The Lost Girl
When you’re an identical twin, your story always starts with someone else. For Iris, that means her story starts with Lark. Iris has always been the grounded, capable, and rational one; Lark has been inventive, dreamy, and brilliant—and from their first moments in the world together, they’ve never left each other’s side. Everyone around them realized early on what the two sisters already knew: they had better outcomes when they were together.When fifth grade arrives, however, it is decided that Iris and Lark should be split into different classrooms, and something breaks in them both. Iris is no longer so confident; Lark retreats into herself as she deals with challenges at school. And at the same time, something strange is happening in the city around them, things both great and small going missing without a trace. As Iris begins to understand that anything can be lost in the blink of an eye, she decides it’s up to her to find a way to keep her sister safe.

The Lost Girl Details

TitleThe Lost Girl
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 12th, 2019
PublisherWalden Pond Press
ISBN-139780062275097
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy, Fiction, Juvenile, Mystery, Magical Realism, Young Adult

The Lost Girl Review

  • Heidi Heilig
    January 1, 1970
    MY NEED. IT IS MIGHTY.
  • TheBookSmugglers
    January 1, 1970
    This was WONDERFUL. Beautifully written and emotional and I could relate with Iris so MUCH for taking care and worrying about her sister to the point of forgetting about her own health <3and then there are the groups that surround the girls - and Camp Awesome is SO AWESOME
    more
  • Colby Sharp
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing. Captivating. Distinguished.
  • Greg Andree
    January 1, 1970
    Review by 11yo Novalee : )Did you know that a character in The Lost Girl is named after me? She only shows up for a chapter, but she is kick-butt! (I refuse to swear here). Novalee, a member of the Camp Awesome, that Iris’s mom makes Iris join. And with me in it, Camp Awesome is not ironic at all. It really lives up to its name now!!! I was like, YASSSS Queen : )The novel, The Lost Girl, by Anne Ursu, was an outstanding book about two twins sisters, named Iris and Lark, who do absolutely everyth Review by 11yo Novalee : )Did you know that a character in The Lost Girl is named after me? She only shows up for a chapter, but she is kick-butt! (I refuse to swear here). Novalee, a member of the Camp Awesome, that Iris’s mom makes Iris join. And with me in it, Camp Awesome is not ironic at all. It really lives up to its name now!!! I was like, YASSSS Queen : )The novel, The Lost Girl, by Anne Ursu, was an outstanding book about two twins sisters, named Iris and Lark, who do absolutely everything together. But, as the next grade starts, for the first time ever,the dynamic duo are separated in classes. Iris, who is forever looking out for Lark is angry, and as she realizes to herself that Lark won’t be okay on her own, she swears to herself that she will protect her sister, whatever it takes.The first thing about the book that I loved was the character development. Iris, smart, firm, intent, and it feels like part of her is gone when Lark isn’t around. Lark, the dreamer, artist, shy, and she sees things that others do not. These characters and their personalities were what the whole story revolves around. Iris, with her determination to help her sister do well, even if her sister doesn’t need it, or when Lark, the carefree soul, sees things in a different way than people like. These are the kinds of things that hold the story up.I also liked the suspense. Seriously, the suspense in this book kept me up at night. Not kidding. In the story, objects are going missing, and nothing can be explained. Lark’s bracelet, for instance, her most valued possession, went missing, as well as a number of other things. As the story goes on, theories begin to arise from different perspectives of the reader. And, at the same time, Iris and Lark are in a fight, and Iris feels as though Lark would be better off without her, so the reader is also anticipating on how this will play out. The relationships between the characters is something I loved, specifically Iris and Lark. Iris is looking out for her sister, while Lark is the dreamer. The two always are inseparable until, of course, they separate in classes.they always care so much about each other. They hold the story together.You know, I think that in this scenario, my sister and I would both try to be Iris. Weird, but true. As someone who reads and re-reads again and again and again, I can say that this book has things that make me want to re-read. Because, no, I don’t re-read to find out what happens, because I already know. I re-read because I love spending time with the characters,seeing where their personalities lead them. I can’t wait to hang with Lark again, and explore deeper into her imagination and how she analyzes what is put in front of her. I can’t wait to see Iris again, and watch her yet again figure out what obstacles she must surpass. Put this on your TBR list. Pre-order!!!
    more
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book. I read it in one day. And now I want to give this book to every girl child and every woman I know. I want you to read it. It's magical, but not *just* magical.
