Underlord (Cradle, #6)
A tournament approaches. All around the world, great clans and sects prepare their disciples to fight against one another in a competition of young Underlords. Even the Blackflame Empire is drawn in, but their youth are not strong enough to compete. Yet.

Underlord (Cradle, #6) Details

TitleUnderlord (Cradle, #6)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 1st, 2019
PublisherHidden Gnome Publishing
Rating
GenreFantasy, Magic, Combat, Martial Arts

Underlord (Cradle, #6) Review

  • TS Chan
    January 1, 1970
    Such insane power. Such insane fun. That, in a nutshell, is the Cradle series, and Underlord is its current pinnacle.Underlord was everything that its title promised adoring fans (including yours truly), and so much more. The Prologue was so ridiculously epic it gave me goosebumps, and all the awesomeness that was the Cradle series came crashing down on me again. I tried to prolong the enjoyment by keeping myself occupied with things to do, to avoid finishing the book too quickly. Alas, it barel Such insane power. Such insane fun. That, in a nutshell, is the Cradle series, and Underlord is its current pinnacle.Underlord was everything that its title promised adoring fans (including yours truly), and so much more. The Prologue was so ridiculously epic it gave me goosebumps, and all the awesomeness that was the Cradle series came crashing down on me again. I tried to prolong the enjoyment by keeping myself occupied with things to do, to avoid finishing the book too quickly. Alas, it barely lasted 36 hours from the time I received the download from my pre-order. This was the first time I had to wait for a Cradle book release and the experience of coming back to the world, and its characters felt wonderful. On hindsight, I believed that I might not have done sufficient justice to the previous five books which I've finished reading on a frantic binge. Having some time to absorb and digest each book fully could have made the initial read even better. Sidenote: I've upgraded Blackflame to 5-stars.In each book thus far, Will Wight kept upping the stakes in line with the power advancements or upgrades in the sacred arts. The rank of Underlord transcends beyond Truegold on a whole new level of mastery altogether. Given this, the final step to becoming an Underlord cannot be achieved through hard training and spirit-enhancing elixirs alone. It comes from something even more profound and what ensued in this book hence was a level of character development that sealed my absolute investment for all the main characters. Lindon is the main protagonist from the very beginning, but it took me quite some time to thoroughly warm up to him. I'm so glad that I genuinely enjoy his story now; a part of this was primarily nurtured by his relationship with his co-mentor, Orthos. Yerin remained as badass as ever, and I loved the touch of vulnerability which emerged from her character arc in this book. Meanwhile, Mercy finally had her backstory fleshed out, and it was fascinating. My latest favourite character had to be Dross - a unique entity that Lindon stumbled upon in Ghostwater, which turned out to be instrumental to Lindon's progress. Dross injected even more humour into the story, which previously was almost monopolised by the melodramatic and irrepressible Eithan, who's still a firm favourite. Oh, and how can I not mention the adorable Little Blue. I cannot commend Wight enough for the worldbuilding and magic system he created for Cradle. While the story primarily took place in the world of Cradle, we get epic accounts of what was happening in the cosmos as supreme beings of power battle across the planets and stars. Within Cradle itself, one could appreciate the size and complexity of the world, with its many political factions, empires, clans and cults, all which some way or another were dictated by the most powerful sacred artists in the world, the Monarchs. In the many years of reading epic fantasy, I have had my exposure to extraordinary sorcerous powers, but I have yet to come across one so well-conceived as a magic cum martial arts system. This statement excludes anime/manga and gaming since I cannot speak with any authority in this arena. The power of the sacred arts is unapologetically insane. But at the same time, there are also distinct rules behind these arts. I was astounded with the many different paths and techniques that the author managed to conjure. Don't forget, each Path has its Striker, Enforcer, Ruler and Forger techniques, and each upgrade in rank unlocks even more techniques available to the sacred artist. And then, there are natural treasures as well as Soulsmithed constructs made from Remnants and bindings which harness vital aura. It was ingenious madness, and I had mad fun reading it. Another sidenote: It could be just me being a mega-fan of Brandon Sanderson, I can't help noticing several nods to The Stormlight Archive in this novel. The ending of each Cradle book always alluded to an even more epic instalment to come, and Underlord was no exception. Its Epilogue is the best in the series so