Destroy All Monsters
A crucial, genre-bending tale, equal parts Ned Vizzini and Patrick Ness, about the life-saving power of friendship.Solomon and Ash both experienced a traumatic event when they were twelve.Ash lost all memory of that event when she fell from Solomon’s treehouse. Since then, Solomon has retreated further and further into a world he seems to have created in his own mind. One that insulates him from reality, but crawls with foes and monsters . . . in both animal and human form.As Solomon slips further into the place he calls Darkside, Ash realizes her only chance to free her best friend from his pain is to recall exactly what happened that day in his backyard and face the truth—together.Fearless and profound, Sam J. Miller’s follow up to his award-winning debut novel, The Art of Starving, spins an intimate and impactful tale that will linger with readers.

Destroy All Monsters Details

TitleDestroy All Monsters
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 2nd, 2019
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062456762
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary

Destroy All Monsters Review

  • Shaun Hutchinson
    January 1, 1970
    Effing brilliant.
  • Giselle
    January 1, 1970
    True rating: 3.5 stars.I chose to read this book because of the mention of a Patrick Ness-like style, and this is definitely true. It starts out confusing as heck, but in a good way. The kind of confusing that captivates you, and pulls you in fully with the promise of a very odd, gritty, mysterious book.Told in dual POV, we go through this story with two very different angles. One is Ash who is your typical teenage girl who doesn't completely fit in, but who's also not a complete loner. Then the True rating: 3.5 stars.I chose to read this book because of the mention of a Patrick Ness-like style, and this is definitely true. It starts out confusing as heck, but in a good way. The kind of confusing that captivates you, and pulls you in fully with the promise of a very odd, gritty, mysterious book.Told in dual POV, we go through this story with two very different angles. One is Ash who is your typical teenage girl who doesn't completely fit in, but who's also not a complete loner. Then there's Solomon who takes us on a wild ride filled with dinosaurs, monsters, and magic. Which is real, though? Is Solomon just making this all up, or is it Ash who is unable to see the monsters? I found this aspect really enjoyable and fun to try and figure out. I did find that my interest in the bizarre world fizzled out after a while, though. As the story advances and the the mystery unravels, I found myself wanting to skip over Solomon's POV to get to the big reveal. It didn't help that the POV switched so often that it was hard to keep track of the going ons of the Darkside and its characters. I felt like I never had time to really immerse myself into that fantasy land before we were snatched away into the real-world of Ash's POV again. This made the story feel very jittery, and I found myself mostly paying attention to Ash's storyline, and getting bored when we were thrown into what had started as an intriguing, dark otherworld. There were also parts of the story that made me uncomfortable. Ash has a "friend with benefits" that, while I know does happen at 16, felt out of place for me. No parent batted an eye at a 16yo spending so much time alone in a boy's room for most of the night/evening. I'm not a prude, but it just felt really awkward and unnecessary for the story.With all that said, the overall message in this novel is an important one. I appreciated that it had real substance, while keeping its air of mystery and magic throughout. It's an overall dark, gritty story that can never be told enough.
    more
  • Rebecca Roanhorse
    January 1, 1970
    Laini Taylor meets John Green in this poignant young adult tale of parallel worlds and deep magic where trauma breaks but friendship heals. Miller offers no easy answers for fighting the all-too-real monsters in our lives but still allows space for hope, healing, and above all, bravery.
    more
  • Andy Winder
    January 1, 1970
    Do you know what this reminded me of (in the best way possible)? Patrick Ness. It’s got the same darkly whimsical feel to it while using monsters to represent deep emotional turmoil. When I read “The Art of Starving” almost two years ago, I was struck by the author’s unconventional choice to discuss eating disorders through science fiction. Destroy All Monsters pushes the way we traditionally discuss serious issues like child abuse and post-traumatic stress disorder in what makes for a thought-p Do you know what this reminded me of (in the best way possible)? Patrick Ness. It’s got the same darkly whimsical feel to it while using monsters to represent deep emotional turmoil. When I read “The Art of Starving” almost two years ago, I was struck by the author’s unconventional choice to discuss eating disorders through science fiction. Destroy All Monsters pushes the way we traditionally discuss serious issues like child abuse and post-traumatic stress disorder in what makes for a thought-provoking read.At first, I wasn’t sure how I felt about the dual perspectives in this book. In my opinion, they have to be done carefully or else it’s hard to immerse the reader in either one. But in this case, both Solomon and Ash were able to establish distinct voices that added important things to the plot. I also felt like Solomon and Ash had an authentic connection as friends, which added even more emphasis to both the traumatic and healing parts of the book.I’d recommend this book for magical realism fans as well as anyone who’s interested in a fascinating psychological fantasy. But I would recommend looking into some of the heavier themes in the book if you think that any of them might trigger you.
    more
