Sabrina & Corina
A haunting debut story collection on friendship, mothers and daughters, and the deep-rooted truths of our homelands, centered on Latinas of indigenous ancestry that shines a new light on the American West. Kali Fajardo-Anstine’s magnetic story collection breathes life into her Latina characters of indigenous ancestry and the land they inhabit. Set against the remarkable backdrop of Denver, Colorado–a place that is as fierce as it is exquisite–these women navigate the land the way they navigate their lives: with caution, grace, and quiet force. In “Sugar Babies,” ancestry and heritage are hidden inside the earth but tend to rise during land disputes. “Any Further West” follows a sex worker and her daughter as they leave their ancestral home in southern Colorado only to find a foreign and hostile land in California. In “Tomi,” a woman leaves prison and finds herself in a gentrified city that is a shadow of the one she remembers from her childhood. And in the title story, “Sabrina & Corina,” a Denver family falls into a cycle of violence against women, coming together only through ritual.Sabrina & Corina is a moving narrative of unrelenting feminine power and an exploration of the universal experiences of abandonment, heritage, and an eternal sense of home.

Sabrina & Corina Details

TitleSabrina & Corina
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 2nd, 2019
PublisherOne World
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Fiction

Sabrina & Corina Review

  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    3.5+ star.There is a depth of sadness in these stories, lightened at times by connections with others or by a slight acknowledgement or recognition that maybe there is a way forward. Children, mostly young girls, being left behind by their mothers and sometimes their fathers by death, by being left willfully, or by abandonment even before they have left is a recurring theme in a number of these stories. They all take place in or around Denver, Colorado where Latina women struggle with physical v 3.5+ star.There is a depth of sadness in these stories, lightened at times by connections with others or by a slight acknowledgement or recognition that maybe there is a way forward. Children, mostly young girls, being left behind by their mothers and sometimes their fathers by death, by being left willfully, or by abandonment even before they have left is a recurring theme in a number of these stories. They all take place in or around Denver, Colorado where Latina women struggle with physical violence, drugs, financial problems, and loss. One of the most affecting stories is “Julian Plaza” where two young girls are dealing with their mother’s illness as she is dying of cancer and the family struggles to care for her. “Tomi” is another that I found especially moving, one with a glimmer of hope where an eight year old boy connects with his ex-con aunt who is trying to find her own way, after his mother leaves. I can’t say I enjoyed all of the stories equally. At the end of a few I was left hanging and didn’t feel there was any closure for the characters, but mainly not for me. However, the majority of the stories are well written, thought provoking and emotionally captivating.I received an advanced copy of this book from Random House through NetGalley.
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  • Never Without a Book™
    January 1, 1970
    The cycles of violence against women in these stories broke me. But Kali Fajardo-Anstine has a way in her writing to make you want to read me. I really wish this was a novel, I was so invested in the characters and plot that I read the book twice (only 200pgs). This collection of short stories is ugly yet beautiful. A moving narrative on the life of Indigenous Latina women; Sabrina & Corina is a must read. Thank you, NetGalley & Random House, (One world Publishing) for the e-copy in exch The cycles of violence against women in these stories broke me. But Kali Fajardo-Anstine has a way in her writing to make you want to read me. I really wish this was a novel, I was so invested in the characters and plot that I read the book twice (only 200pgs). This collection of short stories is ugly yet beautiful. A moving narrative on the life of Indigenous Latina women; Sabrina & Corina is a must read. Thank you, NetGalley & Random House, (One world Publishing) for the e-copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    I love the cover art. It's gorgeous and eye catching. This collection of short stories, Sabrina and Corina, centers around female Latina culture in Colorado. The stories are both hopeful and sad. Every story is thought provoking. It's an interesting read that's different from most short story collections. It's a good read overall.
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  • Jessie
    January 1, 1970
    This short story collection about Indigenous Latina women living in Colorado and bound by family, tradition, trauma, mental illness, and a lot of death. It was a good book, and it touched on a lot of important topics. I appreciated the way that absence and abandonment was explored in so many narratives. The common experiences of the various women felt real and connected. Family loomed large in this book. It was palpable. But. The format. I felt with every new story, that I had to start over gett This short story collection about Indigenous Latina women living in Colorado and bound by family, tradition, trauma, mental illness, and a lot of death. It was a good book, and it touched on a lot of important topics. I appreciated the way that absence and abandonment was explored in so many narratives. The common experiences of the various women felt real and connected. Family loomed large in this book. It was palpable. But. The format. I felt with every new story, that I had to start over getting familiar with everyone again, despite the common themes in this book. I wish, so much, that this book had been a novel about various women in the family living their lives around the tragedy in the title story. I wish we could have come to know them all and their stories and histories in relationship to this central loss. I wanted an epic story of a spread out family and all of the common ties and differences that shaped their relationship to this particular loss; I wanted to see their resilience and their traumas shape their reactions. I wanted a very very long novel. There were excellent seeds here. I’m excited to see more from the author. Thank you netgalley for the ARC L, opinions are my own.
