Binti
Includes a brand-new Binti story!Collected for the first time in an omnibus edition, the Hugo- and Nebula-award-winning Binti trilogy, the story of one extraordinary girl's journey from her home to distant Oomza University.In her Hugo- and Nebula-winning novella, Nnedi Okorafor introduced us to Binti, a young Himba girl with the chance of a lifetime: to attend the prestigious Oomza University. Despite her family's concerns, Binti's talent for mathematics and her aptitude with astrolabes make her a prime candidate to undertake this interstellar journey.But everything changes when the jellyfish-like Medusae attack Binti's spaceship, leaving her the only survivor. Now, Binti must fend for herself, alone on a ship full of the beings who murdered her crew, with five days until she reaches her destination.There is more to the history of the Medusae--and their war with the Khoush--than first meets the eye. If Binti is to survive this voyage and save the inhabitants of the unsuspecting planet that houses Oomza Uni, it will take all of her knowledge and talents to broker the peace.Collected now for the first time in omnibus form, follow Binti's story in this groundbreaking sci-fi trilogy.

Binti Details

TitleBinti
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherDAW
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fantasy, Fiction, Young Adult

Binti Review

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars for this collection of the three Binti novellas, plus a new short story! Review first posted on Fantasy Literature (along with several other reviews from my co-reviewers there; we have a whole range of opinions on the BINTI stories):As Binti, a mathematically brilliant, 16 year old member of the African Himba tribe, sneaks away from her home in the dead of night, I felt almost as much anticipation as Binti herself. Binti has decided, against massive family pressure, to accept a full-ri 3.5 stars for this collection of the three Binti novellas, plus a new short story! Review first posted on Fantasy Literature (along with several other reviews from my co-reviewers there; we have a whole range of opinions on the BINTI stories):As Binti, a mathematically brilliant, 16 year old member of the African Himba tribe, sneaks away from her home in the dead of night, I felt almost as much anticipation as Binti herself. Binti has decided, against massive family pressure, to accept a full-ride scholarship to the renowned Oomza University on a planet named ― wait for it ― Oomza Uni. (Perhaps the university sprawls across the entire planet? Certainly it covers several cities many miles apart.) Himba tribe members are technically advanced but socially isolated from other people, and Binti’s breaking away from her tribe evidences her courage, but leaves her isolated, an outsider.On the spaceship, Binti has found several like-minded friends among the students traveling to Oomza Uni (and even a new crush) when disaster strikes in the form of a proud, militant alien race, the large jellyfish-shaped Meduse. The Meduse massacre all of the humans on the ship except the pilot, who is necessary to their plans, and Binti, who is not, but who is mysteriously protected against attack by her edan, an ancient metal artifact that she carries with her. Binti is forced to deal with the aftermath of this catastrophe and the constant threat of death from the Meduse who are lurking outside her room. As she searches for a way to not just survive but to resolve her deep anger and distress, Binti herself grows and changes as a result.This theme of personal growth and change continues through the second and third novellas in this collection, Home and The Night Masquerade, as well as the new short story, “Binti: Sacred Fire.” In “Sacred Fire,” Binti is dealing with the emotional aftermath of the massacre that she experienced first-hand on the spaceship, and is experiencing rage incidents and trouble developing relationships with others. She takes on an impromptu personal retreat to the desert, searching for inner peace and understanding, and finds new friendships in the process.Binti: Home follows Binti as she leaves the university for a period to return to her home on Earth, with her Meduse friend Okwu accompanying her. Trouble awaits them there, not just from Binti’s choice to attend Oomza University rather than accept the role her family intended for her, but from Okwu’s presence. The Meduse have a long history of war with the Khoush people, and though there is currently a tentative peace treaty, Okwu’s being in their territory has inflamed emotions. Meanwhile, Binti is also having issues with her ongoing PTSD and with new revelations about her life and ancestry.At the beginning of Binti: The Night Masquerade, Binti has just found out that her family and home are under attack and is rushing home to her family and tribe as fast as possible. The Night Masquerade deals with what she finds when she gets home, and the fall-out from all of the problems that have been building up. It’s up to Binti, with the help of her friends (including the obligatory new love interest), to try to prevent an all-out war between the Khoush and the Meduse.The first novella, Binti, won both the Hugo and the Nebula awards, I believe largely on the strength of its highly unusual minority main character (who, to be fair, is a great YA heroine) and its incorporation of current social issues. Binti is amazing and complex, with mixed motivations and emotions that she doesn’t always understand. She felt real to me, though her continual emotional outbursts and PTSD did get tiresome to read about after a while. But it was delightful learning more about her tribe’s culture, including the Himba women’s practice of covering their skin and hair with otjize, a red clay mixture ― a practice Binti follows with dedication, even when she is lightyears away from her home.At the same time, Okorafor takes on multiple social issues like cultural insensitivity, finding connections with those who are different, and standing up for yourself against social pressure. The Himba are looked down on by the Khoush, the Arab (per Okorafor) people who are the majority, and the Himba in turn look down on the Desert People, or Zinariya, who are actually far more advanced than anyone outside of their tribe realizes. Binti’s best human friend at Oomza Uni is Haifa, a Khoush girl who was born physically male and transitioned to female at age thirteen.Binti also contains some intriguing science fictional concepts and devices, like the astrolabe, a multi-functional mobile device, and the living spaceships, which are closely related to shrimp and can give birth to new spaceships. It’s also got a little of the “Africa power” vibe of Black Panther ― high technology hidden from the view of outsiders ― which I enjoyed. There are the bones of some good world-building here.But, other than the unusual minority heroine and the Africa setting, the BINTI trilogy struck me as a fairly standard YA fantasy/SF novel, with many of the typical tropes. There’s the special snowflake main character who saves a world (at least part of it) despite her youth, a love interest or two, the patriarchal establishment that the main character fights against, and more.The science fiction plot is serviceable but has several rather noticeable plot holes in it. Some examples (warning: spoilers for the first novella are in this paragraph): Binti’s edan device mysteriously poisons the Meduse, thus saving her life … and then Binti’s otjize, a mixture of clay and plant oils, just as magically heals the Meduse’s wounds and scars. No good reason is ever given for either of these key plot devices. The Meduse keep the spaceship pilot alive so that he can get them through security and land the ship on Oomza Uni, but any ship pilot worth his or her salt would refuse to cooperate, perhaps even suicide or crash the ship, to avoid a worse massacre on the planet. Forgiveness for the Meduse’s terrorist murders of hundreds of innocent people on the spaceship is quickly given, with no lasting repercussions, because … their rage was justified by a thoughtless insult given the Meduse chief, a failure to respect his culture. Really? And in The Night Masquerade, two separate, deeply emotional crises occur … and then the punches are pulled, in both cases in rather far-fetched ways. Some additional foundation-setting or foreshadowing might have helped with my ability to accept these events.Perhaps Okorafor’s focus on Binti’s internal growth and turmoil and on social issues led her to not think through the logic of the plot as carefully as she might have. Still, for me the delightfully unique heroine and her culture and story of personal growth more than make up for the plot’s weaknesses. Just don’t think about the plot too hard.I received a free copy from the publisher for review. Thank you so much!Initial post: The publishing gods love me!! I requested this on NetGalley and got a hardcover in the mail today!💕
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  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    #1 Binti ★★★★★#2 Home ★★★★☆#3 The Night Masquerade ★★★☆☆#1-3 Complete Trilogy Edition ★★★★☆They say that when faced with a fight you cannot win, you can never predict what you will do next. But I'd always known I'd fight until I was killed.I've been meaning to pick up these novellas for ages, so I was really excited to get the opportunity to review the entire trilogy now that it's been released in a bind-up. This is a series that starts off really strong—enough so that I'd say the first book, Bi #1 Binti ★★★★★#2 Home ★★★★☆#3 The Night Masquerade ★★★☆☆#1-3 Complete Trilogy Edition ★★★★☆They say that when faced with a fight you cannot win, you can never predict what you will do next. But I'd always known I'd fight until I was killed.I've been meaning to pick up these novellas for ages, so I was really excited to get the opportunity to review the entire trilogy now that it's been released in a bind-up. This is a series that starts off really strong—enough so that I'd say the first book, Binti, is one of the most enjoyable novellas I've ever read, as well as one of my favorite adult sci-fi reads ever.While the first novella lacks a bit in world-building, it more than makes up for that absence with character development. I loved Binti as a character and really treasured her thirst for knowledge and her bravery despite all of the immense obstacles trying to hold her back from her future. Okwu, on the other hand, I had mixed feelings about at first, but quickly came to treasure as a character despite the rocky nature of their meeting. There was always so much I didn’t know, but not knowing was part of it all. The thing about this series is that it can almost be hard to know who you want to root for, because everyone is flawed and history is muddled—which I found incredibly true-to-life for many circumstances, especially considering histories of wars and feds, so I appreciated that there were no "perfect" groups or characters in the equation.Unfortunately, I'll admit that the series did become less enjoyable for me as time went on. The second novella, Home, was still a very fun read, but it became tougher for me to reason with the lack of world-building and the random info dumps; on the other hand, though, The Night Masquerade went too far in the opposite direction and gave me too much information and history with too little action and character development. Even back then I had changed things, and I didn’t even know it. When I should have reveled in this gift, instead, I’d seen myself as broken. But couldn’t you be broken and still bring change? Minor complaints aside, I wholeheartedly recommend this series. It's an incredibly quick trilogy to get through, there's a gorgeous portrayal of culture and how significant cultural history and rituals can be to people—especially to individuals who have a history of being oppressed, like Binti's people, the Himba—and, if you're a fan of audiobooks, I strongly recommend Robin Miles' delivery of these stories.Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!
