The Oysterville Sewing Circle
The #1 New York Times bestselling author brings us her most ambitious and provocative work yet—a searing and timely novel that explores the most volatile issue of our time—domestic violence. At the break of dawn, Caroline Shelby rolls into Oysterville, Washington, a tiny hamlet at the edge of the raging Pacific.She’s come home.Home to a place she thought she’d left forever, home of her heart and memories, but not her future. Ten years ago, Caroline launched a career in the glamorous fashion world of Manhattan. But her success in New York imploded on a wave of scandal and tragedy, forcing her to flee to the only safe place she knows.And in the backseat of Caroline’s car are two children who were orphaned in a single chilling moment—five-year-old Addie and six-year-old Flick. She’s now their legal guardian—a role she’s not sure she’s ready for.But the Oysterville she left behind has changed. Her siblings have their own complicated lives and her aging parents are hoping to pass on their thriving seafood restaurant to the next generation. And there’s Will Jensen, a decorated Navy SEAL who’s also returned home after being wounded overseas. Will and Caroline were forever friends as children, with the promise of something more . . . until he fell in love with Sierra, Caroline’s best friend and the most beautiful girl in town. With her modeling jobs drying up, Sierra, too, is on the cusp of reinventing herself.Caroline returns to her favorite place: the sewing shop owned by Mrs. Lindy Bloom, the woman who inspired her and taught her to sew. There she discovers that even in an idyllic beach town, there are women living with the deepest of secrets. Thus begins the Oysterville Sewing Circle—where women can join forces to support each other through the troubles they keep hidden.Yet just as Caroline regains her creativity and fighting spirit, and the children begin to heal from their loss, an unexpected challenge tests her courage and her heart. This time, though, Caroline is not going to run away. She’s going to stand and fight for everything—and everyone—she loves.

The Oysterville Sewing Circle Details

TitleThe Oysterville Sewing Circle
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 13th, 2019
PublisherWilliam Morrow
ISBN-139780062425614
Rating
GenreFiction, Romance, Womens Fiction, Contemporary, Chick Lit

The Oysterville Sewing Circle Review

  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThis was my first Susan Wiggs novel and I liked this one enough to want to check out her other books. I appreciate her attempt at exploring some heavy subjects in this story however there were a few things in the book that I felt weren't developed to their potential. This has been a common thing with books I have read recently. Just because I know early on how it will probably end, I still need to feel like everything unfolds naturally rather than rushed or glossed over. Don't get me wr 3.5 starsThis was my first Susan Wiggs novel and I liked this one enough to want to check out her other books. I appreciate her attempt at exploring some heavy subjects in this story however there were a few things in the book that I felt weren't developed to their potential. This has been a common thing with books I have read recently. Just because I know early on how it will probably end, I still need to feel like everything unfolds naturally rather than rushed or glossed over. Don't get me wrong though this was still a good read.The fashion world might be glamorous but it is also cutthroat, a fact Caroline Shelby is well aware of having worked in the industry for 10 years in New York City. She decides to return to her hometown of Oysterville, Washington not only because she is unemployed but also because she has recently become legal guardian of her deceased friend's children and she's going to need the help of her parents and siblings. But returning home will mean she will have to face her past, both the good, and the bad. Given the size of the town it will be difficult to avoid running into Will Jensen, a friend from her childhood who broke her heart when he married her best friend, Sierra. When Caroline decides to form a women's support group, she learns that she's not the only one with a deep secret.There's a lot of heavy subjects in the story like domestic violence, addiction, and sexual assault so I would take a pass on this one if you are just in the mood for a light and breezy read. Unfortunately because there was a lot of different things going on , I thought the story as a whole suffered because nothing felt fully developed. It's like the story would focus for while on the sewing circle, and then bounce to the whole love triangle thing, then briefly mention the kids. I feel like you get to the endpoint and it's not as entirely satisfying as you hoped because many parts of the story just felt glossed over. Keeping that in mind, I'm not saying this isn't a good book, rather because of these things, it didn't hit the great or awesome mark for me. Still recommend especially if you like books about women supporting other women.Thank you to the publisher for sending me an advance copy in exchange for a review!