far in building up for the next book, which is titled Uncrowned. What does differentiate Underlord from most of its predecessors was that it has the most well-balanced narrative. Amazing action scenes are a given, but we also get quiet contemplative moments between the characters. And while I laughed quite lot throughout the book, I also teared up during a particularly poignant scene. By now, I've known and accepted that there will be many more books on the horizon to complete the arc that Lindon's journey will take him, especially with Eithan's grand plan in mind. I was informed that Wight mentioned twelve books in total. Strangely though, I am excited with this prospect, as I really cannot get enough of this series. The author had been able to churn out the Cradle books regularly. I surmised that he was able to do this by making each book relatively short (by fantasy standards), and just enough to wrap up the requisite plotline to ensure consistent progression and advancement for our characters to get the story to where it needs to be for a resoundingly epic conclusion.If what I’ve described fit your idea of a great read, I highly recommend this series. Even though it seemed like we're only halfway through, these books were quite short and so fun that rereading wouldn't be a chore. At least, it won't be for me. What I am suggesting is.. don't wait to start Cradle because you are missing out on some seriously cool and awesome entertainment.You can purchase the book from Amazon US. You can also find this, and my other reviews at Novel Notions.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    The name of this book and what it suggests is killing me with anticipation.After reading-Honestly I'm relieved. I was worried that something would go wrong and I wouldn't like it, but it's even better than I thought it would be. I'm not going to do a real review, but I might after rereading it a few times. All the stuff below will be random thoughts and stream of consciousness stuff. Don't expect quality.Questions:(view spoiler)[ Are Jai Long and his sister at the Sacred Valley yet? I don't thi The name of this book and what it suggests is killing me with anticipation.After reading-Honestly I'm relieved. I was worried that something would go wrong and I wouldn't like it, but it's even better than I thought it would be. I'm not going to do a real review, but I might after rereading it a few times. All the stuff below will be random thoughts and stream of consciousness stuff. Don't expect quality.Questions:(view spoiler)[ Are Jai Long and his sister at the Sacred Valley yet? I don't think the epilogue said anything about that. Answer- "Last fall, two young outsiders had torn through the Heaven's Glory School, breaking their way into Sacred Valley. They were still at large somewhere, hiding just as she was." Also, it probably doesn't make sense for Lindon to go back home until at least after the tournament. But I really want to see his family/hometown's reaction to the fact that he could easily conquer the entire Valley. To answer my own question, "'The tournament does not allow anyone below or above Underlord', Charity said 'though advancements during competition are allowed. All competitors must be younger than 35...". Now I wonder how likely it is that Lindon will advance during the competition. If he's going to spend a few months training with the Akura's he'll probably be at least halfway to Overlord by the time the tournament starts.Also, the next book or two has a great setup to be more character-driven rather than advancement-driven. Yeren being separated from Lindon (AGAIN) after they've made some (relatively) big strides in their relationship is killer. I also really want to see how Lindon stacks up to Jai Long and Eithan (AND Naru Gwei) now. It would be hilarious if he could kick Naru Gwei's ass. He's always punched above his weight class. He spent most of this book crushing Truegolds and standing against Underlords. Could he at least almost fight an Overlord now? What's Orthos up to? We can assume he'll start training Lindon's sister, but what else?And finally, what kind of terrible, agonizing, wonderful development will Lindon go through under his revenge-training with the Akura's? (hide spoiler)]I know a few of those questions may have been answered and I just didn't read closely enough/forgot. Sorry.Other thoughts.(view spoiler)[We got just the slightest glimpse of Lindon being treated like a VIP because he was a top-100 Truegold. It would be interesting to see how he'd be treated in the Blackflame Empire now that he's an Underlord, but since he's with the Akura's now he's back to being a runt. LOL. On the other hand, he was singled out (for bad reasons, but still) to represent the Akura Clan in a super important tournament. If/when he returns to the Blackflame Empire (and he may well be an Overlord or higher by that point), they'll probably treat him like royalty. Again, funny to imagine. (hide spoiler)]Like always, the worst part of finishing a great book like this is knowing we now need to wait again for the next breath of awesomeness.