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  • MadameMelli
    January 1, 1970
    An vielen Stellen zeigt sich, was für großartige Ideen die Autorin hat. Jedoch war der Schreibstil oft holprig und es gab auch Dinge, die zu wenig konsistent waren und mir auffielen.Die Entwicklungen waren oft auf eine positive Art wild. Mein Kommentar dazu heute war: Sie schreibt ein wenig so, wie die Melvins Musik machen. Und das ist definitiv nichts schlechtes ;)
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  • wanderer (Para)
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received from the publisher (DAW) on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I enjoyed this series of novellas immensely. I've had Binti on my TBR since 2016 and in a way, I'm glad I waited until now - even though this is my first read, they work far, far better as one book. “I have to try and make it better,” I said. “I can’t just leave here.” Binti, a mathemagical genius and a master harmonizer, is the first of the Himba people to  be invited to attend the prestigious Oomza Uni. Her fam ARC received from the publisher (DAW) on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I enjoyed this series of novellas immensely. I've had Binti on my TBR since 2016 and in a way, I'm glad I waited until now - even though this is my first read, they work far, far better as one book. “I have to try and make it better,” I said. “I can’t just leave here.” Binti, a mathemagical genius and a master harmonizer, is the first of the Himba people to  be invited to attend the prestigious Oomza Uni. Her family disapproves - her skills are valuable and her people do not leave their land but focus on developing technology where they are - so she leaves in secret. But on the ship, a tragedy strikes, and she is forced into the role of a diplomat, both to save herself and prevent an interspecies war. The next two books are focused on the consequences of her decisions and her eventual return home, and the extra short story in this edition, focused on her daily life at the Oomza Uni and making friends bridges the gap between books #1 and #2 wonderfully.What I liked the best are the setting and the themes. It deals quite heavily with identity and culture - they provide a major source of conflict. Binti might go against her society's norms quite often, but she is still proudly Himba, never without otjize, the scented clay the women use. She has to deal with other people's prejudices towards her and confront her own. The worldbuilding approach is deep instead of wide, a consequence of the original novella length, so while the world does seem small in places (there are only about 3-4 Earth cultures mentioned), what's there seems fairly well thought out. After the events of the first story, Binti also ends up with a case of PTSD, with which she struggles throughout the whole series - and again, I appreciate writers who don't make the characters shrug off trauma after maybe one scene of them dealing with it because it's inconvenient.If there is a thing that might annoy some people, it's that the protagonist starts off as fairly special and gets more so as the story goes on - additional powers, hidden lineage, the works. It didn't bother me much, but it's a dealbreaker I see mentioned quite often.Enjoyment: 4/5Execution: 4/5Recommended to: fans of science fantasy, those looking for books with themes of culture and culture clashNot recommended to: those annoyed by superspecial protagonistsMore reviews on my blog, To Other Worlds.
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  • Callibso
    January 1, 1970
    Die drei Erzählungen um Binti sind in diesem Buch zusammengefasst und sie lassen sich gut wie einen durchgehenden Roman lesen, die dritte Erzählung schließt z.B. nahtlos an die zweite an.Die erste Erzählung, die auch den Hugo Award gewonnen hat, hatte ich schon auf Englisch gelesen (s. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...)Binti von den Himba wird auserwählt zur besten Universität der Galaxis zu kommen. Die erste Geschichte erzählt ihre heimliche Reise dorthin. Sie ist von zu Hause ausgerisse Die drei Erzählungen um Binti sind in diesem Buch zusammengefasst und sie lassen sich gut wie einen durchgehenden Roman lesen, die dritte Erzählung schließt z.B. nahtlos an die zweite an.Die erste Erzählung, die auch den Hugo Award gewonnen hat, hatte ich schon auf Englisch gelesen (s. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...)Binti von den Himba wird auserwählt zur besten Universität der Galaxis zu kommen. Die erste Geschichte erzählt ihre heimliche Reise dorthin. Sie ist von zu Hause ausgerissen und muss einen brutalen Überfall der Medusen auf das Schiff erleben und mit ihren Fähigkeiten einen Krieg verhindern.In der zweiten und dritten Erzählung lernen wir zuerst die Universität kennen. Dann kehrt Binti mit ihrem Freund, einem Vertreter der Medusen, zu ihrer Familie zurück. Dies geht gründlich schief: ihr Volk nimmt ihr übel, dass sie heimlich gegangen war und der Stamm der Koush erträgt ihren Medusenfreund nicht und beginnt einen Krieg. Binti muss ihre Familie retten und in die Wüste fliehen, wo sie mit ihren eigenen Vorurteilen konfrontiert wird und Neues über ein scheinbar bekanntes Volk erfährt.Binti ist verwurzelt in ihrer Tradition, aber auch immer Neuem aufgeschlossen. Um sie herum gibt es viele bornierte Wesen, die andere aufgrund des Anderssein verachten. Es sind Geschichten um Traditionen, in denen man nicht erstarren soll, Wurzeln, die keine Fesseln sein sollen und Vorurteile, die uns den Blick verschleiern.Irgendwann mutet Okorafor ihrer Protagonistin etwas zuviel zu: in jeder Erzählung wird Binti zusätzlich Mitglied eines weiteren Volkes, nimmt DNA und Eigenschaften dieses Volkes an. In der ersten Erzählung sind dies die Medusen, dann die Enyi Zinariya und zum Abschluss noch lebende Raumschiffe, zu denen leider zu wenig erklärt wird.Ich bin ein Fan von Nnedi Okorafor, sie schafft es immer wieder, einen Sog zu erzeugen, der mich mitreißt und fasziniert. Ihre Science-Fiction ist keine Hard SF, die Welten haben ihre eigene afrikanisch beeinflusste Mythologie. Allerdings empfand ich - als Mathematiker - Bintis Mathematik in diesem Buch sehr befremdlich: das ist alles rein intuitiv, sie "'verästelt" und "harmonisiert" und murmelt dann Gleichungen. Dies hat meine Toleranz schon ziemlich strapaziert. Ähnlich ist es mit dem Astrolabium, das sie benutzt und auch selbst gebaut hat: dies ist mitnichten das gleichnamige alte astronomische Messinstrument, sondern... ja was eigentlich?Eine Art Smartphone zur Kommunikation auf der man auch sein ganzes Leben speichert.Dennoch haben mir die Geschichten um Binti Spass gemacht, mein Favorit von Okorafor bleibt aber "Wer fürchtet den Tod".Noch eine abschließende Bemerkung: die Cross Cult Bücher sind ja nicht gerade billig, dafür erwarte ich eigentlich besseres Papier als dieses Buch hat.
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  • Mara
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars - I have heard an immense amount of hype about BINTI and the subsequent novellas from Nnedi Okorafor, so I was excited to be able to give this bindup of the stories a try. These get full marks from me on investment in characters, world building, and set up/premise. Alas, I do feel that there's something lacking in the execution of the vision here. The first of the novellas is definitely the strongest, but even it has some pacing issues & deus ex machina elements. That being said, I 3.5 Stars - I have heard an immense amount of hype about BINTI and the subsequent novellas from Nnedi Okorafor, so I was excited to be able to give this bindup of the stories a try. These get full marks from me on investment in characters, world building, and set up/premise. Alas, I do feel that there's something lacking in the execution of the vision here. The first of the novellas is definitely the strongest, but even it has some pacing issues & deus ex machina elements. That being said, I just LIKED being in this world enough that it made up for some of the sins. All in all, not as amazing as I had been sold on, but I'm still glad to have read the series, and let's be real... after AKATA WITCH, I'm sold on Okorafor as a great storyteller who I want to spend a lot more time with.