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  • Julia Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    This collection blew me away. Each story here is centered on the experiences of Latinas of indigenous descent in and around Denver. Fajardo-Anstine brings her readers so close to her characters – their desires, their fears, their families, their histories – that we feel like we're inside their bodies and minds. SABRINA & CORINA is deeply intimate, profoundly beautifully written, so surprisingly and flawlessly plotted that each turn of the page is a revelation. I can't stop thinking about it. This collection blew me away. Each story here is centered on the experiences of Latinas of indigenous descent in and around Denver. Fajardo-Anstine brings her readers so close to her characters – their desires, their fears, their families, their histories – that we feel like we're inside their bodies and minds. SABRINA & CORINA is deeply intimate, profoundly beautifully written, so surprisingly and flawlessly plotted that each turn of the page is a revelation. I can't stop thinking about it. I can't wait to buy it for everyone I know.
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  • Scarllet ✦ Underrated Lit Warrior
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and Random House for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.Sabrina & Corina: Stories by Kali Fajardo-Anstine is a collection of short stories based around Latinas of Indigenous descent living in Western America. My absolute favorites of the bunch are "Sisters," "Cheesman Park," "Tomi," & "Any Further West."Each of these stories has a sense of absence, a sense abandonment. The various bittersweet relationships between mothers and daughters, sisters and Thank you to Netgalley and Random House for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.Sabrina & Corina: Stories by Kali Fajardo-Anstine is a collection of short stories based around Latinas of Indigenous descent living in Western America. My absolute favorites of the bunch are "Sisters," "Cheesman Park," "Tomi," & "Any Further West."Each of these stories has a sense of absence, a sense abandonment. The various bittersweet relationships between mothers and daughters, sisters and brothers, women and their male counterparts, women and other women are very much explored with care. It keeps you attached to the snippets of the lives we jump into for just a few minutes. I absolutely adored the thought-provoking character study, the character work that was done to bring the lives of these women to reality. There is such unique and divine quality surrounding them, Faji's voice is beautiful and her descriptions of Latin American culture are poignant. You have to slow down and truly take these stories in, take in the way Faji uses language to coat the pages of her collection in a fine mist of dazzling truth and magic. There are strong and compelling survivors that live through cycles of violence acted upon their bodies, their culture, their lands. A lot of the narrative is very bleak and dark at times, though. It helps to slow down two-fold because then you aren't as heavy-hearted reading this collection in just one sitting but also when Faji brings in the light, you can find some hope through her utter honesty. Indigenous women are missing or dead. There is violence enacted upon the woman body at every turn and yet nobody says a word at the physical evidence of that fact. Two of my five star short stories in this collection: "Sisters" and "Cheesman Park" actually have similar discussions on the way that battered or "bruised" women are not seen. Faji truly does not pull her punches in exploring the harsh realities of not only womanhood but being of Indigenous descent and being other. This collection is out in this world now and honestly, recommend to get yourself a copy.
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  • Ebony Rose
    January 1, 1970
    Sabrina & Corina is an impressive collection of short stories. Though the stories show considerable range and depth, there are consistent themes of abandonment, family, culture and belonging that thread the stories together quite beautifully. Mental illness and familial/domestic violence also features prominently in many of the stories. Even more so, there is a thread of a quiet sort of melancholy through the stories that binds them to one another. Fajardo-Anstine is a talented writer, and t Sabrina & Corina is an impressive collection of short stories. Though the stories show considerable range and depth, there are consistent themes of abandonment, family, culture and belonging that thread the stories together quite beautifully. Mental illness and familial/domestic violence also features prominently in many of the stories. Even more so, there is a thread of a quiet sort of melancholy through the stories that binds them to one another. Fajardo-Anstine is a talented writer, and the subjects here - latinas of indigenous/native ancestry - are so important. However, this was not a five star read for me, mostly because although I was impressed with the stories and wanted to connect to them, I just didn't quite get there. I never became fully immersed in the stories (save for a select few) or characters (again, except for a select few). However, I did find this collection to be incredibly well written as well as thought provoking overall.