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  • Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Caroline never thought she would be returning to her childhood home of Oysterville and definitely not with two children that weren't her own.Caroline had wanted to leave as badly as any young person and head to New York City. Caroline did make it big in New York until a famous designer stole her clothing line.Her loss and the death of her friend had Caroline returning with her friend's two children because Caroline had no idea how to take care of a child let alone two.Caroline had a loving, supp Caroline never thought she would be returning to her childhood home of Oysterville and definitely not with two children that weren't her own.Caroline had wanted to leave as badly as any young person and head to New York City. Caroline did make it big in New York until a famous designer stole her clothing line.Her loss and the death of her friend had Caroline returning with her friend's two children because Caroline had no idea how to take care of a child let alone two.Caroline had a loving, supportive family to help her and ideas on how to help women of domestic abuse since that is what took her friend who left her the two children.We get a glimpse into Caroline’s life as a teenager as well as her life now. Her teenage years were just as full of love as her adult life with her family.THE OYSTERVILLE SEWING CIRCLE was a sweet, beautiful read with lovable characters and a setting you will want to make your own.If you enjoy sewing, the fashion world, being on a beach setting, learning about running a restaurant, being with loving characters, and seeing women helping other women, THE OYSTERVILLE SEWING CIRCLE will be a wonderful addition to your reading stack.A truly cozy, heartwarming read for readers of women’s fiction. 5/5This book was given to me by the publisher as an ARC via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lori Tatar
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed The Oysterville Sewing Circle. Believe me when I say, it is not what it appears at first glance, and that is by design. It handles some pretty heavy topics, primarily domestic abuse, in a way that is easy to take in and not feel overwhelmed by the message. This is a story for women, about women and about love, and not just following our passions, but finding them as well. It illustrates how our lives are our own, even when they are not. This was a great read!
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  • Kris - My Novelesque Life
    January 1, 1970
    RATING: 3.5 STARS**Review to come**
  • Carla Johnson-Hicks
    January 1, 1970
    The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs was a wonderful story about Caroline Shelby, her life, her friends, her love, her family and her determination. Caroline never thought she would return to her childhood home of Oysterville to live and definitely not with two children. Growing up Caroline wanted to leave Oysterville, Washington to become a famous designer in New York. She was on her way, when her mentor and boss stole her clothing line and her best friend died from an overdose leaving The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs was a wonderful story about Caroline Shelby, her life, her friends, her love, her family and her determination. Caroline never thought she would return to her childhood home of Oysterville to live and definitely not with two children. Growing up Caroline wanted to leave Oysterville, Washington to become a famous designer in New York. She was on her way, when her mentor and boss stole her clothing line and her best friend died from an overdose leaving behind two children. Caroline had been named their guardian. With her loss and the death of her friend had Caroline had no idea how to take care of a any child, so with the encouragement of her mother, Caroline was on her way back home. But returning home will mean she will have to face her past, both the good, and the bad. Given the size of the town it will be difficult to avoid running into Will Jensen, a friend from her childhood who broke her heart when he married her best friend, Sierra.This story is told in two timelines, the present and Caroline's life as a teenager. I enjoyed both timelines equally and enjoyed getting to know not only Caroline, but her family and friends. Caroline is a a great character. She is one of those women that could have given up with everything that has happened to her, but she digs down and finds that strength within and picks up her life, and makes it a success. It is not easy, there are bumps along the way, hurdles to overcome, but she does it, not just for herself, but for Flick and Addie. She is also someone who cares about others and begins a group to support women who are victims of Domestic Abuse. As we get to know Will, her best friend and secret crush from her youth, I want to slap him. He gave up a wonderful woman for her best friend who was a bit flighty and somewhat selfish, although if that had not happened, they would not be where they are now. The secondary characters, her family and friends, support and encourage her which adds to the story. I really enjoyed this book. It handles some heavy topics, primarily domestic abuse, in a way that is easy to take in and not feel overwhelmed by the message. It also deals with date rape as a form of domestic abuse as well as assault. This is a story for women, about women and about love, and not just following our passions, but finding them as well. It shows us that even when we think there is nothing left for us and we are doomed to live the life that we have been thrust into, that there is something else, other opportunities and people to help us if we have the strength and are willing to take the chance to move on. I definitely recommend this book to those who enjoy an empowering story of friendship and new beginnings.I listened to this book and enjoyed the narration by Khristine Hvam. She is a wonderful narrator and her performance added much to my enjoyment of the book. She gave voice to the various characters, especially Caroline and Will. The story flowed for me and I will definitely look for more books narrated by Khristine Hvam. The publisher, HarperAudio, generously provided me with a copy of this book upon request. The rating, ideas and opinions shared are my own.