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  • Whitney
    January 1, 1970
    This is an author that I discovered from the Lavar Burton Reads podcast. I really enjoyed the cultural aspects of this series as well as the main character. The world building in this novel is really creative. The first two novellas are zippy reads but could use a little more character and plot development. The third novella was a little less gripping and more winding for me, but it had a satisfying ending.
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  • Asheley
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/4Binti: The Complete Trilogy by Nnedi Okorafor is the entire collection of Binti novellas plus a brand-new story in one hardcover edition, and the book is beautiful! This is a collection of Afrofuturistic stories that has been on my radar since the first story has come out; I remember seeing the original cover for the first Binti and being interested in it but not picking it up at the time. I actually made the decision that I’d read the novellas when they were all published, so I was delight 3.5/4Binti: The Complete Trilogy by Nnedi Okorafor is the entire collection of Binti novellas plus a brand-new story in one hardcover edition, and the book is beautiful! This is a collection of Afrofuturistic stories that has been on my radar since the first story has come out; I remember seeing the original cover for the first Binti and being interested in it but not picking it up at the time. I actually made the decision that I’d read the novellas when they were all published, so I was delighted to see that they would be published together in one book, and I was even more delighted that I would have the opportunity to read and review it for the publisher. The decision to read these stories back-to-back-to-back was the right one for me.Binti is a very smart young woman from a small, insular African village who has her life basically mapped out for her due to the customs of her people. Unbeknownst to her parents, she has been accepted to Oozma University with high marks and the equivalent of a full scholarship, and she very much wants to go. Going would mean being ostracized or banished by her people and possibly even her own family, who really don’t seem to support nor understand women in academics or higher learning. Staying home and getting married is her other option and the ultimate in settling; this is not at all what Binti wants. Binti chooses to go to University, sneaking away and risking everything. While being transported to University, the unthinkable happens: her ship is attacked by beings of another culture and everyone is massacred except for her. She is the only one left alive, but she is…changed. Binti ends up caught between several groups of people, an unwilling spokesperson for them all. This trilogy is the story of how she tries to bring peace not only to these different groups of people, but also to her family after she has left them, and to herself for the decisions that she has made.The strengths of these stories are many, the biggest of these being Binti herself and the world-building. The world is very well done, especially considering that these are all stories that are on the shorter side. The language is lush and descriptive, and I feel like it was pretty easy to lay these scenes out in my head whether the setting was Binti’s village, outer space, or Oozma University. Binti herself is incredible as a character. She becomes increasingly complex as the series continues as she learns that she can do new things and she continues to change as the story arc moves. Her culture is so rich and vital to her, so she carries it with her from place to place; I love this so much. I loved every part of the African culture that was put into this story and I see what the author did here.What I love most about Binti is that she is true to what she is feeling. If she feels unsure about herself or a decision that she has to make, the readers know it. If she feels sad or embarrassed, we know it. If she feels cautious or if she feels her own strength, we know that too. Binti isn’t automatically this warrior-type character just because she is the lead in the story, and I appreciate that so much. We get the whole person, with all of her vulnerabilities and flaws and strengths, and they’re very well done. I am reminded of a scene in the first novella when Binti has come into a crowded area in a larger city, and she overhears people talking down about her because of how she is dressed and because of what she is wearing on her skin and hair. In those scenes, I learned so much about Binti and how vulnerable yet strong she is. (I also want to mention that the supporting cast is just great.)The thing that I felt was a weakness for me may not be a problem for other readers: it’s the math part of the story, which played very heavily throughout. I’ve already mentioned that Binti is very smart, which I love; in particular, she excels in mathematics. But I think the mathematical parts of the story brought me totally out of the narrative every time equations were mentioned, and also every time treeing was mentioned. Which was a lot. I had four novellas to get used to it and try to find my place with the math, and I could not. It just never happened for me.More than anything, I love Binti’s journey into discovering who she really is and being comfortable with that, comfortable enough to be honest with her family and her village, and comfortable enough to be honest with herself about what she wants from life. So I guess this is sort of a coming-of-age tale wrapped up in science fiction. I think that if the stories were longer, they would be slightly more developed because there would be more room for detail and fleshing out characters and scenes that I felt were a little rushed or disjointed. To me, the newest story (Sacred Fire) is the best out of all of them. Just so, so good. And at the moment, it looks like it is only available in this omnibus, but perhaps that will change with a little bit of time.I recommend this one strongly if you’re a fan of Afrofuturistic stories or just science fiction novellas in general. Binti is a fun character and the world and characterization in these stories is definitively worth experiencing.I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Thank you, Daw Books!Find this review and more like it on my blog, Into the Hall of Books!
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  • reherrma
    January 1, 1970
    Seit dem Roman "Wer fürchtet den Tod" bin ich ein Fan der SF von Nnedi Okorafor, auch die Romane Das "Buch des Phönix" und "Lagune" haben mir gefallen. Diese Geschichte aber, hat mir von ihrem Werk, das ich bisher kenne, am wenigsten gefallen. Ihre Geschichten entstammen einer, für europäische Leser, ungewöhnlichen Science-Fiction-Tradition, die ein schillerndes, oft beinahe magisches Universum der Zukunft beschreiben, mit außergewöhnlichen Aliens, vielen Momenten, die zum Staunen einladen, und Seit dem Roman "Wer fürchtet den Tod" bin ich ein Fan der SF von Nnedi Okorafor, auch die Romane Das "Buch des Phönix" und "Lagune" haben mir gefallen. Diese Geschichte aber, hat mir von ihrem Werk, das ich bisher kenne, am wenigsten gefallen. Ihre Geschichten entstammen einer, für europäische Leser, ungewöhnlichen Science-Fiction-Tradition, die ein schillerndes, oft beinahe magisches Universum der Zukunft beschreiben, mit außergewöhnlichen Aliens, vielen Momenten, die zum Staunen einladen, und einer Heldin, die zwischen Welten, die nicht verschiedener sein könnten, auf der Suche nach sich selbst und ihrem Zuhause ist."Binti" ist eigentlich eine Novellensammlung, die, auch vom amerikanischen Verlag und von CrossCult zuerst als eBooks veröffentlicht wurde, dies ist der Sammelband der drei zusammenhängenden Binti-Novellen.Binti, Himba von der Erde, ist eine außergewöhnliche Protagonistin, die sich einerseits zutiefst in der Kultur der Himba verwurzelt fühlt, aber auch nicht widerstehen kann, als sie die Zulassung für die Oomza-Universität bekommt. Sie riskiert es, zur Außenseiterin zu werden, die mit allen Traditionen ihres Volkes bricht, um auf einem lebendigen Raumschiff (Raumschiffe sind in der Science-Fiction-Welt, die Nnedi Okorafor für die Binti-Novellen erschafft, genetisch manipulierte, intelligente Meerestiere, die reiselustig sind und in mit Pflanzen gefüllten Kammern in ihrem Inneren Menschen und andere Aliens von Planet zu Planet befördern) zu der Universität zu reisen.Auf dem Weg zur Universität wird ihr Raumschiff von Medusen überfallen und sie wird zur Zeugin eines Massakers und erweist sich als die einzige Person, die Schlimmeres verhindern kann. In den nächsten Monaten wird sie zur Friedensstifterin, und die Eigenschaften und Ideen anderer Spezies und Kulturen werden wortwörtlich ein Teil von ihr...Damit beginnt die erste von drei Novellen, in denen wir Bintis Reisen und Erlebnisse sowie ihre Suche nach Identität begleiten...Während die erste Novelle noch spannend ist, wobei vieles noch offen bleibt, so sind die beiden nächsten Teile merkwürdig unispiriert, sie haben keinen echten Spannungsbogen und plätschern m.E. so vor sich hin. Auch nervt mich nach einiger Zeit die esoterischen Momente bei der Beschreibung der Himba-Kultur, die, nach Lektüre des Buches, sowieso das Beste ist, was die Erde jemals hervorgebracht hat...Irgendwie hat mich Nnedi mit diesem Buch nicht gepackt...