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  • Karen (idleutopia_reads)
    January 1, 1970
    There are times when we open a book and its undiscovered terrain. The social construct we live in doesn't always apply to the story we are entering so we have to come in with an open mind. In this book, Kali Fajardo-Anstine takes certain elements and amplifies it to the point were we grow weary of the terror, the evil, and all of the harm done against the women that we encounter. I think it was meant to be written that way. Sometimes the stories and the settings are the same but the impact they There are times when we open a book and its undiscovered terrain. The social construct we live in doesn't always apply to the story we are entering so we have to come in with an open mind. In this book, Kali Fajardo-Anstine takes certain elements and amplifies it to the point were we grow weary of the terror, the evil, and all of the harm done against the women that we encounter. I think it was meant to be written that way. Sometimes the stories and the settings are the same but the impact they have on you are still striking. To see the same violence over and over again, the cycle can either infuriate you to action or numb you. I think she meant for the reader to feel this. I think she wanted certain aspects of the world we live in amplified and mirrored in such a way that we didn't lose sight of them. We often get muddled through with fogs and mists that are put in the way to draw focus away from the bigger picture. She wants us to confront this, to get tired of the gentrification, of the violence against women, of white men using them as commodities, as exotic objects that they can use to immortalize their name, to perpetuate their violence while still feeling superior, to continue the colonization of the land but now through the women. It's an amazing read. She doesn't mince words. Sometimes the worst harm is done through family that ask well "what did you expect"? Family that is supposed to be there for you but can't be there for themselves so you have to either sink with them or let them go. It's just a provocative and offers a different perspective into the lives of indigenous Latina women. The cycle of violence that follows generations and the chains between the stories were wonderfully crafted. You see parallels between the stories that guide how the story impacts you. I think this repetition of the same violence amplifies your indignation against colonization. The prose hits you in a way that just makes the story hurt and leave behind a bruise as a reminder of the violence. The violence that we should be furious at and the people that continue to perpetuate it. Just a five star read overall.Thank you to Netgalley and Random House Publishing Group for a free e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lorilin
    January 1, 1970
    Sabrina and Corina is a collection of short stories about different Latina women living in the western United States. Most of the stories are bleak, featuring female characters who are poor, beaten down, and broken. Many of the women feel pushed to be in relationships with men for financial support, but these relationships aren’t healthy and end up hurting the women even more. Those who try to survive on their own don’t fare much better. Here are brief summaries of some of the stories:*** A girl Sabrina and Corina is a collection of short stories about different Latina women living in the western United States. Most of the stories are bleak, featuring female characters who are poor, beaten down, and broken. Many of the women feel pushed to be in relationships with men for financial support, but these relationships aren’t healthy and end up hurting the women even more. Those who try to survive on their own don’t fare much better. Here are brief summaries of some of the stories:*** A girl’s junkie mother only returns to the house every once in a while, stays a few weeks, then disappears again for months.*** A woman has to apply funeral makeup on her dead best friend from childhood.*** A little girl gets lice every time she’s forced to visit with her poor half-brother. (Even though I was meh about the ending on this one, it was one of my favorite stories.)*** Two sisters have to come to terms with their mother’s terminal breast cancer diagnosis, while their father struggles to pay for her medical care.And the sadness goes on. And on…Honestly, I wouldn’t normally finish a book like this. It’s just too damn depressing. But the one saving grace is that at least some of the women are strong survivors. And it helps, too, that there are repeated themes of family loyalty, community, perseverance, and deep respect for grandparents and tradition.The stories are beautifully told, but every single one is hopelessly tragic. Even when people rally and come together, it’s always clear that they have no chance at a good life. So my advice is to read Sabrina and Corina with caution. Maybe only take on a couple stories at a time and then supplement with some good self-care. Trust me, you’re going to need a lot of hugs after this one.Big thanks to One World and Net Galley for the ARC!See more of my reviews at www.bugbugbooks.com.