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    I have read most of Susan Wiggs' books and her new book is definitely my favorite. It's got everything you need for a great novel - well written characters, a fantastic plot and a beautiful setting. There's some romance, lots of family love along with learning to overcome defeat. It's also about domestic violence that occurs in every level of society and is often hidden from other people.As Caroline returns to Oysterville after 10 years in New York City, she's a different person than the girl wh I have read most of Susan Wiggs' books and her new book is definitely my favorite. It's got everything you need for a great novel - well written characters, a fantastic plot and a beautiful setting. There's some romance, lots of family love along with learning to overcome defeat. It's also about domestic violence that occurs in every level of society and is often hidden from other people.As Caroline returns to Oysterville after 10 years in New York City, she's a different person than the girl who couldn't wait to get out of the small town and live in the big city. She left with big dreams of being a fashion designer but has come home in defeat. She's also different because she has two young children under her care. She never wanted children growing up and is not sure of how to parent the two children whose mother died in her apartment in New York. The first person she runs into is Matt, who she loved as a teenager and is now married to her best friend. The more she settles into town, she learns that there are several women who are hiding their secret of violence in their lives. This problem makes her start the Oysterville Sewing Circle—where women can join forces to support each other through the troubles they keep hidden. The two main questions that are answered throughout the novel are: Will Caroline be able to learn to parent the two small children in her care and quit questioning herself and will she able to be successful as a clothing designer and overcome her past defeats.This was a wonderful heart-warming story with fantastic characters that addressed several major problems that exist in our world now - domestic violence and drug usage. I highly recommend it!Thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Lorna
    January 1, 1970
    Susan Wiggs and her books have long been favorites of mine in the past. After not reading one for awhile, I decided to jump back into with this one and while it wasn’t exactly what I thought it would be, it was still a delightful(mostly)read for me. Mostly because the subject matter includes domestic violence and that could be a trigger for some. Just a heads up.Carolyn left Oysterville ten years previously to study fashion to fulfill her lifelong dream of working in the world of high fashion as Susan Wiggs and her books have long been favorites of mine in the past. After not reading one for awhile, I decided to jump back into with this one and while it wasn’t exactly what I thought it would be, it was still a delightful(mostly)read for me. Mostly because the subject matter includes domestic violence and that could be a trigger for some. Just a heads up.Carolyn left Oysterville ten years previously to study fashion to fulfill her lifelong dream of working in the world of high fashion as a designer. She succeeds in many ways until it’s all ripped away from her. Tragedy follows on the heels of that and she finds herself taking two small children(not hers)back to Oysterville with her. Recovery for both her and her young charges is much needed and her family home is just the thing for them. Of course, her longtime friend/crush Will, now married to her high school best friend, is back home as well. While deciding what to do, she kind of falls into being asked to design and make several hundred shirts, something she can’t do alone. She also wants to do something for domestic abuse survivors and so The Oysterville Sewing Circle is born.The woman members are survivors and while not everyone helps with the sewing, they all feel better for the companionship of other women with the same problems. Of course, there’s also a romance.This story jumps back and forth through time. We meet Will and Carolyn as older children as they explore the ocean and all the nooks an crannies of the town. They are pretty much inseparable, but that all changes when Sierra moves to town. Carolyn became pretty much the third wheel, although a welcome one. In the present, Will is still the good guy, the man everyone loves, but that can’t compete with Sierra’s wanderlust and need for a huge career.There’s a lot going on in this book. Not only do we have the book within a book with the past and present, but there’s also the New York fashion scene, the time spent with the heartbroken children, the addition of the sewing circle and all the women characters involved, and that’s not even going into the romance or Carolyn trying to forge a new career. Even with all that, in the beginning, I thought it a bit slow and kept putting it down. I had no idea where it was going either. I wondered if it was going to be a mystery, a romance, or just a heartwarming story. In a way, it ended up being all of those things. Once I really got into the story, I was finally hooked and ended up quite enjoying the read.The best part of the book for me was the characters. I wasn’t as big a fan of Carolyn’s as I was Will, but still I liked her. The children were so sweet and heartbroken and I felt for them all the way through the read. The women of the Sewing Circle, while not necessarily from the same backgrounds, became part of the story and I enjoyed them as well. Carolyn’s family were also a welcome addition to the story. There is, of course, a villain-one that I wanted to knock upside the head a few times myself! Enough said.I would recommend this to adult chic lit or romance readers. It’s got a small mystery, but I don’t consider it one. And FYI, this book doesn’t contain cheating.
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  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    I got an Advance Reader Edition at ALA Midwinter and it was fun to meet the author there, too!Caroline returns to her hometown of Oysterville, Washington because she has no other choice. While her design career in New York ended in disaster, the real tragedy was the death of her dear friend, Angelique, from an accidental drug overdose. Angelique worked as a model and named Caroline the legal guardian of her two children, Flip and Addie. Being a parent is often overwhelming for Caroline, but with I got an Advance Reader Edition at ALA Midwinter and it was fun to meet the author there, too!Caroline returns to her hometown of Oysterville, Washington because she has no other choice. While her design career in New York ended in disaster, the real tragedy was the death of her dear friend, Angelique, from an accidental drug overdose. Angelique worked as a model and named Caroline the legal guardian of her two children, Flip and Addie. Being a parent is often overwhelming for Caroline, but with the support of her family and friends she starts over with her design work and begins to create a loving and safe home for the children. She also reconnects with her childhood best friends Will and Sierra. As Caroline starts to turn life around for herself and her children issues from her past threaten everything.The Oysterville Sewing Circle is the name of the support group Caroline, her sisters and friends start for women who are victims of domestic violence. Learning their stories sheds light on the many aspects of this horrific problem. I have not read a lot of books by Susan Wiggs, but I’ve enjoyed those I have. She is thorough in her research and deftly weaves important facts throughout a well written story, whether it be a part of history I knew nothing about or social issues like domestic violence in this book. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and highly recommend it.