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Binti: The Complete Trilogy is a bind up containing all three novellas (Binti, Home and The Night Masquerade) in Nnedi Okorafor's award winning Binti trilogy plus an extra short story called Sacred Fire. I'll review each of the stories separately but I've really enjoyed the whole series so it's definitely one I'm happy to recommend! Binti: Binti is a member of the Himba tribe, a group of people who live in a dessert region of their planet and who have a strong connection to each other and their Binti: The Complete Trilogy is a bind up containing all three novellas (Binti, Home and The Night Masquerade) in Nnedi Okorafor's award winning Binti trilogy plus an extra short story called Sacred Fire. I'll review each of the stories separately but I've really enjoyed the whole series so it's definitely one I'm happy to recommend! Binti: Binti is a member of the Himba tribe, a group of people who live in a dessert region of their planet and who have a strong connection to each other and their home. She is the first member of the tribe to be offered a place at the galaxy famous Oomza University, somewhere only the very best of the best are invited to study. It goes against all traditions for Binti to leave her homeland and it's something her family would never allow so she has to sneak off in the middle of the night to catch the spaceship on time. When the ship comes under attack by a jellyfish like alien species Binti is the only one on board who has a chance to communicate with the Meduse and try to broker peace before they arrive at the university.I thought this story was a great introduction to the series although I really would have loved for it to be longer! I loved Binit's character, she's smart and resourceful but also nervous as she leaves her homeland for the first time and you could feel her bewilderment as she first arrived in a big city which was completely alien to her. The story shows all to well how much prejudice humans can feel towards people who are a little bit different to themselves but I liked the way Binti handled that and was glad to see her start to make friends with the other students on board the ship.Where it fell down a little for me was after the Meduse came on board and slaughtered nearly everyone on board including Binti's new friends. I was really curious about the Meduse's anatomy & could easily picture them almost floating around the ship but it was a little hard to believe she was able to talk them out of their plans to destroy the university so quickly. I think I just needed a little bit more time to see Binti and Okwu go from enemies to allies, that would have made the turnaround feel a bit more believable and realistic.I am really curious to see where the story goes from here though and I've got very high hopes for the series as a whole. Sacred Fire: This short story is set several weeks after Binti and Okwu arrive at the Oomza University. Binti is struggling to come to terms with everything that happened on the journey and is quite obviously, and very understandably, suffering from PTSD and flashbacks. She had dreamed of attending the university but nothing is quite what she expected. She's treated as an outsider even by the other humans because they consider the Himba people to be lesser than themselves, people don't understand her culture and they also blame her for surviving the massacre on the ship when many of their friends and family members were killed.It's not all bad though, Binti is enjoying her studies and she's even starting to make a couple of friends so there is hope for her future. This was an enjoyable short and definitely left me looking forward to continuing the series. Home: Binti and Okwu have been studying at the Oomza University for a year now and it's time for Binti to return home and face her family before continuing her studies. She is considered a hero by some for preventing the meduse from attacking the university but others consider her a traitor for supposedly aligning with them against the humans. Her family haven't forgiven her for leaving them and travelling so far from home either so it's set to be a difficult reunion.I have to admit I was surprised and a little disappointed when I realised that most of this story wouldn't be set at the university because I was so interested in all the different alien creatures that attend. But then we get to travel back to Binti's homeland and find out all about her family's tribal traditions and I was so swept up in the story that I didn't have time to be upset.This isn't an easy journey for Binti, her family are resentful that she left and to be honest I kind of hated most of her siblings for the way they treated her when she returned but I loved Binti for standing up for what she wanted and being brave enough to choose her own path in life. It was hard for her to come home and realise how much she has changed while the people she left behind carried on in the same familiar paths, she no longer feels like she fits in with her family which was heartbreaking, especially since she doesn't feel much like she fits in at university either.She does find out a lot about her father's side of the family though which I absolutely loved, they are a nomad tribe who were much more open to change and much happier to welcome Binti into their circle. She had to face some difficult truths about the fact that while people are prejudiced against her and the Himba tribe, the Himba, herself included, also have their own prejudices against the nomadic dessert tribes even though they are blood relations. I felt like Binti really grew a lot emotionally in this instalment and I'm excited to see where her journey takes her next. The Night Masquerade: As much as I've enjoyed this series overall I have to admit that The Night Masquerade wasn't my favourite instalment and I was left feeling a little disappointed about the way things ended.The previous instalment ended when Binti realised that Okwu and her family were under attack and this one kicks off with her desperate journey across the desert with the help of her guide Mwinyi. Binti is unable to contact anyone she left behind but she knows something awful has happened and that the Khoush have broken the treaty so it's a race against time for her to get home in time to help the people she cares about.It's hard to go into too much detail but what Binti uncovers is a shocking betrayal that should have left her devastated. I think one of the problems I had with this story was how quickly she seemed to brush everything off and start trying to rebuild the peace between the Khoush and the Meduse. I get that she was trying to prevent her village being destroyed in an all out war between the other two groups but considering everything the Khoush had done at that point I would have expected her to be a little less invested in the peace process. I guess she's a better woman than I am though!Really my main issue with this novella was how unresolved so many things were, we get some answers but a lot of things are left open ended and this really didn't feel like the end of a series. If there was another book to come I wouldn't have been so disappointed by that but as the end of a trilogy it felt unsatisfying. Especially the way the author played with our emotions only to magically fix things moments later. I think after loving the first two stories so much I had high expectations for a grand finale and it just wasn't as epic as I hoped.
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  • Gitti
    January 1, 1970
    Binti ist ein Mädchen aus dem Stamme der Himba. Sie ist die erste Himba, die an der Oomza Universität angenommen wurde, aber Himba verlassen ihr Heimatdorf nicht. Und doch ist Binti sich sicher, dass der Weg zur Uni für sie der Richtige ist und schleicht sich heimlich davon.Damit beginnt für sie das Abenteuer ihres Lebens, das nicht nur ihr Leben, sondern das vieler verändern wird.Ich muss sagen, ich war skeptisch, ob das Buch wirklich etwas für mich ist. Ich habe es weder mit afrikanischen Auto Binti ist ein Mädchen aus dem Stamme der Himba. Sie ist die erste Himba, die an der Oomza Universität angenommen wurde, aber Himba verlassen ihr Heimatdorf nicht. Und doch ist Binti sich sicher, dass der Weg zur Uni für sie der Richtige ist und schleicht sich heimlich davon.Damit beginnt für sie das Abenteuer ihres Lebens, das nicht nur ihr Leben, sondern das vieler verändern wird.Ich muss sagen, ich war skeptisch, ob das Buch wirklich etwas für mich ist. Ich habe es weder mit afrikanischen Autoren, noch mit Preisträgern. Aber nachdem mir Children of Blood and Bone schon so gut gefallen hatte, dachte ich mir, dass das hier auch etwas für mich sein könnte.Das Buch besteht aus drei Kurzgeschichten die im Abstand von jeweils einem Jahr entstanden sind und nun erstmals als ein Buch erscheinen. Alle drei Kurzgeschichten waren vorher schon einzeln erschienen. An manchen Stellen der Geschichten merkt man, dass es eigentlich einzeln stehende Geschichten sind, da hier auf das Geschehen der Vorgänger ausführlicher Bezug genommen wird und Dinge erklärt werden, die einem klar sind, wenn man die drei Geschichten am Stück liest. Das war aber nur ganz selten der Fall und hat nicht wirklich gestört.Ich bin sehr froh, dass ich Bintis Geschichte vom Anfang bis zum jetzigen Ende am Stück verfolgen konnte. Bintis Entwicklung ist unglaublich spannend, sowie eigentlich das gesamte Setting. Der Handlungsort ist zu großen Teilen Bintis Heimat am Rande der Namib Wüste, irgendwann in unserer Zukunft. Die Oomza Universität liegt auf einem eigenen Planeten und dorthin reist Binti auf einem lebenden Raumschiff. Dort angekommen lernt sie viele weitere Spezies kennen und akzeptieren.Auch die Medusen, die auf der Erde gegen die Khoush, einem Nachbarstamm, Krieg geführt haben, lernt sie dort besser kennen und verstehen.Zurück auf der Erde kommt es dann aber wieder zu Feindseligkeiten zwischen Khoush und Medusen und Binti versucht hier zu klären. Dafür nutzt sie die ihr eigene Magie.Das Buch bietet immer wieder erstaunliche Wendungen und bleibt damit bis zu Schluss unglaublich spannend. Der Schreibstil war so bildhaft, dass ich mir die fremden Kulturen bildhaft vorstellen konnte. Ich war sozusagen sofort in meinem eigenen Film gefangen.Für mich war dieses Buch auf jeden Fall eines meiner Jahreshighlights, ich werde die Autorin sicher im Auge behalten und ihre weiteren Bücher auch noch lesen. Vielleicht gibt es ja auch noch einmal etwas über Binti und ihre Freunde. Darüber würde ich mich auf jeden Fall sehr freuen.Von mir daher eine volle und dringende Leseempfehlung!