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  • Bookishfolk
    January 1, 1970
    This collection was everything I wanted it to be and more! It's centered around Latina women of indigenous ancestry and that is definitely the shining star in all of these stories and BRAVOOOO for bringing this into the spotlight. It felt refreshing, and I feel honored to have these words.These stories revolve around women, mostly working class women, who are strong, courageous and determined humans. Their ancestors were here before America was America and I think people (mostly white people) fo This collection was everything I wanted it to be and more! It's centered around Latina women of indigenous ancestry and that is definitely the shining star in all of these stories and BRAVOOOO for bringing this into the spotlight. It felt refreshing, and I feel honored to have these words.These stories revolve around women, mostly working class women, who are strong, courageous and determined humans. Their ancestors were here before America was America and I think people (mostly white people) forget this or unfortunately, choose not to care. History books tell us certain stories about the wild West, but this collection shows us the truth and gives us a lens to see the West from something other than a white person's gaze. Halle-frigin-lujah. It helps us remember and honor those cultures that were here first-and that makes me feel like I'm holding literal magic in my hands.There is a depth to each story and always a sense that although things might be tough or hard, or let's be honest, just real, cause this shit isn't always easy...but that there is a way to progress and move forward. BUT THEN, add women-centered stories, culture, intimate portrayals, gorgeous sentence structure and storytelling and characters you fall in love with immediately (for both good and bad)-yes please! BUT WAIT, you also get love, atmospheric descriptions where landscape and location plays a main character, thoughts about heritage and what that means, friendship, and family dynamics...screaming. BUT ALSO, most of the narrative takes place in Denver, Colorado (I'm only a short drive from Denver and so many references and places in the stories I could picture) and I nearly screamed with excitement as I frantically flipped pages while soaking it all in. This collection is that good.These stories are tough, emotional and have a sense of sadness interwoven in each one. So when you read them, don't expect happy, funny (although I laughed quite a few times), or a lighthearted read. What you need to expect is a connection with characters you may never make again (although I have high hopes we will start to see more of this from authors and from Fajardo-Anstine herself) and a sense that our true history is important and should be honored. This collection will make you laugh, cry, worry, think and ultimately, a better person. I truly believe in the magic of this book.Sabrina and Corina is beautiful collection of stories (even the cover is one of the most beautiful covers I have ever seen) and I would suggest you run and grab a copy of this asap. I promise you, you won't regret it!P.S. I was lucky enough to meet Kali Fajardo-Anstine last week in Denver and I haven't come down from the high since. I can't wait to see what else she has to offer us-I know a book is in the works for sure and I'm thrilled!!! copied from my blog over at http://www.bookishfolk.com
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  • Stacey A. Prose and Palate
    January 1, 1970
    "One gin and tonic turned into three and soon the girl blurted out an apology befoe asking Doty what happened to her eyes (it wasn't that they were ugly, just turned every which way). The other guests had moved onto the dance floor. Doty could feel white streamers blow over the grass, their own kind of shadows."I had an accident.”“Oh, no," said the girl, scooting closer to Doty and squeezing her hand. "I bet people say you're lucky it wasn't worse.”“As a matter of fact," said Doty, "no one says "One gin and tonic turned into three and soon the girl blurted out an apology befoe asking Doty what happened to her eyes (it wasn't that they were ugly, just turned every which way). The other guests had moved onto the dance floor. Doty could feel white streamers blow over the grass, their own kind of shadows."I had an accident.”“Oh, no," said the girl, scooting closer to Doty and squeezing her hand. "I bet people say you're lucky it wasn't worse.”“As a matter of fact," said Doty, "no one says anything about it at all."I am incredibly grateful to Lupita for sending me what has become my favorite short story collection of the year so far. It is impossible for me to tell you which story I liked best because the entire book is just so damn good. But I can tell you that I have returned to it over and over to re-read and absorb the power, the sadness, and the fierceness that Kali poured out on to the pages as she took me down a dark, eye opening path of violence, addiction, poverty and racism. I was completely blown away by this incredible collection and when I read that the scene in Cheesman Park was based on a real experience of of the author's.... I just.... no words. I loved how she flipped the narrative in Sugar Babies. Reading the stories Sisters, Tomi, Sabrina and Corina.... they all just broke me. I wanted all of the stories to be longer.... I wanted more on all of these flawed, complex, female characters. This book is just a force and the author is insanely talented and I can not wait to read what she writes next.
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  • Corinne Keener
    January 1, 1970
    Sabrina & Corina is a really beautifully crafted short story collection about Indigenous Latina women living in and around Denver. Each story had an acute sense of sadness and loss, many of them dealt with violence against women, and abandonment. These are necessarily dark themes, but the heart of most of the stories was warm and deeply human. Mothers, grandmothers and daughters, sisters, cousins, and in my favorite story, Tomi, an aunt and her nephew search for connection to one another des Sabrina & Corina is a really beautifully crafted short story collection about Indigenous Latina women living in and around Denver. Each story had an acute sense of sadness and loss, many of them dealt with violence against women, and abandonment. These are necessarily dark themes, but the heart of most of the stories was warm and deeply human. Mothers, grandmothers and daughters, sisters, cousins, and in my favorite story, Tomi, an aunt and her nephew search for connection to one another despite how awkward that can be, and despite sometimes hurting one another. It has been a long, long time since a book has made me cry, and these are short stories so I didn't even have hundreds of pages to get to know any one character. Fajardo-Anstine has a gift for crafting characters I was able to connect to and feel deeply about instantly.
