Shout
A searing poetic memoir and call to action from the bestselling and award-winning author of Speak, Laurie Halse Anderson!Bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson is known for the unflinching way she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Now, inspired by her fans and enraged by how little in our culture has changed since her groundbreaking novel Speak was first published twenty years ago, she has written a poetry memoir that is as vulnerable as it is rallying, as timely as it is timeless. In free verse, Anderson shares reflections, rants, and calls to action woven between deeply personal stories from her life that she's never written about before. Searing and soul-searching, this important memoir is a denouncement of our society's failures and a love letter to all the people with the courage to say #metoo and #timesup, whether aloud, online, or only in their own hearts. Shout speaks truth to power in a loud, clear voice-- and once you hear it, it is impossible to ignore.

Shout Details

TitleShout
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 12th, 2019
PublisherPenguin Young Readers Group
Rating
GenrePoetry, Young Adult

Shout Review

  • Hannah Greendale
    January 1, 1970
    Part One (roughly the first half of the book) drones on, but Part Two and Three bring thunder and rage and unapologetic ferocity to the issue of sexual abuse, rape, and the unforgivable way society treats women (and men) who find the courage to come forward and speak the truth. the question is born out of true confusionno one ever told him the rules of intimacyor the law, his dad only talks about condomswith a "don't get her pregnant" warninghis mom says "talk to your father"so he watches a lot Part One (roughly the first half of the book) drones on, but Part Two and Three bring thunder and rage and unapologetic ferocity to the issue of sexual abuse, rape, and the unforgivable way society treats women (and men) who find the courage to come forward and speak the truth. the question is born out of true confusionno one ever told him the rules of intimacyor the law, his dad only talks about condomswith a "don't get her pregnant" warninghis mom says "talk to your father"so he watches a lot of pornto get offto be schooledporn says her body is territorybegging to be conquered no conversation requiredyou take what you want* _* Note: Quote taken from an Advanced Readers' Edition.
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  • Schizanthus
    January 1, 1970
    Content warnings include sexual assault, PTSD, war, physical abuse, fat shaming, alcohol and other drug use. This is the story of a girl who lost her voice and wrote herself a new one. I expect I’m one of the only ones reading SHOUT before they’ve read Speak. I’ve had Speak on my ‘I absolutely have to read this book’ list for as long as I can remember but still haven’t read it. I searched my local library for it but they don’t own it. I tried for several years to buy it on Kindle but it wasn’t Content warnings include sexual assault, PTSD, war, physical abuse, fat shaming, alcohol and other drug use. This is the story of a girl who lost her voice and wrote herself a new one. I expect I’m one of the only ones reading SHOUT before they’ve read Speak. I’ve had Speak on my ‘I absolutely have to read this book’ list for as long as I can remember but still haven’t read it. I searched my local library for it but they don’t own it. I tried for several years to buy it on Kindle but it wasn’t available to purchase in my country (I just checked and it’s still not an option). I finally bit the bullet and added it to my Book Depository order last year and it’s been looking at me ever since from my shelf, quietly asking me why I haven’t opened its pages. Honestly? It’s intimidated me. It’s the book about sexual assault and while I’ve read so many others, I think I’ve worried about what it will bring up for me when I do finally read it. So, long story slightly shorter, my plan is to SHOUT, then Speak, and then SHOUT again. I’m interested to see if my perspective on SHOUT changes after I’ve read Speak. I guess time will tell.The first section of this book is essentially memoir in free verse. Laurie takes the reader on a journey through a series of childhood memories; a father haunted by war when alcohol isn’t numbing his memories, a mother silenced, her own experiences of school, work and surviving sexual assault. I really loved reading about Laurie’s experience as an exchange student in Denmark and would happily devour as much information as I could about those 13 months; what I’ve read has sparked an interest in Danish culture.The second section, which begins almost two thirds of the way through the book, broke my heart as Laurie shared just a handful of stories about her interactions with other survivors, whose young bodies have been invaded and lives changed, most often by those they know and should have been able to trust. Although this section made me cry one of the things that got to me the most was something hopeful - the colourful ribbons tied to fences in Ballarat, Australia in support of the abused, which ultimately created Loud Fence. The images of those ribbons of support broke me. This section includes responses from readers, students who have heard Laurie speak, teachers and librarians; those who need to share their story, those who don’t understand what was so bad about Melinda’s experience in Speak, those who want to censor “inappropriate” reading material.I’m not sure how to sum up the third section other than to say that it was the shortest section but also the one in which I shed most tears. Laurie’s final poems about her parents simply gutted me.Although it’s clearly stated in the blurb I still hadn’t thought there’d be as much memoir as there was in this book. I’d expected a greater percentage of poems to be directly addressing sexual assault, even though there are plenty that do. When my expectations didn’t line up with reality I thought I’d be disappointed but I wasn’t and I’m already ready for a reread. I expect that I will revisit this book each time I read one of Laurie’s books that are mentioned here, to search out her favourite scenes and glimpses of the story behind the story.There’s a vulnerability here and it’s entwined with strength, determination, courage, resilience and so much compassion. While I finished this book with a contented sigh I’m still yearning for more. Luckily for me, as this is the first of Laurie’s books that I’ve read (shame on me!), I still have plenty to explore.Thank you, Laurie Halse Anderson, for sharing some of your life in this book, for breaking my heart, growing my empathy, giving me so many amazing passages to highlight and inspiring me. I will see you on Ultima Thule.Thank you so much to NetGalley and Viking, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, for the opportunity to read this book.
