Brave, Not Perfect
In a book inspired by her popular TED talk, New York Times bestselling author Reshma Saujani empowers women and girls to embrace imperfection and bravery.Imagine if you lived without the fear of not being good enough. If you didn't care how your life looked on Instagram, or worry about what total strangers thought of you. Imagine if you could let go of the guilt, and stop beating yourself up for tiny mistakes. What if, in every decision you faced, you took the bolder path?Too many of us feel crushed under the weight of our own expectations. We run ourselves ragged trying to please everyone, all the time. We lose sleep ruminating about whether we may have offended someone, pass up opportunities that take us out of our comfort zones, and avoid rejection at all costs.There's a reason we act this way, Reshma says. As girls, we were taught to play it safe. Well-meaning parents and teachers praised us for being quiet and polite, urged us to be careful so we didn't get hurt, and steered us to activities at which we could shine.The problem is that perfect girls grow up to be women who are afraid to fail. It's time to stop letting our fears drown out our dreams and narrow our world, along with our chance at happiness.By choosing bravery over perfection, we can find the power to claim our voice, to leave behind what makes us unhappy, and go for the things we genuinely, passionately want. Perfection may set us on a path that feels safe, but bravery leads us to the one we're authentically meant to follow.In Brave, Not Perfect, Reshma shares powerful insights and practices to help us override our perfect girl training and make bravery a lifelong habit. By being brave, not perfect, we can all become the authors of our biggest, boldest, and most joyful life.

Brave, Not Perfect Details

TitleBrave, Not Perfect
Author
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherCurrency
ISBN-139781524762339
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Self Help, Feminism, Business, Personal Development

Brave, Not Perfect Review

  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    An outstanding personal development/self-help/growth book about the ways men and women are cued to behave differently. Women, so frequently, are encouraged to be perfect and when something can't be done in such a way, they shouldn't bother trying. That leads, then, to not trying new things or developing their bravery muscle. Saujani offers up some of the ways that bravery can be practiced and integrated and how to break away from those preconceived ideas of perfection.Short, succinct, and doesn' An outstanding personal development/self-help/growth book about the ways men and women are cued to behave differently. Women, so frequently, are encouraged to be perfect and when something can't be done in such a way, they shouldn't bother trying. That leads, then, to not trying new things or developing their bravery muscle. Saujani offers up some of the ways that bravery can be practiced and integrated and how to break away from those preconceived ideas of perfection.Short, succinct, and doesn't feel like a book made from a TED Talk. It offers actionable steps, powerful insights, and tons of science/social science research. The voice is excellent and encouraging. It was a reminder to not shut up in instances where speaking up or out would be of tremendous value. Perfect for those who love DROP THE BALL or who are tired of cis white dudes leading the ~disruption~ in personal development. Saujani is a woman of color, and her background is tremendously necessary in this space. More to be said on the "All The Books" podcast!
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  • Amanda (Books, Life and Everything Nice)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley, Currency, and Reshma Saujani for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me. Like: - A self help business book for woman without being overly technical or dry- She launched Girls Who Code and ran for political office- Gives a voice to all the things that so many women experience Love:- Incredibly relatable - That bravery is a muscle: the more you use it, the stronger your bravery muscle will be- The author’s voice/writing style: professional, authori Thank you to NetGalley, Currency, and Reshma Saujani for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me. Like: - A self help business book for woman without being overly technical or dry- She launched Girls Who Code and ran for political office- Gives a voice to all the things that so many women experience Love:- Incredibly relatable - That bravery is a muscle: the more you use it, the stronger your bravery muscle will be- The author’s voice/writing style: professional, authoritative, but relatable and kind- The message that its okay to not be liked, because those just aren’t your people- The quote “In a world full of princesses, dare to be a hot dog.” Dislike: —Wish that: - There were a few more practical examples of how to be brave on a day to day basis- The book was longer!Overall, a very powerful, relatable book that every woman needs to read. Even if you think you’re brave, I think you will find many elements of value in here. A book I’m going to be referencing again and again.