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  • Lolly K Dandeneau
    January 1, 1970
    via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/She said people will find the loveliest part of you and try to make it ugly. “And they will do anything,” she always said, “to own that piece of you.”In this fantastic collection of stories by Kali Fajardo- Anstine about the experiences of Latina women indigenous to the vast land of the American West, characters range in age and life situations. Beauty can’t save any of them from the violence of bad men, nor can it guarantee a better life , “the via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/She said people will find the loveliest part of you and try to make it ugly. “And they will do anything,” she always said, “to own that piece of you.”In this fantastic collection of stories by Kali Fajardo- Anstine about the experiences of Latina women indigenous to the vast land of the American West, characters range in age and life situations. Beauty can’t save any of them from the violence of bad men, nor can it guarantee a better life , “they look at us like we’re nothing.” In Sugar Babies, a restless mother leaves while her daughter cares for her own school ‘baby’. Sabrina & Corina is one of the saddest with a bad ending for a much admired Cordava cousin. The loss finds Corina using her make-up skills to tend to Sabrina’s body as she reminisces of her deep love for “the family beauty”. Too, she shares the distance between them before everything went wrong, before her cousin’s ‘carelessness’ began to disgust her. This family of women have lived with nothing but tragedies, how can anyone hope for a happy fate with so much evidence to the contrary?In Sisters, Dotty has her sight stolen from her and thinks about a missing girl, about survival and thus begins the story of what happens when women say no and bruise a man’s ego, inciting his rage. This is the sort of story that makes me think of Margaret Atwood’s biting quote, ‘Men are afraid that women will laugh at them. Women are afraid that men will kill them.’ What happens to the women in each story can knock the wind out of you, and though fiction, it’s not one bit fantastical and that is frightening.In Remedies, lice are the monster. I adore characters that understand natural medicine and for some, home remedies was the only cure. Too, a young girl struggles with a half-brother in her life, the father absent for both of them but why should she have to share her own mother? The writing is gorgeous throughout, I kept breaking my heart against each one. Just when I thought it couldn’t get sadder, I was gutted again. ‘Cora and I had been around sick and dying people our entire lives. People, we learned, weren’t permanent and neither were their illnesses.’ Characters are all struggling to keep things together through illnesses, death, grief, and the aftermath of prison. Some deal with their own shameful pasts, others with the inevitable trajectory of what’s to come. The Bob Dylan quote before the stories begin is spot on, these are certainly sad-eyed ladies. Yes, read it!!!Publication Date: April 2, 2019Random HouseOne World
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  • Jonathan
    January 1, 1970
    This is just a quick sum up of some of the stories in this collection I’m using for a review on my Instagram book blog jonathangolding_books Sugar Babies- a young girl and her classmate are tasked with a homework project of taking care of a “baby” made from a sugar sack, all while her estranged mother who never showed her what it was like to be taken care of randomly returns home after leaving her and her father. They try to reconnect and she struggles to get her hopes up as she finds her male c This is just a quick sum up of some of the stories in this collection I’m using for a review on my Instagram book blog jonathangolding_books Sugar Babies- a young girl and her classmate are tasked with a homework project of taking care of a “baby” made from a sugar sack, all while her estranged mother who never showed her what it was like to be taken care of randomly returns home after leaving her and her father. They try to reconnect and she struggles to get her hopes up as she finds her male classmate is also surpassing her in the ability to take care of their “sugar baby”Sabrina & Corina- Sabrina is round dead being strangled to death, and Corina tells the story of her and her cousin being best friends until the final few months of her life. She tells how men always loved Sabrina for her exotic look and they took drastically different paths in life. Also on top of all that she was asked by her family to do the makeup on Sabrina for her open casket funeral.Sisters- this story reads like a thriller finding out at the beginning that one of two sisters who live together goes blind within a few days. One sisters desires the companionship of a man and a husband while the other is content with her sister and the life they have. Forced to go on double dates with two men things take a rough turn and this story left me speechless.Remedies- a young girl is forced to spend time with her half brother by her mother who isn’t the connection to the young boy, it’s her father that left both her and the boys mother. Meanwhile her grandmother has ancient remedies for all ailments and this story is a great look into the older Latino culture and superstitionsJulian Plaza- this story broke my heart, about two young sisters who frequent her father to work at an old folks home where he does maintenance. They play games and watch as death swirls around them not only as they watch tenants of the home die frequently, but their mother is at home slowly dying from breast cancer which the family doesn’t have the money to pay for treatment.Galapago- a middle aged woman keeps trying to convince her grandmother who raised her to move out of the home she has lived in for over 50 years, only for the process to be sped up when a young man break in and the grandmother kills him. She then tells stories and reminisces about the years she spent in that house and neighborhood with her husband and granddaughter.Cheesman Park- a young woman returns home from California where she fled after constantly witnessing her father beat her mother, ironically she returns because the man she was seeing attacked her. She finds comfort in her mother and inadvertently saves the life of a young widowed woman her own age who lives in the same building, the two form an odd friendship and things continue from there.