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  • Buchdrache
    January 1, 1970
    Dieser Tage wird Science Fiction aus Afrika wie auch China immer beliebter. Eine*r der auch in westlichen Ländern immer bekannter werdenden Autor*innen ist auch Nnedi Okorafor, Autorin der Binti-Reihe, eine Reihe von Novellen, die sich um die junge Studentin Binti drehen. Man hört viel Gutes über Binti, aber auch einige durchmische Stimmen. Für mich war es leider ein Abbruch nach einem Viertel der Novellen.Um es kurz zu machen: Die Novellen haben einfach nicht für mich funktioniert. Der Schreibs Dieser Tage wird Science Fiction aus Afrika wie auch China immer beliebter. Eine*r der auch in westlichen Ländern immer bekannter werdenden Autor*innen ist auch Nnedi Okorafor, Autorin der Binti-Reihe, eine Reihe von Novellen, die sich um die junge Studentin Binti drehen. Man hört viel Gutes über Binti, aber auch einige durchmische Stimmen. Für mich war es leider ein Abbruch nach einem Viertel der Novellen.Um es kurz zu machen: Die Novellen haben einfach nicht für mich funktioniert. Der Schreibstil war mir zu unpersönlich, die Erzählung zu klinisch. Vor allem auf Binti habe ich keinen guten Blick erhalten und ich konnte sie kaum kennen lernen.Man bekommt dafür jedoch eine Menge Worldbuilding und das ist tatsächlich ein großer Pluspunkt. Die Autorin hat sich hier eine ganze Menge spannender Dinge ausgedacht und zu Papier gebracht. Man hat das Gefühl, in einer lebendigen Welt zu sein, die auch tatsächlich bevölkert ist.Leider, leider ist das allermeiste davon im Tell erzählt, nicht im Show. Es wird dem Leser also berichtet, nicht vorgeführt, sodass man als Leser keinen wirklichen Anteil an der Welt hat und mehr das Gefühl hat, einen Zeitungsartikel zu lesen, statt einer literarischen Erzählung.Somit sind zwar wirklich gute Ansätze da, ich konnte aber absolut keinen Zugang zu ihnen finden. Zudem geht es sehr viel um Mathematik, und das geht mir persönlich ja nun komplett ab.Binti ist also im Kern gut, die Umsetzung scheiterte jedoch für mich. Schade, schade, denn ich musste das Buch daher nach etwa 100 Seiten abbrechen.Ich danke dem Verlag für die Bereitstellung des Rezensionsexemplares!
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  • paperlove
    January 1, 1970
    Ich kann diese Rezension leider nicht ohne Spoiler verfassen, da es sich um eine Gesamtausgabe mit jeweils drei Novellen handelt und der offizielle Klappentext sich eigentlich nur auf die erste davon bezieht. An dieser Stelle muss ich erwähnen, das mir zu Beginn nicht bewusst war, dass es sich um drei eigenständige Geschichten handelt, die man getrennt voneinander betrachten muss. Ich bin anfangs vielmehr davon ausgegangen, dass es sich um eine abgerundete Geschichte handelt und die drei enthalt Ich kann diese Rezension leider nicht ohne Spoiler verfassen, da es sich um eine Gesamtausgabe mit jeweils drei Novellen handelt und der offizielle Klappentext sich eigentlich nur auf die erste davon bezieht. An dieser Stelle muss ich erwähnen, das mir zu Beginn nicht bewusst war, dass es sich um drei eigenständige Geschichten handelt, die man getrennt voneinander betrachten muss. Ich bin anfangs vielmehr davon ausgegangen, dass es sich um eine abgerundete Geschichte handelt und die drei enthaltenen Bände mehr Verbindungen zueinander aufweisen. Und vielleicht war meine Enttäuschung auch der falschen Erwartung geschuldet, die ich an das Buch hatte.1. Novelle:Die erste Novelle ist mit knapp 70 Seiten zwar die kürzeste alle drei Geschichten, rückblickend aber trotzdem die, die mich am meisten packen konnte. Im Mittelpunkt steht Binti, die den Wunsch hegt, sich von ihrer Familie abzuwenden und in eine weit entfernte Universität zu reisen, die sich irgendwo im Weltraum befindet. Auf der Reise dorthin wird das Schiff von Medusen überfallen und sie muss zusehen, wie alle Crewmitglieder sterben - etwas, das einen bleibenden Eindruck bei Binti hinterlässt.Als Leser wird man direkt ins Geschehen hineingeworfen, ohne irgendwelche genaueren Erläuterungen zum Worldbuilding oder den verschiedenen Wesen, die es in diesem Roman gibt. Mir ging das alles ehrlich gesagt etwas zu schnell und ich hätte es schöner gefunden, wenn sich die Autorin mehr Zeit für das Erzählen von Bintis Reise zur Universität gelassen hätte.2. Novelle:Die zweite Novelle spielt einige Zeit nach diesem Vorfall und Binti entschliesst sich, wieder zu ihrer Familie zurückzukehren. Auf ihrer Reise wird sie von Okwu - einer männlichen Medusa - begleitet. Als Binti in ihrer Heimat ankommt erwartet sie aber keine Willkommensfeier, sondern viel mehr Ablehnung von ihrer Familie und ihrem ehemaligen Freund. In Bintis Volk wird es nicht akzeptiert, wenn sich eine alleinstehende Frau einfach so auf eine weite Reise begibt und das lassen sie Binti auch spüren. Und obwohl inzwischen ein Bündnis zwischen den Menschen und den Medusen herrscht, wird es von Bintis Familie nicht toleriert, dass sie mit einer Medusa angereist ist.Binti will sich schliesslich auf eine Pilgerreise begeben, die allerdings anders ausfällt, als sie es sich vorgestellt hat.Auch hier verliert die Autorin keine Zeit und ich hatte Mühe mich in der Geschichte zurecht zu finden. Als sich Binti auf diese Pilgerreise begibt, ist mir der rote Faden immer mehr abhandengekommen und ich weiss bis jetzt nicht so richtig, was da eigentlich passiert ist. 3. Novelle:Zur dritten Novelle kann ich inhaltlich gar nicht so viel schreiben, weil ich im Schlussteil fast gänzlich das Interesse für Bintis Geschichten verloren haben. Auf mich wirkte dass alles zu gehetzt und der emotionslose, distanzierte und nüchterne Schreibstil hat verhindert, dass ich überhaupt eine Bindung zu Binti oder einem der anderen Charaktere aufbauen konnte. Ich habe das Ende dann nur noch quer gelesen.Fazit:Eine starke, weibliche Protagonistin mit afroamerikanischer Abstammung, die viel Potential für eine spannende Geschichte geboten hätte. Leider war es mir durch den emotionslosen Schreibstil nicht möglich, eine Bindung zu dieser aussergewöhnlichen Protagonistin aufzubauen. Ich bin überzeugt davon, dass das Buch als zusammenhängende Geschichte besser funktioniert hätte, denn durch die drei für sich stehenden Novellen wirkte das ein bisschen wild durcheinander gewürfelt. Zudem haben mir ein paar zusätzliche Infos zum Worldbuilding gefehlt. Dadurch, dass die Storys nur so kurz erzählt werden, fand ich es schwierig, mich in dieser Science-Fiction-Welt zurecht zu finden. Ich kann dem Buch deshalb nur 2.5 Sterne vergeben.