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    The writing on this was pretty atrocious. The same general points were restated over and over and OVER again throughout and it got very tiring very quickly. Also the romance (what there was of it) was kind of sketch with him being married at the beginning to her supposed best friend. Basically, it was all over the place trying to provide conflict and then going on and on about the conflict, but it was mostly self-created conflict. I am not talking about the physical/mental abuse victims and surv The writing on this was pretty atrocious. The same general points were restated over and over and OVER again throughout and it got very tiring very quickly. Also the romance (what there was of it) was kind of sketch with him being married at the beginning to her supposed best friend. Basically, it was all over the place trying to provide conflict and then going on and on about the conflict, but it was mostly self-created conflict. I am not talking about the physical/mental abuse victims and survivors because that was actual conflict and for everyone who WASN'T the main character, handled decently. I am talking mostly about the main character's giving up on the guy she liked as a kid to her friend, handling it badly for the rest of her life, and the entire plot with the evil designer, abusive guy, and her repetitive internal monologues about how she can't handle these kids she's inherited. Just deal with it, lady. I can handle only so much whining before I give up on a character and a book.Did not read about 1/5 of this because I got too irritated and skipped multiple chapters to just read the end.Thanks to the publisher for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kelli Estes
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished reading the galley of this beautiful story and I know other readers are going to love it as much as I do. It is the heartbreaking story of abuse and the powerful healing that can happen when women pull together.
  • Julie Barnard
    January 1, 1970
    Such a great book - definitely worth reading. I will probably read more books by this author.
  • Blender
    January 1, 1970
    Such a powerful story of how heartbreak can find healing.
  • Karol
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, I won this book from Goodreads. So thank you! Now on to the review. ****Warning, some minor spoilers ahead****I thought this book was decent, but not a great read. It was very repetitive and not as deep as I would have liked. I think the subject matter (domestic abuse, drug abuse, sexual assault) is important and am glad Susan Wiggs tackled it, but I wish she'd gone deeper. I also wish that some of the characters in the book that were in the Sewing Circle (abuse victims) had been m First of all, I won this book from Goodreads. So thank you! Now on to the review. ****Warning, some minor spoilers ahead****I thought this book was decent, but not a great read. It was very repetitive and not as deep as I would have liked. I think the subject matter (domestic abuse, drug abuse, sexual assault) is important and am glad Susan Wiggs tackled it, but I wish she'd gone deeper. I also wish that some of the characters in the book that were in the Sewing Circle (abuse victims) had been men (it happens more than people admit.) I would have loved to see a more inclusive and nuanced group of survivors. They honestly all felt a bit one dimensional and cliched. Plus, this book made it seem like pretty much every woman ever has been a victim of some form of abuse or assault or harassment. It wasn't as realistic as it could have been.As for the main story line with the protagonist and the guy she's loved since childhood, I enjoyed the parts that flashed back to their childhood summers, but felt the present day story was lacking and uninspired. She makes a ton of bad choices, lets people walk all over her, and then we are supposed to root for her. I just found it hard to care about her. And he gets over his "perfect" marriage quite quickly and easily. I found myself not really caring if they got together, because it felt like they purposely kept making choices that kept them apart. All they had to do was actually talk to each other and say how they felt, but that was apparently too hard for them.Another issue I had was that the kids she basically "adopts" felt like an afterthought. Their story just wasn't fleshed out enough. I wanted to know more about these kids, to understand what they were going through. But it was all a bit too surface, not enough substance. All in all, I thought it was a decent read, but it didn't stay with me, and I won't remember much of it in a year.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Goodreads for my Advance Readers Edition of The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs. To be honest, after seeing the title, I was not sure this book would be something I would enjoy. If I had to change anything about the book, I think it would be the title. However, if you are looking for a good summer read then this will be a good choice. I have not read very many books by Susan Wiggs, but I did enjoy reading this one. She attacks many difficult topics revolving around women such Thank you, Goodreads for my Advance Readers Edition of The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs. To be honest, after seeing the title, I was not sure this book would be something I would enjoy. If I had to change anything about the book, I think it would be the title. However, if you are looking for a good summer read then this will be a good choice. I have not read very many books by Susan Wiggs, but I did enjoy reading this one. She attacks many difficult topics revolving around women such as romance, career struggles, sisterhood, family, heartache, drug abuse and domestic violence. We get to see some insight in the fashion industry and the world of models and designers. The ending of the book seemed to be a little rushed and at one point, I thought my book had pages missing. I found myself a little frustrated as the story came to an end. All in all, this was a good book and I know many of you out there will love it.
