Shout
A searing poetic memoir and call to action from the bestselling and award-winning author of Speak, Laurie Halse Anderson!Bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson is known for the unflinching way she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Now, inspired by her fans and enraged by how little in our culture has changed since her groundbreaking novel Speak was first published twenty years ago, she has written a poetry memoir that is as vulnerable as it is rallying, as timely as it is timeless. In free verse, Anderson shares reflections, rants, and calls to action woven between deeply personal stories from her life that she's never written about before. Searing and soul-searching, this important memoir is a denouncement of our society's failures and a love letter to all the people with the courage to say #metoo and #timesup, whether aloud, online, or only in their own hearts. Shout speaks truth to power in a loud, clear voice-- and once you hear it, it is impossible to ignore.

Shout Details

TitleShout
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 12th, 2019
PublisherPenguin Young Readers Group
Rating
GenrePoetry, Young Adult

Shout Review

  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    “the overlap of my stories and my lifeis a garden courtyard, sky-strung with stars” The first half of this book was a 4-star read for me, but the second half was a full shimmering 5 stars. So it gets 4 stars, rounded up.It's been a long time since I read Speak, but I still recall how deeply that book affected me. In a time of #MeToo, it is easy to forget how powerful and important little books like that were for readers. Every day, survivors are finding their voices and learning how they, too, “the overlap of my stories and my lifeis a garden courtyard, sky-strung with stars” The first half of this book was a 4-star read for me, but the second half was a full shimmering 5 stars. So it gets 4½ stars, rounded up.It's been a long time since I read Speak, but I still recall how deeply that book affected me. In a time of #MeToo, it is easy to forget how powerful and important little books like that were for readers. Every day, survivors are finding their voices and learning how they, too, can speak up, without shame, about what happened to them. Now, twenty years later, Anderson is back with a voice that is louder, stronger, and attuned with the current era. It is still much-needed.Her voice is wiser now, too; more mature. It speaks of twenty years of talking with survivors, sharing their pain and, most of all, listening. The first half of this book is a memoir of Anderson's upbringing, including how she was raped at thirteen and her struggle in the aftermath. Through verse, she talks about how the toxic misogynistic environment of the 1970s set women up to say nothing, be good, be quiet, don't ask questions, definitely no questions about sex or menstruation. You can see how her experiences both within her family, and within society at large, would later silence her voice when she needed it most.It is the second half where her writing is strongest, however. This is complete speculation, but it felt to me like the author wrote the hard-hitting poems of the second part first, and then proceeded to tell the first part of her story in verse to fit with the rest. The later poems all work as powerful standalones and read like they were written as such, but I think the first half could have been stronger as prose. “Censorship is the child of fearthe father of ignoranceand the desperate weapon of fascistseverywhere.” The second half made me absolutely furious. The poems are about rape, consent and censorship, using a lot of grotesque metaphors and imagery that fit the subject matter well, but are disturbing. I think the most upsetting aspect of all was, surprisingly, the censorship; the constant barriers faced by those trying to teach kids about their bodies and sex and consent. It made me so angry to see teachers cancelling Anderson's talks, or banning her books, because she talked honestly about young girls and sex. Kids of all genders need these talks. They are essential if we are to stop what happened to Anderson, and Speak's Melinda, from happening to others. So, read this book. And let your kids read this book, too.CW: Rape (graphic), PTSD, abuse, alcoholism, substance abuse.Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • Laurie Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    My truth.
  • Hannah Greendale
    January 1, 1970
    Part One (roughly the first half of the book) drones on, but Part Two and Three bring thunder and rage and unapologetic ferocity to the issue of sexual abuse, rape, and the unforgivable way society treats women (and men) who find the courage to come forward and speak the truth. the question is born out of true confusionno one ever told him the rules of intimacyor the law, his dad only talks about condomswith a "don't get her pregnant" warninghis mom says "talk to your father"so he watches a lot Part One (roughly the first half of the book) drones on, but Part Two and Three bring thunder and rage and unapologetic ferocity to the issue of sexual abuse, rape, and the unforgivable way society treats women (and men) who find the courage to come forward and speak the truth. the question is born out of true confusionno one ever told him the rules of intimacyor the law, his dad only talks about condomswith a "don't get her pregnant" warninghis mom says "talk to your father"so he watches a lot of pornto get offto be schooledporn says her body is territorybegging to be conquered no conversation requiredyou take what you want* _* Note: Quote taken from an Advanced Readers' Edition.