  • Katie Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    I requested an ARC of this book based on how much I enjoyed the author's previous novel, Breadcrumbs. Unfortunately, after reading the author's note about the patriarchy and "subversive female friendships" and then seeing reviews here on Goodreads associating the book with #MeToo and the Resistance, I have decided not to read it after all. I make it a point to avoid children's books with political agendas, and this book seems to have a strong one. I'm disappointed, but my reading list is long an I requested an ARC of this book based on how much I enjoyed the author's previous novel, Breadcrumbs. Unfortunately, after reading the author's note about the patriarchy and "subversive female friendships" and then seeing reviews here on Goodreads associating the book with #MeToo and the Resistance, I have decided not to read it after all. I make it a point to avoid children's books with political agendas, and this book seems to have a strong one. I'm disappointed, but my reading list is long and reading time is limited, so I have to move on.
    more
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Smash the patriarchy indeed.
  • Kidlitter
    January 1, 1970
    A DRC was provided by Edelweiss for a fair and honest review.Lark and Iris, how I wanted to like you more! Despite this reader being wary of books about twins, your author is a good writer with the best of intentions for you. She wants to write a book about girls being diminished by the patriarchy, an insensitive school culture, poor though well-meaning parenting, and their own self-doubt. She also wants to throw in a good dose of not-so-nice magic borrowed from everyone from Grimm to Stephen Ki A DRC was provided by Edelweiss for a fair and honest review.Lark and Iris, how I wanted to like you more! Despite this reader being wary of books about twins, your author is a good writer with the best of intentions for you. She wants to write a book about girls being diminished by the patriarchy, an insensitive school culture, poor though well-meaning parenting, and their own self-doubt. She also wants to throw in a good dose of not-so-nice magic borrowed from everyone from Grimm to Stephen King to Angela Carter. She wants Girl Power to rescue you. It's just that your battles are undermined by your problems with each other and everyone else, and the subsequent confusion sorting it all out. This reader found herself sympathizing with your clueless parents coping with your crippling codependency, rather than condemning them for siding with the school that wants you to develop independently. And believable magic needs more to be established as a motif than just dark hints from a creepy antique store owner (especially when everything about him should scream RUN.) But your twin bubble becomes suffocating for the reader too, and your inability to get along with others is disturbing. The book's premise is intriguing - twins struggling through their first real separation when they are placed in separate fifth-grade classrooms must balance the challenges of making other friends, contending with bullies and uncomprehending adults, with a growing awareness that all is not right in their world. The supernatural beckons what with vanishing objects, a vanished girl from long ago, cranky crows and a mysterious cat, and enough illnesses for a 19th century neurasthenic heroine. The intrusion of an omniscient narrator warning the reader that something wicked this way comes becomes tiresome since there are enough signals of its coming littered through the plot. Ursu does a nice job of conveying the funkiness of the twins' Minneapolis neighborhood, and the addition of believable everyday details of elementary school life, such as forced conversations between students in small groups known as "pods," Iris' participation in a "Girl Power" program, and the pressures of homework and gossip make the twins' struggles realistic. Ursu is a lovely phrase-maker and all of her skill is on display " It was only the first day, and no one knew yet how the girls would arrange themselves over the course of the camp-a series of open circles, or in tight sharp immovable shapes.” Lark, with her social maladjustments, twee wardrobe, and quirky personality, is just a little too wet, and Iris, with her obsessive-compulsive ways and desire to control everything, is complicated without sometimes being likable enough. Mr. Green, the antiquary, comes off as downright sinister, even when he isn't making inappropriate speeches to little girls in his shop. What is positive is the portrayal of the majority of their peers as bright, empathetic kids who put up with the twins’ neuroses and willingly extend social support and more. Lark and Iris, with friends like these, you must have something going for you. By the way, another read-alike about twins caught up in the supernatural is Janet Lunn's Twin Spell, a forgotten classic which gets the push-me/pull-you nature of twinship, with a haunting sense of the power and potential tragedy this unique relationship can have.
