the eyes. And on that note, I think it could have been edited a little better to smooth out some of the language issues that happen when transferred from audio to page. But yet, I also get the concern for wanting to adhere to authenticity. I just felt like the true message could have been conveyed with some slight editorial polishing.My Favorite Part of Suffering Is Never for Nothing:My personal favorite chapter was the one on gratitude. Sometimes it truly is difficult to have gratitude in the suffering. She mentioned how in the years she lived with the very Indians who speared her husband to death that although this tribe experienced great hardship, they never complained. The women had to carry fifty pounds on their backs. Stil, not a grumbling word escaped their mouths. And what’s more, these tribal people were not even Christians. Yet, they had a cheerful countenance and heart of gratitude. How convicting for us believers! Some people living in harsh third world countries have more cheer than we do as Christians who have a true reason to exude joy.A Final Word on Suffering Is Never for Nothing:Elisabeth Elliot’s resurgence of words found from old audio is a reminder of a woman who knew suffering well and is a woman we would be wise to listen to. The book reads like a sermon and is filled with illustrative stories to get her point across. For many who are familiar with her words, it will be more of a careful reminder. All in all, it was a helpful, short read.
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  • Jessica Wilkins
    January 1, 1970
    This was a brilliant little book based off a series of talks Elisabeth Elliot gave quite a few years ago. It felt like sitting down with a wise aunt who is both encouraging and challenging. Elliot breaks down suffering and it's purpose and inspires the reader to embrace the joy and the pain with gratitude. It is not the least bit trite or smug. If you know anything about Elisabeth Elliot's life.. she knew hardship and suffering, yet she humbly doesn't claim to be an expert in the subject. She po This was a brilliant little book based off a series of talks Elisabeth Elliot gave quite a few years ago. It felt like sitting down with a wise aunt who is both encouraging and challenging. Elliot breaks down suffering and it's purpose and inspires the reader to embrace the joy and the pain with gratitude. It is not the least bit trite or smug. If you know anything about Elisabeth Elliot's life.. she knew hardship and suffering, yet she humbly doesn't claim to be an expert in the subject. She points us to God and the answers He gives. I found it to be really helpful and comforting.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    This book is based on talks that Elisabeth Elliot gave. It is a short little book chock full of theological depth. I wrote down so many quotes as I read. I highly recommend this.
  • Gena
    January 1, 1970
    I had selected this book to review for B&H publishers. I don't recall reading anything from Elisabeth Elliot previously but I had heard her name a d knew the story of her first husband.I highly recommend this book! It was an easy read and came at a perfect time in my life. It seems so many of us are struggling. The words of Elisabeth gives hope and encouragement with lots of Scriptual background.This is a book I will keep on my shelf and read over and over again!
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  • Stefanie Kellum
    January 1, 1970
    *I read a digital ARC of this title from the publisher via NetGalley.
  • Journey FAITH
    January 1, 1970
    I finished up this new book last night, Suffering Is Never Not For Nothing by Elisabeth Elliot. First, you might be wondering, how did Elisabeth Elliot write a new book, as she passed away a few years ago? Well Jennifer Lyle, put it together from CD set that was a recorded from a message Elisabeth gave on suffering. This was a quick read, but I gained much encouragement and Biblical lessons about suffering from it. This is a wonderful book for every Christian to read through, as we all will face I finished up this new book last night, Suffering Is Never Not For Nothing by Elisabeth Elliot. First, you might be wondering, how did Elisabeth Elliot write a new book, as she passed away a few years ago? Well Jennifer Lyle, put it together from CD set that was a recorded from a message Elisabeth gave on suffering. This was a quick read, but I gained much encouragement and Biblical lessons about suffering from it. This is a wonderful book for every Christian to read through, as we all will face or have gone through suffering. Maybe you feel like you haven’t suffered, but what Elisabeth points out is and shares is, it is having what you don’t want or wanting what you don’t have, which covers small and big things, that matter not at all by comparison. She also shares what this world would be like without suffering, where everything was perfect. Because the deepest things that Elisabeth learned came from the deepest suffering, the