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  • Schizanthus
    January 1, 1970
    Content warnings include sexual assault, PTSD, war, physical abuse, fat shaming, alcohol and other drug use. This is the story of a girl who lost her voice and wrote herself a new one. I expect I’m one of the only ones reading SHOUT before they’ve read Speak. I’ve had Speak on my ‘I absolutely have to read this book’ list for as long as I can remember but still haven’t read it. I searched my local library for it but they don’t own it. I tried for several years to buy it on Kindle but it wasn’t Content warnings include sexual assault, PTSD, war, physical abuse, fat shaming, alcohol and other drug use. This is the story of a girl who lost her voice and wrote herself a new one. I expect I’m one of the only ones reading SHOUT before they’ve read Speak. I’ve had Speak on my ‘I absolutely have to read this book’ list for as long as I can remember but still haven’t read it. I searched my local library for it but they don’t own it. I tried for several years to buy it on Kindle but it wasn’t available to purchase in my country (I just checked and it’s still not an option). I finally bit the bullet and added it to my Book Depository order last year and it’s been looking at me ever since from my shelf, quietly asking me why I haven’t opened its pages. Honestly? It’s intimidated me. It’s the book about sexual assault and while I’ve read so many others, I think I’ve worried about what it will bring up for me when I do finally read it. So, long story slightly shorter, my plan is to SHOUT, then Speak, and then SHOUT again. I’m interested to see if my perspective on SHOUT changes after I’ve read Speak. I guess time will tell.The first section of this book is essentially memoir in free verse. Laurie takes the reader on a journey through a series of childhood memories; a father haunted by war when alcohol isn’t numbing his memories, a mother silenced, her own experiences of school, work and surviving sexual assault. I really loved reading about Laurie’s experience as an exchange student in Denmark and would happily devour as much information as I could about those 13 months; what I’ve read has sparked an interest in Danish culture.The second section, which begins almost two thirds of the way through the book, broke my heart as Laurie shared just a handful of stories about her interactions with other survivors, whose young bodies have been invaded and lives changed, most often by those they know and should have been able to trust. Although this section made me cry one of the things that got to me the most was something hopeful - the colourful ribbons tied to fences in Ballarat, Australia in support of the abused, which ultimately created Loud Fence. The images of those ribbons of support broke me. This section includes responses from readers, students who have heard Laurie speak, teachers and librarians; those who need to share their story, those who don’t understand what was so bad about Melinda’s experience in Speak, those who want to censor “inappropriate” reading material.I’m not sure how to sum up the third section other than to say that it was the shortest section but also the one in which I shed most tears. Laurie’s final poems about her parents simply gutted me.Although it’s clearly stated in the blurb I still hadn’t thought there’d be as much memoir as there was in this book. I’d expected a greater percentage of poems to be directly addressing sexual assault, even though there are plenty that do. When my expectations didn’t line up with reality I thought I’d be disappointed but I wasn’t and I’m already ready for a reread. I expect that I will revisit this book each time I read one of Laurie’s books that are mentioned here, to search out her favourite scenes and glimpses of the story behind the story.There’s a vulnerability here and it’s entwined with strength, determination, courage, resilience and so much compassion. While I finished this book with a contented sigh I’m still yearning for more. Luckily for me, as this is the first of Laurie’s books that I’ve read (shame on me!), I still have plenty to explore.Thank you, Laurie Halse Anderson, for sharing some of your life in this book, for breaking my heart, growing my empathy, giving me so many amazing passages to highlight and inspiring me. I will see you on Ultima Thule.Thank you so much to NetGalley and Viking, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, for the opportunity to read this book.
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  • Mackenzi
    January 1, 1970
    wow.
  • Julie Ehlers
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't speak upwhen that boy raped me, instead I scaldedmyself in the shower and turnedme into the ghost of the girlI once was, my biggest fearbeing that my father,no stranger to gamingwith the devil,would kill that boyand it would be my fault.I was impressed by Laurie Halse Anderson's first novel, Speak, and several years later what I remember most about the 10th anniversary edition I read was the poem Halse Anderson included at the beginning, about all the young women and girls who have reac I didn't speak upwhen that boy raped me, instead I scaldedmyself in the shower and turnedme into the ghost of the girlI once was, my biggest fearbeing that my father,no stranger to gamingwith the devil,would kill that boyand it would be my fault.I was impressed by Laurie Halse Anderson's first novel, Speak, and several years later what I remember most about the 10th anniversary edition I read was the poem Halse Anderson included at the beginning, about all the young women and girls who have reached out to let her know what a difference she and her book made in their lives. That poem may have been the seed for Shout, a memoir-in-verse where Halse Anderson tells her own life story, including her turbulent family life, her own rape at age 14, how she came to write Speak, and the impact it had, among other things.This book is astoundingly effective. The writing is mostly amazing. Halse Anderson's story is poignant and tragic and, above all, inspirational. All I could think when I read it was, she has done so much good in the world already, and with Shout she is about to do even more. One of the sad things about reading a book like this is that you imagine tweens and young teens reading it and you think, they're too young to be reading stuff like this, and then you remember that they are the ones stuff like this is happening to. They need books like this, and we are lucky we have Halse Anderson to provide them. This is my second of her books but won't be my last. I want to be inside her head again.too many grown-ups tell kids to followtheir dreamslike that's going to get them somewhereAuntie Laurie says to follow your nightmares insteadcuz when you figure out what's eating you aliveyou can slay it
