Between Two Shores
The daughter of a Mohawk mother and French father in 1759 Montreal, Catherine Duval finds it is easier to remain neutral in a world that is tearing itself apart. Content to trade with both the French and the British, Catherine is pulled into the fray against her wishes when her British ex-fiance, Samuel Crane, is taken prisoner by her father. Samuel asks her to help him escape, claiming he has information that could help end the war.Peace appeals to Catherine, but helping the man who broke her heart does not. She delays . . . until attempts on Samuel's life convince her he's in mortal danger. Against her better judgment she helps him flee by river, using knowledge of the landscape to creep ever closer to freedom. Their time together rekindles feelings she thought long buried, and danger seems to hound their every mile. She's risked becoming a traitor by choosing a side, but will the decision cost her even more than she anticipated?

Between Two Shores Details

TitleBetween Two Shores
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherBethany House Publishers
ISBN-139780764219085
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian Fiction, Fiction, Christian Historical Fiction

Between Two Shores Review

  • Jocelyn Green
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not going to "review" my own book but I will just say this novel is unlike any other I've written to date. It took some bravery and courage to take the story where I did, and I'm hoping it resonates with the people this book was meant to touch. You may notice feathers on the book cover--may this story give you wings to fly.
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  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    My heart feels like it's been drug across rocks between two shores. It's hurting for a number of reasons...squandered relationships, hungry people, orphaned children, widows, love lost and so much more.Among the backdrop of the Seven Years' War is Catherine Duval, the daughter of a Mohawk mother and French father. She is torn between a desire to live with the People and her father who has no one else after he divorces.This novel includes a great deal of beautiful imagery and symbolism. So many o My heart feels like it's been drug across rocks between two shores. It's hurting for a number of reasons...squandered relationships, hungry people, orphaned children, widows, love lost and so much more.Among the backdrop of the Seven Years' War is Catherine Duval, the daughter of a Mohawk mother and French father. She is torn between a desire to live with the People and her father who has no one else after he divorces.This novel includes a great deal of beautiful imagery and symbolism. So many of thoughts rambling through my mind are spoilers. Between Two Shores is a beautifully written historical fiction novel.My gratitude to publisher Bethany House for a complimentary copy of the novel. I was not required to post a review and the opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Deanne Patterson
    January 1, 1970
    From the very first book I read by Jocelyn Green I was impressed and just when you think she couldn't possibly top her other books, she amazingly does!Once I started I just couldn't put it down, reading 75% the first day!I am always so impressed with the research she puts into her books to make them accurate and this is one of the reasons I love historical fiction, what I can learn from it.The book drew me into it's depths and I really felt as though I was there with these amazing characters. Ca From the very first book I read by Jocelyn Green I was impressed and just when you think she couldn't possibly top her other books, she amazingly does!Once I started I just couldn't put it down, reading 75% the first day!I am always so impressed with the research she puts into her books to make them accurate and this is one of the reasons I love historical fiction, what I can learn from it.The book drew me into it's depths and I really felt as though I was there with these amazing characters. Catherine Duval is a half Mohawk, half French daughter of a trapper, Gabriel Duval. She is a very strong The author doesn't sugar coat things in the book the way it's described is the way people really lived back then. It takes place in Montreal, Quebec in 1759.Catherine is caught between two worlds her Indian side and trying to please her French father. It was refreshing to read a novel that didn't have romance in it that concentrated so much on historical detail instead.I highly recommend this to all who enjoy historical fiction. Historical fiction readers will definitely have space on their bookshelves for this authors' books.Published February 5th 2019 by Bethany House Publishers. I was provided with a complimentary copy. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Sarah Grace Grzy
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars.This book was my most anticipated 2019 release. Green has quickly become my favorite historical fiction author, so I was greatly looking forward to reading Between Two Shores. Unfortunately, I was a bit disappointed. The cover is honestly the best thing about this book.I loved the rich, complex plots in the previous Jocelyn Green books I have read, so I had high hopes for this one. But to be honest, this book really didn't feel like it had a plot for the first three-quarters of it. The 2.5 stars.This book was my most anticipated 2019 release. Green has quickly become my favorite historical fiction author, so I was greatly looking forward to reading Between Two Shores. Unfortunately, I was a bit disappointed. The cover is honestly the best thing about this book.I loved the rich, complex plots in the previous Jocelyn Green books I have read, so I had high hopes for this one. But to be honest, this book really didn't feel like it had a plot for the first three-quarters of it. The first 45% was almost entirely backstory, and therefore the story took seemingly forever to get going. The ending was very sweet, and I was happy to see some reconciliation between certain characters. I also loved the themes