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I think I would've gotten a lot more out of this if I fit Saujani's definition of a perfectionist—fixed mindset, constantly worried what others think of me, a Type-A Hermione Granger. As more of a Faramir (blessed with an awesome father instead of Denethor), I didn't quite reap the full Brave, Not Perfect experience of empowerment.Which is not to say I didn't benefit from the read. Having Saujani's concepts and assertions to push my own experiences against allowed me to more closely define how m I think I would've gotten a lot more out of this if I fit Saujani's definition of a perfectionist—fixed mindset, constantly worried what others think of me, a Type-A Hermione Granger. As more of a Faramir (blessed with an awesome father instead of Denethor), I didn't quite reap the full Brave, Not Perfect experience of empowerment.Which is not to say I didn't benefit from the read. Having Saujani's concepts and assertions to push my own experiences against allowed me to more closely define how my own drive toward perfection behaves in my life. And reading what motivates her and other Hermione Granger perfectionists to push themselves toward bravery (regret, jealousy, competitiveness) offered me the opportunity to realize that my motivations will have to be something else entirely. Even looking at some of her strategies to cultivate a bravery mindset affirmed that the ways I've worked to enlarge my life since adolescence are solid, beneficial approaches.But this was definitely more a case of Learn How Different You Are than Learn How You Too Can Change Your Life! I'm an enneagram 4, so you'd think I'd be rolling in that special snowflake-ness like a cat in catnip, but...honestly...I could really use some help with the type of perfectionism I do experience.It didn't help that a lot of Saujani's statements about the source of perfectionism in women, women's right to claim their truth, and how her readers, too, can achieve greatness through bravery were very black and white and riddled with logical holes and inconsistencies. Instead of focusing on what she was advocating, I kept getting snarled in what wasn't being said. (Or cited in the Notes.)I mean, sure, maybe we should rethink how we raise our girls, but do we really think raising them like our boys is the solution? Doesn't the way we raise our boys cause problems of its own? And, yes! Claim your truth, ladies! ...But don't think that your truth gives you the right to stop hearing others' truths, too. And it's fantastic that so many women have found that bravery has led them to creating amazing non-profits and opening new chapters of success...but isn't that still focusing on the end goal instead of the process of being brave?I think Brave, Not Perfect will leave many, many readers with an awakening sense of their own power and a roadmap for fully inhabiting their own lives, but for those of us outside Saujani's template—or those less moved by the pathos of her encouragement—there's a lot less here. I will certainly take the insights I've gained and see whether I can turn them into weapons in the neverending battle against my own perfectionist demons, and there are a few strategies I can put into immediate action (Take On a Physical Challenge; Trust Yourself; Review, Reassess, Realign), but the hunt for advice that speaks to my Faramir-type perfectionist continues....
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  • Heart1lly
    January 1, 1970
    More like a 3.5.Let me just start by saying I really respect Girls Who Code. I'm not a girl anymore, I'm a woman (34), but if I had a Girls Who Code program in my school things might have gone a bit differently for me. Reshma illuminates a lot of problems girls face and have faced in our society growing up. The information and anecdotal evidence wasn't new to me, it was everything I've heard before and then some, before I've lived through the circumstances she admonishes throughout Brave, Not Pe More like a 3.5.Let me just start by saying I really respect Girls Who Code. I'm not a girl anymore, I'm a woman (34), but if I had a Girls Who Code program in my school things might have gone a bit differently for me. Reshma illuminates a lot of problems girls face and have faced in our society growing up. The information and anecdotal evidence wasn't new to me, it was everything I've heard before and then some, before I've lived through the circumstances she admonishes throughout Brave, Not Perfect.I have well-meaning parents, but I sometimes wonder what would have happened in my life had they not cringed every time I was interested in something that involved math."That has math in it, you can't do that."I was interested in science once upon a time, but...because it had math in it, something I didn't do well in, I was discouraged from even trying. When I picked up an astronomy class in university my parents scoffed at me because they just ~knew~ I would fail and end up dropping out. So, when I DID end up dropping out I felt like I was just proving them correctly that I was a screw-up and couldn't learn math or do anything involving math. I'm actually feeling angry as I type this review.Teachers have told me that they were frustrated with me because I wasn't getting it, or learning the math and ugh. Just ugh. Everyone around me actively discouraged me as a child from really going after my dreams and it's not just me this happens to. It happens to countless girls in school.So, if you have a young daughter, reading this book might be a good idea. If you're already a fan of Reshma's, then none of this information is going to be new to you. All in all I thought this was a pretty okay read, though I don't think I was truly the demographic. I'd say this book is way more helpful if you're a young woman just starting out in the world or the parent of a young woman.Sadly, I feel like the advice is lost on me only because I've already learned the lessons within the book and I feel like I could tell other young women the same stuff Reshma espoused.It's also a very quick read. I got through it in a day when I really sat down to listen. The audiobook is narrated by the author, and the performance is pretty good though there are some weird pauses here and there. It's a bit "rah rah, you can do it, get it girl!" but I think it's perfect for a young woman who might be struggling and I know we all know or knew young women who were struggling because of the weird-ass nature of how society treats those of us who aren't dudes.