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  • Ashleigh Rose
    January 1, 1970
    “too many grown-ups tell kids to follow their dreams / like that’s going to get them somewhere / Auntie Laurie says follow your nightmares instead / cuz when you figure out what’s eating you / you can slay it” || Thank you for having the courage to lead the way in this work, @halseanderson. Your bravery and words are an eternal gift to us all; I am thankful to have your torch blazing a path for us and igniting the sparks within us. 🔥 💛3.12.19 #SHOUT
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  • Tatiana
    January 1, 1970
    If you, like me, read YA looking for excellence, Shout is the book not to be missed. If you get an audio version read by the author, even better. (The best if you listen to it at 1.25 speed).Half memoir, half a work of advocacy for sexual assault survivors, it grew on me the more I listened to it. It is written in verse, and I personally didn't think it was always effective, especially in the memoir part. In fact, I thought verse short changed Anderson's auto-biographical narrative that would ha If you, like me, read YA looking for excellence, Shout is the book not to be missed. If you get an audio version read by the author, even better. (The best if you listen to it at 1.25 speed).Half memoir, half a work of advocacy for sexual assault survivors, it grew on me the more I listened to it. It is written in verse, and I personally didn't think it was always effective, especially in the memoir part. In fact, I thought verse short changed Anderson's auto-biographical narrative that would have been served better by a different (longer) form. It gave an insight into the author's inspirations and why Speak had captured now generations of readers, but left a lot of her personal story out. (On a side note, I am kind of crushed Anderson never wrote a novel based on her year of school exchange in Denmark!)Poems in the second part of the book worked MUCH better. A lot of them were well contained and powerful, full of rage and kindness and appeal for compassion. I had approached the feminist part with trepidation, because of how on the nose these things are often written in YA. All-men-are-garbage feminist treatises (a la Blood Water Paint) don’t do it for me. Shout ended up surpassing my expectations. It was amazing to see Anderson grow and heal and be enraged through her writing of and processing the responses to Speak. Marking it as a Printz contender, first in 2019.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    This searing, timely, timeless memoir in verse will sweep every "best of" in 2019. This is Laurie's story, about being a survivor, about being a woman, about being an advocate who is passionate about young people, about intellectual freedom, and about being the best people we can all possibly be. It's angry and it's hopeful. It's sad and it's powerful. It's real and raw. The verse is flawless. It adds movement and clarity. It is exactly what it wants to be: a shout, not a whisper. Put it on your This searing, timely, timeless memoir in verse will sweep every "best of" in 2019. This is Laurie's story, about being a survivor, about being a woman, about being an advocate who is passionate about young people, about intellectual freedom, and about being the best people we can all possibly be. It's angry and it's hopeful. It's sad and it's powerful. It's real and raw. The verse is flawless. It adds movement and clarity. It is exactly what it wants to be: a shout, not a whisper. Put it on your to-read lists. This is a masterclass in feminism, in storytelling, and in the power of words to draw action that changes the world.
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  • Trina (Between Chapters)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm intentionally not giving a star rating because it doesn't seem fair to me to assign ratings to personal memoirs. That said, I'd recommend this book to just about anyone. To people who have experienced sexual assault, harassment, and rape - this book is inclusive and I think would provide healing and a mirror.To people who haven't - You likely know someone who has experienced assault. Many can't, or don't want to talk about it. If you want to gain some understanding, here is an account that i I'm intentionally not giving a star rating because it doesn't seem fair to me to assign ratings to personal memoirs. That said, I'd recommend this book to just about anyone. To people who have experienced sexual assault, harassment, and rape - this book is inclusive and I think would provide healing and a mirror.To people who haven't - You likely know someone who has experienced assault. Many can't, or don't want to talk about it. If you want to gain some understanding, here is an account that is freely given.To parents - I think this is a must read for parents. It gives some advice on talking to your children and teens about consent, how to help them if they experience assault, and things to look out for. It's not a guide, but you can glean this information. It is yet another building block that I will utilize with my son when he is old enough.Audiobook review: Narrated by the author. This is a poetry collection, so the format and flow is lost on audio. I believe she mentioned some artwork in her acknowledgements, and that is also lost in the audio version. However, I feel that hearing the author voice her own story was impactful. tw: rape, harassment, accounts of rapists going unpunished. Drug & alcohol abuse. War PTSD. Mention of suicides. Abusive relationships -spouse/spouse, parent/child.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    2019's first superstar. LHA has long been known as a rockstar of consent, a revealer of truths for teens, and in Shout, she gets very personal with her own story--her childhood, her own sexual assault and recovery, and her journey to the writing life. I was left with the tiniest sense of the weight she must carry, as holder of all those secrets of her readers, and the dynamo of her power. GET THIS BOOK.