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  • maxamoud
    January 1, 1970
    Shut up and take my 💰💰💰
  • Mysti Dewees
    January 1, 1970
    **POSSIBLE SPOILERS CONTAINED WITHIN**This book is wonderful. I loved it as much as the last 5. The epilogue.. THE EPILOGUE. Woah guys! I can’t wait for the next installment in the Cradle series. Lindon, Yerin and Mercy’s transformations - especially Yerins - are amazing. Nothing short of what I expected from our main characters. You see a more vulnerable side to Yerin in this book, which I love. She’s that badass Sword Sage apprentice, who’s facing death defying odds - literally - and comes out **POSSIBLE SPOILERS CONTAINED WITHIN**This book is wonderful. I loved it as much as the last 5. The epilogue.. THE EPILOGUE. Woah guys! I can’t wait for the next installment in the Cradle series. Lindon, Yerin and Mercy’s transformations - especially Yerins - are amazing. Nothing short of what I expected from our main characters. You see a more vulnerable side to Yerin in this book, which I love. She’s that badass Sword Sage apprentice, who’s facing death defying odds - literally - and comes out on top. Her Blood Shadow? AWESOME. Dross is slowly becoming one of my favorite little side characters. I’m loving the snarky comments and witty remarks that come from him, at the worst possible times too. Orthos! COME BACK! I missed his grumpy turtle self in the second half of this book. He definitely grew on me in the previous books, I was sad to see him veer off on his own path. Albeit, it had to be done, but it still hurt my heart to see him and Lindon part ways for a little while. Oh Eithan.. what are you up to you nefarious mastermind, you? Overall, I loved this book so much. I will be anxiously awaiting the next installment. I don’t think it can be written fast enough though!
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  • Rob
    January 1, 1970
    Executive Summary: This is might be my favorite of the series thus far, and it's at least the best book since Blackflame. Full Review I really loved this book and this series. I think if I had started reading it during the weekend it came out instead of a few days later and I'd have read it in 1-2 days instead of 4. Every time I picked it up, I just wanted to keep reading, but often I either didn't have enough time, or I was too tired to concentrate properly.After how much I loved Blackflame, I Executive Summary: This is might be my favorite of the series thus far, and it's at least the best book since Blackflame. Full Review I really loved this book and this series. I think if I had started reading it during the weekend it came out instead of a few days later and I'd have read it in 1-2 days instead of 4. Every time I picked it up, I just wanted to keep reading, but often I either didn't have enough time, or I was too tired to concentrate properly.After how much I loved Blackflame, I found Skysworn a bit of a letdown. Ghostwater was a better entry, but I wondered if the series had peeked in the third book. Then this book came along and kicked things into another gear.I watch a ton of shonen anime, and those series often become less interesting to me when the main character gets too powerful. I worried Lindon would be much less interesting the stronger he got.The typical solution to this problem is to add tougher and tougher enemies, which is a technique that Mr. Wight uses, but what sets it above for me is the cool variety of ways each of the characters get stronger.He also does a pretty good job with humor. I found myself laughing at something nearly as often as I was cheering for a badass fight scene. I especially love the way Mercy says hello to EVERYONE.My only minor issue is that I still find myself confused as to some of the larger cosmic events. I'm sure the more careful readers are getting all kinds of information out of these interludes, I find myself scratching my head. I'm hoping that in time all of this stuff will make more sense, and maybe I'll do a reread to see what stuff I was missing.This series continues to be highly entertaining and I'm eagerly awaiting the next book. I have a ton of questions, and he sets things up really nicely for what's to come next.