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  • MundiNova
    January 1, 1970
    "I'd rather be caught trying than not at all."Yes, I'm this book's demographic: A women working in tech who doubts herself constantly.Self-help business books are hit or miss. But after reading Brave, Not Perfect I'm now realizing why they're hit or miss: Ask yourself, "Am I this book's demographic?" If the answer is no, then the book will be a miss. Just because you're working in the corporate world, doesn't mean every pseudo-psychology/business book is meant for you. Some are written specially "I'd rather be caught trying than not at all."Yes, I'm this book's demographic: A women working in tech who doubts herself constantly.Self-help business books are hit or miss. But after reading Brave, Not Perfect I'm now realizing why they're hit or miss: Ask yourself, "Am I this book's demographic?" If the answer is no, then the book will be a miss. Just because you're working in the corporate world, doesn't mean every pseudo-psychology/business book is meant for you. Some are written specially for C-suite or VPs who have the flexibility to make large scale choices. But Brave, Not Perfect was written for me. If you're wondering if it's written for you, ask yourself if any of the following applies:1) You spend too much time reading, rewriting, and rereading an email before you send it because one small grammar or spelling mistake would plague you for the rest of the day. Or worse, make your colleagues think you're an idiot.2) You didn't apply for the job you wanted because you didn't meet 100% of the requirements and don't already know how to perform it perfectly. Because taking the time to learn the job could waste your employer's time, and you'd hate to do that.3) You sacrifice your time to please someone else, to make them like you more, even if you really don't want to do it.4) You have a safety net in place that allows you to take chances.That last one is key. This book is not for the working single mom, living paycheck to paycheck just to put food on the table, who can't afford to take risks with her or her family's lives. There's a certain level of privilege this book caters to. That's not necessarily a bad thing. Multi-millionaires need financial advisers, that doesn't mean being a financial adviser is an evil profession and shouldn't exist. This book is very much needed for the sad demographic of ~20% women in tech. As I was reading this book (which took only a day because I couldn't put it down), all the women in my life that I love and want to see succeed would bubble up. In one section, I thought, "This is what A needs to read!" In another section, "I need to tell B to do this!"So yeah, ya'll been warned. I'm going to tell you fine ladies to read this book.Theme: 5 starsWriting: 4 stars
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  • Jonathan Carter
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: The publisher has given me an E-ARC of the book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, Live Bolder is a book every person needs in their life. Especially girls and women. The book discusses how you'll never be able to do a thing without being courageous. It's about taking chances, failing, and learning from those failures.Reshma Saujani really did an impressive job in being an inspiration. Even myself, a guy, learned so much from a Disclaimer: The publisher has given me an E-ARC of the book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, Live Bolder is a book every person needs in their life. Especially girls and women. The book discusses how you'll never be able to do a thing without being courageous. It's about taking chances, failing, and learning from those failures.Reshma Saujani really did an impressive job in being an inspiration. Even myself, a guy, learned so much from a book that is marketed to empower women. I learn so much about the inequality of life even for our modern age. I felt the poignant reality of women being raised to be perfect and not brave. And most importantly, I saw that anything is possible if only we put our minds to it and find the right support.Overall, Brave, Not Perfect is the perfect book to learn how to be brave. It is a timely and relevant collection of experiences and tips to conquer our fears.