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  • Ilana
    January 1, 1970
    So powerful. Essential reading actually. I felt the urge to read this book when it was announced as up and coming. Borrowed an ebook version from the library and the loan expires in less than 24 hours and when I finished it in the small hours yesterday I was already thinking I should get my own copy, either in print or as an ebook or in the audio format which is narrated by Laurie Halse Anderson herself, which must make for an... lump in my throat, having trouble typing... quite an experience, t So powerful. Essential reading actually. I felt the urge to read this book when it was announced as up and coming. Borrowed an ebook version from the library and the loan expires in less than 24 hours and when I finished it in the small hours yesterday I was already thinking I should get my own copy, either in print or as an ebook or in the audio format which is narrated by Laurie Halse Anderson herself, which must make for an... lump in my throat, having trouble typing... quite an experience, to say the least. Just earlier tonight I was reading excerpts of her free verse from it to my boyfriend, and in the chapter, or poem called “Collective”, about giving talks all over the world to teenagers and always some boy wondering why it’s so terrible, why Speak talks about what happens to the protagonist Melinda as rape, when all that happened was she had sex with a boy she danced with and kissed before, it’s not like he was a bad guy with a gun who dragged her down an alley (not an exact quote I don’t think, which is why no quote marks) and the first time this shocked her and then she realized this was how we educated, or the lack of education we give boys. Go speak to your dad and then dad says use a condom and whatever you do don’t get her pregnant and then the boys watch porn and think the women really want to be treated like that...Well that’s just a small part. If you’re a victim of abuse of any kind, which let’s face it, a whole heck of a lot of people of both sexes and any number of genders are, well yes, there’s plenty of potentially triggering material here but this is a woman who speaks from a place of compassion and of wanting to give a voice to us all, and tools to let us know we are not alone and resources at the end of the book we can lean on. But first of all, first and foremost, a story told in verse, a story straight from the heart, to share about a journey, her journey, the struggles she was born to carry for her parents, the poverty and alienation that led her to make the wrong sorts of friends, who were interested in flirting with danger just to pass the time and because there was no internet yet, and the sexual violations that led her to complete despair to eventually find a voice to write about it, and then the road beyond, leading us up to today, when the time has come to have it out in the open, when we are beyond pretending nothing ever happened, and boys have joined girls in saying they want to feel safe. And shouldn’t that just be an inalienable right? And why is it something we even have to fight for? But until that becomes a reality, we need books like this. And really there’s only just the one. Well two, but the two making a whole. I do strongly recommend you read Speak first, since Shout is a follow up to that novel, and it will make a lot more sense to you that way since Anderson refers to Speak both directly and indirectly in Shout. It isn’t a sequel because the is nonfictional and autobiographical and written in free verse, but she wrote it as a follow up to it out of a frustration that so little had changed since she had written her first book that now a louder voice was needed. I didn’t think I’d be writing all this. I’m tired and sleep deprived. But this book... well it certainly spoke to me and had I the energy right now, I’d be doing some shouting of my own.
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  • Alyse Liebovich
    January 1, 1970
    Speak is one of the first books I had to read in grad school for my YA lit class. I remember feeling thinking, wow, this is not what I expected YA lit to be. YA lit was not really a thing when I was actually considered a YA, so this was news to me. I was encouraged that authors were broaching these type of devastating but important subjects and that students had access to these kinds of stories. When I first saw Shout was being released, I added it to the virtual cart to purchase for the library Speak is one of the first books I had to read in grad school for my YA lit class. I remember feeling thinking, wow, this is not what I expected YA lit to be. YA lit was not really a thing when I was actually considered a YA, so this was news to me. I was encouraged that authors were broaching these type of devastating but important subjects and that students had access to these kinds of stories. When I first saw Shout was being released, I added it to the virtual cart to purchase for the library assuming--based on the title and tree illustration--it was a sequel or companion to Speak. Really, knowing LHA had a new book out was reason enough to purchase without further investigation. Then I went to a booktalk at Anderson's, which is where I learned this was a memoir in verse about being the survivor of rape and sexual assault. I felt like an idiot for not knowing this and subsequently wanted to read it immediately. Because ordering books for the library is more complicated than you'd think, I didn't want to wait, bought a copy there, and dove right in. This book is a powerful punch to the patriarchy. I hope, like Speak, this book helps the voiceless be heard. Though I have not personally been a victim of physical assault, this got me thinking (yet again) about specific moments where men have said things to me that I knew were inappropriate--sometimes in the moment, sometimes in hindsight--but felt powerless to call them out. I can't even imagine the courage it takes to share these raw memories and emotions but am so glad she did. She writes not just about girls, but boys too who have been prey, in many cases due to the hush-hush of the Catholic church. Keep holding them accountable!I loved the poems about her time living in Denmark and how that kind of cultural shift experience overseas can completely open one's world. I hope that inspires young readers to consider doing something similar. And in regards to "librarian on the cusp of courage," "inappropriate dictators," and "innocence," we school librarians are just as fired up about the those who try to censor, be it admin, school boards, or parents. Proud to put several copies of this book on our library shelves and will defend its place should the issue ever arise. Raise your hand if you want to send copies of this to Brock Turner and Brett Kavanaugh....