of faith. The final few scenes were very powerful. Although I feel like they could have been far more impactful if spread throughout the book instead of hinted at here and there until the end. The characters also felt rather flat to me. I didn't even like them, no less empathize with them until more than halfway through the book - and even then, I still didn't really like Samuel. (view spoiler)[I'm sorry, dude. You are a manipulator, and I am very mad that you let Catherine start to fall in love with you again even though you were married. Which you somehow neglected to tell her until well on your journey. (hide spoiler)] I feel like Catherine had the potential to be a really fabulous character, but honestly, she just wasn't there. Also, the lack of romance - while not necessarily a bad thing, I suppose - really threw me, as I was expecting one until a plot twist about 65% through the book. Overall, I think this had the potential to be a really amazing piece of fiction. But unfortunately, it just didn't hit the mark for me.FTC disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley. I was not required to write a positive review. These are my honest thoughts and opinions.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    A must read for historical fiction fans. Through vivid prose and rich historical detail, Jocelyn Green proves once again that she is a master storyteller. Through a strong heroine and supporting cast, Green allows the reader to experience the turmoil and hardship experienced by the Canadian settlers and native Indians during the seven years of the French and Indian War. In Catherine Stands-Apart, we have a strong yet vulnerable heroine who is searching for a place to belong. The image of standin A must read for historical fiction fans. Through vivid prose and rich historical detail, Jocelyn Green proves once again that she is a master storyteller. Through a strong heroine and supporting cast, Green allows the reader to experience the turmoil and hardship experienced by the Canadian settlers and native Indians during the seven years of the French and Indian War. In Catherine Stands-Apart, we have a strong yet vulnerable heroine who is searching for a place to belong. The image of standing apart is both literal and figurative. She is caught between the heritage of both parents, her mother a Mohawk while her father was a French-Canadian. In her search to belong, she needs to discern which side of the conflict will benefit her family and people the most. This is not only a story of a physical journey but a spiritual one of as well. Through descriptive prose, I was able to empathize with Catherine's anger, sorrow and pain as she struggled to find her place among family and her Creator. A couple of my favorite quotes:" Here in this creek. behind a black cavern shaped by water, she would shed the burden of others' expectations. She would be the river that set its own course and not the rock hollowed out by continual force. A river that flowed between nations and did not heed a man-made war."" God was not to be bargained with. She had nothing to entice Him, for she possessed nothing He needed. Yet He loved her, and that was what she cling to....If she could not bend God's will to hers, could she possible bow to His?"I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from the author/publisher. I was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    What a poignant, heart-stirring book. Words are always hardest to find for the stories that I love most. Catherine Duval is such an inspiring character, both for her admirable qualities, but even more so for her flaws. As one that has moved easily between the worlds of her French father and her Mohawk mother, Catherine seeks the peace that comes with remaining neutral. However, neutrality is becoming a dangerous place to be on both shores, so she must decide what is more important - choosing a s What a poignant, heart-stirring book. Words are always hardest to find for the stories that I love most. Catherine Duval is such an inspiring character, both for her admirable qualities, but even more so for her flaws. As one that has moved easily between the worlds of her French father and her Mohawk mother, Catherine seeks the peace that comes with remaining neutral. However, neutrality is becoming a dangerous place to be on both shores, so she must decide what is more important - choosing a side may ultimately mean peace and survival for many, but the revelations that come along with it may mean discord, not peace, for her inner world.What else to say about this beautiful book? The secondary characters, of which there are several, are layered and oh so human. Even the antagonists of the story have backgrounds and pasts, and in war, it's hard to know who the real enemy is when both sides are hurting. The details of the wilderness, trading posts, the grim realities of war, the tender relationships between sisters by blood and sisters by choice, these aspects all provide the reader with scenes that captivate and compel.I think what I loved most about this book is that it is not a romance. Indeed, though the cover is beautiful, I wonder that it doesn't quite convey the gravity and complexity of this story. This is a discourse on what it means to be family, both the family that you're born into, and the family that circumstances choose for you. It's a testament to forgiveness and healing and doing the right thing to great personal detriment. It's about knowing when to lean in and when to finally walk away. And you may think that with all these lofty words I'm using that the story is dramatic, and at times, perhaps it is, but on the whole, it is nuanced, beautifully paced, and at times completely surprising. In my opinion, this is Green's best work to date.Full of vivid imagery, rich historical details, and ultimately an abundance of hope and redemption, Between Two Shores is on my list of favorites for 2019.I received a complimentary copy of this novel from the publisher. The thoughts and opinions expressed in this review are my own, and I was not required to post a review, positive or otherwise.