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  • Ashleigh Rose
    January 1, 1970
    “too many grown-ups tell kids to follow their dreams / like that’s going to get them somewhere / Auntie Laurie says follow your nightmares instead / cuz when you figure out what’s eating you / you can slay it” || Thank you for having the courage to lead the way in this work, @halseanderson. Your bravery and words are an eternal gift to us all; I am thankful to have your torch blazing a path for us and igniting the sparks within us. 🔥 💛3.12.19 #SHOUT
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    2019's first superstar. LHA has long been known as a rockstar of consent, a revealer of truths for teens, and in Shout, she gets very personal with her own story--her childhood, her own sexual assault and recovery, and her journey to the writing life. I was left with the tiniest sense of the weight she must carry, as holder of all those secrets of her readers, and the dynamo of her power. GET THIS BOOK.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Cc @halseanderson I’m utterly gobsmacked. SHOUT is outstanding, profoundly moving work that will have you crying on one page while raising your fist in defiance and strength on the next. This is a phenomenal book; I can say that reading it changed me for the better. Five trillion stars, Laurie Halse Anderson. ❤❤❤ Cc @halseanderson I’m utterly gobsmacked. SHOUT is outstanding, profoundly moving work that will have you crying on one page while raising your fist in defiance and strength on the next. This is a phenomenal book; I can say that reading it changed me for the better. Five trillion stars, Laurie Halse Anderson. ❤️❤️❤️
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    This searing, timely, timeless memoir in verse will sweep every "best of" in 2019. This is Laurie's story, about being a survivor, about being a woman, about being an advocate who is passionate about young people, about intellectual freedom, and about being the best people we can all possibly be. It's angry and it's hopeful. It's sad and it's powerful. It's real and raw. The verse is flawless. It adds movement and clarity. It is exactly what it wants to be: a shout, not a whisper. Put it on your This searing, timely, timeless memoir in verse will sweep every "best of" in 2019. This is Laurie's story, about being a survivor, about being a woman, about being an advocate who is passionate about young people, about intellectual freedom, and about being the best people we can all possibly be. It's angry and it's hopeful. It's sad and it's powerful. It's real and raw. The verse is flawless. It adds movement and clarity. It is exactly what it wants to be: a shout, not a whisper. Put it on your to-read lists. This is a masterclass in feminism, in storytelling, and in the power of words to draw action that changes the world.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Empowering memoir in verse. Releases 3/12/2019 and when it does, I’m buying my own copy so I can write in the margins and underline quotes. I was lucky enough to read an ARC. I highly recommend it for all high school collections and it also has incredibly strong adult appeal. Every word matters - stories matter - life stories matter. Get this book into as many hands as you can. This is more than a call-to-action. This is a battle cry.
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    With her follow up to SPEAK, Laurie Halse Anderson once again puts forth a powerful piece of literature filled with compelling prose along with fierce dialog. Anderson successfully pulls back the tragic layers to the continual occurrences of rape, sexual assault, misogyny and all too often "turning a blind eye" and "victim blaming". As our country begins to heal and educate itself through the ME TOO movement, we are witness to protests, demonstrations and conversation with the hopes of no longer With her follow up to SPEAK, Laurie Halse Anderson once again puts forth a powerful piece of literature filled with compelling prose along with fierce dialog. Anderson successfully pulls back the tragic layers to the continual occurrences of rape, sexual assault, misogyny and all too often "turning a blind eye" and "victim blaming". As our country begins to heal and educate itself through the ME TOO movement, we are witness to protests, demonstrations and conversation with the hopes of no longer being silent.