greatest gifts of her life have also entailed the greatest suffering. She goes on to say if we don’t ever want to suffer, we must be very careful never to love anything or anybody. From those situations, she learned the unshakable conviction that God is love.People often ask why when bad things happen. Elizabeth shares some stories from others, along with her personal stories. What we know is that suffering is a mystery that none of us is really capable of plumbing, and it’s a mystery about which she is sure everyone at some time or other has asked why. She shares that there are a good many things in this life that we really can’t do anything about, but that God wants us to do something with. She goes into what the message of suffering is, accepting suffering, and gratitude. Which she believes are two things that ought to distinguish everyone that calls themselves a Christian are accepting and gratitude. In other words, she says it is us growing in contentment and honoring God ~ thanking God in advance because no matter what is about to happen, you already know that God is in charge. You are not in a sea of chaos. She shares how to do this, one thing she says is we need Jesus Christ, our refuge, our fortress, the stronghold of my life. It takes desolation to teach us our need of Him. I liked what she says about unseen things, the visible things are transitory. It is the invisible things that are really permanent. She says she often prayed that God would deliver her from making a career out of her troubles. Oh how true that is, so often when there is an issue, something wrong, first thing is I let my feelings get in the way and then try to take control. Instead of going to the One who is in control and trusting Him with it.So what do we do with our burdens and suffering, sometimes it just entails being obedient, offering up what we have to Him, doing the next thing in front of us, and that might be just sweeping the floor. Why, she says because it was Jesus that bore all my sins, all my griefs and all my sorrows. And yet there is a full tale yet to be fulfilled. I don’t understand it. I simply affirm it. I accept it.This is a book, that would make a great gift to give to anyone going through a hard time and to gift to ourselves. A good message for us to all know, that suffering is never for nothing. I only shared a tiny bit of the book with you, there is so much more she teaches on suffering. “God has a lot up His sleeve that you and I haven’t the slightest idea about now. He’s told us enough so that we know that suffering is never for nothing.”
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  • Doug
    January 1, 1970
    Great read on understanding God’s purpose in our greatest painNo matter who we are or where we came from, we will sooner or later be touched by some form of suffering. There is no escaping it. While some seem to suffer more than others for no apparent reason, suffering cannot be avoided or ignored.In her new book, published posthumously by B&H Publishing, Elisabeth Elliot gets up close and personal about some of the greatest suffering of her life: namely the brutal murder of her husband, Jim Great read on understanding God’s purpose in our greatest painNo matter who we are or where we came from, we will sooner or later be touched by some form of suffering. There is no escaping it. While some seem to suffer more than others for no apparent reason, suffering cannot be avoided or ignored.In her new book, published posthumously by B&H Publishing, Elisabeth Elliot gets up close and personal about some of the greatest suffering of her life: namely the brutal murder of her husband, Jim, by the hands of the very people in which he sought to share the Gospel. She also discusses the kind of pain and grief we will all experience at one point or another. In her 128-page book, which reads like a memoir, Elliot topically illustrates the purpose and plan in our suffering. In fact, she writes: “The deepest things that I learned in my own life have come from the deepest suffering. And out of the deepest waters and the hottest fires have come the deepest things that I know about God.”While suffering is never welcomed, Elliot is saying we don’t know who God really is until we allow Him to take us through (and give Him) our greatest pain. While the Joel Osteens of the Church claim you can to live “Your Best Life Now,” life is just not like that. However, God is faithful to bring us through our great pain and suffering – if we let Him. In one of her most significant chapters (Chapter Three: Acceptance), Elliot says if we have a broken heart, “God will not despise that offering if that’s all you have to offer.” Overall, Elliot’s book is well-written, thought-provoking and timely. I highly recommend it and gave it a 5 out of 5 stars.Full disclosure: In accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255, I received this book free through B&H Publishing. My opinions are my own and I wasn’t required to write a positive review. © 2019 by Doug S., M.A.