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  • Susie Finkbeiner
    January 1, 1970
    I have read every single one of Jocelyn Green's novels and I speak with authority when I say that Between Two Shores is her finest work. Her story is compelling as usual, her characters well developed and authentic, her research done with the utmost integrity, the prose laced with beautiful imagery. But there was something about this story that sets it apart, brings it to another level in Green's work. There was a certain poetry to this story that caused me to pause and reread sentences, closing I have read every single one of Jocelyn Green's novels and I speak with authority when I say that Between Two Shores is her finest work. Her story is compelling as usual, her characters well developed and authentic, her research done with the utmost integrity, the prose laced with beautiful imagery. But there was something about this story that sets it apart, brings it to another level in Green's work. There was a certain poetry to this story that caused me to pause and reread sentences, closing my eyes to really absorb the music of her prose. The protagonist possessed a complexity that endeared me to her, causing me to find myself praying for her to be okay. The relationships between the characters were complexed, nuanced, and absolutely true. I have always loved Green's work. It's exciting to see her continue to get better and better with each new novel.Full disclosure: Bethany House Publishers sent me an advanced reader's copy of this book because they know I'm a major Jocelyn Green fan and because they're kind. I promised them nothing in return. I write this review because I really loved the book. That is all.
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  • Sarah Sundin
    January 1, 1970
    In Between Two Shores, Jocelyn Green brings to life the perilous times of the French & Indian War in Canada. Lush descriptions and compelling characters make reading this story a rich experience. Along the way, Catherine faces truths about herself and the Lord that resonated with me. Don’t miss this story!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    "Richly historic, even haunting, Green pens a remarkable tale of the clash of cultures and the quest for enduring love. Between Two Shores is extraordinary storytelling, showcasing an unforgettable heroine who is both fierce and a force for good in an ever-changing frontier landscape. A novel not soon forgotten."Laura Frantz, author of A Bound Heart
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  • Stephenia McGee
    January 1, 1970
    With emotional depth, layered characters, and an adventure that sweeps you away, Between Two Shores delivers it all. Green once again transports the reader to an intricately constructed era, her attention to historical details adding authenticity to her dynamic settings. Historical Fiction lovers won’t want to miss this riveting tale of courage, faith, and a woman who discovers that what makes her stand apart could also bridge the divides in her country, her home, and her heart.
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  • Cathy Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! Jocelyn Green always writes the best, most meaty and historically accurate fiction out there. She's an automatic read for me based on name alone.
  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    A book with wonderful depth, terrific characters, amazingly accurate historical detail- these all combine to make a read that kept me awake till 2AM to get to the conclusion. One thing that I really loved about this book was that everything doesn’t necessarily turn out the way one might think, but that is life. God’s ways aren’t always ours, and sometimes he has a different path for us than what we wish. His way will be better.I enjoyed the characters in this story, and one feels pulled into the A book with wonderful depth, terrific characters, amazingly accurate historical detail- these all combine to make a read that kept me awake till 2AM to get to the conclusion. One thing that I really loved about this book was that everything doesn’t necessarily turn out the way one might think, but that is life. God’s ways aren’t always ours, and sometimes he has a different path for us than what we wish. His way will be better.I enjoyed the characters in this story, and one feels pulled into the time and place by the terrific historical detail. With all the treasures this book holds, I had to give it my rare five stars. You should get your hands on this read! It’s a beautifully written historical novel that just is meant to be read and savored!I received this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Find this and other reviews at: https://historicalfictionreader.blogs...And now for something completely different… That's what I thought on picking up Jocelyn Green’s Between Two Shores. I’d not read the author before, but it’d been a minute since I’d tackled anything set during the French and Indian War and I was giddy at the possibilities.The novel incorporates some great historical subject matter, the experiences of captives taken by Native American tribes are more than noteworthy, but I was Find this and other reviews at: https://historicalfictionreader.blogs...And now for something completely different… That's what I thought on picking up Jocelyn Green’s Between Two Shores. I’d not read the author before, but it’d been a minute since I’d tackled anything set during the French and Indian War and I was giddy at the possibilities.The novel incorporates some great historical subject matter, the experiences of captives taken by Native American tribes are more than noteworthy, but I was transfixed by Green’s depiction of the fur trade’s female practitioners. This little-known chapter was entirely new to me and I love how it afforded Green the opportunity to explore authentic feminine fortitude without inventing an anachronistic exception to eighteen-century norms.The novel affords great insight into the lives of Quebec’s French colonists and I found the atmospheric details quite comprehensive. I also liked the cross-cultural notes Green was able to explore by virtue of Catherine’s unique heritage and complex emotional relationships.The religious themes of the novel are moderate, but I felt they paired nicely with Catherine’s struggle to identify both her place and individual purpose. Green plays with ideas of guilt, familial obligation, and personal happiness and while I’m not particularly religious, I found the material compelling and intensely creative.