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  • Lois Young
    January 1, 1970
    For my complete review, checkout my blog https://mistyaquavenatus.com/2019/02/05/why-you-need-to-read-binti-the-complete-trilogyEvery once in a while you hear about a story that is so unique and so captivating that it is suggested that everyone should read it regardless if it’s not from their preferred genre of literature. "Binti" is a story about a young woman who leaves her home—without her family’s blessing—so that she can take advantage of an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to attend the mos For my complete review, checkout my blog https://mistyaquavenatus.com/2019/02/05/why-you-need-to-read-binti-the-complete-trilogyEvery once in a while you hear about a story that is so unique and so captivating that it is suggested that everyone should read it regardless if it’s not from their preferred genre of literature. "Binti" is a story about a young woman who leaves her home—without her family’s blessing—so that she can take advantage of an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to attend the most prestigious university in the galaxy, Oomza Uni. She boards a spacecraft and it is traveling to a distant planet, and Binti has never been away from her home before. It seems like the story will pick up pace once the spacecraft arrives; only it is attacked by a “hostile” alien species. This is the first part of the first novella in the series by Nnedi Okorafor—which, won both the Nebula and the Hugo awards for “Best Novella”—and, neither the action, nor the story ends with the first novella! "Binti: The Complete Trilogy" contains all of the author's stories in one volume!"Binti" starts off with a simple plot: a gifted young woman goes against her family’s expectations in order to attend an esteemed university. Readers are introduced to Binti’s intelligence for mathematics, abilities as a harmonizer, and Himba culture. At the same time, readers are reminded that human differences and alien versus human culture clashes exist in the future as well. One particular rivalry between the species quickly becomes the center of the story, quickly. Binti has to find a way to survive her new—and unexpected—predicament, which will be hard because the Meduse, the hostile alien species want her dead. "Binti: Sacred Fire" is the latest story written by the author in this series, but it serves as an interlude between the first and the second books in the series. "Binti: Home" is about what is in the title. Binti completes her first semester or year at Oomza Uni and decides to return home to visit her family and to participate in her tribe’s pilgrimage. "Binti: The Night Masquerade" starts where "Binti: Home" left off, with Binti rushing back to her family home after her pilgrimage in order to stop a war before it starts. Within the conclusion to this series, readers realize that not everyone is willing to accept change, not everyone wants to interact with someone who is “different” from themselves, and not everyone is willing to admit he/she/it/they have flaws.It was thrilling to read "Binti" again. And, "Binti: The Complete Trilogy" allows readers to enjoy all of the Binti stories in tandem. Fans of Nnedi Okorafor and readers of speculative fiction will appreciate this series compilation as much as I did. Reading through Binti’s life as a university freshman reminded me of some of my experiences during my first year of college as well, including the changes in myself and the stagnancy of everything else. "Binti" is a story about personal growth through experience and change, and how expectations depend on individual actions, not those of others. This coming-of-age story is pleasing to all readers and it should not be overlooked.I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Kay Lou
    January 1, 1970
    The Binti trilogy is a very beautiful coming of age story that depicts what it is like to not meet the expectations of those around you and what it means to disagree or be different than your family and culture. Binti chooses to go to Oomza University despite the risk that she will become effectively banished from her home for leaving. Once she leaves, she witnesses a massacre as a result of a class in cultures, and chooses the difficult path of helping reconcile the feud between the Medusae and The Binti trilogy is a very beautiful coming of age story that depicts what it is like to not meet the expectations of those around you and what it means to disagree or be different than your family and culture. Binti chooses to go to Oomza University despite the risk that she will become effectively banished from her home for leaving. Once she leaves, she witnesses a massacre as a result of a class in cultures, and chooses the difficult path of helping reconcile the feud between the Medusae and the Khoush. Contradicting the feelings of her people, she befriends a member of the Medusae and ends up learning more about her family's history and what she can do to broker peace. For my reading preference, the stories felt rushed (which make sense because they are short!). But I really wanted to read more about Binti's history, culture and the Binti-verse. I think that Okorafor has an incredible gift for world-building and writing uniquely imaginative stories- I strongly recommend the Binti Trilogy for readers looking for a quick sci-fi read :)
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  • Lari
    January 1, 1970
    (*2,5)
  • Carla Estruch
    January 1, 1970
    I think the new story, Sacred Fire", was an excellent addition for the Binti's story. I had always wanted to know more about Haifa and the Bear!Reading more about Binti is always as coming home.
  • Stefan
    January 1, 1970
    Das Buch hat zwar einige interessante Ideen, aber auch etliche Probleme durch den seltsamen Mix aus Fantasy und Sci-Fi. Insgesamt würde ich das Buch eher in die Fantasy Ecke stecken statt Sci-Fi, trotz Zukunftssetting - einfach weil keine der phantastischen Technologien näher erläutert wird und damit ziemlich magisch wirkt.Durch die Teils enormen Zeitsprünge wirkt die Geschichte sehr bruchstückhaft, was durch die wenig eleganten Wechsel noch verstärkt wird. Von einem Satz zum nächsten vergehen t Das Buch hat zwar einige interessante Ideen, aber auch etliche Probleme durch den seltsamen Mix aus Fantasy und Sci-Fi. Insgesamt würde ich das Buch eher in die Fantasy Ecke stecken statt Sci-Fi, trotz Zukunftssetting - einfach weil keine der phantastischen Technologien näher erläutert wird und damit ziemlich magisch wirkt.Durch die Teils enormen Zeitsprünge wirkt die Geschichte sehr bruchstückhaft, was durch die wenig eleganten Wechsel noch verstärkt wird. Von einem Satz zum nächsten vergehen teilweise Monate oder sogar Jahre ohne Einleitung oder einen Hinweis auf diesen Zeitsprung.Zudem mangelt es der Geschichte an Konsequenzen, selbst dem massenmordenden Erzfeind wird problemlos verziehen - nur nicht den bösen weißen Koush. Die bleiben einfach immer engstirning, herablassend, kriegstreiberisch-böse und eben weiß. In der Hinsicht ist das Buch überraschend rassistisch, denn selbst an den anderen Antagonisten gibt es positive Seiten zu entdecken.So bleibt für mich ein unterhaltsames, aber auch eindimensionales Buch mit einigen interessanten Ideen und einer etwas zähen Story, vor allem gegen Ende hin.
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  • Tallianna Vanamee
    January 1, 1970
    Eine seltsame ReiseIhr Name ist Binti und sie ist die erste Himba, die jemals an der Oomza Universität, einer der besten Lehranstalten der Galaxis, angenommen wurde. Aber diese Möglichkeit wahrzunehmen bedeutet, dass sie ihren Platz innerhalb ihrer Familie aufgeben und mit Fremden zwischen den Sternen reisen muss, die weder ihre Denkweise teilen, noch ihre Bräuche respektieren.Die Welt, deren Teil sie werden möchte, hat einen langen Krieg gegen die Medusen hinter sich und Bintis Reise zwischen d Eine seltsame ReiseIhr Name ist Binti und sie ist die erste Himba, die jemals an der Oomza Universität, einer der besten Lehranstalten der Galaxis, angenommen wurde. Aber diese Möglichkeit wahrzunehmen bedeutet, dass sie ihren Platz innerhalb ihrer Familie aufgeben und mit Fremden zwischen den Sternen reisen muss, die weder ihre Denkweise teilen, noch ihre Bräuche respektieren.Die Welt, deren Teil sie werden möchte, hat einen langen Krieg gegen die Medusen hinter sich und Bintis Reise zwischen den Sternen lässt sie dieser Spezies näherkommen als ihr lieb ist. Wenn Binti das Vermächtnis eines Krieges überleben will, mit dem sie nichts zu tun hatte, wird sie die Gaben ihres Volkes brauchen und die Weisheit, die sich in der Universität verbirgt - aber zuerst muss sie es bis dorthin schaffen, lebendig. (Klappentext)Der nachfolgende Text kann Spoiler enthalten.Als ich von diesem Roman erfuhr, wollte ich ihn unbedingt lesen, denn immer wieder wurde darauf hingewiesen, dass es sich um „afrikanische Science-Fiction“ handeln würde und ich war neugierig, wie sich das auswirken würde.Tatsächlich ist es schwer in Worte zu fassen, aber die Geschichte fühlt sich anders an, vermutlich auch schon dadurch, dass Binti eine Himba ist. So interessant das ist, es hat mir doch den Zugang zu den Bräuchen und Eigenheiten, die beschrieben werden, erschwert. Das ist für mich kein neues Phänomen, habe ich es doch schon früher bei asiatischen Filmen und Büchern kennen gelernt. Trotzdem fällt es mir schwer, das Buch vorbehaltlos zu mögen, denn mir gefällt nicht, wie ihre Familie und ihr Stamm mit Binti umgeht, nur weil sie lernen möchte und deswegen ihre Heimat verlässt. Da kocht in mir schon mal der Zorn auf und ich mag gar nicht weiter lesen.Die Story selbst ist überhaupt nicht so verlaufen, wie ich es mir vorgestellt hat und ich weiß immer noch nicht, ob mir der gewalttätige Unterton in der Geschichte gefällt oder nicht. Ich bin mir auch nicht sicher, ob ich es plausibel finde, dass Binti sich so schnell mit jemandem anfreundet, der ihr so viel genommen hat. Des Öfteren habe ich das Gefühl, dass die Handlung zu hastig erzählt wird und dabei einige erklärende Dinge herausgefallen sind. So habe ich bis zum Schluss ständig das Gefühl, etwas verpasst zu haben, das aber gar nicht erwähnt wurde. Mir fehlt auch der Hintergrund, so z. B. in was für einer Welt lebt Binti? Es wird erzählt, die Seen ihrer Heimat seien ausgetrocknet, aber warum? Wie sieht es jetzt auf der Erde aus? Selbst die nähere Umgebung ihrer Heimat wird nur erwähnt, aber nie wirklich beschrieben. Infodumping ist immer schlecht, aber ich mag es nicht, wenn es zu wenig Informationen gibt.Auch das Ende war für mich ein wenig unbefriedigend, denn irgendwie hat sich ja nichts wirklich an der politischen Situation geändert.„Binti“ verfolgt eine spannende Idee, die leider für mich nicht ganz nachvollziehbar umgesetzt wurde. Dieses Buch ist auf jeden Fall anders, als andere Science-Fiction Literatur und ist es wert, gelesen zu werden und sich eine eigene Meinung darüber zu bilden.