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  • Sami
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know what made me cry more: the ragged grace of the prose, or Laurie Halse Anderson's gut-wrenching life story. In a collection that feels both autobiographical and impersonal, Laurie's life journey is mixed with her thoughts on rape culture, declarations of belonging, redemption, and hope for anyone who has suffered at the hands of another. She pulls no punches, and it can be unbearably hard to read, but this is one of the most important gifts we can give to the generations to come.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    This was the first Laurie Halse Anderson Book I read. It definitely will not be my last. Like Jacqueline Woodson, she writes in a way that lets me overcome my own personal issues with poetry (a high school teacher forcing us to find the true “meaning” of a poem, rather than allowing us to get lost in the words). Unfortunately, far too many of us have stories like Laurie’s. Fortunately, we can all find kinship and hope in her words.
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  • G. MA
    January 1, 1970
    I hear you, Laurie. I wonder if all our screams were raised at once, would the ground burst, enflamed with ragefire? These poems are embers kindled in the fifth chamber of your heart. It's an honor, by the way, to live there with you. Now, it's time to hone the words we never spoke, sharpened bones elongated across pages, until the world is finally ready to listen. Tears glisten. All the words flooding, waterfall strong, everything we cannot find adequate words to express what we mean, how it fe I hear you, Laurie. I wonder if all our screams were raised at once, would the ground burst, enflamed with ragefire? These poems are embers kindled in the fifth chamber of your heart. It's an honor, by the way, to live there with you. Now, it's time to hone the words we never spoke, sharpened bones elongated across pages, until the world is finally ready to listen. Tears glisten. All the words flooding, waterfall strong, everything we cannot find adequate words to express what we mean, how it felt, how it hurts, how it feels. Every. Day. I am with you, Laurie. And I am done with silence.
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  • India
    January 1, 1970
    Guys, this book. It seeped into my soul and held on so tightly there were times I couldn’t breathe and times I felt so incredibly seen. Laurie’s got a gift. Dive in and feel the catharsis.
  • Kazia
    January 1, 1970
    This book made my heart break and mend and break and mend and mend and mend.
  • Arlene
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful...Written in verse, Laurie Halse Anderson proves once again that through her writing and her novels, she gives many of her silent readers a voice. Highly recommend reading Speak, Wintergirls, and The Impossible Knife of Memory first, as there are references to those characters and stories in this book. face my truthThis is not a resting bitch faceThis isa touch-me-and-you-die-face
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  • Kate (Beyond Bookish)
    January 1, 1970
    Incredible!
  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    There aren't enough words for how much I love Laurie Halse Anderson as an author and as a person. She advocates for teachers, but most importantly she advocates for kids--especially kids who need an advocate. This book, though, is so powerful. She's awesome when she speaks, but she's extraordinary when she shouts.
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  • Text Publishing
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Shout is Anderson’s reckoning; it follows a hurting cry to the universe that turns into a hard-won path to healing and ultimately unfolds into a powerful call to action...With Speak, Anderson opened the door for more novels exploring the deeply felt and deeply personal aftermath of sexual violence. Shout serves as both a testament to the life-altering, lifesaving impact of these types of stories—and as an urgent and brutal reminder of their ongoing necessity.' New York Times‘20 years after her ‘Shout is Anderson’s reckoning; it follows a hurting cry to the universe that turns into a hard-won path to healing and ultimately unfolds into a powerful call to action...With Speak, Anderson opened the door for more novels exploring the deeply felt and deeply personal aftermath of sexual violence. Shout serves as both a testament to the life-altering, lifesaving impact of these types of stories—and as an urgent and brutal reminder of their ongoing necessity.' New York Times‘20 years after her groundbreaking book Speak was published, acclaimed YA and children’s book writer Laurie Halse Anderson is coming out with an intensely personal follow-up...We don't exaggerate when we say you should buy Shout for everyone—especially the young men and women—in your life.’ Refinery29
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  • Christine Stamper
    January 1, 1970
    I found myself a bit confused by this text. Some moments are beautiful and poignant, while others have seemingly random poems put together in no logical order. I think some guidance on what the three parts that divide the text are suppose to be could guide expectations and readers. (For instance, Part One seems very much Anderson's early life and rape that lead to her writing Speak. PartTwo is the aftermath of the book? Arguing for its existence? A needed conversation that needed more support. P I found myself a bit confused by this text. Some moments are beautiful and poignant, while others have seemingly random poems put together in no logical order. I think some guidance on what the three parts that divide the text are suppose to be could guide expectations and readers. (For instance, Part One seems very much Anderson's early life and rape that lead to her writing Speak. PartTwo is the aftermath of the book? Arguing for its existence? A needed conversation that needed more support. Part Three seems to be about her relationship with her parents and felt very random. If I'd known what she was intending as the "purpose" of this section).Where the book shines, though, is as a companion to Speak. Equal parts humor, anger, gut-wrenching pain, and loving warmth, Shout reminds readers that the #MeToo “moment” we are in is part of an on-going dialogue. I would love to teach Part One after Speak.