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    This book was everything and nothing that I anticipated. I’ve come to expect great stories and beautiful writing from Jocelyn Green and she delivered, but she also gave me such a wonderful surprise along the way. This book veers away from the pattern of its genre and was all the more beloved for that reason.Catherine-Stands-Apart was a character that I could root for. She experiences many of the same struggles that people still face today. Pleasing others to the detriment of yourself, the hearta This book was everything and nothing that I anticipated. I’ve come to expect great stories and beautiful writing from Jocelyn Green and she delivered, but she also gave me such a wonderful surprise along the way. This book veers away from the pattern of its genre and was all the more beloved for that reason.Catherine-Stands-Apart was a character that I could root for. She experiences many of the same struggles that people still face today. Pleasing others to the detriment of yourself, the heartache that can come with love and acting for the greater good. The motivations that drive her felt east to relate to. I understood her reactions to the world around her and the actions of others. As a woman of the fur trade she was afforded greater independence without sacrificing historical accuracy and that was a selling point for me. Nothing takes me out of a story faster than modern thoughts or actions imposed on a historical situation.Relationships between women, and especially sisters can be some of the most complicated. This book placed great importance on this, and watching the bonds between Catherine, Bright Star and Thankful grow and change was a pleasure. No one develops more than Catherine though as she experiences love in all its different forms. The love of siblings, love for a parent, romantic love, loving oneself and most importantly God’s love.I received a copy of this book from the author and Bethany House Publishers in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Molly Jaber (Cover To Cover Cafe)
    January 1, 1970
    It's been some time since I read a Jocelyn Green novel, and let me tell you this....it was so refreshing to get back to her books. This book, filled with beautiful historical detail, took me on a journey to Montreal, and kept me hooked until the last page was reached. Catherine, Samuel, Bright Star, and the amazing characters truly became a part of my soul. I loved following them on their journey. The rich detail of the French and Indian War was depicted beautifully. It came to life for me, maki It's been some time since I read a Jocelyn Green novel, and let me tell you this....it was so refreshing to get back to her books. This book, filled with beautiful historical detail, took me on a journey to Montreal, and kept me hooked until the last page was reached. Catherine, Samuel, Bright Star, and the amazing characters truly became a part of my soul. I loved following them on their journey. The rich detail of the French and Indian War was depicted beautifully. It came to life for me, making me feel a part of Catherine and Samuel's lives. If you love history, hope, longing and mercy, then grab this book up. It's tenderly written, and will wrap you up as you read through these pages. As a reader, the emotions will flow through you the further into the story that you get. I highly recommend this with 4 stars and two thumbs up. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Bethany House Publishers and was under no obligation to post a review, positive or negative.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    "If I've learned anything from you, it's that life is about far more than equal exchange." Managing her father's trading post along the St. Lawrence River, Catherine Duval is accustomed to making smart decisions; her bi-racial heritage as the daughter of a Mohawk Indian and a French trapper granting her distinct advantages and disadvantages as a business woman. While the French and Indian War ravages the countryside near her Montreal, Quebec home, Catherine has managed to remain as neutral as po "If I've learned anything from you, it's that life is about far more than equal exchange." Managing her father's trading post along the St. Lawrence River, Catherine Duval is accustomed to making smart decisions; her bi-racial heritage as the daughter of a Mohawk Indian and a French trapper granting her distinct advantages and disadvantages as a business woman. While the French and Indian War ravages the countryside near her Montreal, Quebec home, Catherine has managed to remain as neutral as possible in order to trade on both sides of the contentious battle for control of the region. Suddenly everything changes, nothing stays the same.When Samuel Crane, the one man who managed to conquer Catherine's seemingly impenetrable affections, suddenly re-appears in her life, he brings the raging conflict to her doorstep with an uncompromising request. Now, not only does Catherine have to straddle two geographic shores, her heart appears destined to travel the same path. Stunning is the only possible way to describe the lovely literacy of prose that Jocelyn Green brings to this story; showcasing her ability to write vivid descriptions amidst finely tooled historical references; introducing complex characters whose heartstrings every reader will long to play. "Creator God, create in me a clean heart, one that shows loyalties to You above armies and empires and allies.I received a copy of this book from the author and publisher. The opinions stated are entirely my own.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    When you enjoy something you savor it and this is a book that you will want to savor and digest. It seeps into you and when you lay it down you will continue to reflect on the characters. Jocelyn Green is a consummate author and her novels are so thoroughly researched that you come away with a history lesson without even realizing it. This book draws you in and you become so entangled in the characters that you feel like you are experiencing their lives. The words are so rich that you can see, t When you enjoy something you savor it and this is a book that you will want to savor and digest. It seeps into you and when you lay it down you will continue to reflect on the characters. Jocelyn Green is a consummate author and her novels are so thoroughly researched that you come away with a history lesson without even realizing it. This book draws you in and you become so entangled in the characters that you feel like you are experiencing their lives. The words are so rich that you can see, taste, and feel the anguish of hunger, war, and separation of those you hold dear. I loved how faith is woven throughout and how forgiveness and restoration complete the picture of a masterpiece. This book is a like a beautiful sonata that you listen to with your eyes closed, as you are mesmerized by the beauty of it. Definitely will be on my top ten list for 2019.I received a complimentary copy from the author/publisher. The honest review and opinions are my own and were not required.