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This book is one of those dazzling ones, the ones that keep you enthralled with tight structure and the bright petals of atmospheric sentences and characters you care about immediately. Every story in here was a hit for me. Kali Fajardo-Anstine has created something gorgeous. These stories center Indigenous and Chicanx women, lovingly rendered and living their complicated, varied lives in present-day white supremacist America, often building up, laughing with, helping, and loving each other, in This book is one of those dazzling ones, the ones that keep you enthralled with tight structure and the bright petals of atmospheric sentences and characters you care about immediately. Every story in here was a hit for me. Kali Fajardo-Anstine has created something gorgeous. These stories center Indigenous and Chicanx women, lovingly rendered and living their complicated, varied lives in present-day white supremacist America, often building up, laughing with, helping, and loving each other, in families and friendships. They mostly take place in Colorado, and the landscape is a constant presence, which the characters have mixed feelings about but for the reader it feels very grounding. These stories feel like perfect gems, both in craft and in content. Definitely don’t sleep on this one! Can’t wait to read more from this author.I received an eARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review; opinions are my own.
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  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. (#partner @randomhouse @litandlatte) • Sabrina & Corina by Kali Fajardo-Anstine is the second short story collection I’ve read this year. I do this thing, with short story collections, where I’ll read a couple, and then never pick the book up again. I don’t know why. That was never a problem with this book, though. I would finish a story and immediately want to see what came next.These stories revolve around Latina women of indigenous descent who live in Colorado. They take place 3.5 stars. (#partner @randomhouse @litandlatte) • Sabrina & Corina by Kali Fajardo-Anstine is the second short story collection I’ve read this year. I do this thing, with short story collections, where I’ll read a couple, and then never pick the book up again. I don’t know why. That was never a problem with this book, though. I would finish a story and immediately want to see what came next.These stories revolve around Latina women of indigenous descent who live in Colorado. They take place in the fictional town of Saguarita and real places like Denver, and the sense of place is strong. I pictured Saguarita as a Durango-like setting but I’m not sure what it was actually based on.These stories explore the cycles of violence surrounding these women, how it feels to watch your neighborhood gentrify around you until it is unrecognizable, what it’s like to be a single parent or be raised by a single parent, and more. My favorite story of the bunch, Remedies, is about a girl who keeps getting lice when she has to visit with her half-brother. Her mother feels some sort of obligation to the boy, despite not even being in a relationship with his father anymore.These stories are insightful, poignant, and moving. I highly recommend picking up this collection. I’ll be thinking about it for awhile
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  • Sam Ewen
    January 1, 1970
    This collection is poignant, beautiful, heartbreaking and empowering. KFA highlights these women in profound detail and brings life to them and their stories for us all to witness. Each story had me needing to read the next. I can only imagine what more Fajardo-Anstine will bring us in her work to come and I am here for it.
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  • Mona AlvaradoFrazier
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a collection of short stories that bring to life the lives of working-class indigenous, Latina, and dual ethnicity, bilingual and bicultural women. The commonality is the backdrop of Denver, Colorado and the town of Saguarita, "a place where the land with its silken fibers of swaying grass resembled a sleeping woman with her face pressed firmly to the pillow, a golden blonde by day, a raven-haired beauty by night."What I loved about this author (Kali Fajardo-Anstine) was her ability This book is a collection of short stories that bring to life the lives of working-class indigenous, Latina, and dual ethnicity, bilingual and bicultural women. The commonality is the backdrop of Denver, Colorado and the town of Saguarita, "a place where the land with its silken fibers of swaying grass resembled a sleeping woman with her face pressed firmly to the pillow, a golden blonde by day, a raven-haired beauty by night."What I loved about this author (Kali Fajardo-Anstine) was her ability to immerse the reader into the setting which she aptly describes in unique and familiar ways. By 'familiar' I mean as a Latina, Chicana in the southwest, I've known these characters. They're my neighbors, relatives, and friends. The author has a wonderful ability to describe people in few but powerful words: "She was a small shadowy woman, my grandmother." "Her stance was wobbly and unrefined, as though she had given someone else permission to wear her skin...she was caught forever in her own undercurrent."The women in the story are treated with respect although the reader doesn't have to agree with their choices. These are strong, scrappy women who make mistakes like everyone else and navigate their world the best they can with what they know and have at the time. These are stories that women can relate to because of the themes: love, abandonment, betrayal, abuse, friendship, and mother-daughter relationships. Most of the stories are contemporary but a couple of them are set in the 1960's, like my favorite one "Sisters."Thank you to NetGalley for providing an uncorrected e-book file for review. I would definitely read other books by this author.