  • Teenage Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Plot: Trigger Warning: Child MolestationAsh and Solomon have been friends since they were kids. They were friends when Solomon found out he was gay, when his mother was arrested, when Ash got her depression, but nothing changed them more than the traumatic event that happened to them when they were twelve. It was so traumatic, that neither of them remembered what happens, only that Ash fell out of the tree house, and her father believes Solomon to be dangerous. From there, Solomon started going Plot: Trigger Warning: Child MolestationAsh and Solomon have been friends since they were kids. They were friends when Solomon found out he was gay, when his mother was arrested, when Ash got her depression, but nothing changed them more than the traumatic event that happened to them when they were twelve. It was so traumatic, that neither of them remembered what happens, only that Ash fell out of the tree house, and her father believes Solomon to be dangerous. From there, Solomon started going deeper into the reality he created: The Darkside, where he is friends with the Rebel Princess Ash and has to protect her from the people who want to harm her. Ash, who attends Hudson High School, unlike Solomon who misses more days than he attends, has her eyes set on the football team. As the horrific events start happening to fellow classmates and her town, Ash is sure the football team is behind them, but why is the question she needs to answer. Using her photography skills, she is out to find the Truth with the capital T. Using her connection to Conner, who is a player on the team and is the son of the coach. Conner is also her booty call, and Solomon’s step-brother. Hopefully Ash will be able to use Conner to help her find the truth, and she can help him with his concerns about Solomon. Solomon is busy going deeper and deeper into the Darkside that he created, barley bathing, eating, and he is basically homeless. Fighting the block, her mind put on the night she fell out of the tree house, Ash knows what she is blocking is the key to saving Solomon, and even though something is telling Ash she does not want to know, she is determined to find out, for Solomon. Thoughts:Sam J. Miller wrote this novel about the life-saving friendship between Ash and Solomon. The book alternates between the point of view of Ash and Solomon, where Ash is in the real world, and Solomon is in the Darkside. Only, the Darkside is not real, as it is all part of Solomon’s way of dealing with the tree house trauma. Miller wrote it to connect with the real world, which it did in the parts, as Darkside Solomon was with Ash when the real world Ash was with Solomon. But when the characters were separated, Solomon’s chapters did not advance the story and were just a throwaway chapter until you got to Ash again. Solomon was a broken character, so the only emotion you can feel for him is a pity, and love because of what Ash sees in him: “Ash and me, we made each other better” (168). The plot only became good near the climax of the story, when Ash finds out what happened to Solomon, which made sense, but it did not feel organic. But these things are not supposed to. Miller could also have written the friendship between Solomon and Ash to be stronger. With Solomon being gay, gave away the potential for romance in their relationship, their interactions and conversations did not give the best-firmed-till-death vibe. Strained maybe because Solomon was off in the world when Ash was talking to him, their relationship did not give the quoted life-saving friendship that Mill said to have written. The plot to the story, minus Solomon’s unnecessary Darkworld part, Ash’s was good, as she does detective work on the football team, and digs through her memories to save Solomon. Overall, the story was alright, the trigger warning does give this story an interesting edge that makes it different, but the characters’ personality will not help save the story.
    more
  • Courtney Lavallee
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't sure what to think of this book in the beginning. It was very hard to follow so I kept getting pulled out of the story. Also there should be a massive trigger warning for Child Molestation, as this is a topic talked about in the book.With all that said, this book did get better and substantially so. By about the 200pg mark I could not put the book down, everything was changing and interesting. This was a very well researched book as it deals with trauma and how some people deal with the I wasn't sure what to think of this book in the beginning. It was very hard to follow so I kept getting pulled out of the story. Also there should be a massive trigger warning for Child Molestation, as this is a topic talked about in the book.With all that said, this book did get better and substantially so. By about the 200pg mark I could not put the book down, everything was changing and interesting. This was a very well researched book as it deals with trauma and how some people deal with their trauma. This was very insightful to how some mental illness seems to the person experiencing it. My only issue was I wish the ending was explained a bit more in detail, it wasn't rushed but I felt it could've been more in depth. However, with the more in depth, it would've been much longer and that could've been something the author did not want. This book I think will be harmful to some but also helpful to so many others that it outweighs the harmful aspects. I recommend this book to everyone unless the subject matter is triggering.
    more
  • emmy
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book. It was highly creative, and it was refreshing to see a character with serious mental health issues depicted in all their complexity in a YA title. I found the ending to be somewhat unsatisfying, particularly given the centrality of the friendship between the two MCs throughout the novel.
    more
  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    DNF @ ~50% I'll read everything Sam Miller writes--I adore his imagination and his willingness to mesh SFF elements with the topic of mental health--but the execution of this one just didn't work out for me. Full review to come!
  • Sam Miller
    January 1, 1970
  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    Sam J Miller is a master, so I hope this book will be masterfull.
Write a review