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Laurie, Thank you for this book. Thank you, thank you, thank you.Sarah
  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    **I listened to the audio and later read the book. I preferred the audio.Laurie Halse Anderson didn’t just write a memoir in verse, she a poet, whose voice drips the poetry of youthful innocence and pain. Childhood set her up to be victimized by It, the boy who raped her, the way girls and women were subservient to boys and men. I know this because I was born in 1964, two or three years after Anderson. As I listened to her narrating the gem she titled SHOUT, tears pricked my eyes, because her ex **I listened to the audio and later read the book. I preferred the audio.Laurie Halse Anderson didn’t just write a memoir in verse, she a poet, whose voice drips the poetry of youthful innocence and pain. Childhood set her up to be victimized by It, the boy who raped her, the way girls and women were subservient to boys and men. I know this because I was born in 1964, two or three years after Anderson. As I listened to her narrating the gem she titled SHOUT, tears pricked my eyes, because her experiences echoed mine so closely I nodded at her memories, thinking #MeToo whether she spoke of listening to the Watergate hearings on the radio (my memories are watching on TV) or the tragic embarrassment of being chosen last in gym class by popular, athletic classmate captains.I listened to the audio of SHOUT and also purchased the Kindle version, which I’ll read later this week, after I’ve recovered from the book hangover that I might last forever. SHOUT made me want to write a poetic version of my memoir, to express myself in verse that could never be as elegant as Anderson’s. SHOUT made me feel lucky that Laurie Halse Anderson exists and that she writes for teens in words that resonate for adults as well.SHOUT made me feel tears from my childhood still unshed.SHOUT made me hope for the years of pain her young readers can avoid by knowing that they can and should SPEAK if they are victims.SHOUT made me feel.
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    With her follow up to SPEAK, Laurie Halse Anderson once again puts forth a powerful piece of literature filled with compelling prose along with fierce dialog. Anderson successfully pulls back the tragic layers to the continual occurrences of rape, sexual assault, misogyny and all too often "turning a blind eye" and "victim blaming". As our country begins to heal and educate itself through the ME TOO movement, we are witness to protests, demonstrations and conversation with the hopes of no longer With her follow up to SPEAK, Laurie Halse Anderson once again puts forth a powerful piece of literature filled with compelling prose along with fierce dialog. Anderson successfully pulls back the tragic layers to the continual occurrences of rape, sexual assault, misogyny and all too often "turning a blind eye" and "victim blaming". As our country begins to heal and educate itself through the ME TOO movement, we are witness to protests, demonstrations and conversation with the hopes of no longer being silent.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Cc @halseanderson I’m utterly gobsmacked. SHOUT is outstanding, profoundly moving work that will have you crying on one page while raising your fist in defiance and strength on the next. This is a phenomenal book; I can say that reading it changed me for the better. Five trillion stars, Laurie Halse Anderson. ❤❤❤ Cc @halseanderson I’m utterly gobsmacked. SHOUT is outstanding, profoundly moving work that will have you crying on one page while raising your fist in defiance and strength on the next. This is a phenomenal book; I can say that reading it changed me for the better. Five trillion stars, Laurie Halse Anderson. ❤️❤️❤️
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Empowering memoir in verse. Releases 3/12/2019 and when it does, I’m buying my own copy so I can write in the margins and underline quotes. I was lucky enough to read an ARC. I highly recommend it for all high school collections and it also has incredibly strong adult appeal. Every word matters - stories matter - life stories matter. Get this book into as many hands as you can. This is more than a call-to-action. This is a battle cry.
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  • Kara Leann
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely stunning! This should be required reading for all teenagers and adults.
  • Text Publishing
    January 1, 1970
    ‘[P]erhaps the most significant contribution of any memoir of childhood sexual assault and abuse...Her book is a powerful testament that bears witness not just to her own pain, and the pain of others similarly abused, but also to the power of speaking persistently, time and time again, about topics that most people don’t want to hear.' LA Review of Books‘Shout is for survivors, for abusers and assaulters, for consenting young men and women, for gatekeepers unwilling to let sex through. Immensely ‘[P]erhaps the most significant contribution of any memoir of childhood sexual assault and abuse...Her book is a powerful testament that bears witness not just to her own pain, and the pain of others similarly abused, but also to the power of speaking persistently, time and time again, about topics that most people don’t want to hear.' LA Review of Books‘Shout is for survivors, for abusers and assaulters, for consenting young men and women, for gatekeepers unwilling to let sex through. Immensely powerful, Shout is for everyone…. as bold (and beautiful) as the title suggests.’ Shelf Awareness, starred review‘Shout is Anderson’s reckoning; it follows a hurting cry to the universe that turns into a hard-won path to healing and ultimately unfolds into a powerful call to action...With Speak, Anderson opened the door for more novels exploring the deeply felt and deeply personal aftermath of sexual violence. Shout serves as both a testament to the life-altering, lifesaving impact of these types of stories—and as an urgent and brutal reminder of their ongoing necessity.' New York Times‘20 years after her groundbreaking book Speak was published, acclaimed YA and children’s book writer Laurie Halse Anderson is coming out with an intensely personal follow-up...We don't exaggerate when we say you should buy Shout for everyone—especially the young men and women—in your life.’ Refinery29
