The Language of Fire
The Language of Fire is a lyrical, dark, and moving look at the life of Joan of Arc, who as a teen girl in the fifteenth century commanded an army and helped crown a king of France.This extraordinary verse novel from award-winning author Stephanie Hemphill dares to imagine how an ordinary girl became a great leader, and ultimately saved a nation.Jehanne was an illiterate peasant, never quite at home among her siblings and peers. Until one day, she hears a voice call to her, telling her she is destined for important things. She begins to understand that she has been called by God, chosen for a higher purpose—to save France.Through sheer determination and incredible courage, Jehanne becomes the unlikeliest of heroes. She runs away from home, dresses in men’s clothes, and convinces an army that she will lead France to victory.As a girl in a man’s world, at a time when women truly had no power, Jehanne faced constant threats and violence from the men around her. Despite the impossible odds, Jehanne became a fearless warrior who has inspired generations.

The Language of Fire Details

TitleThe Language of Fire
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 11th, 2019
PublisherBalzer + Bray
ISBN-139780062490131
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Poetry, Young Adult, Retellings

The Language of Fire Review

  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    UM YES PLEASEJoan of Arc is the best
  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    While it was a little dry for some of the historical parts (the travel and battles, mostly), I thought it was overall interesting and offered insights about society's treatment of women that are still relevant. It was also quick to read and absorb.I'll be sure to check out the author's Wicked Girls someday (about the witch trials in Salem), to see if it's similarly reflective about women and history. (EDIT: I forgot to note that my copy was an ARC, so it did have some typos and I'm assuming part While it was a little dry for some of the historical parts (the travel and battles, mostly), I thought it was overall interesting and offered insights about society's treatment of women that are still relevant. It was also quick to read and absorb.I'll be sure to check out the author's Wicked Girls someday (about the witch trials in Salem), to see if it's similarly reflective about women and history. (EDIT: I forgot to note that my copy was an ARC, so it did have some typos and I'm assuming parts of it would have changed between my copy and the final release copy.)
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  • Asteropê
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting, there's another Joan of Arc verse novel for 2019 as well: Voices: The Final Hours of Joan of Arc. Will be interesting to see the different takes on the same figure.
  • Erikka
    January 1, 1970
    This wasn't terrible, but it also wasn't great. It got very monotonous after about 100 pages and had way more detail than I think the intended audience would care about. I think the idea was solid and that Joan of Arc is a fascinating character, but this book made her seem very dull. It was definitely well researched and was clearly a passion project, so I'll give it credit for that.
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