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  • Evelyn Fonseca
    January 1, 1970
    I always jump at the opportunity to request an Elisabeth Elliot book, she has been a huge inspiration in my Christian walk and remains my favorite author. This short little book (approx. 110 pages) is a series of talks Mrs. Elliot gave years ago before her passing. Her messages were meshed together and edited to be printed in book form so naturally, her voice is different in this one. There are many Christian books on the subject of suffering and pain but none has as much Biblical wisdom as this I always jump at the opportunity to request an Elisabeth Elliot book, she has been a huge inspiration in my Christian walk and remains my favorite author. This short little book (approx. 110 pages) is a series of talks Mrs. Elliot gave years ago before her passing. Her messages were meshed together and edited to be printed in book form so naturally, her voice is different in this one. There are many Christian books on the subject of suffering and pain but none has as much Biblical wisdom as this one in just100 pages! Coming from a life riddled with so much pain after losing 2 husbands and suffering health issues, Elisabeth learned and gained so much wisdom through her pain. She shares that valuable wisdom with you in this book. As a young adult myself, reading through her book is like having a conversation with a wise and godly grandmother (at least that's how I feel). Even though I'm not currently going through anything major, I still felt very comforted and challenged. Her words have made me ponder hard and convicted me about the way I have handled pain in the past. I feel a little more prepared for whenever hard times come. This makes for a great gift for someone who is going through difficult times. I highly recommend! I received a copy of this book from B&H in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed here are entirely my own.
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  • Jeanie
    January 1, 1970
    It's only in the cross that we can begin to harmonize this seeming contradiction between suffering and love. And we will never understand suffering unless we understand the love of God. Spoken from a woman who knows suffering. I have read several of her books and her devotion to the Lord will keep me reading more. She has lost 3 husbands and suffered many losses but instead of looking inward, she looks to Jesus. I know this may sound abstract and idealist, however, it is in suffering we know God It's only in the cross that we can begin to harmonize this seeming contradiction between suffering and love. And we will never understand suffering unless we understand the love of God. Spoken from a woman who knows suffering. I have read several of her books and her devotion to the Lord will keep me reading more. She has lost 3 husbands and suffered many losses but instead of looking inward, she looks to Jesus. I know this may sound abstract and idealist, however, it is in suffering we know God in a deeper level that is why suffering is never for nothing. The six chapters are built upon a foundation of faith. It takes faith to walk thru suffering and faith is the hope in what is not seen. Faith is not knowing all the answers or why's but the who and that is capital WHO. 1) Chapter 1 - The Terrible Truth2) Chapter 2- The Message3.) Chapter 3 - The acceptance4> Chapter 4 - The Gratitude5.) Chapter 5 - Offering6.) Chapter 6 TransfigurationEach chapter flows from the other giving you hope for the suffering you are in. Highly recommend. A Special Thank you to B & H Books and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.
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  • Miriam Jacob
    January 1, 1970
    “Suffering Is Never For Nothing” by Elisabeth Elliot teaches us that suffering always has a loving purpose. When trials and troubles come our way, we know the One who knows why. Suffering is a mystery that we cannot plumb. Through the deepest sufferings come the deepest lessons. We trust the One who knows to lead us through the dark into the light. Suffering and love are inexplicably and inextricably linked. God’s love for us sent His Son, Jesus to die for our sins on the cross to give us eterna “Suffering Is Never For Nothing” by Elisabeth Elliot teaches us that suffering always has a loving purpose. When trials and troubles come our way, we know the One who knows why. Suffering is a mystery that we cannot plumb. Through the deepest sufferings come the deepest lessons. We trust the One who knows to lead us through the dark into the light. Suffering and love are inexplicably and inextricably linked. God’s love for us sent His Son, Jesus to die for our sins on the cross to give us eternal life. Jesus carried our sins, griefs and sufferings on the cross. We don’t have to carry the heavy burdens ourselves. Some burdens are so heavy that we will sink under its weight. That’s why Jesus carried our burdens for us. Christ died for our sins and won victory for us. We can bear suffering because we trust God to bring amazing good out of it. “Suffering Is Never For Nothing.”
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  • Cynthia Vogel
    January 1, 1970
    For Those Who Wonder WhyAnother gem from Elisabeth Elliott...published post-humously, based on a transcription of talks she gave at a conference. Words birthed in deep sorrow and loss...But from a heart that held no bitterness of resentment toward God or the Auca Indians who speared her beloved young husband. Not did she blame God for the deaths of her next two husbands.Her life was her university. God was her professor. And in the course of wisdom she received an A+ as God guided her and taught For Those Who Wonder WhyAnother gem from Elisabeth Elliott...published post-humously, based on a transcription of talks she gave at a conference. Words birthed in deep sorrow and loss...But from a heart that held no bitterness of resentment toward God or the Auca Indians who speared her beloved young husband. Not did she blame God for the deaths of her next two husbands.Her life was her university. God was her professor. And in the course of wisdom she received an A+ as God guided her and taught her through the deep waters of suffering and grief. This book is a must read for those who struggle to understand what God could possibly be doing by granting them heartache and pain.