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I read Speak nearly 20 years ago. Back then, Speak was my favorite book. It stuck with me for years afterwards. It’s one of the few books that I really remember even after all these years.At some point, after you’ve read 1000 or so books, they can start to blur.I was hesitant to start Shout. How do you follow up a book like Speak? And with a book of poems? They aren’t really my thing.As with most hyped things I think, “No, not for me. I have a million things to read, I’m not going to give in and I read Speak nearly 20 years ago. Back then, Speak was my favorite book. It stuck with me for years afterwards. It’s one of the few books that I really remember even after all these years.At some point, after you’ve read 1000 or so books, they can start to blur.I was hesitant to start Shout. How do you follow up a book like Speak? And with a book of poems? They aren’t really my thing.As with most hyped things I think, “No, not for me. I have a million things to read, I’m not going to give in and read something I’m not super excited about. Not this time.” But then I give in and do it anyway. And this time, I was very glad that I did (and very glad that audio books exist).The first half of the book explores Laurie Halse Anderson’s early life post-rape, dealing with the emotional trauma while living an emotionally closed off family and an abusive, alcoholic father suffering from PTSD. This part can be slow at times but still emotionally wrought. I really enjoyed the first part of the book. Its unflinching in the face of a young girl’s pain and frustration and hurt. You see this girl dealing with something no one should have to deal with in the best (albeit self-destructive) way she can.If the first part breaks your heart, the second part will get you strapping on your armor getting ready to go to battle. Battle for those who can’t defend themselves.Battle for those who are told to be quiet about their pain.Battle for those who have been taken advantage of by people in power.Battle for people deprived opportunities because they didn’t give into that power.Battle for those who said “no”, but the other person decided “they were playing hard to get” or “they didn’t really mean it” or “they were asking for it because of the way they dressed/what they drank/how they acted.”Battle for students deprived books and materials deemed inappropriate. Battle for students deprived information about sex and their bodies because it makes some people “uncomfortable.” I’m getting mad again just thinking about it. It’s not an easy read. These things never are, but that’s why they’re important. Triggers: Rape, PTSD, Abuse, Alcoholism, and Substance Abuse.
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  • Sami
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know what made me cry more: the ragged grace of the prose, or Laurie Halse Anderson's gut-wrenching life story. In a collection that feels both autobiographical and impersonal, Laurie's life journey is mixed with her thoughts on rape culture, declarations of belonging, redemption, and hope for anyone who has suffered at the hands of another. She pulls no punches, and it can be unbearably hard to read, but this is one of the most important gifts we can give to the generations to come.
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  • Gary Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    I'll just send you over to Alyse Liebovich's review. I can't write a better review of Shout than hers.
  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    tw: rape Pain won’t be containedby bars or marksyour scars deserve attention, too. In true Laurie Halse Anderson style, her memoir is powerful and lets the truth fly. I loved learning about Laurie's life, told in her signature visceral, brave style.Laurie Halse Anderson inspired me when I was ten years old, reading the Vet Volunteers series, and now she inspires me with her unflinching look at teen life and her ability to tell her own story in a way that packs a huge punch.Don't let the fact t tw: rape Pain won’t be containedby bars or marksyour scars deserve attention, too. In true Laurie Halse Anderson style, her memoir is powerful and lets the truth fly. I loved learning about Laurie's life, told in her signature visceral, brave style.Laurie Halse Anderson inspired me when I was ten years old, reading the Vet Volunteers series, and now she inspires me with her unflinching look at teen life and her ability to tell her own story in a way that packs a huge punch.Don't let the fact that it's told in verse turn you off. I hate poetry, but Shout has a full narrative and the poetic style of Anderson's writing is only ever beautiful, never confusing or overly flowery.I feel like this book is not getting nearly enough attention, so I'm really hoping to see this one take off in the book community soon! It's an incredibly relevant piece, and if you somehow have avoided reading Speak, make sure you check that one out as well (it's essentially a YA classic).
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    “Shame turned inside out is rage.” For fans of LHA, this is a must read. Difficult to read at times but so important.
  • Kazia
    January 1, 1970
    This book made my heart break and mend and break and mend and mend and mend.