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  • Molly Dettmann
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a fascinating read. I felt so many emotions. Laurie Halse Anderson is a master with words. I loved learning more about her life growing up and after she published Speak (the part about the National Book Award dinner was so good!). The entire memoir felt like a literal shout. Anderson shouts about the pain her readers have suffered because of assault or rape. She shouts for herself and other survivors rebuilding their lives. She shouts against the schools who pull fire alarms instea This was such a fascinating read. I felt so many emotions. Laurie Halse Anderson is a master with words. I loved learning more about her life growing up and after she published Speak (the part about the National Book Award dinner was so good!). The entire memoir felt like a literal shout. Anderson shouts about the pain her readers have suffered because of assault or rape. She shouts for herself and other survivors rebuilding their lives. She shouts against the schools who pull fire alarms instead of letting her speak. I can see some of the metaphors being a little confusing to teen readers, but I think this would be a great read to study and discuss with students and of course anyone who Speak resonates with would love Shout.
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  • Kara Belden
    January 1, 1970
    One word: POWERFUL. There is not a more fitting title for a book. This book gave me all the feels - disgust, defeat, discomfort, anger, nostalgia. This book provides so much to think, and talk, and shout about. I loved the poems alluding to her other works. A delightful surprise! :)
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful.
  • Gary Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Review coming soon ...
  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    Someone please give this book an award, many awards, next year! Shout is a powerfully written memoir in verse, with poems whose language demands to be savored even as they pack emotional wallops to the reader. Anderson tells her life story, including that of her parents and how their family dysfunctioned together. The poems detail how her upbringing influenced her life and eventual career, and especially how the experience of being raped in high school shattered her; she couldn't fully acknowled Someone please give this book an award, many awards, next year! Shout is a powerfully written memoir in verse, with poems whose language demands to be savored even as they pack emotional wallops to the reader. Anderson tells her life story, including that of her parents and how their family dysfunctioned together. The poems detail how her upbringing influenced her life and eventual career, and especially how the experience of being raped in high school shattered her; she couldn't fully acknowledge how much so until she was drawn many years later to explore the experience through writing her groundbreaking novel Speak. Anderson relates how, after the publication of Speak, she gained confidence and came into her own as a public person and advocate, and how important that novel became to teen and adult survivors of sexual abuse, some of whose experiences she weaves into her story here. I started to quote some of my favorite lines in this review but had to stop when I realized that I was going to be quoting quite a huge chunk of the book! This book is amazing and important, and I hope it is read by a wide audience, including young men. This review is based on an advance reader copy.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    After Speak was published 20 years ago, Laurie Halse Anderson comes out with Shout, a book written in free verse prose during this #MeToo movement. The contents in the book contain some of Anderson's most exposed moments and thoughts in her life. Anderson has been one of my favorite authors since I first read Speak about 15 plus years ago when I was a teenager. She writes about real life issues that many can relate to. Anderson doesn't sugar coat anything. She writes with absolute candor.The pro After Speak was published 20 years ago, Laurie Halse Anderson comes out with Shout, a book written in free verse prose during this #MeToo movement. The contents in the book contain some of Anderson's most exposed moments and thoughts in her life. Anderson has been one of my favorite authors since I first read Speak about 15 plus years ago when I was a teenager. She writes about real life issues that many can relate to. Anderson doesn't sugar coat anything. She writes with absolute candor.The prose is swift and to the point. It describes the feelings at a time when someone is the most vulnerable. However, these reflections breathe hope and confidence to voice out Anderson has to say. These rants and calls to action need to be heard. There is no backing down. There is no hiding. There is no turning back. She lets society know that she has been violated against her will. The truth needs to be heard.The first part is more focused on reflection in Anderson's memoir. She tells the story of her life as she grows up and what she endures during her childhood into adulthood. She tells the readers how she has been defiled and has been taken advantage of so many times in her life. The second part hones in with Anderson connecting with other survivors and about others' stories. The third part describes a little bit about Anderson's family history and a thank you for listening. The formatting of the writing is the