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  • C. A.
    January 1, 1970
    I've read the Binti novellas separately but I jumped at the chance to read them again as a single story, with an additional short story added in. Nnedi Okorafor's protagonist is a wonderful YA hero and the worldbuilding draws you in. I'm an old science fiction reader. For a very long time there was little to no religion mentioned in science fiction unless it was being mocked, disproven, used as an easy shorthand character description or shown to have scientific backing all along, with very few e I've read the Binti novellas separately but I jumped at the chance to read them again as a single story, with an additional short story added in. Nnedi Okorafor's protagonist is a wonderful YA hero and the worldbuilding draws you in. I'm an old science fiction reader. For a very long time there was little to no religion mentioned in science fiction unless it was being mocked, disproven, used as an easy shorthand character description or shown to have scientific backing all along, with very few exceptions. I am not religious, but so many people are shaped by their faiths and traditions that suddenly ignoring them seems like an odd thing for a writer to do and there's little reason to think that humanity as a whole will abruptly stop being religious at some point. Binit is steeped in the traditions of her people, as she would be, and those traditions comfort and inform her. That makes it doubly impressive that she defies her parents and leaves her planet to take advantage of an offer to attend a prestigious university where she can hone her mathematical and harmonizing skills. But after an encounter with an aggressive alien race that kills everyone on her ship but the pilot and herself, her life's trajectory is changed forever.Each novella moves the story, and her story arc along, and the new short story is a wonderful little slice of life between books 1 and 2 that shows her coming to grips with bullying, homesickness, and not feeling like she belonged. I greatly enjoyed these stories, even reading them a second time. I think the second two aren't quite as good as the first, possibly because they're expanding on the world rather than introducing it and that's never quite as interesting. And they do suffer slightly from their format; novellas don't leave as much room for development. Rather than a three-book trilogy, the three of them together make a good-sized novel that rushes along to tell its story and necessarily glosses over a few things to get there.But Binti's coming-of-age story is a great one. Check it out, you won't be disappointed.
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  • Nachoolo
    January 1, 1970
    As a newbie to the subgenre known as "Afrofuturism", I found the Binti trilogy quite refreshing.Still, Binti is not a perfect work.Worldbuilding outside the surroundings of Binti, for example, it's quite lackluster, although the length of the books (they are novellas, afterall) is probably to blame instead of the author.The amount of unexplained things in the story, and how fast is Binti to forgive atrocities and the lack of giving a fuck about some things (or how fast she forgets about it after As a newbie to the subgenre known as "Afrofuturism", I found the Binti trilogy quite refreshing.Still, Binti is not a perfect work.Worldbuilding outside the surroundings of Binti, for example, it's quite lackluster, although the length of the books (they are novellas, afterall) is probably to blame instead of the author.The amount of unexplained things in the story, and how fast is Binti to forgive atrocities and the lack of giving a fuck about some things (or how fast she forgets about it after they get outside her vision) is quite infuriating.It might be because I'm having some dissonance with the author's vision, but the last thing really grinds my gears, specially because Binti is not called out for the majority of this; and in the moments that she is, the author puts the character that is criticizing Binti as being in the wrong.Although, in this last point. there's one thing that Binti is constantly call out and, unlike the other criticism, she thinks that she's on the wrong. And this is her ignoring her culture's traditions and, to be honest, quite sexist views.I'm quite certain that the author wanted us to go against this bullshit and instead support Binti, but the only thing that I felt is exasperation towards Binti (who, mind you, its show to be a fuckng genius through all of the story and a master diplomat). I felt exasperation towards her accepting the bullshit reasoning of the "traditionalists" of her culture, bullshit that she should be able to refute easily.After this rant, you probably imagine that I that I hated the books. This is not true, as, although I cannot say that I like my experience with it, a cannot say that I hated it. What I felt was that it had a lot of potential. Potential that, at the end, was ignored.Overall, I can only recommend this trilogy if you are interested in afrofuturism. If not, this will be a hard reading.
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  • Ab
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fantastic series with so many amazing features, including a female, person of color, who is the HERO; she loves math and technology and is excellent at them both; she is from an African tribal community who are mistreated by the lighter skinned Khoush people and thought of as primitive (though they rely on them - the Himba - to produce essential communications technology), though this culture also treats its women as lesser-than, AND looks down on another outsider culture who lives de This was a fantastic series with so many amazing features, including a female, person of color, who is the HERO; she loves math and technology and is excellent at them both; she is from an African tribal community who are mistreated by the lighter skinned Khoush people and thought of as primitive (though they rely on them - the Himba - to produce essential communications technology), though this culture also treats its women as lesser-than, AND looks down on another outsider culture who lives deep in the desert (though they are actually extremely advanced) ... So many relatable, applicable, complex issues brought to the fore through this epic tale about a girl, Binti, who just wants to see and experience more beyond her isolated culture. She travels off-world to Oozma University, which is something of a Hogwarts for smart, curious students from across the galaxy. Students sneer at Binti, first Himba to attend, who looks to them to be primitive and Other. She only feels fully dressed and connected to her home culture when wearing a clay-and-oil-like substance smeared all over her body, which many, though tentacled, fur-covered, gigantically tall, and flying, cannot somehow accept. Binti speaks across all organic forms of life, and attempts to bring peace to a long war between Khoush and Meduse.This book was so masterful in its world-building and character creations that as soon as you begin reading you are immediately enveloped and shown a vivid picture of all that is going on. I feel as much connection to this series as I did to Madeline L'Engle's "Wrinkle in Time" series, and Rowling's "Harry Potter" series. Looking forward to other books by the author, and immediately buying her other book, "Who Fears Death." Love love love.
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  • Kaylee
    January 1, 1970
    Another lesson in which I am reminded that award-winning does not mean I will necessarily enjoy it fully.I liked it! I just didn't love it. I'd say I'd just been overhyped on this, but that's not necessarily true, because what actually made me not like it as much was the coming-of-age aspect (the writing was fine, the imagination was great, and the book jacket had errors that really annoyed me, like using the word "Medusae"). And while most coming-of-age stories are about reconciling personal de Another lesson in which I am reminded that award-winning does not mean I will necessarily enjoy it fully.I liked it! I just didn't love it. I'd say I'd just been overhyped on this, but that's not necessarily true, because what actually made me not like it as much was the coming-of-age aspect (the writing was fine, the imagination was great, and the book jacket had errors that really annoyed me, like using the word "Medusae"). And while most coming-of-age stories are about reconciling personal desires and destinies with familial and cultural ones, I found myself especially bothered by Binti's situation.This is probably due to me never having familial guilt of my own, or letting myself get too influenced by others' expectations and disapproval. So, I admit, I am not the right reader for this, which needs someone who can cheer on Binti and understand her (ill-timed and illogical) second-guessing and be fine with the fact that her entirely rational and independent persona could be so easily influenced by people expressing distaste. I think I also felt irritation because here was this character that is written with this strong innate sense of self... until something challenges what she was taught. (And this is addressed a few times, which is great! I enjoyed those rare moments where her prejudice was called out as hypocrisy.) I just couldn't stand her being so ridiculously devoted to a people and family that didn't support her or even try to understand her.Enjoyed the ending, though, for the most part, and I loved the idea of the Uni being such an overwhelmingly open place. (Also, laughed - hard - at the Saturn part!)