  • Richie Partington
    January 1, 1970
    Richie’s Picks: SHOUT by Laurie Halse Anderson, Viking, March 2019, 304p., ISBN: 978-0-670-01210-7“As I walk this land with broken dreamsI have visions of many thingsBut happiness is just an illusionFilled with sadness and confusion”-- Jimmy Ruffin, “What Becomes of the Broken Hearted”“in the name of loveWhen he was eighteen years old, my fathersaw his buddy’s head sliced into two pieces,sawn just above the eyebrows by an explodingbrake drum, when he was in the middleof telling a joke.Repairing Richie’s Picks: SHOUT by Laurie Halse Anderson, Viking, March 2019, 304p., ISBN: 978-0-670-01210-7“As I walk this land with broken dreamsI have visions of many thingsBut happiness is just an illusionFilled with sadness and confusion”-- Jimmy Ruffin, “What Becomes of the Broken Hearted”“in the name of loveWhen he was eighteen years old, my fathersaw his buddy’s head sliced into two pieces,sawn just above the eyebrows by an explodingbrake drum, when he was in the middleof telling a joke.Repairing planes, P-51s, on an air base in England,hungry for a gun, not a wrench, my fatherpushed an army-issue trunk into his mindand put the picture of his friend’s last breathat the bottom of it.Then they sent him to Dachau.Not just him, of course, his whole unit,and not just to Dachau but to all of the campsbecause the War was over.But not really.Daddy didn’t talk to me for forty yearsabout what he saw, heard, what he smelledwhat he did about it;one year of silence for every day of the Flood,one year for every day from Lent until Easter.The air in Dachau was clouded with the ashfrom countless bodies, as he breathed it inthe agony of the dying infected my father,and all of his friends. They tried to helpthe suffering, following orders, took out theirrage in criminal ways while their officersturned away. My father filled the trunkin his head with walking corpses who sangto him every night for the rest of his life.One day Daddy watched a pregnant womanwalking slowly down the road near the gates of Dachauhe matched his steps to hers,then stopped as she crouched in a ditchand birthed a baby.My father, a kid on the verge of destruction,half-mad from the violence he’d seendesperate to kill, to slaughter, to maim,watched that baby slip into the worldbetween her momma’s blood-slicked thighsand it healed him just enoughthat he wept.He wrapped the newborn in her mother’s apronand helped them both to the Red Cross tentset up for survivors.”Twenty years after the publication of SPEAK, Laurie Halse Anderson now shares the true life stories that inspired her powerful, unforgettable YA classic. Told in the same prose poetry style as SPEAK, SHOUT is the verse memoir of Anderson’s life, “highlighted” by her rape at age thirteen. There are stories here about her parents and grandparents; about lessons Anderson learned in becoming a writer; and stories about her interactions, as a well-known author, with young people.I first read SPEAK in my capacity as the children’s/YA buyer for a small bookstore chain headquartered in the North Bay community I called home. I embraced and championed the story of Melinda Sordino’s freshman year of high school, and I hand-sold many, many copies to young people and adults. Beginning a couple of years later, as a teacher’s assistant at the local middle school, I read SPEAK aloud to a succession of eighth-grade English classes. SPEAK is a cautionary tale that all middle schoolers should read in advance of being tossed into the cauldron of high school. It is a book that has saved lives, and wrong-minded administrators who have tried to censor or ban it--and there have been plenty of them over the years--should be brought up on educational malpractice charges. Two decades after first reading SPEAK, and after traversing mountains of other books, I still consider SPEAK one of my absolute favorite YA reads.I want to now get the word out about SHOUT, both to today’s young people and to twenty years’ worth of Laurie Halse Anderson fans who were as moved by Melinda Sordino’s wry observations and travails as I was. For all of us old fans, there are scores of ‘Wow!” moments in SHOUT when we encounter the real people, situations, and events in Laurie Halse Anderson’s life that she incorporated into SPEAK. There’s also a good measure of Anderson’s humor here, such as a hysterically funny scene involving translation gone awry when Anderson struggles to learn the subtleties of a new language as a high school exchange student in Denmark.While providing valuable nuggets about the craft of writing and her early stumblings, Anderson shares the roadmap of her path to becoming a writer. We learn how she spent time working as a reporter. Her observations of an unrepentant sexual predator, whose trial she covered, melded with her nightmares and memories as a rape victim, providing the impetus for writing SPEAK.After the book was published, Anderson was named a National Book Award finalist and, in another pivotal moment, grasped by observing fellow finalist Walter Dean Myers, her solemn responsibility to her young readers. Taking this lesson to heart, Anderson has stood on the front lines for the past two decades, teaching young people the principles behind what has more recently come to be the #metoo movement:“collectivea what? of teensa wince of teensmutter of teensan attitude, a grumble, a grunta disenchantment of teenage girlsa confusion of teen boyswhen I talk about Speak to a classor an auditorium full of teenagersthere’s always that guyin the back row wearing a jerseysoccer or lacrosse or footballhe’s a good boy, he asksthe first real question --‘Why was Melinda so upset?I mean, it wasn’t a bad guy with a gunwho dragged her down an alley;she liked the guy, danced with him,she kissed him,so what’s the big deal?’a kiss of boyfriends a dance of rapistswhat’s the big deal?asked at every kind of schoolall over the countrycurious boys honestly inquiringtheir friends squirminga quest of knights erranta smirk of dudesthe question is born out of true confusionno one ever told him the rules of intimacyor the law, his dad only talks about condomswith a ‘don’t get her pregnant’ warninghis mom says ‘talk to your father’so he watches a lot of pornto get offto be schooledporn says her body is territorybegging to be conqueredno conversation requiredyou take what you wantan occupation of menthose boys taught meto talk about consentget real about consequencesrespect the room enoughto tell the truthcuz, lordy lord, they need itother boys pull me aside for a privateconversation, they say one of their friends,a girl who was rapedis depressed and cutting and getting highto forget what