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    Saujani ran for Congress and lost. It was the first major failure of her life. And after she picked herself up, mourned and recovery she realized that it was a gift, an opportunity to change directions and a moment that not many women allow themselves to face. She started Girls Who Code and she wants to make resilience and bravery a foundation of girls lives.Why I started this book: I am always looking for books and reminders to be BRAVE.Why I finished it: Short and sweet, this is a great remind Saujani ran for Congress and lost. It was the first major failure of her life. And after she picked herself up, mourned and recovery she realized that it was a gift, an opportunity to change directions and a moment that not many women allow themselves to face. She started Girls Who Code and she wants to make resilience and bravery a foundation of girls lives.Why I started this book: I am always looking for books and reminders to be BRAVE.Why I finished it: Short and sweet, this is a great reminder of the power of bravery. That there is immense courage in using the word YET. I'm not a good public speaker YET. I'm not ____ YET. That we can learn, grow and become.
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  • Nikki Betzler
    January 1, 1970
    I think Saujani has a very compelling message and mission and I highly respect what she’s doing for girls and our culture. This book just seems to be written for someone who has never thought about being brave or being their own person before and it doesn’t offer a lot of depth. I’d recommend this more to younger teenage girls.
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  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    There are a lot of great takeaways from this book. The main one, something I can't get enough reminders for, is to doubt yourself less. It was a comfortable read that backs up anecdotes with research. Although I could have done without some of the celebrity name dropping, it doesn't detract from the message.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKBrave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolder by Reshma Saujani was a book that I just needed in my life. It was a beautiful reflection on the realities of how our own aspirations can get in the way. This book focuses on reframing/eliminating perfectionist thinking. Rather than expecting that we have to have flawless execution, she really stresses that there is power and joy in learning in the journey. She talks abo More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKBrave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolder by Reshma Saujani was a book that I just needed in my life. It was a beautiful reflection on the realities of how our own aspirations can get in the way. This book focuses on reframing/eliminating perfectionist thinking. Rather than expecting that we have to have flawless execution, she really stresses that there is power and joy in learning in the journey. She talks about how with women we often are afraid of fear and failure avoidance. In reality, the best thing we could do for ourselves is feel these things. She talks about how we can often not go for what we want because of this, and that's just wrong. I loved that this book was part "Here's our reality," then "Here's what to do about it." The steps shared were simple and actionable, and they're ones I could see myself implementing. I read this book because I was needing some inspiration and affirmation, and it so did that for me. Thanks to NetGalley for the sneak peek, and I'd highly encourage y'all to check this one out when it's released in February!
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  • Mel
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading this book, and it served as a good reminder to chose bravery instead of letting perfect be the enemy of good. I also enjoyed hearing more about Reshma Saujani's background running for Congress, and the other stories she had of people struggling between bravery and perfection. This book is also a quick, light read.The book is, at times, a little repetitive, and doesn't quite hit the mark with being concrete in suggestions. I felt it could use a little more organization and a lit I enjoyed reading this book, and it served as a good reminder to chose bravery instead of letting perfect be the enemy of good. I also enjoyed hearing more about Reshma Saujani's background running for Congress, and the other stories she had of people struggling between bravery and perfection. This book is also a quick, light read.The book is, at times, a little repetitive, and doesn't quite hit the mark with being concrete in suggestions. I felt it could use a little more organization and a little more meat.That said, I think it could be a helpful book to someone, and possibly would've benefited me a few years ago moreso than now.
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  • Kasey
    January 1, 1970
    Note that I read a copy of an uncorrected proof so the actual book may be different. I also have watched Reshma Saujani's TED talk and I felt like this book was an extension of the talk. There weren't new points for me, but then I've been reading books on topics like these for quite some time. I think women who need that push of encouragement would like this book. The only thing I found kind of....iffy....is conflating Hillary Clinton with Barack Obama. You can't compare a woman and man without Note that I read a copy of an uncorrected proof so the actual book may be different. I also have watched Reshma Saujani's TED talk and I felt like this book was an extension of the talk. There weren't new points for me, but then I've been reading books on topics like these for quite some time. I think women who need that push of encouragement would like this book. The only thing I found kind of....iffy....is conflating Hillary Clinton with Barack Obama. You can't compare a woman and man without factoring in their race. Although I understand that the book focuses on women, I did wish intersectionality was touched upon.