    more
  • Jessica Lawson
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, Anne Ursu, you've done it again. On an emotional level, The Lost Girl expertly captures the pain of separation and the fear/joy/bravery/hope involved in forging new bonds. Making friends, facing bullies, feeling different than peers, wondering where/if you'll ever fit in, being taken seriously as a young person~ all are addressed in a way that really made me feel as though I were in Iris's shoes (and Lark's as well). As for the technical side of the writing, there is so much to admire here-- Oh, Anne Ursu, you've done it again. On an emotional level, The Lost Girl expertly captures the pain of separation and the fear/joy/bravery/hope involved in forging new bonds. Making friends, facing bullies, feeling different than peers, wondering where/if you'll ever fit in, being taken seriously as a young person~ all are addressed in a way that really made me feel as though I were in Iris's shoes (and Lark's as well). As for the technical side of the writing, there is so much to admire here--the structure is worthy of study~ the weaving of plot threads and emotional threads and character threads...just incredible. And the magic~ oh yes, the magic. *Hugs book*
    more
  • Benjamin Kissell
    January 1, 1970
    While an arc isn't always the same as the final-product (the lack of interior art, for ex), nothing could change how simply perfect The Lost Girl was from page one forward.Few authors have ever truly mastered the lyrical voice of the narrator the way Anne Ursu has; at once the classical wink-and-a-nod narrator you'd find in a Grimm's tale and simultaneously refreshingly original, new and modern. Anne Ursu is that supreme figure singing Homer's epics with Annie Lennox's voice.Whether she's casual While an arc isn't always the same as the final-product (the lack of interior art, for ex), nothing could change how simply perfect The Lost Girl was from page one forward.Few authors have ever truly mastered the lyrical voice of the narrator the way Anne Ursu has; at once the classical wink-and-a-nod narrator you'd find in a Grimm's tale and simultaneously refreshingly original, new and modern. Anne Ursu is that supreme figure singing Homer's epics with Annie Lennox's voice.Whether she's casually referencing pop culture, familiar characters found in other strong, amazing novels or filling your world with her own, perfectly wonderful tale ... The Lost Girl is anything but.
    more
  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate to receive an ARC of Anne Ursu's upcoming novel, THE LOST GIRL, the story of two sisters trying to survive growing up in a world that is far too quick to judge and underestimate them. Lark and Iris are unlike any characters I've read before. The twin girls leap to life on the page, each different in their own way. Ursu's lyrical prose weaves a dreamlike narrative rich in emotion as the sisters endure an unexpected separation, during which time each of them must discover what trul I was fortunate to receive an ARC of Anne Ursu's upcoming novel, THE LOST GIRL, the story of two sisters trying to survive growing up in a world that is far too quick to judge and underestimate them. Lark and Iris are unlike any characters I've read before. The twin girls leap to life on the page, each different in their own way. Ursu's lyrical prose weaves a dreamlike narrative rich in emotion as the sisters endure an unexpected separation, during which time each of them must discover what truly defines her. Lyrical, bold, and surprising, THE LOST GIRL is a story of sisterhood, friendship, and overturning the patriarchy.
    more
  • Tj Shay
    January 1, 1970
    In every Anne Ursu book there is a paragraph, sometimes many, that you have to stop and reread because you have to experience the way words are used perfectly to encapsulate the world of emotion. The Lost Girl has several. The story of twins who are identical but not the same, struggling through the world and becoming the people they were meant to be.
    more
  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    The author of The Real Boy and Breadcrumbs returns with a new marvelous read for middle graders. Lark and Iris are twins. It’s the thing that everyone notices about them. They are very different underneath their physical similarities. Iris is rational, protective and always willing to argue. Lark is dreamy, creative and sensitive. When the two girls are separated for the first time into different classrooms at school, Lark retreats into herself. She has several humiliating experiences that Iris The author of The Real Boy and Breadcrumbs returns with a new marvelous read for middle graders. Lark and Iris are twins. It’s the thing that everyone notices about them. They are very different underneath their physical similarities. Iris is rational, protective and always willing to argue. Lark is dreamy, creative and sensitive. When the two girls are separated for the first time into different classrooms at school, Lark retreats into herself. She has several humiliating experiences that Iris can’t find a way to help with. Meanwhile, Iris finds herself being quieter without Lark to speak up for and has difficulty finding her own way. She is drawn to a strange new antiques shop and begins to spend time there reading old books that belonged to a mysterious “Alice.” The man in the shop is extremely odd, talking about magic and collections. Other odd things are happening as well with art disappearing around the city and crows gathering in the trees. When Iris finds herself in real danger, the mysteries begin to make horrible sense, but she isn’t sure that anyone will even care she is gone.Ursu once again weaves an incredible tale of magic. This one is set in Minneapolis and Ursu beautifully shares elements of the northern Midwest and the Twin Cities in the story. The setting of anchors this tale in reality which works particularly well as the reveal of the magical part of the book is so gradual. The book is nearly impossible to summarize well or concisely because there are so many elements to the story. As you read though, it is a cohesive whole, a world that Ursu builds for the reader with real skill where the elements click together by the end of the book.While the book is about both Lark and Iris, the focus is primarily on Iris, the more prickly and outspoken sister. Lark is seen through the lens of Iris’ concern for her and Lark’s opinion of her own role with her sister isn’t shared until towards the end of the book. That reveal is one of the most powerful elements of the book, demonstrating how Iris has not been seeing things clearly at all. The narrator voice is just as well done, creating a feeling of a tale within a tale, where magic is real all along.A grand adventure of a book full of magic and girl power. Appropriate for ages 9-12.https://wakingbraincells.com/2019/02/...