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  • MundiNova
    January 1, 1970
    "I have experienced enough Cordova deaths to know one pot was filled with green chili, another with pintos, and the last one with menudo. Deaths, weddings, birthdays -- the menu was always the same."No one can hurt you like familyThese beautiful short stories will break your heart, just a little, then fill you with love. Fajardo-Anstine writes Indigenous Latina family stories all taking place in or around Denver. Each story focusing on one relationship at a time: mothers and daughters, sisters, "I have experienced enough Cordova deaths to know one pot was filled with green chili, another with pintos, and the last one with menudo. Deaths, weddings, birthdays -- the menu was always the same."No one can hurt you like familyThese beautiful short stories will break your heart, just a little, then fill you with love. Fajardo-Anstine writes Indigenous Latina family stories all taking place in or around Denver. Each story focusing on one relationship at a time: mothers and daughters, sisters, close cousins, brother and sister. There's a common theme of absent parents and children that have to grow up just a little too quickly. Family misfits who want to be seen as valuable. Also gentrification of urban Denver and death ceremonies, both forced changes we sometimes don't want to acknowledge. The title story, "Sabrina & Corina", was my clear favorite and one I'll re-read again.Fajardo-Anstine's writing is very descriptive without falling into purple prose. The reader can clearly visualize the weather sweeping through the Colorado countryside, a mother's kitchen, and the familiar funeral parlor. I really hope Fajardo-Anstine explores novel length books because she would be amazing at it I'm sure.I received a copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Stories: 5 starsWriting/Prose: 5 starsOverall Theme: 5 stars
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Although the subject matter of "Sabrina & Corina" is often bleak and depressing, this collection of short stories filled my heart with joy. Fajardo-Anstine does an incredible job examining themes of abandonment, addiction, and violence against women, all while conveying the soaring spirits of her female characters. Set around Denver, Colorado, these stories all share commonalities of how we are truly affected by our ancestry (in this case, of indigenous nature), none more than our immediate Although the subject matter of "Sabrina & Corina" is often bleak and depressing, this collection of short stories filled my heart with joy. Fajardo-Anstine does an incredible job examining themes of abandonment, addiction, and violence against women, all while conveying the soaring spirits of her female characters. Set around Denver, Colorado, these stories all share commonalities of how we are truly affected by our ancestry (in this case, of indigenous nature), none more than our immediate family. For better or worse, we are direct products of our environments. I was completely taken by Fajardo-Anstine's writing style, and I was saddened each time a story ended - I could have stayed with all of these characters so much longer! I am ecstatic to see what this writer does next - we certainly need her valued perspective of diverse and strong women - and I'll be happily recommending this collection to everyone I know!
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  • Brooke Dilling
    January 1, 1970
    Fajardo-Anstine has written a book to be read slowly and savored. I love her strong Latina characters and the sad, yet hopeful stories she’s penned. The stories are rich with details, so much of the book gives glimpses into Denver’s Latinx history... I’m craving more! In Fajardo-Anstine’s stories, the women are strong and resilient — in spite of (or perhaps because of) the (mostly) rotten men in their lives. Their lives may not be ideal, but these women are survivors.There is some cross-over of Fajardo-Anstine has written a book to be read slowly and savored. I love her strong Latina characters and the sad, yet hopeful stories she’s penned. The stories are rich with details, so much of the book gives glimpses into Denver’s Latinx history... I’m craving more! In Fajardo-Anstine’s stories, the women are strong and resilient — in spite of (or perhaps because of) the (mostly) rotten men in their lives. Their lives may not be ideal, but these women are survivors.There is some cross-over of characters between a few stories, which I enjoyed... and would have like to see more. And I also loved that the city of Denver is prominently featured throughout the book— she feels like another character. I’ll be re-reading this, sharing it with friends, and anticipating the book’s official April 2019 release.