happened, they want to helpmake it better, they want to kill the guy who did itthey’re trying to be righteous, honorablebut they’re not sure howa vengeance of puppiessome boys talk about being abused by menof becoming a locker room targetof never using the bathroom in schoolnot even once in four yearscuz that’s a dangerous placeif you’re not an alpha running with the right packa few become bulliestired of being teased, beat on,made to feel small, left out in the coldthey attack the quiet boysthe isolated, who walk in the shadowssome of the bullies are homebred monstersbuilt by Frankendads, limb by limbfilled with regret and juiced by shamea retribution of scarsmy husband did the math, calculatedI’ve spoken to more than a million teenssince Speak came out, those kidstaught me everything, those girls showed me a path through the woodsthose boys led meto write Twisted,my song of admiration to young men paying the pricefor their fathers’ failuresthe collective noun I’m seeking is ‘curiosity’we have a curiosity of boyswaiting on the truthand when their questionsgo unansweredthe suffering begins foran anguish of victims”Laurie Halse Anderson concludes SHOUT with nods to some of her other works and characters, as she shares bittersweet experiences of her parents’ final days. I love how the book begins and concludes with the two people who brought her into the world.As noted in a recent New York Times article, Laurie Halse Anderson was a true pioneer in writing for and talking with young people about sexual abuse and consent. SHOUT left me breathless and teary-eyed. As the brother to a sister, the father to a daughter and, now, the grandfather to a granddaughter, I urge you to read and widely share SHOUT.Richie Partington, MLISRichie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.comhttps://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/[email protected]
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  • Kayleigh
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars.“Too many grown ups tell kids to follow their dreams, like that's going to get them somewhere. Auntie Laurie says follow your nightmares instead. Because when you figure out what's eating you alive, you can slay it.”Shout is bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson is known for the unflinching way she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Now, inspired by her fans and enraged by how little in our culture has changed since her groundbreaking novel Speak was first p 5 stars.“Too many grown ups tell kids to follow their dreams, like that's going to get them somewhere. Auntie Laurie says follow your nightmares instead. Because when you figure out what's eating you alive, you can slay it.”Shout is bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson is known for the unflinching way she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Now, inspired by her fans and enraged by how little in our culture has changed since her groundbreaking novel Speak was first published twenty years ago, she has written a poetry memoir that is as vulnerable as it is rallying, as timely as it is timeless. In free verse, Anderson shares reflections, rants, and calls to action woven between deeply personal stories from her life that she's never written about before. (Using the Goodreads summary again because it's better than anything I can come up with). Laurie Halse Anderson has been one of my favorite authors since 2011, and I think I love her a little more with every book she writes. As someone who is a survivor of rape and sexual assault, her books and advocacy for victims has meant so much to me for a very long time. I love how she was so willing to write about her own rape at thirteen and how she struggled and healed after. She describes how difficult it was to be both a woman and a survivor in the 1970s, because women were constantly shut down and told to be quiet. We've made progress, but this book proves to me even more that we have such a long way to go, because there's no reason I should see similiarties in how Laurie was treated nearly fifty years ago and how I've been treated in my life.She not only describes her own experiences and details her childhood, she also gives space to other survivors. She's spent so much of her life listening and advocating for other victims and it really, really shows. It was heartbreaking to read, and sometimes hard for me to even get through, but I have so much respect for her. It's hard enough to heal from your own sexual assault let alone listening to others talk about theirs, but it's so damn important. There's so much vulnerability and strength in publishing a book like this one, and I send all my love and admiration to Laurie for writing it.“We should teach our girls that snapping is okay, instead of waiting for someone else to break them.”
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  • Rose
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come sometime later. I thought this was an excellent reflection through the use of poetry of the author's experiences and observations of many important issues.
  • Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)
    January 1, 1970
    “Shame, turned inside out, is rage.” I feel like I can never find the words to accurately convey my thoughts about memoir or non0fiction books, because who am I to judge someone else's life and stories. But Shout by Laurie Halse Anderson is as moving and impactful as you hope. The story is filled with fear, anger, frustration, determination, loneliness, and hopefulness. It's a call to honor all the women in our lives and a rallying cry to stand against rape culture. It was wonderful listenin “Shame, turned inside out, is rage.” I feel like I can never find the words to accurately convey my thoughts about memoir or non0fiction books, because who am I to judge someone else's life and stories. But Shout by Laurie Halse Anderson is as moving and impactful as you hope. The story is filled with fear, anger, frustration, determination, loneliness, and hopefulness. It's a call to honor all the women in our lives and a rallying cry to stand against rape culture. It was wonderful listening to Laurie's story in her own words, the audiobook is only like 3.5 hours and I defintely think it's the way to go for this book. There are definitely momets that are hard to lsiten to, but Shout is such a powerful story, you can't pass it up. “too many grown-ups tell kids to follow their dreamslike that's going to get them somewhereAuntie Laurie says follow your nightmares insteadcuz when you figure out what's eating you aliveyou can slay it”
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