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    I have watched Reshma Saujani's TED talk and I feel this book is an extension of the talk. Both are such an inspiration for women who feel stuck in the loop of disappointments and tries to get everything done perfectly. I feel it is a little bit too long and I was puzzled about some examples that Reshma Saujani mentioned in the book. Overall it’s a good book and the author’s credentials add value to every word in it.
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  • Bianca
    January 1, 1970
    Girls are raised to be perfect and boys are raised to be brave. Brave, Not Perfect is exactly what it appears to be - an extension of Reshma Saujani's motivational TED Talk. The message she sends in both the talk and the book is clear, and it's a message that sends chills up your spine when you realize how true it is. She states, "Most girls are taught to avoid risk and failure. We’re taught to smile pretty, play it safe, get all A’s. Boys, on the other hand, are taught to play rough, swing high Girls are raised to be perfect and boys are raised to be brave. Brave, Not Perfect is exactly what it appears to be - an extension of Reshma Saujani's motivational TED Talk. The message she sends in both the talk and the book is clear, and it's a message that sends chills up your spine when you realize how true it is. She states, "Most girls are taught to avoid risk and failure. We’re taught to smile pretty, play it safe, get all A’s. Boys, on the other hand, are taught to play rough, swing high, crawl to the top of the monkey bars and then just jump off headfirst." Crawling to the top of the monkey bars is (perhaps) less of a goal now as an adult, but avoiding risk and failure and aiming to be perfect are things that are still very much apparent in everyday life. As a more concrete example in the adult world, men apply for a job when they meet only 60% of the qualifications, but women apply only if they meet 100% of them. It's a statistics you may have heard before (originating from a Hewlett Packard internal report), and it is but one example of behaviour I see again and again as a mentor, woman, and member of the community, particularly in technology.Reshma mentions these examples as well as many others in her new book. She tells the stories of real women with real triumphs and failures. In other words: you are not alone. You are not the only one weighed down by the so-called limitations and expectations as a woman. Brave, Not Perfect drives home the point that it's not just the onus of women as individuals or even as a community to take more risks and strive to be better, but that there's a whole cultural mind shift that need to take place in order to make a real difference.All this being said, I found Brave, Not Perfect to be an easy and engaging read, whether you decide to read it front to back or (as I'm doing now) flip through it for particular sections or passages. It has an inspiring message backed by real world women and examples. The book also goes into detail with suggestions on how to become more brave in ways that are customizable and attainable; even smaller steps may be taken, as long as they bring you in the direction that you want to go.Especially at this time of year as we approach International Women's Day on March 8, Brave, Not Perfect can provide personal and career-oriented value to many women or other groups who may need more bravery in their lives.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    What a fantastic book! 4.5 stars.Reshma Saujani's TED talk was recommended to me by several colleagues at work, so when I saw the book, I knew a little about its premise. I have two boys, and yet, I am a girl :) So it was quite interesting reading this book with both my mom filter on and as a woman myself. I've already recommended it to all the parents I know, because so much of this book is about highlighting behavior that exists in a way that feels indoctrinated. Things we don't do consciously What a fantastic book! 4.5 stars.Reshma Saujani's TED talk was recommended to me by several colleagues at work, so when I saw the book, I knew a little about its premise. I have two boys, and yet, I am a girl :) So it was quite interesting reading this book with both my mom filter on and as a woman myself. I've already recommended it to all the parents I know, because so much of this book is about highlighting behavior that exists in a way that feels indoctrinated. Things we don't do consciously maybe because we've done them this way such a long time. It's highlighting the invisible hidden in plain sight.And like most truths, once you see it, you can't unsee it. A few years ago, I picked "brave" as my word of the year so that I could become braver. And one of the biggest shifts that happened that year wasn't that I became brave but that I realized how brave I already was. The author talks about the positive cycle of how bravery begets bravery and that is very much the case. So does realizing how brave you are because it shifts the way you see yourself and now you're no longer "afraid" to be brave. It is imperative that we turn this cycle around for our girls. The subtle (and not so subtle) push towards perfection is one of the most damaging signals women receive (and then internalize.) I still see this people-pleasing, "looking perfect on the outside but falling apart on the inside" every single day. Not only does it curb our potential as women, it also keeps us disconnected from each other because it's not possible to have real connection/belonging without authenticity.I've highlighted so much of this book and I will continue to recommend it to every parent (and woman) I know. We can only do better when we know better and this book is a solid step forward in that direction. And it also has tangible, specific next steps you can take to move into the practice of bravery.Thank you Reshma Saujani for helping us all get less perfect and braver. (and thank you netgalley for the early preview of this awesome book!)