    more
  • Aeicha
    January 1, 1970
    Iris and Lark may be identical twins but that doesn’t make them exactly the same. Lark’s dreamy, creativity perfectly balances the rational, grounded nature of Iris. The two just work better together, which is why they feel like their world is ending when their principal and parents decide the two girls should be in separate fifth grade classes. Who will reign in Iris when her temper gets the better of her and who will help Lark find her voice? Add in a strange antique store and owner, some awes Iris and Lark may be identical twins but that doesn’t make them exactly the same. Lark’s dreamy, creativity perfectly balances the rational, grounded nature of Iris. The two just work better together, which is why they feel like their world is ending when their principal and parents decide the two girls should be in separate fifth grade classes. Who will reign in Iris when her temper gets the better of her and who will help Lark find her voice? Add in a strange antique store and owner, some awesome girls, and a bit of magic and Iris and Lark are in for an unforgettable journey. Anne Ursu returns with another brilliant and captivating middle-grade read! The Lost Girl is an empowering celebration of girls, friendship, and the magic of believing in yourself. Ursu weaves a spellbinding story through absolutely gorgeous prose and pitch-perfect storytelling. There are so many breathtaking passages in The Lost Girl that pierced my heart and still haven’t left me. Young readers will be delighted by The Lost Girl’s fantastical and whimsical magical elements, from a wall walking cat, a well of magic, and an impossible house. But the real magic is in Ursu’s ability to craft utterly moving and beautiful emotional arcs and her unforgettable characters. Ursu deftly and carefully explores so many topics that readers will find relatable and that will make them feel seen and heard and understood. The Lost Girl is full of engaging, powerful, and well-developed characters, especially female characters. From Lark and Iris, to a group of awesome girls, a cat named Duchess, and the mysterious Alice. Ursu shines a radiant light on the power of female friendships and bonds, the importance of providing girls with great female role models, and never silencing their voices. Bursting with incredible storytelling, unforgettable characters, and captivating magic, The Lost Girl is an awesome and inspiring book that will stay with readers for a long time.
    more
  • Melinda
    January 1, 1970
    Sisterhood and magic in Minneapolis. How have I never read anything by Anne Ursu before now?
  • Lorie Barber
    January 1, 1970
    I write this fully realizing that book perfection is in the eye of the reader. So what. Don’t at me. This book is perfection. It is honorable. It is spectacular in its prose, its characters, its story, and ITS MESSAGES. THE LOST GIRL has found me. It has helped make me whole again. It has given me a deeper perspective in who I am and what I can do with my voice, with my friends, FOR my friends. EVERY CHILD needs these kinds of messages. THE LOST GIRL is distinguished. It needs to be in the hands I write this fully realizing that book perfection is in the eye of the reader. So what. Don’t at me. This book is perfection. It is honorable. It is spectacular in its prose, its characters, its story, and ITS MESSAGES. THE LOST GIRL has found me. It has helped make me whole again. It has given me a deeper perspective in who I am and what I can do with my voice, with my friends, FOR my friends. EVERY CHILD needs these kinds of messages. THE LOST GIRL is distinguished. It needs to be in the hands of every MG & YA reader in this country for all time, but especially at this moment. It is perfection in a beautiful binding.
    more
  • Monica Edinger
    January 1, 1970
    My New York Times' review here.