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    A brilliantly colourful narrative, Green proves once more that there is no genre or time period she cannot hold ransom with her distinctive ability. Ambitious and bold, Between Two Shores employs the literary sensibilities of Lori Benton and the sweepingly epic tendencies of Laura Frantz. The Canadian wilderness in all of its elusive, craggy and harsh beauty is mined with grace and colour, surrendering itself as easy canvas to Green's adept prose. This is a treatise on the many forms of love and A brilliantly colourful narrative, Green proves once more that there is no genre or time period she cannot hold ransom with her distinctive ability. Ambitious and bold, Between Two Shores employs the literary sensibilities of Lori Benton and the sweepingly epic tendencies of Laura Frantz. The Canadian wilderness in all of its elusive, craggy and harsh beauty is mined with grace and colour, surrendering itself as easy canvas to Green's adept prose. This is a treatise on the many forms of love and resilience. It takes the CBA historical tropes and turns them on their ear. A fascinating and dimensional character, Catherine is the stronghold of a plot at times treacherous and hopeful. A magnificent feat, Green has (yet again) carved herself a place as one of the most dimensional, surprising and worthy wordsmiths in the inspirational industry.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Catherine is torn between so much. Her father, her sister and brother, her country, war and the prospect of peace. Throw into the mix Samuel and there’s a deep beautiful story here. One of love but not the romantic typical type of story one usually expects. It’s a thought provoking one that is unpredictable on many levels. It is definitely a page turner and will keep your interest going page after page. Catherine is a complex character. This is definitely a keeper and one I want to re-read again Catherine is torn between so much. Her father, her sister and brother, her country, war and the prospect of peace. Throw into the mix Samuel and there’s a deep beautiful story here. One of love but not the romantic typical type of story one usually expects. It’s a thought provoking one that is unpredictable on many levels. It is definitely a page turner and will keep your interest going page after page. Catherine is a complex character. This is definitely a keeper and one I want to re-read again. This period of time isn’t one I’ve read much about or the area. So I like that it was an original idea as well. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Catherine Duval is the daughter of a French father and Mohawk mother. Her Indian name is Stands-Apart, for she has always tried to straddle both worlds. Now in 1759, in the middle of what we know now as the French and Indian War, Catherine must take a side - and her actions may change the fate of a nation.Near Montreal, Catherine and her father run a trading post. Because of Catherine’s connections she often uses Mohawk traders to smuggle goods into and out of New England, an advantage not share Catherine Duval is the daughter of a French father and Mohawk mother. Her Indian name is Stands-Apart, for she has always tried to straddle both worlds. Now in 1759, in the middle of what we know now as the French and Indian War, Catherine must take a side - and her actions may change the fate of a nation.Near Montreal, Catherine and her father run a trading post. Because of Catherine’s connections she often uses Mohawk traders to smuggle goods into and out of New England, an advantage not shared by many around them. People are starving all throughout New France as the war has taken away all the able-bodied men. The return of Samuel Crane, now a ransomed British captive but formerly Catherine’s fiance, drastically changes things. Samuel insists he has information that can turn the tides of the war, though he needs Catherine’s help in getting to Quebec, and she may not be willing to give it. Choosing to help Samuel would mean potentially losing everything if she is caught and branded a traitor, but at the same time it might actually help her country if they can bring an end to the conflict.This book is as deep and wide as the St. Lawrence river, which the story often revolves around. To tell you much about the plot would give away the secrets locked within. Jocelyn Green always presents the reality of historical life - the tragedies may outnumber the triumphs by far, but there is still joy to be found. There’s no fluff here, and the story itself takes a while to launch due to backstory needing to be covered, yet within the pages a lot of beauty can be found as characters draw strength from the Creator God while facing incredible hardship.My favorite quote from the book came from Chapter 30. Catherine has been asked who she is now after all that has transpired in the previous pages. She responds: “[We’re] two people trying to bring order from chaos, yet held steadfast by a God who loved us before we loved Him.” I don’t know about you, but as someone who is currently going through some uncertain waters, there’s great peace in knowing we are held by God’s love.I received my copy of the book from the publisher. All thoughts in this review are my own.This review originated at http://reviewsbyerin.dreamwidth.org