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  • Cassie (book__gal)
    January 1, 1970
    Sabrina & Corina does such a graceful job at showing what micro-aggressions really look like, specifically against indigenous Latina women, in this collection. Sometimes the violence in these stories is outright and in your face; other times, however, in the stories I found most impactful, there is more subtle yet just as insidious violence, like a detective telling a woman she should model while sizing up the police photographs of her body after abuse. These stories made me think about how Sabrina & Corina does such a graceful job at showing what micro-aggressions really look like, specifically against indigenous Latina women, in this collection. Sometimes the violence in these stories is outright and in your face; other times, however, in the stories I found most impactful, there is more subtle yet just as insidious violence, like a detective telling a woman she should model while sizing up the police photographs of her body after abuse. ⁣⁣⁣⁣These stories made me think about how violence happens even without physicality; how words and choices can be violent too. So many of the women in this book reckon with that realization. These women are strong and resilient and I think you may see yourself in some of them. Many stories left a lump in my throat at the end - a wonderful debut from Kali Fajardo-Anstine!
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  • Cortney (cortingbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Breathtakingly beautiful and heartbreaking stories about some of the hardships Indigenous Latina women go through in life that will bring tears to your eyes. I felt each story. I don’t normally read short stories but this one I highly recommend. I could easily see all of these stories turned into full novels I would love to own. My favorites in the collections were: •Sabrina & Corina: The books namesake about two cousins and the different paths they take. •Remedies: The consequences of tryin Breathtakingly beautiful and heartbreaking stories about some of the hardships Indigenous Latina women go through in life that will bring tears to your eyes. I felt each story. I don’t normally read short stories but this one I highly recommend. I could easily see all of these stories turned into full novels I would love to own. My favorites in the collections were: •Sabrina & Corina: The books namesake about two cousins and the different paths they take. •Remedies: The consequences of trying to do the right thing or to make up for someone else’s bad decisions. Made me smile. •Ghost Sickness: Bittersweet ending to a great collection.{eARC provided by publisher in exchange for an honest review}
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  • Salena Moffat
    January 1, 1970
    🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸 out of 5 🌸s#SabrinaAndCorina by @kalimaja🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸 out of 5 🌸sI absolutely loved this collection of stories. To be very honest, I went into it slightly biased in its favor--one of the author's sisters was my eldest daughter's best friend when they were small, and I share the dubious distinction with another sister of having been horribly bitten by the same dog. That said, the stories stunned me with their scope, their imagery, and the breadth of the author's knowledge of the human condition, s 🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸 out of 5 🌸s#SabrinaAndCorina by @kalimaja🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸 out of 5 🌸sI absolutely loved this collection of stories. To be very honest, I went into it slightly biased in its favor--one of the author's sisters was my eldest daughter's best friend when they were small, and I share the dubious distinction with another sister of having been horribly bitten by the same dog. That said, the stories stunned me with their scope, their imagery, and the breadth of the author's knowledge of the human condition, specifically of the female human condition. The stories are riveting and just plain lovely. The collection brought to mind nobody so much as Lucia Berlin. Brilliant.
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  • Sebastian
    January 1, 1970
    A stunning, stellar collection of short stories, and from an author speaking for those who so rarely get a voice in high literature. I enjoyed the immense craft, heart, and hard work Fajardo-Anstine put into these stories. First read: April 24, 2019, Wednesday
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  • Kari
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful collection of short stories about the lives of Indigenous Latina women in Colorado. Fajardo-Anstine created such strong female characters to lead her culturally-rich stories. I honestly cannot wait to read whatever the author comes out with next.
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  • Alyson Hagy
    January 1, 1970
    A powerful, passionate collection of stories centered on the experience of Latina women in the Southwest. Fajardo-Anstine’s voice is fresh and unstinting, her vision complex and bold. An important, delightful, dazzling debut.
  • Carrie Esposito
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful stories about Latinas living in the American West. These stories are unsentimental yet have a gorgeous light in them. There’s a tell it like it is sensibility that makes readers feel both comfortable and uncomfortable in all the best ways. For me personally, I liked learning about the Northside, the Denver neighborhood I moved into and am still seeking to know. Also, each story has engaging characters and an accessible style that invites readers to sit down, listen, pay attention, and Beautiful stories about Latinas living in the American West. These stories are unsentimental yet have a gorgeous light in them. There’s a tell it like it is sensibility that makes readers feel both comfortable and uncomfortable in all the best ways. For me personally, I liked learning about the Northside, the Denver neighborhood I moved into and am still seeking to know. Also, each story has engaging characters and an accessible style that invites readers to sit down, listen, pay attention, and stay awhile.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. These short stories are just incredible. A portal into the lives of minority groups I know little to nothing about yet after reading felt absolutely connected to. After each one ended, I was left wanting more and wondering about the fate of the characters. Highly recommend.
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  • Karee
    January 1, 1970
    Review coming soon
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