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  • Carol Ames
    January 1, 1970
    It was excellent. The characters were to real I want to go to Oysterville. It is so timely in its message but also a great romance. I loved every minute of it. It was not what I thought it would be but is so much more. I really loved it. I couldn’t put it down.
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  • Lisa Cobb Sabatini
    January 1, 1970
    I won an Advance Reader's Edition of The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs from Goodreads.The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs is a story about women facing their struggles, growing in strength, and making their own paths in life. This book reminds readers that there is betrayal and cruelty in the world, yet there is also friendship and love. The author taps on all of the reader's emotions as protagonist Caroline navigates through her experiences of love and loss, rollercoaster ci I won an Advance Reader's Edition of The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs from Goodreads.The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs is a story about women facing their struggles, growing in strength, and making their own paths in life. This book reminds readers that there is betrayal and cruelty in the world, yet there is also friendship and love. The author taps on all of the reader's emotions as protagonist Caroline navigates through her experiences of love and loss, rollercoaster circumstances and unexpected responsibilities, fears and profound joy.A heartwarming novel, The Oysterville Sewing Circle by Susan Wiggs offers readers insight into the many facets of abuse as well as the strength of women uniting together to face it.
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  • Cate
    January 1, 1970
    When I started this book I did not know if I would like it or not, because it seemed slightly cheesy like a hallmark movie kind of story and that is really not my kind of thing but even though it did have those hokey kind of moments there was a deeper more important story dealing with domestic violence and women being harassed and taken advantage of by men, and how necessary it is for us women to not only stand up for themselves but to come together in friendship and support to be each others al When I started this book I did not know if I would like it or not, because it seemed slightly cheesy like a hallmark movie kind of story and that is really not my kind of thing but even though it did have those hokey kind of moments there was a deeper more important story dealing with domestic violence and women being harassed and taken advantage of by men, and how necessary it is for us women to not only stand up for themselves but to come together in friendship and support to be each others allies and to allow our voices to be heard. Besides this important message it was also a beautiful story about love and motherhood and I particularly enjoyed the parts in the book talking about growing up in a small beach community and the magic of summer romance and friendship because I also grew up in a beach town where every summer the tourists would arrive, introducing endless possibilities for summer love and friendship, and wonderful memories.
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  • Tracy Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book by Susan Wiggs. I haven't read many by her, but will definitely looking for more. This story starts out in the big city of New York in the midst of high fashion, designers, and glamorous models. Tragedy then turns the tides, and our main character, Caroline Shelby returns to her hometown of Oysterville, Washington to learn how to become a mom, a woman's advocate, and a best friend and wife to her long time crush from years past. Come follow her journey of ups and downs I really enjoyed this book by Susan Wiggs. I haven't read many by her, but will definitely looking for more. This story starts out in the big city of New York in the midst of high fashion, designers, and glamorous models. Tragedy then turns the tides, and our main character, Caroline Shelby returns to her hometown of Oysterville, Washington to learn how to become a mom, a woman's advocate, and a best friend and wife to her long time crush from years past. Come follow her journey of ups and downs and enjoy getting to know all of her family and friends as this tale keeps you turning the pages! Happy Reading everyone!
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  • Georgine
    January 1, 1970
    received an early copy from Goodreads.This was an amazing book. I enjoyed the interaction between the ladies as they became friends and associates, and what they ended up accomplishing between them.I also enjoyed how Caroline became a real mother with the two kids she was guardian of, after their mother died.I would recommend this book.