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  • kartik narayanan
    January 1, 1970
    Underlord is an unputdownable, pedal to the floor, rush of a book. It manages to tick all the boxes - Fan-f***ing-tastic action, a pace that 'fast' does not adequately describe and characters that are unforgettable. Now, all of these characteristics are part of Will Wight's standard bag of tricks. But, in addition to all of these, this book also has way more humour than in previous iterations which went a long way in making the uber-fast pace more comfortable to read. I also liked how Linden act Underlord is an unputdownable, pedal to the floor, rush of a book. It manages to tick all the boxes - Fan-f***ing-tastic action, a pace that 'fast' does not adequately describe and characters that are unforgettable. Now, all of these characteristics are part of Will Wight's standard bag of tricks. But, in addition to all of these, this book also has way more humour than in previous iterations which went a long way in making the uber-fast pace more comfortable to read. I also liked how Linden actually has some significant character development in this book. And this goes well with the theme of the book, which is that advancing to Underlord is less about power and strength (though those matter) and more about discovering who you are truly are. As a result, our favourite characters all has to discover, confront and accept their true purposes in life. I really liked this change in level requirements since it makes the characters do something that they have not done before.The book has a pulse pounding climax. The ending is quite disruptive and moves the story into new areas which I am totally itching to read.
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  • clint hillert
    January 1, 1970
    May the Dread Gods take you Will WightNever in my life have I been so happy and yet so filled with rage and despair. Fifteen hours have passed since I downloaded this book, and aside from the seven hours I slept, I've done nothing but read it. Now it's done. Finished! Just like that! What am I to do now? Wait for your next release? ...I mean, probably...
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  • Calvin Park
    January 1, 1970
    Will Wight’s Underlord is amazingly fantastic. I absolutely loved this book. Somehow Wight manages to pack plenty of action, lots of plot points, and some stellar character development into what is actually a relatively short book. The Cradle series is quickly becoming one of my all-time favorite fantasy series. If you aren’t reading it yet, I don’t know what else I can say to convince you—but I’m going to try. Way back in the first book of the series, Unsouled, I felt like Lindon was interestin Will Wight’s Underlord is amazingly fantastic. I absolutely loved this book. Somehow Wight manages to pack plenty of action, lots of plot points, and some stellar character development into what is actually a relatively short book. The Cradle series is quickly becoming one of my all-time favorite fantasy series. If you aren’t reading it yet, I don’t know what else I can say to convince you—but I’m going to try. Way back in the first book of the series, Unsouled, I felt like Lindon was interesting, but the side characters were a little flat, lacking depth and strong characterization. I can’t imagine uttering that criticism about Underlord. Wight has crafted a tantalizing cast of characters that really shines. He’s definitely playing the long game here, letting us get to know characters bit by bit over the course of multiple books and that results in some big emotional payoffs in this novel. I try hard to avoid spoilers, but we learn significant things about each of the main characters in this novel. Yet none of the things we learn feel like an ending. Wight has really done a great job of making each reveal or bit of growth feel natural, like it’s leading to something more. If you enjoy strong characters in your fantasy, you definitely need to check out this novel. Of course, the characters aren’t the only thing that shines here. Wight also continues to reveal bits about his magic system, taking his characters and us to the next level of power. What’s so impressive is that he does this in a way that feels natural, not forced, and in a way that really feels like the characters we’ve come to know and love are growing. The plot of this one is also engaging from page one, feels like it has a good amount of payoff that we get in this novel, but also several intriguing strings are left dangling. Underlord is magnificent in nearly every way. There isn’t a great deal for me to critique here. If anything, I felt like a few scenes could have had greater impact if they had been just slightly longer and given