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  • Liv
    January 1, 1970
    Vielen Dank an Netgalley.de und Cross Cult, die mir dieses Leseexemplar zur Verfügung gestellt haben!Binti (Gesamtausgabe).Binti ist eine Novellensammlung, die sehr schwer zu bewerten ist. Allein gefiel mir sehr gut, das Worldbuilding und die Kulturen faszinierten mich unglaublich. Ein Grossteil meiner Faszination gehörte Dritter Fisch, ein lebendiges, krebsartiges Raumschiff, in dessen Inneren Personen transportiert werden können. Die Idee haute mich förmlich um.Auch die Teile Heimat und Nachtm Vielen Dank an Netgalley.de und Cross Cult, die mir dieses Leseexemplar zur Verfügung gestellt haben!Binti (Gesamtausgabe).Binti ist eine Novellensammlung, die sehr schwer zu bewerten ist. Allein gefiel mir sehr gut, das Worldbuilding und die Kulturen faszinierten mich unglaublich. Ein Grossteil meiner Faszination gehörte Dritter Fisch, ein lebendiges, krebsartiges Raumschiff, in dessen Inneren Personen transportiert werden können. Die Idee haute mich förmlich um.Auch die Teile Heimat und Nachtmaskerade folgten dem Wolrdbuilding, nachdem Binti von Ihrem ausserplanetarischen Studium zurückkehrt, als Botschafterin die einen Krieg verhindern will.Leider haperte etwas an der Umsetzung. Während das Worldbuilding wirklich genial war, so litt die Handlung etwas darunter. Speziell, die Konsequenzen.Durch alle drei Novellen hindurch lässt sich feststellen, dass es keine Konsequenzen für irgendwas gibt. Im Prinzip kann jeder tun und lassen, was er will, ohne fürchten zu müssen, dass irgendwer deshalb wirklich wütend sein würde. Einzig Okwu war dagegen hin und wieder gefeit, wenn auch nur selten.Allerdings war Binti doch eine wirklich gute Science Fiction-Geschichte, die man gewiss allen weiterempfehlen kann, die sich gerne vorstellen, was es ausser uns noch gibt.Meine Review zu Band 1Meine Review zu Band 2Meine Review zu Band 3
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  • Colleen Corgel
    January 1, 1970
    I can understand why the Binti Trilogy is so highly regarded. These novellas are thoughtful, powerful, and potentially heartbreaking.There are so many themes to pick apart, but I think that at the core of the story is about migration. In this case, Binti is from a tribe in Africa that is very firmly rooted to the Earth. But Binti has a bit of wanderlust, and leaves against the wishes of her family. Once she's in space, Binti encounters and survives an attack by the Meduse, an alien race that is I can understand why the Binti Trilogy is so highly regarded. These novellas are thoughtful, powerful, and potentially heartbreaking.There are so many themes to pick apart, but I think that at the core of the story is about migration. In this case, Binti is from a tribe in Africa that is very firmly rooted to the Earth. But Binti has a bit of wanderlust, and leaves against the wishes of her family. Once she's in space, Binti encounters and survives an attack by the Meduse, an alien race that is at war with another group of humans on Earth. Throughout her journey, Binti literally changes from many of her encounters, and her physical appearance often reflects how Binti's attitude begins to shift from her traditional upbringing. It also brings about a huge amount of conflict with Binti herself, and eventually her family and community.I enjoyed a lot of the aspects of these novels and Okorafor is an excellent writer. Science Fiction tropes are used with great efficiency, and the world building is top notch. I particularly enjoyed the usage of some ancient alien theories when Okorafor was detailing some of the mythologies of Binti's tribe and their neighbors in Africa. If I had any real complaints, its that the pacing was a little irregular. There were spots that dragged - surprising for novellas- and then there were story beats that just were way too fast. But these are minor, and if you're looking for a deep science fiction story, this is for you.I received this ARC from DAW and NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion.
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  • Alex Can Read
    January 1, 1970
    Nnedi Okorafor has spun a fantastical world in her Binti novellas, one that is full of wonder and an incredible desire for peaceful solutions.The world Okorafor has built is so carefully crafted. I love that space travel is done via giant shrimp ships and that Oomza Uni is a planet sized school that has just about seen it all. I love that rationality and reason have an effect, and that emotions and tradition are still sometimes impervious to the former.Binti is an interesting character, she’s no Nnedi Okorafor has spun a fantastical world in her Binti novellas, one that is full of wonder and an incredible desire for peaceful solutions.The world Okorafor has built is so carefully crafted. I love that space travel is done via giant shrimp ships and that Oomza Uni is a planet sized school that has just about seen it all. I love that rationality and reason have an effect, and that emotions and tradition are still sometimes impervious to the former.Binti is an interesting character, she’s not violent, more of a pacifist than anything, but absolutely not a coward. Binti is constantly being torn in half. She is constantly stuck in the middle of two sided battles. Between her desires and those of her people, the Himba; between the Koush and Medusae; between violence and peace; between Earth and space; between two tribes; between duty and learning. Binti wants to do what is right, and she is finding that the path is not an easy one. But, Binti is both resourceful and a Master Harmonizer, one who brings harmony. She will have to be prepared to sacrifice everything in the end.Binti: The Complete Trilogy is on shelves now!Thank you to DAW for providing me with an eARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Susie Dumond
    January 1, 1970
    Binti is gifted with an incredible aptitude for math and for "harmonizing", or negotiating peace. When she's selected to attend an elite university on a different planet, her family and community are skeptical. But before she even arrives at the university, her ship is invaded by an alien species that kills everyone on board - except her. Can she use her harmonizing skills to survive and offer the invaders a chance to get what they came for?I've wanted to read the Binti novellas for a while now, Binti is gifted with an incredible aptitude for math and for "harmonizing", or negotiating peace. When she's selected to attend an elite university on a different planet, her family and community are skeptical. But before she even arrives at the university, her ship is invaded by an alien species that kills everyone on board - except her. Can she use her harmonizing skills to survive and offer the invaders a chance to get what they came for?I've wanted to read the Binti novellas for a while now, and this omnibus edition was exactly what I needed to help me do it! I love the story of Binti and the complex world that she inhabits. Okorafor is so good at writing about power dynamics and discrimination in SFF, and that's especially clear in the Binti trilogy. I wish that this edition (which comes with a great new short story!) included more of a foreword or preface with background information or explaining what it seeks to do. It was a little jarring going between the novellas, as they're all structured a little differently and have some big tone changes. But overall, a great series with a lot to explore.Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Peter Ash
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't been so taken with a book of science fiction/fantasy since reading Ursula Le Guin. Okorafor's world-building is amazing. Just for starters, we have interstellar space ships that are living beings. The action takes place on Earth (Africa) and on a distant planet, home to the greatest university in the galaxy. The heroine, Binti, is totally believable and is struggling with the biggest issues such as how much does one owe to one's loving family versus the development of one's special tal I haven't been so taken with a book of science fiction/fantasy since reading Ursula Le Guin. Okorafor's world-building is amazing. Just for starters, we have interstellar space ships that are living beings. The action takes place on Earth (Africa) and on a distant planet, home to the greatest university in the galaxy. The heroine, Binti, is totally believable and is struggling with the biggest issues such as how much does one owe to one's loving family versus the development of one's special talents, as well as how does one break the cycle of violence and revenge that perpetuates war. Not to be too pretentious about it, the issues of the Odyssey and the Iliad.NotesI actually read this as 3 separate volumes: Binti, Binti: Home, and Binti: The Night Masquerade. The volumes are quite short, and all three together come to 455 pages, so I would recommend the complete trilogy, if you can get it.There are a few important words that recur frequently and that you won't find an English dictionary or possibly any Earthly dictionary (they are in italics) so you might want to make a small glossary as you read.
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  • Tellulah Darling
    January 1, 1970
    I'd heard about this series for quite some time now, so when the complete trilogy popped up on NetGalley, I took it as a sign to bump it up to the top of my TBR pile and I"m very glad I did.Binti is a refreshing break from the myriad of greek god and celtic mythology stories out there. (Which I love and devour so this isn't a criticism of them, it's just that most stories with mythology tend to fall into a European perspective.)Binti weaves African life and mythology with sci-fi space travel, al I'd heard about this series for quite some time now, so when the complete trilogy popped up on NetGalley, I took it as a sign to bump it up to the top of my TBR pile and I"m very glad I did.Binti is a refreshing break from the myriad of greek god and celtic mythology stories out there. (Which I love and devour so this isn't a criticism of them, it's just that most stories with mythology tend to fall into a European perspective.)Binti weaves African life and mythology with sci-fi space travel, alien races, the pointlessness and devastation of war and beauty and harmony of mathematics in the world. it should be impossible to weave all these seemingly disparate strands together but Okorafor doesn't it masterfully, all under the umbrella of a YA novel. If I had one complaint, it is that there is too much crying, but really, don't let that keep you from picking up this marvelous series.
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  • Sharonda Isadora
    January 1, 1970
    You know what? I love this trilogy. The growth of Binti along with the rest of the cast of characters is nothing short of amazing. Binti's strength throughout these three books is a testament of a black woman's perseverance even through the worst of situations in life. Ms. Okarafor's mind is wild...in a good way. This world building is nothing short of amazing. From the planets to the constant diversity of the many species of aliens and humans in Binti. I was completely blown away by it all. Nig You know what? I love this trilogy. The growth of Binti along with the rest of the cast of characters is nothing short of amazing. Binti's strength throughout these three books is a testament of a black woman's perseverance even through the worst of situations in life. Ms. Okarafor's mind is wild...in a good way. This world building is nothing short of amazing. From the planets to the constant diversity of the many species of aliens and humans in Binti. I was completely blown away by it all. Nigh Masquerade did fall a bit short for me mainly because after the climax in the middle of the story, I felt like some things were unnecessarily added to add length and some things...just some could have been left out. But at the end of it all, it's a good completion to Binit's story...everything wraps up nicely.
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