  • Susie
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Edelweiss for an advanced copy. So... much.... whining. This book would have benefited from a different timeline. Finally, something of consequence was revealed when the eBook showed I was 50% through, and then something else finally at 80%. Then in the second half, a couple of chapters were thrown in with a different narrator. The reveal for that was good, but by then I just wanted to be done. My mother was an identical twin, and I usually love twin stories. There was so much self-dou Thanks to Edelweiss for an advanced copy. So... much.... whining. This book would have benefited from a different timeline. Finally, something of consequence was revealed when the eBook showed I was 50% through, and then something else finally at 80%. Then in the second half, a couple of chapters were thrown in with a different narrator. The reveal for that was good, but by then I just wanted to be done. My mother was an identical twin, and I usually love twin stories. There was so much self-doubt (yes, I realize they are elementary-aged girls), and at times the characterizations seemed a bit muddled. Who was the strong one? Who was willing to speak out? That seemed to keep changing.
    more
  • Stephanie Lucianovic
    January 1, 1970
    I rec'd an Advanced Reader's Copy of this book.THIS BOOK. This is a book for the #MeToo. It's a book for the #Resistance. It's a book for sisterhood, both of blood and water. It's a book for NOW. There are so many things I've underlined that I want to quote but won't. You will discover them yourself. Hurry, February.The thing that gets me most about Anne Ursu's writing is how much like puff pastry dough it is: delicious, addicting, skillfully crafted, but most of all, it's about the insanely del I rec'd an Advanced Reader's Copy of this book.THIS BOOK. This is a book for the #MeToo. It's a book for the #Resistance. It's a book for sisterhood, both of blood and water. It's a book for NOW. There are so many things I've underlined that I want to quote but won't. You will discover them yourself. Hurry, February.The thing that gets me most about Anne Ursu's writing is how much like puff pastry dough it is: delicious, addicting, skillfully crafted, but most of all, it's about the insanely delicate, carefully constructed layers. Blown away.
    more
  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    So many layers. So much meaning. Now that I have read it and it’s entirety, I want to go back through and reread to pick up on all the little cues I missed. Hansel and Gretel meets Nightbooks
  • Misti
    January 1, 1970
    Identical twins Iris and Lark are always together. So, when they get their fifth-grade classroom assignment, they are sure that there has been some mistake: for the first time ever, they will be in different classes at school. Lark, always the more shy and quiet of the two, retreats into herself in the face of bullies and a teacher who wants her to be more assertive. And Iris, who has always made it her mission to defend her sister, is unmoored and feels out of control without Lark to anchor her Identical twins Iris and Lark are always together. So, when they get their fifth-grade classroom assignment, they are sure that there has been some mistake: for the first time ever, they will be in different classes at school. Lark, always the more shy and quiet of the two, retreats into herself in the face of bullies and a teacher who wants her to be more assertive. And Iris, who has always made it her mission to defend her sister, is unmoored and feels out of control without Lark to anchor her. Meanwhile, strange things are happening around them: crows leave small, shiny gifts for Lark. A strange antique store with an even stranger sign opens nearby. Small items start disappearing from the girls' house, and large items start disappearing from nearby museums. What do all of these things have to do with Iris and Lark? And will they ever find their way in their new situation?I wanted to love this book, because I love Breadcrumbs. But, ultimately, I just liked it fairly well. The plot didn't pull together as cohesively as I would have liked (though there was one unexpected plot twist that I appreciated), and I found it difficult to relate to Iris, who is the main perspective character of the story. I would have liked to have seen more of Lark's point of view. I would still recommend this book, especially to young readers who enjoy stories about sibling relationships, and books set in our world but with touches of magic. The occasional illustrations by Erin McGuire are charming. It's just that my expectations for this book were very high, and it didn't quite rise to meet them.
    more
  • Nikii
    January 1, 1970
    Longtime readers of this author expect certain things: lyrical prose, wry humour, deft characterization and a story in which the protagonist's' internal life is at least as interesting as the adventure in which they find themselves. "The Lost Girl" delivers all of these, in spades.While exploring questions of identity, perception and self-perception, friendship, and growing up female in a society torn between tradition and modernity, "The Lost Girl" tells a tale of magic, brazen theft, antiquiti Longtime readers of this author expect certain things: lyrical prose, wry humour, deft characterization and a story in which the protagonist's' internal life is at least as interesting as the adventure in which they find themselves. "The Lost Girl" delivers all of these, in spades.While exploring questions of identity, perception and self-perception, friendship, and growing up female in a society torn between tradition and modernity, "The Lost Girl" tells a tale of magic, brazen theft, antiquities, and peril featuring a set of identical twins, a (possibly) cursed storefront, and an after-school program called "Camp Awesome" against a backdrop of domestic and personal upheavals large and small.In other words, there is a lot going on. And yet, the structure and pace of the storytelling is so gentle, so adroit, that the complexity of it is not truly revealed until the final pages.I would recommend this book to anyone with an imagination and a beating heart.