just a hint more depth. I’d argue that’s true for the entire novel at some level. In particular, there’s a character it looks like we’ll see a good deal more of in the next book that I felt like wasn’t given enough page time in this one to make us fully care about her. It’s also possible I just want more of Wight’s amazing world and characters, however, so I have to be careful with this critique. In the end, Underlord is a phenomenal read that takes all the promise of the series, ups the ante, gives us some great payoffs, and sets the stage for what is sure to be another action-packed installment. If martial arts inspired fantasy is your thing, then you need to be reading the Cradle series. Underlord is just the latest installment in a truly exceptional series, and Wight shows no signs of faltering in his telling of this story. 4.75/5 stars.5 – I loved this, couldn’t put it down, move it to the top of your TBR pile4 – I really enjoyed this, add it to the TBR pile3 – It was ok, depending on your preferences it may be worth your time2 – I didn’t like this book, it has significant flaws and I can’t recommend it 1 – I loathe this book with a most loathsome loathing
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  • Bonhomous
    January 1, 1970
    Will Wight is ascendingI can never get enough. I devour these books in two days and then I have to spend the time cycling them into my core until the next book comes out. This one was no exception. Even Robert Jordan's books took a decline in quality at book 6, but Will Wight's keep getting better. At the back of the book he had bloopers! I've never seen an author do that before, it was awesome. I'm hoping that the series continues for at least another 6 books.
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  • Bethany Hoeflich
    January 1, 1970
    Unbelievable. I thought for sure that Will Wight wouldn't be able to top Ghostwater. I was wrong. He surpassed my wildest dreams with Underlord. It was, in short, perfection. As the title implies, Lindon continues to advance, though it's not easy. More than that, thanks to an expertly-written prologue and epilogue, we get a glimpse of the larger world as Suriel's job just got a lot harder. And even better, we got a taste of what has happened to Lindon's family after he left. My only regret is th Unbelievable. I thought for sure that Will Wight wouldn't be able to top Ghostwater. I was wrong. He surpassed my wildest dreams with Underlord. It was, in short, perfection. As the title implies, Lindon continues to advance, though it's not easy. More than that, thanks to an expertly-written prologue and epilogue, we get a glimpse of the larger world as Suriel's job just got a lot harder. And even better, we got a taste of what has happened to Lindon's family after he left. My only regret is that I read it so fast, and now I will suffer until Uncrowned is published.
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  • Colin
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic new entry to the series.If you haven't read a Will Wight novel before, you're in for something special. Well, not if you start with, "Underlord". Then you'd just be super confused. Start somewhere else. preferably at the beginning. Where's the beginning? Traveler's Gate. Start there. Or maybe not. I'm not your mother. Anyway, Wight has grown so much as a writer from when the Traveler's Gate was released that it's amazing to see. He's reasonably prolific, and has great rapport with hi A fantastic new entry to the series.If you haven't read a Will Wight novel before, you're in for something special. Well, not if you start with, "Underlord". Then you'd just be super confused. Start somewhere else. preferably at the beginning. Where's the beginning? Traveler's Gate. Start there. Or maybe not. I'm not your mother. Anyway, Wight has grown so much as a writer from when the Traveler's Gate was released that it's amazing to see. He's reasonably prolific, and has great rapport with his fans. This is his most polished work to date, which can be both a good thing and a bad thing. The bad first. This novel feels like it shouldn't exist, kind of. It's details a prelude competition to a bigger, more bombastic winner-take-all heavyweight battle amongst some high end magic users. As for the magic system itself, It seems like Wight mugged every Kung Fu movie ever created and was like, "Give me all your most ridiculous Kung Fu move names, or I'm gonna karate chop you in the nuts." It's hilarious, frankly. One of the magic techniques detailed in these pages is called, "The Flight of Seventeen Bloody Rhinoceros" (Rhinoceri? Rhinoceroses? I don't know.)I'm joking, that's not real, but if he reads this review, it might just make it into the next book. "Honey, call