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  • Marie Bubilo
    January 1, 1970
    This book is based on a talk that Elisabeth did several years before her death. This book is a quick and somewhat easy read. She presents an excellent case to support the idea that “suffering is never for nothing” using her personal life experience, others’ experience, and Biblical truth. I especially love the definition she gives suffering: “Suffering is having what you don’t want or wanting what you don’t have.” She also engages the reader by having us look at the suffering in our own lives- l This book is based on a talk that Elisabeth did several years before her death. This book is a quick and somewhat easy read. She presents an excellent case to support the idea that “suffering is never for nothing” using her personal life experience, others’ experience, and Biblical truth. I especially love the definition she gives suffering: “Suffering is having what you don’t want or wanting what you don’t have.” She also engages the reader by having us look at the suffering in our own lives- large or small. Thank you B&H Publishing group for providing me a copy of this book for an honest review.
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  • Jonathan Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    This book, based on a series of talks Elisabeth Elliot did on suffering, is amazing. With a simple definition of suffering, “Having what you don’t want or wanting what you don’t have,” Elisabeth Elliot opens the door to show how and why the Christian must not only embrace suffering if/when it comes, but also not forget to do the next thing. Reading of the work she continued after the martyring of her first husband, Jim, blew my mind. But she knew, as do I, that she serves a Sovereign God and kno This book, based on a series of talks Elisabeth Elliot did on suffering, is amazing. With a simple definition of suffering, “Having what you don’t want or wanting what you don’t have,” Elisabeth Elliot opens the door to show how and why the Christian must not only embrace suffering if/when it comes, but also not forget to do the next thing. Reading of the work she continued after the martyring of her first husband, Jim, blew my mind. But she knew, as do I, that she serves a Sovereign God and knows that from death comes life. I highly recommend this book. I don’t think I could recommend it highly enough!
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    "Suffering Is Never for Nothing" is lightly edited from a talk that Elizabeth Elliott gave at a conference. She talked about some of the things she has suffered through and what she's learned about suffering from those experiences. The overall idea is that we more deeply come to know God through suffering and learn to depend on Him and His love and sovereignty. The focus was not so much on detailed theology as it was advice on how to get through suffering. Overall, I'd recommend this book.I rece "Suffering Is Never for Nothing" is lightly edited from a talk that Elizabeth Elliott gave at a conference. She talked about some of the things she has suffered through and what she's learned about suffering from those experiences. The overall idea is that we more deeply come to know God through suffering and learn to depend on Him and His love and sovereignty. The focus was not so much on detailed theology as it was advice on how to get through suffering. Overall, I'd recommend this book.I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Deborah Flora
    January 1, 1970
    Isn't the title alone encouraging?! This is a story of suffering and hope. Of lessons learned in the midst of mourning and in circumstances beyond our control. It offers light and finding faith as our tether rope, fixing us to Christ.Elisabeth Elliot walks us through verses she clung to and truths she learned and applied in her life. She shows us what a difference acceptance and gratitude can make in our lives. And more than that, she shows us that God is love, He loves us and we are seen by Him Isn't the title alone encouraging?! This is a story of suffering and hope. Of lessons learned in the midst of mourning and in circumstances beyond our control. It offers light and finding faith as our tether rope, fixing us to Christ.Elisabeth Elliot walks us through verses she clung to and truths she learned and applied in her life. She shows us what a difference acceptance and gratitude can make in our lives. And more than that, she shows us that God is love, He loves us and we are seen by Him.I received a copy of this book to review and all opinions are 100% my own.
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  • Kara
    January 1, 1970
    This book is actually a transcript of a series of messages Elisabeth Elliot did on the topic of suffering. In saying that, it doesn’t always read well, since she was speaking. I have read her other books so I know she is a more than capable writer. But I give this book 5 stars nevertheless, because her message is timeless and biblical and mostly because I would read a grocery list written by Elisabeth Elliot and give it 5 stars.
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  • Amanda Stamm
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommend! Brings suffering into perspective and how you can turn suffering into joy.
  • Christi Brownlow
    January 1, 1970
    Pure gold.
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