    more
  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author and publisher for providing an advanced copy for our #bookexpedition group to read. Iris and Lark are identical twins who are always at each other’s side. Iris is practical, grounded, and capable of taking care of both herself and Lark, who’s creative, dreamy, and sees things in a way that others do not. When 5th grade starts, a decision is made to place the girls into separate classrooms, and something inside each girl breaks. As the new year progresses, Lark deals with Thank you to the author and publisher for providing an advanced copy for our #bookexpedition group to read. Iris and Lark are identical twins who are always at each other’s side. Iris is practical, grounded, and capable of taking care of both herself and Lark, who’s creative, dreamy, and sees things in a way that others do not. When 5th grade starts, a decision is made to place the girls into separate classrooms, and something inside each girl breaks. As the new year progresses, Lark deals with challenges at school and retreats into herself. Iris is determined to support Lark any way she can, and loses a bit of herself along the way. Not only is this troubling, but things both big and small are going missing from the girls’ home and the city where they live. With a foreword by he author that’s not to be missed, this new novel has themes that will resonate with middle grade readers: the power of love and the struggles of growing up.
    more
  • Lupine
    January 1, 1970
    Breadcrumbs is one of my very favorite books so I was a little scared to read this one, for fear of disappointment. I needn’t have worried. It was just ...clutch-to-my-chest-I-want-to-read-it-again good. I can’t wait to put it in the hands of of readers who will love a story of girls, magic, friendship, sisterhood and strength. Another one that you’ll get different things out of depending on what ages you are when you read it.
    more
  • Sherry Ellis
    January 1, 1970
    Iris and Lark are twins. Iris is the practical one. Lark is the dreamer. The two have always been together. Iris taking care of Lark. Lark relying on Iris. But in fifth grade, things change. They are placed in separate classes. The Lost Girl is the story of how the two cope with this situation.Interwoven throughout the main story is a subplot of the arrival of a mysterious antique shop, its quirky owner, and a case of disappearing items. Why have things gone missing? Why are there crows in the t Iris and Lark are twins. Iris is the practical one. Lark is the dreamer. The two have always been together. Iris taking care of Lark. Lark relying on Iris. But in fifth grade, things change. They are placed in separate classes. The Lost Girl is the story of how the two cope with this situation.Interwoven throughout the main story is a subplot of the arrival of a mysterious antique shop, its quirky owner, and a case of disappearing items. Why have things gone missing? Why are there crows in the town? Is magic real? It gets downright sinister when the story reaches its climax. So much so that sensitive readers may find themselves hiding under their covers. It's the subplot that keeps readers turning the pages.The Lost Girl is an imaginative coming-of-age tale. Children who have experienced being separated from a sibling, twin or otherwise, can relate. The author does a nice job of getting into each of the protagonists' heads. By the end of the story, each girl experiences personal growth and learns something new. The only thing that could have been developed a little more is the backstory of the villian. Readers may be left wondering why the villain was so evil.The Lost Girl is a very good middle grade read. Recommended for children in grades 4-6.
    more
  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    One thing this story does very well is give us a compelling depiction of girl power. Twins Iris and Lark are struggling with their first separation as they begin 5th grade in different homerooms. We see the story for the most part from the perspective of Iris, the down-to-earth twin. There is also a mystery narrator contributing to the magical aspects of the story. What did not work for me was the way most of the adults were depicted as bumbling around and then there is the evil owner of the ant One thing this story does very well is give us a compelling depiction of girl power. Twins Iris and Lark are struggling with their first separation as they begin 5th grade in different homerooms. We see the story for the most part from the perspective of Iris, the down-to-earth twin. There is also a mystery narrator contributing to the magical aspects of the story. What did not work for me was the way most of the adults were depicted as bumbling around and then there is the evil owner of the antique store. All in all, a twin tale with elements of a Hansel and Gretel retelling. Thank you to Walden Pond Press and Edelweiss for a digital ARC of this new middle grade novel.
    more
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely extraordinary. I loved it.