the publisher, I just found a great new move."The good. This series is still every bit as engaging as it ever was, and the writing is gradually better every time. It was never bad, but it's becoming more refined. His characters are fun. Wei Shi Lindon is an interesting character to inhabit, and the gung ho "If-it-bleeds-we-can-kill-it" Yerin is a great counterpoint to Lindon's more reserved self.The action sequences are still as over the top as ever. His books remind me of if Michael Bay decided to switch to video games, and created an RPG, but in a good way. "Hey Jake, I'm not sure where to go next with this chapter? What should we do?""Well Michael Bay, have you tried your signature move?""Blowing everything up with something ridiculously loud and overpowered? How was that NOT my first thought‽ You're a genius, Jake!""Don't worry Michael Bay, I know you're still preoccupied with 'Transformers '76: The Transformation Nation.' Everyone has an off day."It's a fun action book, and my only complaint is that it shouldn't exist. This should have been combined with, "Uncrowned" and as a result it feels more like a novella, even though it's a full length novel. Is it still awesome? Yes. Is it still worth it? Again, yes. Should you buy it? OF COURSE you should buy it. Or read it on Kindle Unlimited, or whatever medium you're using. Again, I'm not your mother. She has more tattoos than I do, and she once beat me in an am wrestling competition with a menthol cigarette hanging out of her mouth. Alright, I'm out.
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  • Steffan
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5 stars
  • Lazybee
    January 1, 1970
    3.5. Power levels are clearly defined, but extremely weird. Eithan is the best thing in this book.
  • Dirtyfox
    January 1, 1970
    5 out of 5 starsThis was everything I was hoping for and more, it continued the trend in Ghostwater with more action and more dangers to characters.Lindon, Yerin, and Mercy are competing in an opportunity to reach Umderlord but they are competing against another country. Also Charity has a grudge against Lindon who killed Harmony back in Ghostwater and keep making things difficult for them like Giving the opposite faction the mission to kill him.in one of the fights Yerin gets injured pretty bad 5 out of 5 starsThis was everything I was hoping for and more, it continued the trend in Ghostwater with more action and more dangers to characters.Lindon, Yerin, and Mercy are competing in an opportunity to reach Umderlord but they are competing against another country. Also Charity has a grudge against Lindon who killed Harmony back in Ghostwater and keep making things difficult for them like Giving the opposite faction the mission to kill him.in one of the fights Yerin gets injured pretty badly and she doesn't have much more to live and the only way for her to remain alive is to reach Underlord.they each reach Underlord in that Amazing ending Fight(also each of their mantra or their goals for that was interesting too). Mercy's enigma is finally solved and we find out that if she wants to reach underlord she must go back to Akura clan and take responsibility as the heir, but that twist at the end was cruel on so many levels. Charity picks Lindon for Akura clan, not Blackflame and thus separating Lindon and Yerin yet again and possibly forcing them to fight each other in the next book.the best book in the series till now without a doubt.
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  • moe
    January 1, 1970
    Could not put it down!!!It's an awesome continuation to the cradle series. If I had anything negative to say about it I would say it feels like it wanted to be longer or maybe slower paced. Coming from Ghostwater where the crew was split and we as readers only had to worry about 1 or 2 perspectives at a time, Underlord feels ever so slightly strained when the perspectives shift. I do think Ghostwater is my favorite so far in the series, but with this new addition, I don't think I'm capable of de Could not put it down!!!It's an awesome continuation to the cradle series. If I had anything negative to say about it I would say it feels like it wanted to be longer or maybe slower paced. Coming from Ghostwater where the crew was split and we as readers only had to worry about 1 or 2 perspectives at a time, Underlord feels ever so slightly strained when the perspectives shift. I do think Ghostwater is my favorite so far in the series, but with this new addition, I don't think I'm capable of definitively choosing a second place. If we are comparing epilogues however, Underlords epilogue solidly has first place.As an added note to the author and readers, Underlord did a phenomenal job of setting up the next few books.