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  • Christine Hill
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book. I decided to review it because I like the book, but I also think there's a lot of value in it.Quick Summary: Reshma Saujani asserts that we are raising boys to be brave and girls to be perfect. This means boys are more likely to take risks than girls. By pointing at ways in which girls hold back in their quest for perfection, Saujani suggests ways we can help girls and women shift from a quest for perfection to a quest to be brave.I’m not a scientist, however I received a free copy of this book. I decided to review it because I like the book, but I also think there's a lot of value in it.Quick Summary: Reshma Saujani asserts that we are raising boys to be brave and girls to be perfect. This means boys are more likely to take risks than girls. By pointing at ways in which girls hold back in their quest for perfection, Saujani suggests ways we can help girls and women shift from a quest for perfection to a quest to be brave.I’m not a scientist, however I safely say that if you’re a scientist and you’re waiting for some powerful evidence to prove that girls are raised to be perfect, you’re going to be disappointed. There are interesting points to this idea, but it’s not strong. The argument that girls are raised to be perfect is less than compelling, except in an anecdotal way.What is compelling is a larger social focus on perfection. I’m not convinced it’s a gendered problem, but I do think it’s a problem. It may be generational, it may be that just the people I know are like this, but I know so many people who strive for perfection. I am definitely one of those people.This book is worthwhile for the tips on how to be braver, whether you’re a man or a woman. It is a powerful message to tell people that it is okay to fail in today’s world of photo filters and 4.6 GPAs. A lot of us are pushing back about being social media perfect, now it’s time to take the next step to be brave and try and (potentially) fail and this book helps in this quest.Is it worth buying? (Kindle $12.99)I think this price is very, very steep. The book isn’t terribly long. Saujani did a TED Talk on this subject, which I watched. There is a lot more information in the book. If this is something you’re really passionate about, then by all means, buy the book (other formats may be cheaper). But, even if you’re not passionate about this issue, perhaps even skeptical, you should read this!! Borrow it from the library and see what it’s all about. Something else you might enjoy:The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin is a nice addition to this conversation, mainly because it’s about one woman’s quest to finding what makes her happy. There’s no sense in being brave if you aren’t going on your quest for something amazing on the other side.
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  • Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    Not familiar with her TED Talk but thought it would be a good read and maybe a good message to hear again, even if it's not new or unfamiliar. Sometimes you see those oh so perfect pictures on Instagram or other social media or when you catch up with an old high school classmate and you see it seems they've got everything while you're struggling to stay afloat. You've got to be perfect, right? You have to act a certain way, you need to speak a certain way, dress a certain way, etc.Nah. Instead, Not familiar with her TED Talk but thought it would be a good read and maybe a good message to hear again, even if it's not new or unfamiliar. Sometimes you see those oh so perfect pictures on Instagram or other social media or when you catch up with an old high school classmate and you see it seems they've got everything while you're struggling to stay afloat. You've got to be perfect, right? You have to act a certain way, you need to speak a certain way, dress a certain way, etc.Nah. Instead, author Saujani encourages us to be brave. To fail. To take risks and forget about being perfect. Yes, it can be hard to break out of that mentality if you've been raised in it and it can be scary. But there are things one can do and steps you can take to change that.I thought it would be an uplifting nice read and while it is, I also wasn't exactly thrilled with it either. There's a trend to turn TED Talks into books when it should really be presented in another format (another video, blog, etc.) and wasn't really feeling this one, either. I suppose it was too familiar and too similar of a message that doesn't fit me or my needs right now. However, it could very easily be a great gift for someone who is graduating out of college or maybe someone who has been going through a tough time and realizes that "Hey, I need to be brave instead of perfect."I'm also not entirely sure if "brave" is the right word here but this is simply a matter of personal preference. I do think that this is certainly the right book for certain audiences and I would have liked something like this right out of college or around there. Borrowed from the library and that was best for me.