  • Casey Jo
    January 1, 1970
    So good! Anne Ursu's writing is so smooth, with delightful insights from an 11=year old voice, like p. 46, comparing when a kid loses a thing and is told "it'll turn up" vs. when a parent loses it and "they got frantic ... as if yellow and blue now made pink." And hurray for a book with complexity and nuance!!!Light spoilers: (view spoiler)[I loved this story of Iris figuring out that she's not the only competent twin, and it's not her job to fix her sisters' life for her. And moreover, "sister' So good! Anne Ursu's writing is so smooth, with delightful insights from an 11=year old voice, like p. 46, comparing when a kid loses a thing and is told "it'll turn up" vs. when a parent loses it and "they got frantic ... as if yellow and blue now made pink." And hurray for a book with complexity and nuance!!!Light spoilers: (view spoiler)[I loved this story of Iris figuring out that she's not the only competent twin, and it's not her job to fix her sisters' life for her. And moreover, "sister's caretaker" is not her primary identity. And I love how Abigail, who's just that much older, is out of touch with kids who weren't raised with quite the same limited expectations of "what girls can do."And the light magical touch is just enough to be wonderful.Another great thing about this book: b0undary-crossing gets acknowledged and addressed. Iris gets called out on trying to fix her sisters' project - Go Lark for naming it! And her parents have an honest conversation with her about why they didn't share about the plan to split the kids up for 5th grade, with appropriate remorse. (And I wonder whether Lark might have asked them to do it.)Note: I was lucky enough to read an ARC, but I'm very excited to see the final product with its interior art. (hide spoiler)]
    more
  • Lisa Nagel
    January 1, 1970
    It’s tough sometimes being an identical twin. Iris is the practical one, and Lark sensitive and fragile, but they have always been inseparable. Trouble starts when their parents decide they should be in separate classrooms for 5th grade...Iris worries Lark will fall apart. But perhaps it is Iris who needs saving when strange things start to happen at the new antique shop in town. Things starts disappearing and crows are acting weird. Girl power and trusting the power in sticking together are pow It’s tough sometimes being an identical twin. Iris is the practical one, and Lark sensitive and fragile, but they have always been inseparable. Trouble starts when their parents decide they should be in separate classrooms for 5th grade...Iris worries Lark will fall apart. But perhaps it is Iris who needs saving when strange things start to happen at the new antique shop in town. Things starts disappearing and crows are acting weird. Girl power and trusting the power in sticking together are powerful messages in this beautiful story.
    more
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusLark and Iris are twins who have always been assigned to the same class. Going into fifth grade, their parents think that the girls are too dependent on each other, and have them put into different classes. To make matters worse, Iris gets the sweet Ms. Shonubi, and Lark gets the new Mr. Hunt. Not only that, but the mean Tommy is also in Lark's class. Lark has trouble fitting in and getting work done, and at the same time, small and large things are going missing from th E ARC from Edelweiss PlusLark and Iris are twins who have always been assigned to the same class. Going into fifth grade, their parents think that the girls are too dependent on each other, and have them put into different classes. To make matters worse, Iris gets the sweet Ms. Shonubi, and Lark gets the new Mr. Hunt. Not only that, but the mean Tommy is also in Lark's class. Lark has trouble fitting in and getting work done, and at the same time, small and large things are going missing from the girls' Minneapolis neighborhood. A bracelet, a small doll, but also the Spoonbridge and Cherry sculpture from the Walker Museum. This might have something to do with the new antique store, We Are Here, run by the odd and creepy Mr. Green. The girls also have to participate in different after school programs, including a girl power group at the local library. Lark starts to go downhill, but no one will listen to Iris. Can she manage to save her sister?Strengths: I always enjoy books that introduce a place as practically another character; it's fun to look up actual locations on Google maps! Lark and Iris' relationship is an interesting one, and it's a good thing that their parents are trying to get them to be less dependent before middle school. The girl power program is a nice touch, as is the 1947 science fact book that Iris realizes is not still correct. Weaknesses: Mr. Green is super creepy, and the book is filled with a lot of twin and school related angst.What I really think: My readers who enjoy magical realism usually like things where the magic is happier. This had the vibe of Snyder's Bigger than a Breadbox, which I can't get to circulate. The girls' method of dressing is firmly elementary school, and I fear my students will think this book too young for them. Will probably not purchase, even though this style of cover circulates well.
    more
Write a review