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  • Jaye Knight
    January 1, 1970
    The 18th century is one of my favorite time periods so this book caught my interest as soon as I read the description. I can’t say the beginning grabbed me as much as I would have liked. The abundance of backstory seemed to have quite a few areas of telling instead of showing that didn’t feel smooth to me, but overall it was a very interesting book. I reenact this time period, so I loved all the history. It wasn't the romance novel as I was expecting, but I am a hopeless romantic so that’s just The 18th century is one of my favorite time periods so this book caught my interest as soon as I read the description. I can’t say the beginning grabbed me as much as I would have liked. The abundance of backstory seemed to have quite a few areas of telling instead of showing that didn’t feel smooth to me, but overall it was a very interesting book. I reenact this time period, so I loved all the history. It wasn't the romance novel as I was expecting, but I am a hopeless romantic so that’s just my preference. If you like fiction that really immerses you in history, then I definitely recommend Between Two Shores.
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  • Paula Shreckhise
    January 1, 1970
    Between Two Shores by Jocelyn Green is an epic tale set in Montreal, Quebec in 1759. It tells of Catherine Duval a half Mohawk, half French daughter of a trapper, Gabriel Duval. Other players include Catherine’s sister, Bright Star; brother, Joseph and two ransomed captives, Thankful and Samuel and several antagonists. It depicts the fighting between the French and British. It is not a story for the faint of heart. It tells of Catherine caught between two worlds and vividly describes the hardshi Between Two Shores by Jocelyn Green is an epic tale set in Montreal, Quebec in 1759. It tells of Catherine Duval a half Mohawk, half French daughter of a trapper, Gabriel Duval. Other players include Catherine’s sister, Bright Star; brother, Joseph and two ransomed captives, Thankful and Samuel and several antagonists. It depicts the fighting between the French and British. It is not a story for the faint of heart. It tells of Catherine caught between two worlds and vividly describes the hardships of war. Catherine has conflicting emotions ever since she left her half brother and sister to go live with her father at his trading post. Will aiding one side or the other help put an end to the war? Jocelyn Green brings to life the struggle of diverse characters during the French and Indian War. The research is impeccable, revealing such customs as Indians capturing English as substitutes for relatives who had died and how such captives were ransomed. This illustrates the spiritual truth that Jesus has ransomed all of us. I was especially touched by the waterfall scene near the end with Catherine, Bright Star and Thankful. It paralleled baptism and washing away hurts granting forgiveness. With Ms. Green’s beautiful descriptions and exemplary prose, it was easy to get caught up in the story. It seemed very real. The deep spiritual lessons permeated the book. I could feel Catherine’s inner turmoil as she tried to please her father and put aside her own wants and needs for the good of others in many situations. The story showed the hardships and sacrifices of the times. You could see how the characters matured both in their walk with God and their interaction with those close to them. I recommend this book for those who love Historical Christian Fiction and appreciate exceptional writing. *I was given a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher on behalf of the author. I was not required to give a favorable review. All opinions are my own. *
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  • Shantelle
    January 1, 1970