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  • Zachary Schillinger
    January 1, 1970
    The Cradle series is still going strong!Underlor was a natural continuation of the previous books. Almost to the point that if it were not for glimpses into the Abidan war at the beginning it could have been read as the next chapter in the previous book. Without giving anything away, underlord was the book Cradle fans have been waiting for.
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  • Michael J. Conway
    January 1, 1970
    Couldn't put it down.Having read all the previous books in the Cradle series, I have been waiting for the this new book for what seems like a long time. It did not disappoint. I was enjoying it so much, the I couldn't put it down and read it in one day. Surprising plot twist at the end. Nice action scenes. Only thing that I am disappointed about is that I have to wait for the next book, although at the end if the book it said coming soon, whatever that means. lol
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  • Jonthomas Oudyk
    January 1, 1970
    Will read series againUsually i burn through Litrpg pretty fast. But this series has always been exciting, interesting, and diverse in its growth. The characters indicate their caring for one another, despite social norms, in a variety of ways. Using each other and growing at the same time. Usually wuxia is Narcissism literary, but the characters are not “blessed” in a particular way. Looking forward to book 7. Thank you Mr. Wight.
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  • Andrew Lukyanenko
    January 1, 1970
    I have read this book within a day and can say that it is great! We now know much more about the main characters and their history. The epilogue and the bloopers are also wonderful! :) Maybe I'll reread the whole series soon.
  • Alan Flavin
    January 1, 1970
    Best book so farThis book has been a long wait, and let me tell you, it was worth it. Will strikes a perfect balance of action, advancement and plot that leaves you ravenous for more after devouring the entire book in 1 sitting.
  • Soorya
    January 1, 1970
    I'm having serious withdrawals after reading 6 books in a row and finding out that I have to actually wait for the next one. I tore through this series in just a couple of weeks, which probably tells you how much I enjoyed it. These are very fast-paced, Sanderson-esque books that are really difficult to put down. Looking back, I feel like book 1 was a bit bumpier compared to the rest, but it gets really good with books 2 and 3, drops off a bit in #4 (which was shorter than the others), but goes I'm having serious withdrawals after reading 6 books in a row and finding out that I have to actually wait for the next one. I tore through this series in just a couple of weeks, which probably tells you how much I enjoyed it. These are very fast-paced, Sanderson-esque books that are really difficult to put down. Looking back, I feel like book 1 was a bit bumpier compared to the rest, but it gets really good with books 2 and 3, drops off a bit in #4 (which was shorter than the others), but goes right back to peak quality in #5 and #6. Overall I'm impressed with the consistency; there aren't many series that stay good for this long.
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  • Sundeep
    January 1, 1970
    this book was so good, on par with Blackflame and Ghostwater (relatively the best books of the series)I had binged the first five late last year and had no issues following without a reread (there were hints to refresh our memory). The main characters each have a unique voice by now and it was so good to get into that space quickly. Nice to see so many laugh-out-loud moments, topped by the bloopers section (racing action is a given in this series). Prologue and Epilogue were great as well.
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  • J
    January 1, 1970
    A little on the short side, but only a little.It's nice to have a book with both a lot of fighting and a lot of cultivation work. This is probably my favorite book since Soulsmith and Blackflame.The ending is a nice little twist too. I hope the Uncrowned tournament (or an arc surrounding it) is either longer than normal or two books though--we've been building to it for a while now, so a single book might feel underwhelming.
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  • Kyle Dougherty
    January 1, 1970
    These books are like the shounen anime of books. I love them all. I can't wait for book 7 now.In general this book felt like a step up from Ghostwater. Sets up the 7th book nicely which appears to be a TOURNAMENT ARC.Also, the last section of the epilogue is straight fire. Need Uncrowned ASAP.