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  • Nivedita Velagaleti
    January 1, 1970
    Best part of this book is that it is outright raw! No more appeasing, if you like it you like it otherwise no fucks given. This book is for everyone, all imperfections inclusive! I would recommend this to anyone: who has at least once : doubted themselves, cried over not doing it right, not tried something because of fear of failure, tried to please everyone around them.Reshma Saujani gives you strategies to do things differently by just being brave. She uses examples from her life, from others Best part of this book is that it is outright raw! No more appeasing, if you like it you like it otherwise no fucks given. This book is for everyone, all imperfections inclusive! I would recommend this to anyone: who has at least once : doubted themselves, cried over not doing it right, not tried something because of fear of failure, tried to please everyone around them.Reshma Saujani gives you strategies to do things differently by just being brave. She uses examples from her life, from others lives to show what bravery means and what it can be. I’d read it again, and again and again to remind myself to be brave, not perfect!There are so many daily incidences from my personal and professional life that I relate to when I heard this audio book. The countless times I have stayed shut just to avoid sounding foolish, the times I have not supported women around me, the times I have said something else than spit out the truth so as to be likeable. All I need is to practice my bravery muscles one step at a time! I tried so hard while writing code to be perfect, to not let myself make mistakes and when I did make mistakes, I would go into an endless spiral of despair. You don’t need to be perfect, all you need is to be brave.
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  • Gabrielle Nagy
    January 1, 1970
    It took at least half of the book to get going. It was very repetitive. However, that's probably good for people who don't realize that they have perfectionist tendencies or that they're getting in the way of themselves. Most of the first half of the book had information and evoked feelings that I was already aware of. Once you get about two-thirds of the way through, she starts telling you how you can perform small acts of bravery everyday. "Practice flexing your bravery muscles." The third par It took at least half of the book to get going. It was very repetitive. However, that's probably good for people who don't realize that they have perfectionist tendencies or that they're getting in the way of themselves. Most of the first half of the book had information and evoked feelings that I was already aware of. Once you get about two-thirds of the way through, she starts telling you how you can perform small acts of bravery everyday. "Practice flexing your bravery muscles." The third part of the book is where it became interesting and helpful. She gave practical and useful strategies to help you "build a bravery mindset." It definitely feels motivating to realize that it's not as hard to be brave as I thought it was. It's a practical guide and a plan of action to get over being a perfectionist.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky to have this book land on my desk right as I was in the throes of anxiety over deciding to go to code bootcamp. This book was just the thing I needed to read and bonus points that it’s written by the founder of Girls Who Code. I really think this is an important read for women, but even more so I think men could really use this book in their lives so that they can learn to emphasize with their wives and children more. I reaaaalllly think any father to a daughter needs to read this so I was lucky to have this book land on my desk right as I was in the throes of anxiety over deciding to go to code bootcamp. This book was just the thing I needed to read and bonus points that it’s written by the founder of Girls Who Code. I really think this is an important read for women, but even more so I think men could really use this book in their lives so that they can learn to emphasize with their wives and children more. I reaaaalllly think any father to a daughter needs to read this so they can be mindful in what pressures they’re putting on their daughters (unconsciously) and so that they can better understand how to set their daughter up for success. It’s a very cis book though.
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  • Monica S.
    January 1, 1970
    Advance copy provided by author.A readable and relatable book about the author’s own journey as well as her specific stories and tips about how women can work through the relentless crushing need for perfectionism at the cost of mental health and happiness. No stranger to learning through a #failforward mentality, she gives inspiration, tells stories of her Girls Who Code students, and lists actual practices we may do to push through fear of failure and instead try something new.Saujani encourag Advance copy provided by author.A readable and relatable book about the author’s own journey as well as her specific stories and tips about how women can work through the relentless crushing need for perfectionism at the cost of mental health and happiness. No stranger to learning through a #failforward mentality, she gives inspiration, tells stories of her Girls Who Code students, and lists actual practices we may do to push through fear of failure and instead try something new.Saujani encourages us to be more courageous about expanding our horizons. The book is a short and easy read ... I’m looking forward to more and more !