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  • Carolyn Breckinridge
    January 1, 1970
    The Oysterville Sewing Circle is an interesting and sweet read, but a difficult novel to rate. There are numerous facets to this story, some executed quite well, others a little less. The plot line focusing on the main character's love for the fashion industry opens up a world of apparently realistic cut throat practices and abuses. The author has developed several strong, complex and likable main characters, and throughout the novel, she places a heavy emphasis on the importance of family and c The Oysterville Sewing Circle is an interesting and sweet read, but a difficult novel to rate. There are numerous facets to this story, some executed quite well, others a little less. The plot line focusing on the main character's love for the fashion industry opens up a world of apparently realistic cut throat practices and abuses. The author has developed several strong, complex and likable main characters, and throughout the novel, she places a heavy emphasis on the importance of family and community. Relationships propel this story forward, and the inter relatedness of the characters is one of the novel's strong points. Her capturing of adolescent relationships is especially skillful.It is a service to provide an avenue for victims of domestic violence to read about this problem so victims realize they are not alone and also, that they have options. I do think, however, more could have been done with this focus. For example, the author does not offer the suggestion that what is commonly known as the domestic violence cycle is one of the major reasons many victims return to their abusers again and again, although she suggests other reasons, such as poverty and low self esteem. Also, I think it would have been a service to introduce several men into the self help group, as men also are victims and often have an even more difficult time admitting their victimization. It is a serious subject which the author took on but, in my opinion,she did not explore it as fully as she might have within the context of her story. The adaptation of two orphans to their new realities and new environment seemed a little better managed. All in all, The Oysterville Sewing Circle provided enjoyable reading about life in a small, town in a remote part of our county.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    I hesitated to dive into this one, and yet I snatched up the opportunity to read it the moment I saw it. Susan Wiggs is an automatic buy author for me, and I was thrilled to get early access to a digital copy before the release date. From the beginning it felt a little different from her other books, but I really enjoyed it. There are some hard subjects, hard feelings, and yet a wonderful portrayal of the feelings of family, friendships and love. When, I say hard subjects, in touch with the curr I hesitated to dive into this one, and yet I snatched up the opportunity to read it the moment I saw it. Susan Wiggs is an automatic buy author for me, and I was thrilled to get early access to a digital copy before the release date. From the beginning it felt a little different from her other books, but I really enjoyed it. There are some hard subjects, hard feelings, and yet a wonderful portrayal of the feelings of family, friendships and love. When, I say hard subjects, in touch with the current social climate #metoo is brought up specifically, but as you “review” their growing up years there is more. Her NY fashion life best friend dies of an overdose, covered up abuse, and leaves her the guardian of two young children. The traveling back home to family, the dynamics of family as they grew up and so much more. I’m so glad I read this, and I absolutely loved the ending. C-Shell as she is known to her family finds her place, even when it is not the original dream she had for herself. I don’t think I am adequately “reviewing” this one... disclaimer, I stayed up late to finish it (and loved it!). I would definitely recommend giving this book a read. It has all the good feels, with a balanced dose of some emotional issues. Perfect read, and I can definitely see some great book club discussions.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Caroline Shelby returns home, something she never expected, with two children, something else she never expected. After a scandal and a tragedy, Caroline returns home to rebuild her life and start over.Life in New York has opened Caroline's eyes and now, she sees the secrets that are hiding, even in idyllic Oysterville. So, she decides to start a sewing circle, a place where women can support each other and share their strength. Touching and moving, I just couldn't put it down.
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  • Kris Dickinson
    January 1, 1970
    I liked it. The ending seemed a little rushed but other than that, it was a good story line. The part about the dog even had me crying. Its the sign of a good author when they can evoke emotion like that. The 'Sewing Circle' parts could have been more but the author did well with what she did put.
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  • Gaele
    January 1, 1970
    Caroline left the small coastal town of Oysterville to chase her dreams of being a designer, and has worked in New York for several years, now the ‘design assistant’ to a much more famous man. With her sixth entry in the ‘young up and coming’ designer contest, she finally hits on a winner and is excited to make her mark. Until her ‘boss’ steals her designs and everything falls apart. Just adding to that trouble, Caroline’s best friend and model, Angelique and her two children Flick and Addie hav Caroline left the small coastal town of Oysterville to chase her dreams of being a designer, and has worked in New York for several years, now the ‘design assistant’ to a much more famous man. With her sixth entry in the ‘young up and coming’ designer contest, she finally hits on a winner and is excited to make her mark. Until her ‘boss’ steals her designs and everything falls apart. Just adding to that trouble, Caroline’s best friend and model, Angelique and her two children Flick and Addie have sought refuge in her tiny apartment. Angelique won’t speak of the bruises she’s got over her body, and when she’s discovered dead from an overdose, Caroline has no choice but to head home with the children, to keep them safe and start to find a new direction for her life. Throughout the devastation, Caroline only wants answers and opportunities: answers to who killed her friend, and why so many women are killed by abusive partners, and to reclaim her confidence in her designs. With Addie and Flick traumatized and unsure, she’s first providing them some security and family love – her whole family has stepped in to welcome and care for the children and Caroline – allowing them the chance to heal and grow. Adding to that burden is the reappearance in her life of her summer-crush / soulmate now married to her best friend. She’s determined that nothing will convince her to stick around, and a relationship isn’t in her cards – it’s all about Flick and Addie and her designs. And then, discovering the extent, even in her small town, of the women who have been abused, she starts a support group – a group that is making differences in support and in the lives of the women who attend. From starting her own small design business on line to getting noticed by the ‘big guns’, Caroline is building a life in Oysterville, and helping others to reclaim their own sense of purpose and dreams – all in a safe environment. Full of stories of abuse and hope, the struggles with parenting (especially when you aren’t expecting it) and the sweetness of the children’s acceptance, their open hearts and the loving way in which the community comes to support people and business alike – this is a story of redemption, hope and opportunity – with a healthy dose of ‘how to help’ thrown in. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via NetGalley for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Caroline Shelby left her home of Oysterville Washington with big dreams of becoming a successful fashion designer in New York City. Now ten years later, she has returned home with her designs stolen, her dreams crushed, and her best friend’s two kids, six-year-old Flick, and five-year-old Addie in tow. What happened to their mother and why is Caroline now their guardian? Will Jenson is a Navy Seal who has returned to Oysterville where he had spent so many happy summers as a youth with his Grandp Caroline Shelby left her home of Oysterville Washington with big dreams of becoming a successful fashion designer in New York City. Now ten years later, she has returned home with her designs stolen, her dreams crushed, and her best friend’s two kids, six-year-old Flick, and five-year-old Addie in tow. What happened to their mother and why is Caroline now their guardian? Will Jenson is a Navy Seal who has returned to Oysterville where he had spent so many happy summers as a youth with his Grandparents. Honorably discharged because of a wound, he is now a high school teacher and married to Caroline’s former best friend, Sierra. What is the history of Caroline, Sierra, and Will? Why does Caroline have feelings every time she is around Will? As Caroline attempts to rebuild her life, she realizes that domestic violence has touched many that she has known in her own home town. She starts the Oysterville Sewing circle with her sisters for those women to find a place where they can build some solidarity.I enjoyed this novel. There were a lot of different story threads that were occurring at different points in time, and I liked how Wiggs expertly wove them together to get a full three-dimensional story. I enjoyed how the novel explored domestic abuse, and loss. I loved how the women rallied together and were able to help and support each other. I also liked how the book pointed out that domestic abuse can happen in all walks of life. Caroline’s creativity and the look into the fashion industry were also fascinating to me.Favorite Quotes:“It’s terrible in a really . . . . special way. You look at this person and realize she’s just gone. An empty shell.”Overall, The Oysterville Sewing Circle is an intriguing saga the covers love, loss, abuse, and fashion. It’s a great summer read!Book Source: Advance Reader’s Edition for Review from William Morrow as part of the TLC Book Tour. Thank-you!!This review was originally posted on my blog at: https://lauragerold.blogspot.com/2019...
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  • Sascha
    January 1, 1970
    I thought I knew what to expect when I began reading Susan Wiggs' The Oysterville Sewing Circle, but this novel far, far exceeded my expectations.At the heart of this emotionally and thoughtfully compelling novel is Caroline Shelby, a creative spirit who discovered at thirteen that she loved to create, particularly to take a swath of material and design garments. Caroline was also the self-described black sheep of her family, the only one who didn't go into the family restaurant business, the on I thought I knew what to expect when I began reading Susan Wiggs' The Oysterville Sewing Circle, but this novel far, far exceeded my expectations.At the heart of this emotionally and thoughtfully compelling novel is Caroline Shelby, a creative spirit who discovered at thirteen that she loved to create, particularly to take a swath of material and design garments. Caroline was also the self-described black sheep of her family, the only one who didn't go into the family restaurant business, the one who capriciously dyed her hair bold colors, the one who inevitably left her small town in Washington State for the designer big leagues of New York City. And the one who returns home with two motherless children and a career in tatters.Parts of the story are told in flashback and read like a young adult novel as we live with Caroline through some of the events of her teenage years. During those passages we learn how Caroline became best friends with Will and then Sierra. We learn and share Caroline's heartbreaks. To say that I was frequently moved to tears would be an understatement and I am not one to shed a lot of tears while reading a book.Another layer exists to this beautiful novel, one in which secrets prevail, and layers of pain that have been hidden are revealed. Where people who are mentors are shown to be opportunists and frequently worse.No, this novel was not what I expected when I began reading. It was so much better and will stick with me not only because of the heartbreaking dark sides, but because of the amount of love it exudes from Caroline's amazing family to the two children she brings into her life to a group of women who pull together to stand up for each other.I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    This book very much has a message, but I never felt preached at. I liked how it brought issues going on in today's world out in the open, for these characters and for the reader. I will say that as this one started out I was sort of meh...on it. Especially the part in the past, I hated how Caroline didn't stand up for herself around her friends. You could easily see how things were going to go there, both in the past and the present. The book really started picking up for me when the sewing circ This book very much has a message, but I never felt preached at. I liked how it brought issues going on in today's world out in the open, for these characters and for the reader. I will say that as this one started out I was sort of meh...on it. Especially the part in the past, I hated how Caroline didn't stand up for herself around her friends. You could easily see how things were going to go there, both in the past and the present. The book really started picking up for me when the sewing circle came to life. Hearing the women's stories was enlightening and heartbreaking, but what I loved was that this group of women were there for each other. Celebrating in good things, holding hands in not so good things and welcoming back after bad things. I especially loved seeing Caroline build her business, having the women help, giving them confidence to come back to life. I also loved seeing Caroline becoming a mother. She was at times brutally honest with the kids, but they needed it. But even as she told them the truth she gave them a safe place, a place where they were loved, a place to become the people they will be.The bit of drama at the end was a bit surprising, yet not after you thought about things. I was glad with how things got resolved there. But the very ending, was perfect in so many ways.