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  • Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    Why...why...whyyy!!!!Why do I do this to myself!!?? I devour these AWESOME books then suffer through a drought. I have to sift out all the crappy attempts of writing to find even a kernel of entertainment and engagement! Keep writing and I’ll keep reading!!!
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  • Jonathan Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    4.75 Stars
  • Benjamin Espen
    January 1, 1970
    If you have been following along with the Cradle series, you will have a pretty good idea of what to expect by now. Our young protagonist, Wei Shi Lindon Arelius, will have adventures, face insurmountable odds, and advance his Path. Wight has got a good thing going here, and he sticks to what works. I’ve said it before and I will say it again: these books are just fun. But I want to stop a moment and look at why it works. Indulge me.And work it does. When Underlord released on March 1st, 2019, i If you have been following along with the Cradle series, you will have a pretty good idea of what to expect by now. Our young protagonist, Wei Shi Lindon Arelius, will have adventures, face insurmountable odds, and advance his Path. Wight has got a good thing going here, and he sticks to what works. I’ve said it before and I will say it again: these books are just fun. But I want to stop a moment and look at why it works. Indulge me.And work it does. When Underlord released on March 1st, 2019, it rose at least as high as #5 on Amazon’s Kindle store, and maybe higher. Wight doesn’t run any sort of amazing social media campaign, his books mostly sell by word of mouth and through the praises of reviews like this one. His release schedule helps, you don’t have to wait years in between installments. But I think this is good evidence that Wight gives his readers what they want. What they [I] want is a good story, and Wight does that.Fresh off of reading J. D. Cowan’s multi-part review of Sam J. Lundwell's Science Fiction: An Illustrated History, I have a new appreciation for just how good the Cradle series is, and new gratitude to Will Wight for writing the things I like to read. In particular, I learned something about just what it is I like about stories like this. Lindon needed insight into himself in order to advance, and in much the same way I needed insight in what makes a story good in order to be able to understand my own tastes.One of the things I learned from Cowan’s review is that science fiction isn’t really a genre. In fact, debates about what is or isn’t science fiction tend to get bogged down, because the usual definitions don’t cut nature at the joints. By analogy, what is usually called fantasy isn’t a genre either. Cowan proposes instead that science fiction, fantasy, and horror are all subgenres of adventure fiction, which is meant to evoke the emotion of wonder in the reader.Wonder is a trait from adventure fiction and its subgenres fantasy and horror. It is the adventure of exploring new lands, peoples, and possibilities. This was the insight that I needed, because now I can understand what I like, and what I don’t. There is an irreducible element of personal taste in all of our entertainment, but I learned that adventure fiction is the kind that I like to read, precisely because the emotion of wonder is what I am after. There are lots of books labeled as sci fi or fantasy that I don’t like, but this is because genre, the emotion meant to be evoked, has been confused with milieu, or setting. In the sense that I mean the term, setting a story in the future doesn’t make it science fiction. Swords and dragons don’t make a book fantasy either. If the emotion the author is trying to invoke in me is despair or rage, I don’t really want to read that book, no matter what trappings it has. I finally understand why Tolkien insisted that The Lord of the Rings was a romance. He was connecting his work with an older tradition, not inventing a new one.Wight’s books work for me because he is taking me on an adventure! I see the remarkable world of Cradle: Iteration 110 though Lindon’s eyes, and I get to see him grow up as he learns about the marvelous world in which he finds himself. The speculative fiction element is subdued, but not wholly absent. The focus here is on Lindon and his journey, rather than exactly what kind of society you would get if we lived in a simulation and cheat codes were enabled. There is just enough thought given to the structure and sociology to make it plausible. Everything else is about fun.
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  • Suz
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed it overall but I have to admit that I'm starting to get tired of the "all fighting all the time" plot.
  • Kaladin
    January 1, 1970
    Please keep going. This is so addicting!!
  • Jonathan Lin
    January 1, 1970
    Whens the next one, again?
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