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  • Lea
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. I’ve been telling everyone about it, this is what I’ve told my girlfriends: I just finished it and want to tell everyone about it. I highly recommend it. It’s short - the audio was only 5 hours. It talks a lot about raising girls and perfectionism etc. also tips to overcome some of the stuff we’ve been programmed to accept. I was thinking about all my friends with daughters. I think it’s a must read and she’s very nice and no judgy. It’s pretty simple stuff but also mind blowi I loved this book. I’ve been telling everyone about it, this is what I’ve told my girlfriends: I just finished it and want to tell everyone about it. I highly recommend it. It’s short - the audio was only 5 hours. It talks a lot about raising girls and perfectionism etc. also tips to overcome some of the stuff we’ve been programmed to accept. I was thinking about all my friends with daughters. I think it’s a must read and she’s very nice and no judgy. It’s pretty simple stuff but also mind blowing at the same time. I kept thinking that’s me. And I didn’t even know that was like typical woman trained since 8 years old behavior.
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  • Gretchen
    January 1, 1970
    I found myself fascinated with this book and wrote many notes causing me to take longer to read. This book can indeed be read in a day, but in my opinion to anyone that reads this book take your time with it. Really let everything soak in because it is absolutely riveting, and I found it to be extremely helpful as guide or start to unlearning what I, as well as so many women, have been taught at birth. I have started my journey to unlearn everything I was told I have to do as a girl to be accept I found myself fascinated with this book and wrote many notes causing me to take longer to read. This book can indeed be read in a day, but in my opinion to anyone that reads this book take your time with it. Really let everything soak in because it is absolutely riveting, and I found it to be extremely helpful as guide or start to unlearning what I, as well as so many women, have been taught at birth. I have started my journey to unlearn everything I was told I have to do as a girl to be accepted and liked. It has made it very easy to find ways to start this process. To anyone out there that feels they need to be perfect in every aspect of life, this is a book for you.
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  • Alexandria Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    I spent most of this book crying. She spoke to me on a level I didn't understand. Her book has political moments and speaks of women's rights, which is great for me. If you are woman who is on the right wing of politics I recommend you still read this book anyway. Heck, if you are a man raising a daughter you need to read this. This book is amazing and helpful on more ways than I ever expected.
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  • Tierney Chabot
    January 1, 1970
    I love this title, so very much! I feel it answers many questions posed in Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety. I think I didn't realize it would be a self-help book with steps.
  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    I recognized myself so much in this book. Not wanting to leave the comfort of a position just because its familiar, taking the safer route, not wanting to rock the boat etc. I think Reshma did a great job researching the book and providing detailed small steps to becoming more brave and embracing imperfection. I would recommend this book to all women, and especially teen girls.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    Truly inspiring account of the founder of Girls Who Code and how she approaches work and life for ultimate success fulfillment and opportunity. So many good points it would be hard to capture them all in a review. You’ll nod through the entire book. Quick read, focused suggestions to shift from attempting perfection to acting with bravery.
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  • Jennifer Jank
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book (obviously). The author failed hard and publicly, and then she picked herself back up and created a terrific nonprofit (Girls Who Code). She's honest about why she (and a lot of us women) are perfectionists, and why we need to be brave instead. I especially appreciated the end of the book where she offers suggestions on how to be braver.
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    Very impassioned. Your standard perfectionism is bad - it's better to do the thingsBut from a place of why were we conditioned as girls to be small and perfect while boys are encouraged to be rowdy, daring, and take up more space.Also I liked getting more understanding of how GWC came to be. Pretty dope.
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  • Grace P. (gracefulreads)
    January 1, 1970
    As a Girls Who Code alumna, I received an early review copy of this book as part of Team Brave. I know first-hand how important this book and the GWC movement is! This is a must-read for all. I was constantly inspired while reading this book and could not be happier with the final product.
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