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  • BookTrib.com
    January 1, 1970
    Susan Wiggs’ latest, The Oysterville Sewing Circle (William Morrow), is billed as a novel about domestic violence, but it is also a love story – and not the sturdy love between our protagonist Caroline Shelby and Will Jensen, her handsome, long-time childhood crush.Underneath the more obvious storyline is the emerging love for two sweet little kids that Caroline, the career-obsessed fashionista who has sworn she’d never have children, finds growing in her heart, crowding out almost everything el Susan Wiggs’ latest, The Oysterville Sewing Circle (William Morrow), is billed as a novel about domestic violence, but it is also a love story – and not the sturdy love between our protagonist Caroline Shelby and Will Jensen, her handsome, long-time childhood crush.Underneath the more obvious storyline is the emerging love for two sweet little kids that Caroline, the career-obsessed fashionista who has sworn she’d never have children, finds growing in her heart, crowding out almost everything else. That love drives the plotline, creating a gentle, safe place when things get grave.Wiggs has taken on the ugly job of talking about the brutality many women endure at the hands of men who profess to love them. Domestic abuse is one of society’s ill-kept secrets. Neighbors turn up the volume of their televisions to drown out weeping and angry voices; if the fighting happens in public, passers-by turn their heads, giving the couple privacy. No one wants to intervene; hence, the women are left with their feelings of shame and inadequacy and hopelessness; men, with a sense of power and invincibility.The rest of the review: https://booktrib.com/2019/08/sewing-a...
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This book sounds like it is going to center around the Oysterville Sewing Circle group - you know, the thing in the book's title. It sounds like a book about women helping women. But it isn't. Instead, it's an average romance. The actual story - Caroline's fashion career and love life - is fine, even a nice read. ***Spoilers ahead***But the story line about abused and hurt women ended up feeling like an addition meant to add gravitas. The group that gave the book it's title is only in two sectio This book sounds like it is going to center around the Oysterville Sewing Circle group - you know, the thing in the book's title. It sounds like a book about women helping women. But it isn't. Instead, it's an average romance. The actual story - Caroline's fashion career and love life - is fine, even a nice read. ***Spoilers ahead***But the story line about abused and hurt women ended up feeling like an addition meant to add gravitas. The group that gave the book it's title is only in two sections of the book, not even full chapters, and those parts of the book aren't even very well written. They read less like fiction and more like informational pamphlets about domestic violence, not compelling at all. Honestly, I'm a little offended at how these horrible and very sad situations of abuse and assault ended up feeling like they were just a way for Caroline to end up on her path to a happy family and nice career in the fashion industry. What a disappointing book.
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  • Marji Morris
    January 1, 1970
    My favorite parts of this book were the sections dealing with Caroline's (and Will's) childhood. Somehow it rang truer than the present day sections, which seemed a little too predictable. I liked the book, despite the romance mood, because of the drama surrounding the death of Caroline's friend, the trauma of her children, and her ability to land on her feet after being sucker punched by her boss. I liked that the author allowed Caroline to save herself, with a little help from her friends.Inte My favorite parts of this book were the sections dealing with Caroline's (and Will's) childhood. Somehow it rang truer than the present day sections, which seemed a little too predictable. I liked the book, despite the romance mood, because of the drama surrounding the death of Caroline's friend, the trauma of her children, and her ability to land on her feet after being sucker punched by her boss. I liked that the author allowed Caroline to save herself, with a little help from her friends.Interestingly enough, although I don't read fashion books, this is the second this year that involved the fashion industry, and in both of them, there was theft of designs. Apparently that's a rampant problem. The themes of domestic violence and adult bullying also raise their ugly heads.I can't say much more without giving away the plot and ending, but since much of it is predictable, you'll figure it out for yourself as you read. A portion of the sales will be donated to an organization which assists domestic violence victims.
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