    Between Two Shores was a very unexpected but very beautifully-crafted story. Set during the 1750s, it follows the life of Catherine Duval ... daughter of a Frenchman and Mohawk woman. After losing her mother, Catherine leaves the Mohawk village to join her father in his trading business. And life is anything but easy as she struggles to find her true identity. Though this book had some shocking twists and turns that I'm not sure I was ready for, Jocelyn Green is quickly becoming one of my newest Between Two Shores was a very unexpected but very beautifully-crafted story. Set during the 1750s, it follows the life of Catherine Duval ... daughter of a Frenchman and Mohawk woman. After losing her mother, Catherine leaves the Mohawk village to join her father in his trading business. And life is anything but easy as she struggles to find her true identity. Though this book had some shocking twists and turns that I'm not sure I was ready for, Jocelyn Green is quickly becoming one of my newest favorite authors!I love the historical depth and authenticity of Jocelyn Green's books. Exploring 1700s Montreal, the French and Indian War, and native American tribes was fascinating, if not heartbreaking. There was lots of adventure and emotion. Catherine and all the other characters were wonderful. Untangling the lives and emotions of Catherine Stands-Apart, her brother and sister - Joseph and Bright Star, Samuel, Thankful, and all the others was a worthwhile journey. Oh, how dear many of them became to me!The unexpected twist ... still not exactly sure how I feel about how that played out. But I appreciate Jocelyn Green spotlighting themes of singleness, healing from heartbreak, godly friendship, and finding one's identity in Christ! Truly powerful.To fall in love, and have your heart denied, is a very damaging thing. My heart aches for certain characters. But thank the Lord, there is healing even from tragic events. And this book showed that. Even though some of the characters could have possibly made different - better - choices, there was healing, hope, honor, and forgiveness. Which is quite beautiful.So yes. Different, but good. There were at least two powerful scenes that squeezed my heart and brought out all the emotion. I applaud Jocelyn Green for penning a tale that isn't what we expected (or perhaps initially hoped). *bittersweet smile*I received a copy of Between Two Shores from Bethany House Publishers, and this is my honest opinion.
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  • Naomi Musch
    January 1, 1970
    Set in my very favorite time period, I was anxious to read Jocelyn Green's Between Two Shores. The story of a Metis girl and her fictional role in the very real fall of Quebec during the French and Indian War was heart-rending in the way good historical fiction can be. Green's attention to historical detail is vividly portrayed through the lives of Catherine Stands-Apart, her family, and the redeemed captives she deeply cares for. There are surprises in the story, and redemption reaches into sev Set in my very favorite time period, I was anxious to read Jocelyn Green's Between Two Shores. The story of a Metis girl and her fictional role in the very real fall of Quebec during the French and Indian War was heart-rending in the way good historical fiction can be. Green's attention to historical detail is vividly portrayed through the lives of Catherine Stands-Apart, her family, and the redeemed captives she deeply cares for. There are surprises in the story, and redemption reaches into several characters lives in deeper ways than they anticipate. I should note that as the story wove on, I saw an ending coming I hadn't anticipated at the beginning, and I was very satisfied with the way it concluded.
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  • Jennifer K
    January 1, 1970
    I was blown away by this powerful story with poignant pictures of the meaning of family and belonging. I was encouraged as characters who endured suffering and deep hurts were able to experience forgiveness and restoration in ways they had not expected. I appreciated that the female characters are portrayed as strong women who discover and fulfill their purpose. In a time when it was difficult to know who to trust, these women had to take risks and live with their decisions. Green’s writing is r I was blown away by this powerful story with poignant pictures of the meaning of family and belonging. I was encouraged as characters who endured suffering and deep hurts were able to experience forgiveness and restoration in ways they had not expected. I appreciated that the female characters are portrayed as strong women who discover and fulfill their purpose. In a time when it was difficult to know who to trust, these women had to take risks and live with their decisions. Green’s writing is rich with history and the threat of danger during the Seven Years’ War kept me turning pages. I vote for a sequel. I was given a copy of this book by the publisher. All opinions are mine.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I've had a book hangover for several days since finishing this. The story is gripping and the characters stay with you. Jocelyn Green has written another fabulous book. Rich is history, full of memorable characters, this is a must-read. I received a copy from Bethany House Publishers. All opinions are my own.