perfect way to convey Anderson's deepest secrets. The short poems are more powerful because Anderson has control over how she wants the layout of the words to look like. Layout communicates a lot of meaning beyond words. The pace ramps up the more pages you read. It starts softly like a spoken whisper and shifts into a raging shout. There is power in a voice. From speaking out to shouting. Everyone needs to be heard!"First Blood" is one of the most powerful poems in the memoir. Anderson talks about what was the norm and what was legal in 1972. Today in 2019, many of things are illegal, falling under Title IX. Our society is changing, changing better for the lives of everyone.Shout, an empowering memoir is poetic, harrowing and uplifting at the same time. It's about how to advocate for yourself and others who went through similar situations. It makes you think about how many people who have been denied basic human rights. I encourage everyone to read Shout and Anderson's debut book, Speak. I also recommend reading The Impossible Knife of Memory, which is also by Anderson. The Impossible Knife of Memory centers around Hayley and Hayley's father who has PTSD.Warning: There are instances of domestic violence, assault, PTSD, alcoholism, rape and substance abuse in this memoir.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    In the vein of Jacqueline Woodson's Brown Girl Dreaming or El Deafo by Cece Bell that is a twist on a memoir, Halse Anderson wrote her story about her father's trauma and her trauma couched in the beauty and curiosity of her life including studying abroad in Denmark but making powerful statements throughout about sexual assault among other topics. Using verse to tell this story, no one can deny her command with words and language. It's the thing that readers love about her writing AND listening In the vein of Jacqueline Woodson's Brown Girl Dreaming or El Deafo by Cece Bell that is a twist on a memoir, Halse Anderson wrote her story about her father's trauma and her trauma couched in the beauty and curiosity of her life including studying abroad in Denmark but making powerful statements throughout about sexual assault among other topics. Using verse to tell this story, no one can deny her command with words and language. It's the thing that readers love about her writing AND listening to her speak in person. It's powerful with a capital P. In school, you could take just one or two of the verses and dissect and discuss, but as a whole, it's a body of work that defines who she is and why Speak has made the impact its has for the last twenty years.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    I want to read more books in verse because of SHOUT. This memoir is beautiful and accessible. It fulfilled my nosy desire to know more about Laurie's childhood and inner life. I loved SPEAK as a teen and re-read it over and over. She has so much to say about the impact of SPEAK; mentions too how her others relate to her personal life. The irony is that her book isn't loud - it's not a shout in your face, demanding attention. Rather, it's like a best friend sharing secrets: you just want to be by I want to read more books in verse because of SHOUT. This memoir is beautiful and accessible. It fulfilled my nosy desire to know more about Laurie's childhood and inner life. I loved SPEAK as a teen and re-read it over and over. She has so much to say about the impact of SPEAK; mentions too how her others relate to her personal life. The irony is that her book isn't loud - it's not a shout in your face, demanding attention. Rather, it's like a best friend sharing secrets: you just want to be by her side, supporting her, uplifting her. I am a happy participant and can't wait to thrust this into as many hands as possible.
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  • Shayne Bauer
    January 1, 1970
    Can I give this one a 10? (No, seriously.)This is by far the most enjoyable book I have read this year. I laughed out loud, had tears in my eyes and chills down to my toes. Such is the power of words--at least when they come from from Laurie Halse Anderson. She has secured her spot as my favorite author still. How does she DO it? I am wrecked with jealousy at her stunning talent. But I love her dearly because of the power her words have over me. I will be pondering this read forever!
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  • Jesse
    January 1, 1970
    This is going to be one for the ages. If I tried to choose a favorite quote or part I’d end up listing the entire damn book. This is brilliant and I hope it finds its way into EVERYONE’S hands. Thank you, Laurie, for sharing your story, carrying the horrifying stories that have been shared with you, and using your platform, experiences, and rage to create something beautiful and challenging. Your strength is invigorating.
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  • Beth Honeycutt
    January 1, 1970
    I’m grateful to have this ARC! Gut-wrenching, raw, fearless, and honest. I have so much respect for Laurie Halse Anderson!
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    A stunning, powerful, and emotional read. It's times like this that I wish I were a writer so I could adequately describe the beauty and power in this book. I want to hug LHA and all my sisters around the world. It's emotional, triumphant, and transcendent. It moves me to become a better person, full of empathy and kindness. It was quite possibly the best book I have ever read.
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