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  • Clara
    January 1, 1970
    There’s a solemn tone throughout this book as we go back and forth in time and slowly unveiling the divide in which Catherine Stands-Alone lives.She might believe she lives in neutrality, but deep down she knows that’s impossible. Will she do what she must or will she continue as she is, only to eventually truly find herself alone?I want to come back and write some more, but first I must wrap my head around this story.I agree this might be Jocelyn Green’s best so far. After reading such a book I There’s a solemn tone throughout this book as we go back and forth in time and slowly unveiling the divide in which Catherine Stands-Alone lives.She might believe she lives in neutrality, but deep down she knows that’s impossible. Will she do what she must or will she continue as she is, only to eventually truly find herself alone?I want to come back and write some more, but first I must wrap my head around this story.I agree this might be Jocelyn Green’s best so far. After reading such a book I can only commend the author and thank her for writing it. Well done!*I received a review copy from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • MJSH
    January 1, 1970
    "There are many kinds of hurt. What you're describing now is the hurt of healing. when the body knits itself back together, it's a kind of magic no surgeon can reproduce. But there is pain in the process. It will pass. Healing comes with a price, and I'm afraid the price is pain. Beyond that, however, is wholeness."Oh, this book. Such a masterful storytelling of the heartbreak, suffering, and poignant ache of loss during war. And yet, there is much tenderness as the story unfolds to reveal matur "There are many kinds of hurt. What you're describing now is the hurt of healing. when the body knits itself back together, it's a kind of magic no surgeon can reproduce. But there is pain in the process. It will pass. Healing comes with a price, and I'm afraid the price is pain. Beyond that, however, is wholeness."Oh, this book. Such a masterful storytelling of the heartbreak, suffering, and poignant ache of loss during war. And yet, there is much tenderness as the story unfolds to reveal maturation of faith and outlook on life and focuses on the strength in love and forgiveness. Jocelyn Green brings the latter part of the Seven Year War between France and Britain to life with great historical detail and the research that went into creating this story is quite impressive. As expected from the author, the writing is exquisite, the plot and flow of the narrative are flawless, the integration of faith into the story line is seamless, and the characters are unforgettable even long after the last page has been read. Catherine Stands Apart, the heroine, is half Mohawk and half French. She's a strong, independent, loyal, intelligent, skilled, and compassionate woman who tries to bridge the gap between the Mohawk and French cultures. Samuel is someone whom Catherine loved a long time ago when he was an indentured servant in her father's employ. He becomes a British prisoner of war and becomes indentured again to Catherine's father when he begs Catherine to help him get intel to his British army to try to end the war. Samuel, despite his past mistakes and failings, is faithful, loyal, and true to himself. Even though the reunion is difficult emotionally and demands more than Catherine thinks she can sacrifice, Catherine does what she believes is the right thing and becomes a woman she didn't think she could be at the end of the journey.From the title to the epilogue, the beauty and soul lessons found in the pages of this book will grip your heart and not let go. I received a copy of the book from Bethany House and was under no obligation to post a favorable review. All comments and opinions are solely my own.
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  • Hannah Corner
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved this book! The story was rich in history, full of adventure, and also grabbed my emotions throughout. The importance of family is emphasized as well as doing what is right no matter the cost. The story line and the ending were deliciously unpredictable and kept me turning pages to see what lay ahead. I felt like I was there canoeing down the river and shopping at the trading post...the story came alive! Another wonderful story from Jocelyn Green that you won't be able to put down.
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    With Between Two Shores Jocelyn Green once again revisits the French colonial experience, this time focusing on the North American epicenter of the British and French Seven Years' War, the fight for control of Quebec. This novel put me immediately in mind of another classic that made legend of the cultural and political ramifications of this time period, James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans. Here Green delves into questions of culture, identity, and belonging through the half Mohican With Between Two Shores Jocelyn Green once again revisits the French colonial experience, this time focusing on the North American epicenter of the British and French Seven Years' War, the fight for control of Quebec. This novel put me immediately in mind of another classic that made legend of the cultural and political ramifications of this time period, James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans. Here Green delves into questions of culture, identity, and belonging through the half Mohican/half French character of Catherine, a woman caught between two warring worlds, struggling to come to terms with who she is and who she wants to be. Personally, I preferred Green's previous release, A Refuge Assured. Similarly to that novel, Green does not shy away from tackling tough questions that might otherwise be glossed over in similarly positioned novels within this industry. Here she addresses issues of divorce, physical and emotional abuse, and issues of race, the latter two especially timely to see portrayed in an unflinchingly honest and compassionate manner within a historical framework. Humanity's penchant for sin is as timeless as the redemptive thread woven throughout Catherine's journey. Against a stark backdrop of deprivation and conflict, Green's skillful hand guides Catherine through the warring factions within her heart to the realization that with her identity grounded in faith, her heart's desire for belonging and acceptance has always been within her reach.While I love what Green did with this story, it is not a romance in the modern sense of the word, and that is what I craved -- and frankly expected -- after the delicious frisson of Vivienne and Liam's romance in A Refuge Assured. But that very personal preference aside, I deeply appreciate what Green did here in making this a story about a woman in a very male-dominated society coming into her own as an individual and a businesswoman. Stories such as Catherine's are critical, because while I adore reading a well-penned romance, her story is a powerful reminder of the importance of individual emotional health and wholeness, completion found only and without reserve in a relationship with one's creator.
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